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Title: Automated image analysis of atomic force microscopy images of rotavirus particles

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [1]
  1. ORNL
  2. Vanderbilt University
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program
OSTI Identifier:
1003694
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Ultramicroscopy; Journal Volume: 106; Journal Issue: 8-9
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Venkataraman, Sankar, Allison, David P, Qi, Hairong, Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L, Kallewaard, Nancy, CroweJr, James E, and Doktycz, Mitchel John. Automated image analysis of atomic force microscopy images of rotavirus particles. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ultramic.2006.01.014.
Venkataraman, Sankar, Allison, David P, Qi, Hairong, Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L, Kallewaard, Nancy, CroweJr, James E, & Doktycz, Mitchel John. Automated image analysis of atomic force microscopy images of rotavirus particles. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ultramic.2006.01.014.
Venkataraman, Sankar, Allison, David P, Qi, Hairong, Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L, Kallewaard, Nancy, CroweJr, James E, and Doktycz, Mitchel John. Sun . "Automated image analysis of atomic force microscopy images of rotavirus particles". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ultramic.2006.01.014.
@article{osti_1003694,
title = {Automated image analysis of atomic force microscopy images of rotavirus particles},
author = {Venkataraman, Sankar and Allison, David P and Qi, Hairong and Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L and Kallewaard, Nancy and CroweJr, James E and Doktycz, Mitchel John},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2006.01.014},
journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
number = 8-9,
volume = 106,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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