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Title: The Use of Friction Stir Technology to Modify Surfaces of AM60B Magnesium Die Castings

Abstract

These experiments were done to evaluate the feasibility of locally modifying the surface properties of magnesium alloys with friction-stir processing. The magnesium alloy used for the study was high-pressure die-cast AM60B, nominally Mg-6Al-0.13 Mn (wt.%). Friction-stir passes were made with a translation speed of 1.7 mm/s using tool-rotation speeds of 1,250 rpm or 2,500 rpm. Stir passes with good appearance were obtained under both conditions. In some cases up to five passes were overlapped on a single bar to produce stir zones with cross-sectional dimensions of about 1.5 mm x 10 mm. Metallographic examinations indicated that the stir zones were largely comprised of a magnesium solid solution with equiaxed grains on the order of 5-10 {micro}m in size. Hardness mapping showed that the stir zones experienced increases of 16-25% compared to the as-cast metal. Room-temperature testing showed that, compared to the cast metal, the stir zones had flow stresses nearly 20% higher with about twice the tensile elongation.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3]
  1. ORNL
  2. South Dakota School of Mines and Technology
  3. Ford Motor Company
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1003504
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Metals; Journal Volume: 58; Journal Issue: 5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CASTINGS; DIMENSIONS; ELONGATION; FRICTION; HARDNESS; MAGNESIUM; MAGNESIUM ALLOYS; PROCESSING; SOLID SOLUTIONS; STRESSES; SURFACE PROPERTIES; TESTING; VELOCITY

Citation Formats

Santella, Michael L, Degen, Cassandra, Frederick, David Alan, and Pan, Dr. Tsung-Yu. The Use of Friction Stir Technology to Modify Surfaces of AM60B Magnesium Die Castings. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1007/s11837-006-0025-9.
Santella, Michael L, Degen, Cassandra, Frederick, David Alan, & Pan, Dr. Tsung-Yu. The Use of Friction Stir Technology to Modify Surfaces of AM60B Magnesium Die Castings. United States. doi:10.1007/s11837-006-0025-9.
Santella, Michael L, Degen, Cassandra, Frederick, David Alan, and Pan, Dr. Tsung-Yu. Sun . "The Use of Friction Stir Technology to Modify Surfaces of AM60B Magnesium Die Castings". United States. doi:10.1007/s11837-006-0025-9.
@article{osti_1003504,
title = {The Use of Friction Stir Technology to Modify Surfaces of AM60B Magnesium Die Castings},
author = {Santella, Michael L and Degen, Cassandra and Frederick, David Alan and Pan, Dr. Tsung-Yu},
abstractNote = {These experiments were done to evaluate the feasibility of locally modifying the surface properties of magnesium alloys with friction-stir processing. The magnesium alloy used for the study was high-pressure die-cast AM60B, nominally Mg-6Al-0.13 Mn (wt.%). Friction-stir passes were made with a translation speed of 1.7 mm/s using tool-rotation speeds of 1,250 rpm or 2,500 rpm. Stir passes with good appearance were obtained under both conditions. In some cases up to five passes were overlapped on a single bar to produce stir zones with cross-sectional dimensions of about 1.5 mm x 10 mm. Metallographic examinations indicated that the stir zones were largely comprised of a magnesium solid solution with equiaxed grains on the order of 5-10 {micro}m in size. Hardness mapping showed that the stir zones experienced increases of 16-25% compared to the as-cast metal. Room-temperature testing showed that, compared to the cast metal, the stir zones had flow stresses nearly 20% higher with about twice the tensile elongation.},
doi = {10.1007/s11837-006-0025-9},
journal = {Journal of Metals},
number = 5,
volume = 58,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • These experiments were done to evaluate the feasibility of locally modifying the surface properties of magnesium alloys with friction-stir processing. The magnesium alloy used for the study was high-pressure die-cast AM60B, nominally Mg-6Al-0.13 Mn (wt. %). Friction-stir passes were made with a translation speed of 1.7 mm/s using tool-rotation speeds of 1,250 rpm or 2,500 rpm. Stir passes with good appearance were obtained under both conditions. In some cases up to five passes were overlapped on a single bar to produce stir zones with cross-sectional dimensions of about 1.5 mm x 10 mm. Metallographic examinations indicated that the stir zonesmore » were largely comprised of a magnesium solid solution with equiaxed grains on the order of 5-10 {micro}m in size. Hardness mapping showed that the stir zones experienced increases of 16-25% compared to the as-cast metal. Room-temperature testing showed that, compared to the cast metal, the stir zones had flow stresses nearly 20% higher with about twice the tensile elongation.« less
  • The room temperature fatigue properties of AZ91 magnesium alloy produced by high pressure die casting (HPDC) as cast, heat treated, friction stir processed (FSP) and FSP and heat treated were studied. The fatigue properties of the material were evaluated for the HPDC magnesium alloy in the as-received state and after a solution treatment at 415 deg. C for 2 h and an ageing treatment at 220 deg. C for 4 h. The heat treatment resulted in a significant increase in the fatigue properties of the HPDC material, while no significance influence of heat treatment was recorded in the FSP condition.more » The morphology of fracture surfaces was examined by employing a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEGSEM)« less
  • The microstructure and corrosion behavior of high pressure die-cast (HPDC) and super vacuum die-cast (SVDC) AM60B magnesium alloys were investigated in a complex salt solution using slow positron beam technique and potentiodynamic polarization tests. The experiments revealed that a CaCO 3 film was formed on the surface of the alloys and that the rate of CaCO 3 formation for the SVDC alloy with immersion time was slower than that of the HPDC alloy. The larger volume fraction of b-phase in the skin layer of the SVDC alloy than that of the HPDC alloy was responsible for the better corrosion resistance.
  • Spatial variations of microstructure, hardness, chemical composition, tensile behavior, texture and residual stresses were investigated in a friction-stir-processed (FSP) AZ31B magnesium alloy. The residual stresses were measured using two different methods: neutron diffraction and the contour method. No significant variations in the hardness and chemical compositions were found in the FSP zones, including the severely deformed stir zone (SZ), which showed a finer grain size compared to the heat-affected zone and base material. On the other hand, significant changes in the tensile yield strength, texture, and residual stresses were observed in the FSP zones. The relationship between the texture variationsmore » and yield strength reduction; and its influence on the decrease in the residual stress near the SZ is discussed. Finally, the residual stresses measured by neutron diffraction and the contour method are compared and the effect of the texture on neutron diffraction residual stress measurements is discussed.« less
  • An initial study was made to evaluate the feasibility of joining Magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet to galvanized steel sheet in lap configuration using friction stir welding (FSW). Two different automotive sheet steels were used for comparative evaluation of the dissimilar joining potential; a 0.8mm thick, electro galvanized (EG) mild steel, and a 1.5mm thick hot dipped galvanized (HDG) high-strength, low-alloy steel (HSLA). These steels were joined to 2.33mm thick AZ31B magnesium sheet. A single FSW tool design was used for both dissimilar welds, and process parameters were kept the same. Average peak load for the AZ31-1.5 mm steel weld jointmore » in lap shear mode was found to be 6.3 ± 1.0 kN. For the AZ31-0.8 mm steel weld, joint strength was 5.1 ± 1.5 kN. Microstructural investigation indicates melting of the Zn coating at the interface and subsequent alloying with the Mg sheet resulting in formation of solidified Zn-Mg alloy layer at AZ31/steel interface.« less