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Title: The Control of Electron Transport Related Defects in In Situ Fabricated Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Devices

Abstract

Metallic single wall carbon nanotube devices were characterized using low temperature transport measurements to study how the growth conditions affect defect formation in carbon nanotubes. Suspended carbon nanotube devices were grown in situ by a molecular beam growth method on a pair of catalyst islands located on opposing Au electrodes fabricated by electron beam lithography. The authors present experimental evidence that defect formation in carbon nanotubes, in addition to the well known growth temperature dependence, is also affected by the nature and the composition of the carbon growth gases.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1003635
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 89; Journal Issue: 13
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; CARBON; CATALYSTS; DEFECTS; ELECTRODES; ELECTRON BEAMS; ELECTRONS; GASES; ISLANDS; MOLECULAR BEAMS; NANOTUBES; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; TRANSPORT

Citation Formats

Zhou, Zhixian, Jin, Rongying, Eres, Gyula, Subedi, Alaska P, and Mandrus, David. The Control of Electron Transport Related Defects in In Situ Fabricated Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Devices. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2354450.
Zhou, Zhixian, Jin, Rongying, Eres, Gyula, Subedi, Alaska P, & Mandrus, David. The Control of Electron Transport Related Defects in In Situ Fabricated Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Devices. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2354450.
Zhou, Zhixian, Jin, Rongying, Eres, Gyula, Subedi, Alaska P, and Mandrus, David. Sun . "The Control of Electron Transport Related Defects in In Situ Fabricated Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Devices". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2354450.
@article{osti_1003635,
title = {The Control of Electron Transport Related Defects in In Situ Fabricated Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Devices},
author = {Zhou, Zhixian and Jin, Rongying and Eres, Gyula and Subedi, Alaska P and Mandrus, David},
abstractNote = {Metallic single wall carbon nanotube devices were characterized using low temperature transport measurements to study how the growth conditions affect defect formation in carbon nanotubes. Suspended carbon nanotube devices were grown in situ by a molecular beam growth method on a pair of catalyst islands located on opposing Au electrodes fabricated by electron beam lithography. The authors present experimental evidence that defect formation in carbon nanotubes, in addition to the well known growth temperature dependence, is also affected by the nature and the composition of the carbon growth gases.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2354450},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 13,
volume = 89,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Electrical transport measurements were used to study device behavior that results from the interplay of defects and inadvertent contact variance that develops in as-grown semiconducting single wall carbon nanotube devices with nominally identical Au contacts. The transport measurements reveal that as-grown nanotubes contain defects that limit the performance of field-effect transistors with ohmic contacts. In Schottky-barrier field-effect transistors the device performance is dominated by the Schottky barrier and the nanotube defects have little effect. We also observed strong rectifying behavior attributed to extreme contact asymmetry due to the different nanoscale roughness of the gold contacts formed during nanotube growth.
  • The synthesis of single-wall carbon nanotubes by Nd:YAG laser vaporization of a graphite/(Ni, Co) target is investigated by laser-induced luminescence imaging and spectroscopy of Co atoms, C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} molecules, and clusters at 1000 degree sign C in flowing 500 Torr Ar. These laser-induced emission images under typical synthesis conditions show that the plume of vaporized material is segregated and confined within a vortex ring which maintains a {approx}1 cm3 volume for several seconds. Using time-resolved spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging, the time for conversion of atomic and molecular species to clusters was measured for both carbon (200 {mu}s)more » and cobalt (2 ms). This rapid conversion of carbon to nanoparticles, combined with transmission electron microscopy analysis of the collected deposits, indicate that nanotube growth occurs over several seconds in a plume of mixed nanoparticles. By adjusting the time spent by the plume within the high-temperature zone using these in situ diagnostics, single-walled nanotubes of controlled length were grown at an estimated rate of 0.2 {mu}m/s. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.« less
  • Four-probe resistance vs temperature and gate voltage are reported for an individual single-wall carbon nanotube rope before and after doping in situ with potassium. All the features in R(T) from unoriented bulk material, before and after doping, are qualitatively reproduced by the rope data. The 5.3 K conductance of the pristine rope decreases with positive gate voltage, while G vs V{sub g} becomes featureless after K doping. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.
  • Using a carbon nanotube oscillator, the authors performed in situ measurements of densities of electron-beam-induced tungsten compounds with size of less than 100 nm. Total mass of the deposit was proportional to the deposition time. A higher deposition rate was obtained at lower electron-beam acceleration voltage. Density of the deposit decreased from 2.7 to 1.4 g/cm{sup 3} with increasing acceleration voltage from 5 to 15 kV. These results indicate that the increased density with low-acceleration voltage produces effective decomposition of W(CO){sub 6}.
  • In a recent article [M. Nejati, C. Javaherian, B. Shokri, and B. Jazi, Phys. Plasmas 16, 022108 (2009)], Nejati et al. studied the propagation of plasma wave in the single-wall carbon nanotubes in the presence of the electron beam and showed that the frequency of the {sigma}+{pi} plasma wave strongly depends on the nanotube radius in the short-wavelength region. Here we derive the correct form of the dispersion relation for the transverse magnetic wave in the system and show that the frequency of the plasma wave is quite sensitive to the radius of the tube in the long-wavelength limit.