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Title: Materials Characterization in the Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

Abstract

In the nanoscience era, the properties of many exciting new materials and devices will depend on the details of their composition down to the level of single atoms. Thus the characterization of the structure and electronic properties of matter at the atomic scale is becoming ever more vital for economic and technological as well as for scientific reasons. The combination of atomic-resolution Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) represents a powerful method to link the atomic and electronic structure to macroscopic properties, allowing materials, nanoscale systems, and interfaces to be probed in unprecedented detail. Z-contrast STEM uses electrons that have been scattered to large angles for imaging. The relative intensity of each atomic column is roughly proportional to Z{sup 2}, where Z is the atomic number. Recent developments in correcting the aberrations of the lenses in the electron microscope have pushed the achievable spatial resolution and the sensitivity for imaging and spectroscopy in the STEM into the sub-Angstrom (sub-{angstrom}) regime, providing a new level of insight into the structure/property relations of complex materials. Images acquired with an aberration-corrected instrument show greatly improved contrast. The signal-to-noise ratio is sufficiently high to allow sensitivity even tomore » single atoms in both imaging and spectroscopy. This is a key achievement because the detection and measurement of the response of individual atoms has become a challenging issue to provide new insight into many fields, such as catalysis, ceramic materials, complex oxide interfaces, or grain boundaries. In this article, the state-of-the-art for the characterization of all of these different types of materials by means of aberration-corrected STEM and EELS are reviewed.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [1]
  1. ORNL
  2. University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1003155
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Annual Review of Materials Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 35; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 1531--7331
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ATOMIC NUMBER; ATOMS; CATALYSIS; CERAMICS; ELECTRON MICROSCOPES; ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE; ELECTRONS; ENERGY-LOSS SPECTROSCOPY; EQUIPMENT; GRAIN BOUNDARIES; IMAGES; INTERFACES; LENSES; MATERIALS; OXIDES; SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; SPECTROSCOPY; TRANSMISSION; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Varela del Arco, Maria, Lupini, Andrew R, van Benthem, Klaus, Borisevich, Albina Y, Chisholm, Matthew F, Shibata, Naoya, Abe, E., and Pennycook, Stephen J. Materials Characterization in the Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1146/annurev.matsci.35.102103.090513.
Varela del Arco, Maria, Lupini, Andrew R, van Benthem, Klaus, Borisevich, Albina Y, Chisholm, Matthew F, Shibata, Naoya, Abe, E., & Pennycook, Stephen J. Materials Characterization in the Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope. United States. doi:10.1146/annurev.matsci.35.102103.090513.
Varela del Arco, Maria, Lupini, Andrew R, van Benthem, Klaus, Borisevich, Albina Y, Chisholm, Matthew F, Shibata, Naoya, Abe, E., and Pennycook, Stephen J. Sat . "Materials Characterization in the Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope". United States. doi:10.1146/annurev.matsci.35.102103.090513.
@article{osti_1003155,
title = {Materials Characterization in the Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope},
author = {Varela del Arco, Maria and Lupini, Andrew R and van Benthem, Klaus and Borisevich, Albina Y and Chisholm, Matthew F and Shibata, Naoya and Abe, E. and Pennycook, Stephen J},
abstractNote = {In the nanoscience era, the properties of many exciting new materials and devices will depend on the details of their composition down to the level of single atoms. Thus the characterization of the structure and electronic properties of matter at the atomic scale is becoming ever more vital for economic and technological as well as for scientific reasons. The combination of atomic-resolution Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) represents a powerful method to link the atomic and electronic structure to macroscopic properties, allowing materials, nanoscale systems, and interfaces to be probed in unprecedented detail. Z-contrast STEM uses electrons that have been scattered to large angles for imaging. The relative intensity of each atomic column is roughly proportional to Z{sup 2}, where Z is the atomic number. Recent developments in correcting the aberrations of the lenses in the electron microscope have pushed the achievable spatial resolution and the sensitivity for imaging and spectroscopy in the STEM into the sub-Angstrom (sub-{angstrom}) regime, providing a new level of insight into the structure/property relations of complex materials. Images acquired with an aberration-corrected instrument show greatly improved contrast. The signal-to-noise ratio is sufficiently high to allow sensitivity even to single atoms in both imaging and spectroscopy. This is a key achievement because the detection and measurement of the response of individual atoms has become a challenging issue to provide new insight into many fields, such as catalysis, ceramic materials, complex oxide interfaces, or grain boundaries. In this article, the state-of-the-art for the characterization of all of these different types of materials by means of aberration-corrected STEM and EELS are reviewed.},
doi = {10.1146/annurev.matsci.35.102103.090513},
journal = {Annual Review of Materials Research},
issn = {1531--7331},
number = 1,
volume = 35,
place = {United States},
year = {2005},
month = {1}
}