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Title: Breakdown statistics of polyimide at low temperatures

Abstract

The dielectric breakdown data of polyimide at liquid nitrogen temperature are investigated. The applicability of the Weibull distribution is discussed. A new distribution function is proposed, and its utility and strength are illustrated distinctly by employing the Monte Carlo method.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
OE USDOE - Office of Electric Transmission and Distribution
OSTI Identifier:
1003619
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: IEEE Conference on Electrical Insulation and Dielectric Phenomena, Kansas City, MO, USA, 20061015, 20061018
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; BREAKDOWN; DIELECTRIC MATERIALS; DISTRIBUTION; DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS; ELECTRICAL INSULATION; MONTE CARLO METHOD; NITROGEN; STATISTICS

Citation Formats

Tuncer, Enis, Sauers, Isidor, James, David Randy, Ellis, Alvin R, and Pace, Marshall O. Breakdown statistics of polyimide at low temperatures. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Tuncer, Enis, Sauers, Isidor, James, David Randy, Ellis, Alvin R, & Pace, Marshall O. Breakdown statistics of polyimide at low temperatures. United States.
Tuncer, Enis, Sauers, Isidor, James, David Randy, Ellis, Alvin R, and Pace, Marshall O. Sun . "Breakdown statistics of polyimide at low temperatures". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1003619,
title = {Breakdown statistics of polyimide at low temperatures},
author = {Tuncer, Enis and Sauers, Isidor and James, David Randy and Ellis, Alvin R and Pace, Marshall O},
abstractNote = {The dielectric breakdown data of polyimide at liquid nitrogen temperature are investigated. The applicability of the Weibull distribution is discussed. A new distribution function is proposed, and its utility and strength are illustrated distinctly by employing the Monte Carlo method.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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