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Title: The Big Bang, COBE, and the Relic Radiation of Creation (LBNL Science at the Theater)

Abstract

Berkeley Lab's George Smoot won the 2006 Physics Nobel Prize, together with John Mather of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, for "the discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation." The anisotropy showed as small variations in the map of the early universe. This research looks back into the infant universe and provides a better understanding of the origin of galaxies and stars. The cosmic background radiation is a tool to understand the structure and history of the universe and the structure of space-time. These observations have provided increased support for the big bang theory of the universe's origin. The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) NASA satellite, launched in 1989, carries instruments that measured various aspects of cosmic microwave background radiation, and produced the data for these compelling scientific results, which opened up a field that continues very actively today.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Friends of Science: Chabot Space and Science Center; The Exploratorium; Lawrence Hall of Science; Osher Lifelong Learning Institute; University of California - Berkeley, Albany High School Science Dept; Berkeley High School Science Dept; Oakland High School Science Dept
OSTI Identifier:
1007524
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Resource Relation:
Conference: Science at the Theater Lecture Series, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California, presented on March 5, 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; ANISOTROPY; BACKGROUND RADIATION; GALAXIES; NASA; ORIGIN; PHYSICS; RELICT RADIATION; STARS; UNIVERSE; BIG BANG; COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND; CMB

Citation Formats

Smoot, George. The Big Bang, COBE, and the Relic Radiation of Creation (LBNL Science at the Theater). United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Smoot, George. The Big Bang, COBE, and the Relic Radiation of Creation (LBNL Science at the Theater). United States.
Smoot, George. Mon . "The Big Bang, COBE, and the Relic Radiation of Creation (LBNL Science at the Theater)". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1007524.
@article{osti_1007524,
title = {The Big Bang, COBE, and the Relic Radiation of Creation (LBNL Science at the Theater)},
author = {Smoot, George},
abstractNote = {Berkeley Lab's George Smoot won the 2006 Physics Nobel Prize, together with John Mather of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, for "the discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation." The anisotropy showed as small variations in the map of the early universe. This research looks back into the infant universe and provides a better understanding of the origin of galaxies and stars. The cosmic background radiation is a tool to understand the structure and history of the universe and the structure of space-time. These observations have provided increased support for the big bang theory of the universe's origin. The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) NASA satellite, launched in 1989, carries instruments that measured various aspects of cosmic microwave background radiation, and produced the data for these compelling scientific results, which opened up a field that continues very actively today.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 05 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Mar 05 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}