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Title: Synthesis, Characterization, and Properties of Zero-Valent Iron Nanoparticles

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of synthesis, characterization and property measurements techniques important for making understanding the nature of zero valent iron nanoparticles. The chemical reactivity of nanometer-sized materials can be quite different from that of either bulk forms of a material or the individual atoms and molecules that comprise it. Advances in our ability to synthesize, visualize, characterize and model these materials have created new opportunities to control the rates and products of chemical reactions in ways not previously possible. Zero valent iron (ZVI), including non-nanoparticle forms for iron, is one of the most promising remediation technologies for the removal of mobile chlorinated hydrocarbons and reducible inorganic anions for ground water. ZVI nanoparticles may have great potential to assist environmental remediation, but there are significant scientific and technological questions that remain to be answered. Understanding of ZVI reactive metal core-shell nanoparticles requires use of particles that are as well characterized and understood as possible. In this chapter we describe the issues and provide examples that include synthesis of nanoparticles, analytical characterization of the particles and finally measurements of their chemical properties.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1002201
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-48350
2573a; KC0303020; TRN: US201102%%542
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Environmental Applications of Nanomaterials: Synthesis, Sorbents and Sensors, 49-86
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; IRON; NANOSTRUCTURES; CHEMICAL ACTIVATION; CHEMICAL PROPERTIES; GROUND WATER; ORGANIC CHLORINE COMPOUNDS; REMOVAL; SYNTHESIS; REMEDIAL ACTION; Nanoparticles; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Baer, Donald R., Tratnyek, P. G., Qiang, You, Amonette, James E., Linehan, John C., Sarathy, Vaishnavi, Nurmi, J. T., Wang, Chong M., and Antony, Jiji. Synthesis, Characterization, and Properties of Zero-Valent Iron Nanoparticles. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Baer, Donald R., Tratnyek, P. G., Qiang, You, Amonette, James E., Linehan, John C., Sarathy, Vaishnavi, Nurmi, J. T., Wang, Chong M., & Antony, Jiji. Synthesis, Characterization, and Properties of Zero-Valent Iron Nanoparticles. United States.
Baer, Donald R., Tratnyek, P. G., Qiang, You, Amonette, James E., Linehan, John C., Sarathy, Vaishnavi, Nurmi, J. T., Wang, Chong M., and Antony, Jiji. Wed . "Synthesis, Characterization, and Properties of Zero-Valent Iron Nanoparticles". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1002201,
title = {Synthesis, Characterization, and Properties of Zero-Valent Iron Nanoparticles},
author = {Baer, Donald R. and Tratnyek, P. G. and Qiang, You and Amonette, James E. and Linehan, John C. and Sarathy, Vaishnavi and Nurmi, J. T. and Wang, Chong M. and Antony, Jiji},
abstractNote = {This chapter provides an overview of synthesis, characterization and property measurements techniques important for making understanding the nature of zero valent iron nanoparticles. The chemical reactivity of nanometer-sized materials can be quite different from that of either bulk forms of a material or the individual atoms and molecules that comprise it. Advances in our ability to synthesize, visualize, characterize and model these materials have created new opportunities to control the rates and products of chemical reactions in ways not previously possible. Zero valent iron (ZVI), including non-nanoparticle forms for iron, is one of the most promising remediation technologies for the removal of mobile chlorinated hydrocarbons and reducible inorganic anions for ground water. ZVI nanoparticles may have great potential to assist environmental remediation, but there are significant scientific and technological questions that remain to be answered. Understanding of ZVI reactive metal core-shell nanoparticles requires use of particles that are as well characterized and understood as possible. In this chapter we describe the issues and provide examples that include synthesis of nanoparticles, analytical characterization of the particles and finally measurements of their chemical properties.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 04 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Wed Apr 04 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

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  • No abstract prepared.
  • Zero valent iron (ZVI) nanoparticles have been studied extensively for degradation of chlorinated solvents in the aqueous phase, and have been tested for in-situ remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater. However, little is known about its effectiveness for degrading soil-sorbed contaminants. This work studied reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) sorbed in two model soils (a potting soil and Smith Farm soil) using carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) stabilized Fe-Pd bimetallic nanoparticles. Effects of sorption, surfactants and dissolved organic matter (DOC) were determined through batch kinetic experiments. While the nanoparticles can effectively degrade soil-sorbed TCE, the TCE degradation rate was strongly limited bymore » desorption kinetics, especially for the potting soil which has a higher organic matter content of 8.2%. Under otherwise identical conditions, {approx}44% of TCE sorbed in the potting soil was degraded in 30 h, compared to {approx}82% for Smith Farm soil (organic matter content = 0.7%). DOC from the potting soil was found to inhibit TCE degradation. The presence of the extracted SOM at 40 ppm and 350 ppm as TOC reduced the degradation rate by 34% and 67%, respectively. Four prototype surfactants were tested for their effects on TCE desorption and degradation rates, including two anionic surfactants known as SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate) and SDBS (sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate), a cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) bromide, and a non-ionic surfactant Tween 80. All four surfactants were observed to enhance TCE desorption at concentrations below or above the critical micelle concentration (cmc), with the anionic surfactant SDS being most effective. Based on the pseudo-first-order reaction rate law, the presence of 1 x cmc SDS increased the reaction rate by a factor of 2.5 when the nanoparticles were used for degrading TCE in a water solution. SDS was effective for enhancing degradation of TCE sorbed in Smith Farm soil, the presence of SDS at sub-cmc increased TCE degraded by {approx}10%. However, effect of SDS on degradation of TCE in the potting soil was more complex. The presence of SDS at sub-cmc decreased TCE degradation by 5%, but increased degradation by 5% when SDS dosage was raised to 5 x cmc. The opposing effects were attributed to combined effects of SDS on TCE desorption and degradation, release of soil organic matter and nanoparticle aggregation. The findings strongly suggest that effect of soil sorption on the effectiveness of Fe-Pd nanoparticles must be taken into account in process design, and soil organic content plays an important role in the overall degradation rate and in the effectiveness of surfactant uses.« less
  • Graphical abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. Highlights: ► Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}]. ► The conditions of reaction were at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. ► The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. -- Abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm.more » To monitor the reaction, a stainless steel pressure reactor lined with PTFE and mechanically stirred was designed. This design allowed the extraction of samples at different times, minimizing the perturbation in the system. In this way, the shape and the diameter of the nanoparticles produced during the reaction were also monitored. The results showed the production of zero-valent iron nanoparticles that were approximately 5 nm in diameter arranged in agglomerates. The agglomerates grew to 900 nm when the reaction time increased up to 12 h; however, the diameter of the individual nanoparticles remained almost the same. During the reaction, some byproducts constituted by amino species acted as surfactants; therefore, no other surfactants were necessary.« less