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Title: Introduction to Commercial Building Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response -- Appendices

Abstract

There are 3 appendices listed: (A) DR strategies for HVAC systems; (B) Summary of DR strategies; and (C) Case study of advanced demand response.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Earth Sciences Division
OSTI Identifier:
1004169
Report Number(s):
LBNL-59975
TRN: US201106%%292
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS; HVAC SYSTEMS; ENERGY DEMAND

Citation Formats

Motegi, N., Piette, M.A., Watson, D.S., Kiliccote, S., and Xu, P. Introduction to Commercial Building Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response -- Appendices. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/1004169.
Motegi, N., Piette, M.A., Watson, D.S., Kiliccote, S., & Xu, P. Introduction to Commercial Building Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response -- Appendices. United States. doi:10.2172/1004169.
Motegi, N., Piette, M.A., Watson, D.S., Kiliccote, S., and Xu, P. Tue . "Introduction to Commercial Building Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response -- Appendices". United States. doi:10.2172/1004169. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1004169.
@article{osti_1004169,
title = {Introduction to Commercial Building Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response -- Appendices},
author = {Motegi, N. and Piette, M.A. and Watson, D.S. and Kiliccote, S. and Xu, P.},
abstractNote = {There are 3 appendices listed: (A) DR strategies for HVAC systems; (B) Summary of DR strategies; and (C) Case study of advanced demand response.},
doi = {10.2172/1004169},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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