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Title: DNA-controlled assembly of a NaTl lattice structure from gold nanoparticles and protein nanoparticles

Abstract

The formation of diamond structures from tailorable building blocks is an important goal in colloidal crystallization because the non-compact diamond lattice is an essential component of photonic crystals for the visible-light range. However, designing nanoparticle systems that self-assemble into non-compact structures has proved difficult. Although several methods have been proposed, single-component nanoparticle assembly of a diamond structure has not been reported. Binary systems, in which at least one component is arranged in a diamond lattice, provide alternatives, but control of interparticle interactions is critical to this approach. DNA has been used for this purpose in a number of systems. Here we show the creation of a non-compact lattice by DNA-programmed crystallization using surface-modified Q{beta} phage capsid particles and gold nanoparticles, engineered to have similar effective radii. When combined with the proper connecting oligonucleotides, these components form NaTl-type colloidal crystalline structures containing interpenetrating organic and inorganic diamond lattices, as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering. DNA control of assembly is therefore shown to be compatible with particles possessing very different properties, as long as they are amenable to surface modification.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. MIT
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1002841
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Nat. Mater.
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 10, 2010
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; CRYSTALLIZATION; DIAMONDS; DNA; GOLD; OLIGONUCLEOTIDES; PROTEINS; SCATTERING

Citation Formats

Cigler, Petr, Lytton-Jean, Abigail K.R., Anderson, Daniel G, Finn, M G, Park, Sung Yong, Scripps), and Harvard). DNA-controlled assembly of a NaTl lattice structure from gold nanoparticles and protein nanoparticles. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1038/nmat2877.
Cigler, Petr, Lytton-Jean, Abigail K.R., Anderson, Daniel G, Finn, M G, Park, Sung Yong, Scripps), & Harvard). DNA-controlled assembly of a NaTl lattice structure from gold nanoparticles and protein nanoparticles. United States. doi:10.1038/nmat2877.
Cigler, Petr, Lytton-Jean, Abigail K.R., Anderson, Daniel G, Finn, M G, Park, Sung Yong, Scripps), and Harvard). Wed . "DNA-controlled assembly of a NaTl lattice structure from gold nanoparticles and protein nanoparticles". United States. doi:10.1038/nmat2877.
@article{osti_1002841,
title = {DNA-controlled assembly of a NaTl lattice structure from gold nanoparticles and protein nanoparticles},
author = {Cigler, Petr and Lytton-Jean, Abigail K.R. and Anderson, Daniel G and Finn, M G and Park, Sung Yong and Scripps) and Harvard)},
abstractNote = {The formation of diamond structures from tailorable building blocks is an important goal in colloidal crystallization because the non-compact diamond lattice is an essential component of photonic crystals for the visible-light range. However, designing nanoparticle systems that self-assemble into non-compact structures has proved difficult. Although several methods have been proposed, single-component nanoparticle assembly of a diamond structure has not been reported. Binary systems, in which at least one component is arranged in a diamond lattice, provide alternatives, but control of interparticle interactions is critical to this approach. DNA has been used for this purpose in a number of systems. Here we show the creation of a non-compact lattice by DNA-programmed crystallization using surface-modified Q{beta} phage capsid particles and gold nanoparticles, engineered to have similar effective radii. When combined with the proper connecting oligonucleotides, these components form NaTl-type colloidal crystalline structures containing interpenetrating organic and inorganic diamond lattices, as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering. DNA control of assembly is therefore shown to be compatible with particles possessing very different properties, as long as they are amenable to surface modification.},
doi = {10.1038/nmat2877},
journal = {Nat. Mater.},
number = 10, 2010,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {2010},
month = {11}
}