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Title: Short-focal-length compound refractive lenses for x-rays

Abstract

We have fabricated and tested short focal-length compound refractive lenses (CRLs) composed of micro-bubbles embedded in epoxy. The bubbles were formed in epoxy inside glass capillaries. The interface between the bubbles formed 90 to 196 spherical bi-concave microlenses reducing the overall focal length inversely by the number of lenses. When compared with CRLs manufactured using other methods, the micro-bubble lenses have shorter focal lengths, better imaging, and focusing qualities with higher transmissions and gains for moderate energy x-rays (e.g. 7-12 keV). We used beamline 2-3 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) to measure focal lengths between 100-150 mm and absorption apertures between 90 to 120 {micro}m. Transmission profiles were measured giving, for example, a peak transmission of 27% for a 130-mm focal length CRL at 8 keV. The focal-spot sizes were also measured yielding, for example, an elliptical spot of 5 x 14-{micro}m{sup 2} resulting from an approximate 80-fold demagnification of the 0.44 x 1.7 mm{sup 2} source. The measured gains in intensity over that of unfocused beam were between 9 and 26. Theoretical gain calculations that include spherical aberrations show that these values are reasonable. The micro-bubble technique opens a new opportunity for designing lenses in the 8-9more » keV range with focal lengths less than 30-40 mm.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Adelphi
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1008922
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 48th SPIE International Conference on Fourth Generation X-Ray Sources and Ultrafast X-Ray Detectors;August 4, 2003;San Diego, CA
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ABSORPTION; APERTURES; BUBBLES; CAPILLARIES; FOCUSING; GEOMETRICAL ABERRATIONS; GLASS; KEV RANGE; LENSES; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION; X-RAY SOURCES

Citation Formats

Dudchik, Y I, Kolchevsky, N N, Komarov, F F, Piestrup, M A, Cremer, J T, Gary, C K, and Pantell, R H. Short-focal-length compound refractive lenses for x-rays. United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
Dudchik, Y I, Kolchevsky, N N, Komarov, F F, Piestrup, M A, Cremer, J T, Gary, C K, & Pantell, R H. Short-focal-length compound refractive lenses for x-rays. United States.
Dudchik, Y I, Kolchevsky, N N, Komarov, F F, Piestrup, M A, Cremer, J T, Gary, C K, and Pantell, R H. Mon . "Short-focal-length compound refractive lenses for x-rays". United States.
@article{osti_1008922,
title = {Short-focal-length compound refractive lenses for x-rays},
author = {Dudchik, Y I and Kolchevsky, N N and Komarov, F F and Piestrup, M A and Cremer, J T and Gary, C K and Pantell, R H},
abstractNote = {We have fabricated and tested short focal-length compound refractive lenses (CRLs) composed of micro-bubbles embedded in epoxy. The bubbles were formed in epoxy inside glass capillaries. The interface between the bubbles formed 90 to 196 spherical bi-concave microlenses reducing the overall focal length inversely by the number of lenses. When compared with CRLs manufactured using other methods, the micro-bubble lenses have shorter focal lengths, better imaging, and focusing qualities with higher transmissions and gains for moderate energy x-rays (e.g. 7-12 keV). We used beamline 2-3 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) to measure focal lengths between 100-150 mm and absorption apertures between 90 to 120 {micro}m. Transmission profiles were measured giving, for example, a peak transmission of 27% for a 130-mm focal length CRL at 8 keV. The focal-spot sizes were also measured yielding, for example, an elliptical spot of 5 x 14-{micro}m{sup 2} resulting from an approximate 80-fold demagnification of the 0.44 x 1.7 mm{sup 2} source. The measured gains in intensity over that of unfocused beam were between 9 and 26. Theoretical gain calculations that include spherical aberrations show that these values are reasonable. The micro-bubble technique opens a new opportunity for designing lenses in the 8-9 keV range with focal lengths less than 30-40 mm.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2005},
month = {8}
}

Conference:
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