skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Radiation-induced genomic instability: Are epigenetic mechanisms the missing link?

Abstract

Purpose: This review examines the evidence for the hypothesis that epigenetics are involved in the initiation and perpetuation of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI). Conclusion: In addition to the extensively studied targeted effects of radiation, it is now apparent that non-targeted delayed effects such as RIGI are also important post-irradiation outcomes. In RIGI, unirradiated progeny cells display phenotypic changes at delayed times after radiation of the parental cell. RIGI is thought to be important in the process of carcinogenesis, however, the mechanism by which this occurs remains to be elucidated. In the genomically unstable clones developed by Morgan and colleagues, radiation-induced mutations, double-strand breaks, or changes in mRNA levels alone could not account for the initiation or perpetuation of RIGI. Since changes in the DNA sequence could not fully explain the mechanism of RIGI, inherited epigenetic changes may be involved. Epigenetics are known to play an important role in many cellular processes and epigenetic aberrations can lead to carcinogenesis. Recent studies in the field of radiation biology suggest that the changes in methylation patterns may be involved in RIGI. Together these clues have led us to hypothesize that epigenetics may be the missing link in understanding the mechanism behind RIGI.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1008210
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-74577
Journal ID: ISSN 0955--3002; KP1602020; TRN: US201106%%326
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Biology, 87(2):171-191; Journal Volume: 87; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; BIOLOGY; CARCINOGENESIS; DNA; HYPOTHESIS; INSTABILITY; METHYLATION; MUTATIONS; PROGENY; RADIATIONS; ionising radiation; genomic instability; epigenetics; DNA methylation; chromatin remodelling; MicroRNA; INDUCED CHROMOSOMAL INSTABILITY; DOUBLE-STRAND BREAKS; PERSISTENT OXIDATIVE STRESS; INFLAMMATORY-TYPE RESPONSES; DNA METHYLATION CHANGES; GENE-EXPRESSION CHANGES; UNSTABLE CELL-LINES; NON-CPG METHYLATION; X-RAY- IRRADIATION; IONIZING-RADIATION

Citation Formats

Aypar, Umut, Morgan, William F., and Baulch, Janet E.. Radiation-induced genomic instability: Are epigenetic mechanisms the missing link?. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.3109/09553002.2010.522686.
Aypar, Umut, Morgan, William F., & Baulch, Janet E.. Radiation-induced genomic instability: Are epigenetic mechanisms the missing link?. United States. doi:10.3109/09553002.2010.522686.
Aypar, Umut, Morgan, William F., and Baulch, Janet E.. Tue . "Radiation-induced genomic instability: Are epigenetic mechanisms the missing link?". United States. doi:10.3109/09553002.2010.522686.
@article{osti_1008210,
title = {Radiation-induced genomic instability: Are epigenetic mechanisms the missing link?},
author = {Aypar, Umut and Morgan, William F. and Baulch, Janet E.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: This review examines the evidence for the hypothesis that epigenetics are involved in the initiation and perpetuation of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI). Conclusion: In addition to the extensively studied targeted effects of radiation, it is now apparent that non-targeted delayed effects such as RIGI are also important post-irradiation outcomes. In RIGI, unirradiated progeny cells display phenotypic changes at delayed times after radiation of the parental cell. RIGI is thought to be important in the process of carcinogenesis, however, the mechanism by which this occurs remains to be elucidated. In the genomically unstable clones developed by Morgan and colleagues, radiation-induced mutations, double-strand breaks, or changes in mRNA levels alone could not account for the initiation or perpetuation of RIGI. Since changes in the DNA sequence could not fully explain the mechanism of RIGI, inherited epigenetic changes may be involved. Epigenetics are known to play an important role in many cellular processes and epigenetic aberrations can lead to carcinogenesis. Recent studies in the field of radiation biology suggest that the changes in methylation patterns may be involved in RIGI. Together these clues have led us to hypothesize that epigenetics may be the missing link in understanding the mechanism behind RIGI.},
doi = {10.3109/09553002.2010.522686},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Biology, 87(2):171-191},
number = 2,
volume = 87,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2011},
month = {Tue Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2011}
}