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Title: Double scattering of light from Biophotonic Nanostructures with short-range order

Abstract

We investigate the physical mechanism for color production by isotropic nanostructures with short-range order in bird feather barbs. While the primary peak in optical scattering spectra results from constructive interference of singly-scattered light, many species exhibit secondary peaks with distinct characteristic. Our experimental and numerical studies show that these secondary peaks result from double scattering of light by the correlated structures. Without an analog in periodic or random structures, such a phenomenon is unique for short-range ordered structures, and has been widely used by nature for non-iridescent structural coloration.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. (Yale)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1002529
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Opt. Express; Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: (11) ; 05, 2010
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; BIRDS; COLOR; COLORATION; FEATHERS; NANOSTRUCTURES; PRODUCTION; SCATTERING; SPECTRA

Citation Formats

Noh, Heeso, Liew, Seng Fatt, Saranathan, Vinodkumar, Prum, Richard O., Mochrie, Simon G.J., Dufresne, Eric R., and Cao, Hui. Double scattering of light from Biophotonic Nanostructures with short-range order. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1364/OE.18.011942.
Noh, Heeso, Liew, Seng Fatt, Saranathan, Vinodkumar, Prum, Richard O., Mochrie, Simon G.J., Dufresne, Eric R., & Cao, Hui. Double scattering of light from Biophotonic Nanostructures with short-range order. United States. doi:10.1364/OE.18.011942.
Noh, Heeso, Liew, Seng Fatt, Saranathan, Vinodkumar, Prum, Richard O., Mochrie, Simon G.J., Dufresne, Eric R., and Cao, Hui. 2010. "Double scattering of light from Biophotonic Nanostructures with short-range order". United States. doi:10.1364/OE.18.011942.
@article{osti_1002529,
title = {Double scattering of light from Biophotonic Nanostructures with short-range order},
author = {Noh, Heeso and Liew, Seng Fatt and Saranathan, Vinodkumar and Prum, Richard O. and Mochrie, Simon G.J. and Dufresne, Eric R. and Cao, Hui},
abstractNote = {We investigate the physical mechanism for color production by isotropic nanostructures with short-range order in bird feather barbs. While the primary peak in optical scattering spectra results from constructive interference of singly-scattered light, many species exhibit secondary peaks with distinct characteristic. Our experimental and numerical studies show that these secondary peaks result from double scattering of light by the correlated structures. Without an analog in periodic or random structures, such a phenomenon is unique for short-range ordered structures, and has been widely used by nature for non-iridescent structural coloration.},
doi = {10.1364/OE.18.011942},
journal = {Opt. Express},
number = (11) ; 05, 2010,
volume = 18,
place = {United States},
year = 2010,
month = 7
}
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