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Title: Using Clustered Climate Regimes to Analyze and Compare Predictions from Fully Coupled General Circulation Models

Abstract

Changes in Earth's climate in response to atmospheric greenhouse gas buildup impact the health of terrestrial ecosystems and the hydrologic cycle. The environmental conditions influential to plant and animal life are often mapped as ecoregions, which are land areas having similar combinations of environmental characteristics. This idea is extended to establish regions of similarity with respect to climatic characteristics that evolve through time using a quantitative statistical clustering technique called Multivariate Spatio-Temporal Clustering (MSTC). MSTC was applied to the monthly time series output from a fully coupled general circulation model (GCM) called the Parallel Climate Model (PCM). Results from an ensemble of five 99-yr Business-As-Usual (BAU) transient simulations from 2000 to 2098 were analyzed. MSTC establishes an exhaustive set of recurring climate regimes that form a 'skeleton' through the 'observations' (model output) throughout the occupied portion of the climate phase space formed by the characteristics being considered. MSTC facilitates direct comparison of ensemble members and ensemble and temporal averages since the derived climate regimes provide a basis for comparison. Moreover, by mapping all land cells to discrete climate states, the dynamic behavior of any part of the system can be studied by its time-varying sequence of climate state occupancy. MSTCmore » is a powerful tool for model developers and environmental decision makers who wish to understand long, complex time series predictions of models. Strong predicted interannual trends were revealed in this analysis, including an increase in global desertification; a decrease in the cold, dry high-latitude conditions typical of North American and Asian winters; and significant warming in Antarctica and western Greenland.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Center for Computational Sciences
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1003248
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Earth Interactions
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 1087--3562
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ANIMALS; BUILDUP; CLIMATE MODELS; CLIMATES; GENERAL CIRCULATION MODELS; GREENHOUSE GASES; PHASE SPACE; SKELETON; TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS; TRANSIENTS

Citation Formats

Hoffman, Forrest M, Hargrove, William Walter, Erickson, III, David J, and Oglesby, Robert J. Using Clustered Climate Regimes to Analyze and Compare Predictions from Fully Coupled General Circulation Models. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1175/EI110.1.
Hoffman, Forrest M, Hargrove, William Walter, Erickson, III, David J, & Oglesby, Robert J. Using Clustered Climate Regimes to Analyze and Compare Predictions from Fully Coupled General Circulation Models. United States. doi:10.1175/EI110.1.
Hoffman, Forrest M, Hargrove, William Walter, Erickson, III, David J, and Oglesby, Robert J. Sat . "Using Clustered Climate Regimes to Analyze and Compare Predictions from Fully Coupled General Circulation Models". United States. doi:10.1175/EI110.1.
@article{osti_1003248,
title = {Using Clustered Climate Regimes to Analyze and Compare Predictions from Fully Coupled General Circulation Models},
author = {Hoffman, Forrest M and Hargrove, William Walter and Erickson, III, David J and Oglesby, Robert J},
abstractNote = {Changes in Earth's climate in response to atmospheric greenhouse gas buildup impact the health of terrestrial ecosystems and the hydrologic cycle. The environmental conditions influential to plant and animal life are often mapped as ecoregions, which are land areas having similar combinations of environmental characteristics. This idea is extended to establish regions of similarity with respect to climatic characteristics that evolve through time using a quantitative statistical clustering technique called Multivariate Spatio-Temporal Clustering (MSTC). MSTC was applied to the monthly time series output from a fully coupled general circulation model (GCM) called the Parallel Climate Model (PCM). Results from an ensemble of five 99-yr Business-As-Usual (BAU) transient simulations from 2000 to 2098 were analyzed. MSTC establishes an exhaustive set of recurring climate regimes that form a 'skeleton' through the 'observations' (model output) throughout the occupied portion of the climate phase space formed by the characteristics being considered. MSTC facilitates direct comparison of ensemble members and ensemble and temporal averages since the derived climate regimes provide a basis for comparison. Moreover, by mapping all land cells to discrete climate states, the dynamic behavior of any part of the system can be studied by its time-varying sequence of climate state occupancy. MSTC is a powerful tool for model developers and environmental decision makers who wish to understand long, complex time series predictions of models. Strong predicted interannual trends were revealed in this analysis, including an increase in global desertification; a decrease in the cold, dry high-latitude conditions typical of North American and Asian winters; and significant warming in Antarctica and western Greenland.},
doi = {10.1175/EI110.1},
journal = {Earth Interactions},
issn = {1087--3562},
number = 10,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {2005},
month = {1}
}