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Title: Magnetic anisotropy in epitaxial CrO 2 and CrO 2/Cr 2O 3 bilayer thin films

Abstract

We have investigated the effective magnetic anisotropy in CVD-grown epitaxial CrO2 thin film and Cr2O3/CrO2 bilayers using resonant radio frequency transverse susceptibility (TS). While CrO2 is a highly spin polarized ferromagnet, Cr2O3 is known to exhibit magnetoelectronic effect and orders antiferromagnetically just above room temperature. In CrO2, the measured values for the room temperature anisotropy constant scaled with the film thickness and the TS data is influenced by magnetoelastic contributions at low temperature due to interfacial strain caused by lattice mismatch with the substrate. In CrO2/Cr2O3 bilayers M-H loops indicated an enhanced coercivity without appreciable loop shift and the transverse susceptibility revealed features associated with both the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases. In addition, a considerable broadening of the anisotropy fields and large Keff values were observed depending on the fraction of Cr2O3 present. This anomalous behavior, observed for the first time, cannot be accounted for by the variable thickness of CrO2 alone and is indicative of possible exchange coupling between CrO2 and Cr2O3 phases that significantly affects the effective magnetic anisotropy.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. University of South Florida
  2. ORNL
  3. University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1003603
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review B; Journal Volume: 74; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ANISOTROPY; DATA; SPIN; STRAINS; THICKNESS; THIN FILMS

Citation Formats

Frey, N.A., Srinath, S., Srikanth, H., Varela del Arco, Maria, Pennycook, Stephen J, Miao, G. X., and Gupta, A.. Magnetic anisotropy in epitaxial CrO2 and CrO2/Cr2O3 bilayer thin films. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.74.024420.
Frey, N.A., Srinath, S., Srikanth, H., Varela del Arco, Maria, Pennycook, Stephen J, Miao, G. X., & Gupta, A.. Magnetic anisotropy in epitaxial CrO2 and CrO2/Cr2O3 bilayer thin films. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.74.024420.
Frey, N.A., Srinath, S., Srikanth, H., Varela del Arco, Maria, Pennycook, Stephen J, Miao, G. X., and Gupta, A.. Sun . "Magnetic anisotropy in epitaxial CrO2 and CrO2/Cr2O3 bilayer thin films". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.74.024420.
@article{osti_1003603,
title = {Magnetic anisotropy in epitaxial CrO2 and CrO2/Cr2O3 bilayer thin films},
author = {Frey, N.A. and Srinath, S. and Srikanth, H. and Varela del Arco, Maria and Pennycook, Stephen J and Miao, G. X. and Gupta, A.},
abstractNote = {We have investigated the effective magnetic anisotropy in CVD-grown epitaxial CrO2 thin film and Cr2O3/CrO2 bilayers using resonant radio frequency transverse susceptibility (TS). While CrO2 is a highly spin polarized ferromagnet, Cr2O3 is known to exhibit magnetoelectronic effect and orders antiferromagnetically just above room temperature. In CrO2, the measured values for the room temperature anisotropy constant scaled with the film thickness and the TS data is influenced by magnetoelastic contributions at low temperature due to interfacial strain caused by lattice mismatch with the substrate. In CrO2/Cr2O3 bilayers M-H loops indicated an enhanced coercivity without appreciable loop shift and the transverse susceptibility revealed features associated with both the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases. In addition, a considerable broadening of the anisotropy fields and large Keff values were observed depending on the fraction of Cr2O3 present. This anomalous behavior, observed for the first time, cannot be accounted for by the variable thickness of CrO2 alone and is indicative of possible exchange coupling between CrO2 and Cr2O3 phases that significantly affects the effective magnetic anisotropy.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevB.74.024420},
journal = {Physical Review B},
number = 2,
volume = 74,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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