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Title: Ultrafast x-ray scattering in solids

Abstract

X-rays are a valuable probe for studying structural dynamics in solids because of their short wavelength, long penetration depth and relatively strong interaction with core electrons. Recent advances in accelerator- and laser-based pulsed X-ray sources have opened up the possibility of probing nonequilibrium dynamics in real time with atomic-scale spatial resolution. The timescale of interest is a single vibrational period, which can be as fast as a few femtoseconds. To date, almost all such experiments on this timescale have been carried out optically, which only indirectly measure atomic motion through changes in the dielectric function. X-rays have the advantage that they are a direct probe of the atomic positions.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. (Stanford)
  2. (
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1008416
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Light Scattering in Solids IX, Topics in Applied Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; DIELECTRIC MATERIALS; ELECTRONS; PENETRATION DEPTH; PROBES; SCATTERING; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; STRONG INTERACTIONS; X-RAY SOURCES

Citation Formats

Reis, David A, Lindenberg, Aaron M., and Michigan). Ultrafast x-ray scattering in solids. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1007/b14231.
Reis, David A, Lindenberg, Aaron M., & Michigan). Ultrafast x-ray scattering in solids. United States. doi:10.1007/b14231.
Reis, David A, Lindenberg, Aaron M., and Michigan). Thu . "Ultrafast x-ray scattering in solids". United States. doi:10.1007/b14231.
@article{osti_1008416,
title = {Ultrafast x-ray scattering in solids},
author = {Reis, David A and Lindenberg, Aaron M. and Michigan)},
abstractNote = {X-rays are a valuable probe for studying structural dynamics in solids because of their short wavelength, long penetration depth and relatively strong interaction with core electrons. Recent advances in accelerator- and laser-based pulsed X-ray sources have opened up the possibility of probing nonequilibrium dynamics in real time with atomic-scale spatial resolution. The timescale of interest is a single vibrational period, which can be as fast as a few femtoseconds. To date, almost all such experiments on this timescale have been carried out optically, which only indirectly measure atomic motion through changes in the dielectric function. X-rays have the advantage that they are a direct probe of the atomic positions.},
doi = {10.1007/b14231},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 08 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 08 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Book:
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  • No abstract prepared.