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Title: X-ray Diffraction Studies of Striated Muscles

Abstract

In this short review a number of recent X-ray diffraction results on the highly ordered striated muscles in insects and in bony fish have been briefly described. What is clear is that this technique applied to muscles which are amenable to rigorous analysis, taken together with related data from other sources (e.g. protein crystallography, biochemistry, mechanics, computer modelling) can provide not only the best descriptions yet available on the myosin head organisations on different myosin filaments in the relaxed state, but can also show the sequence of molecular events that occurs in the contractile cycle, and may also help to explain such phenomena as stretch-activation. X-ray diffraction is clearly an enormously powerful tool in studies of muscle. It has already provided a wealth of detail on muscle ultrastructure; it is providing ever more fascinating insights into molecular events in the 50-year old sliding filament mechanism, and there remains a great deal more potential that is as yet untapped.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. (IIT)
  2. (
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1008405
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Sliding Filament Mechanism in Muscle Contraction: Fifty Years of Research
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BIOCHEMISTRY; COMPUTERS; CRYSTALLOGRAPHY; INSECTS; MUSCLES; MYOSIN; PROTEINS; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Squire, J.M., Knupp, C., Roessle, M., Al-Khayat, H.A., Irving, T.C., Eakins, F., Mok, N.-S., Harford, J.J., Reedy, M.K., Duke), ESRF), and ICL). X-ray Diffraction Studies of Striated Muscles. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Squire, J.M., Knupp, C., Roessle, M., Al-Khayat, H.A., Irving, T.C., Eakins, F., Mok, N.-S., Harford, J.J., Reedy, M.K., Duke), ESRF), & ICL). X-ray Diffraction Studies of Striated Muscles. United States.
Squire, J.M., Knupp, C., Roessle, M., Al-Khayat, H.A., Irving, T.C., Eakins, F., Mok, N.-S., Harford, J.J., Reedy, M.K., Duke), ESRF), and ICL). Mon . "X-ray Diffraction Studies of Striated Muscles". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1008405,
title = {X-ray Diffraction Studies of Striated Muscles},
author = {Squire, J.M. and Knupp, C. and Roessle, M. and Al-Khayat, H.A. and Irving, T.C. and Eakins, F. and Mok, N.-S. and Harford, J.J. and Reedy, M.K. and Duke) and ESRF) and ICL)},
abstractNote = {In this short review a number of recent X-ray diffraction results on the highly ordered striated muscles in insects and in bony fish have been briefly described. What is clear is that this technique applied to muscles which are amenable to rigorous analysis, taken together with related data from other sources (e.g. protein crystallography, biochemistry, mechanics, computer modelling) can provide not only the best descriptions yet available on the myosin head organisations on different myosin filaments in the relaxed state, but can also show the sequence of molecular events that occurs in the contractile cycle, and may also help to explain such phenomena as stretch-activation. X-ray diffraction is clearly an enormously powerful tool in studies of muscle. It has already provided a wealth of detail on muscle ultrastructure; it is providing ever more fascinating insights into molecular events in the 50-year old sliding filament mechanism, and there remains a great deal more potential that is as yet untapped.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 24 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Mon Apr 24 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}

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