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Title: Nanoporous framework materials interfaced with mechanical sensors for highly-sensitive chemical sensing.

Abstract

We will describe how novel nanoporous framework materials (NFM) such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) can be interfaced with common mechanical sensors, such as surface acoustic wave (SAW), microcantilever array, and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) devices, and subsequently be used to provide selectivity and sensitivity to a broad range of analytes including explosives, nerve agents, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). NFM are highly ordered, crystalline materials with considerable synthetic flexibility resulting from the presence of both organic and inorganic components within their structure. Chemical detection using micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) devices (i.e. SAWs, microcantilevers) requires the use of recognition layers to impart selectivity. Unlike traditional organic polymers, which are dense, the nanoporosity and ultrahigh surface areas of NFM allow for greater analyte uptake and enhance transport into and out of the sensing layer. This enhancement over traditional coatings leads to improved response times and greater sensitivity, while their ordered structure allows chemical tuning to impart selectivity. We describe here experiments and modeling aimed at creating NFM layers tailored to the detection of water vapor, explosives, CWMD, and volatile organic compound (VOCs), and their integration with the surfaces of MEMS devices. Molecular simulation shows that a high degree of chemical selectivity is feasible. Formore » example, a suite of MOFs can select for strongly interacting organics (explosives, CWMD) vs. lighter volatile organics at trace concentrations. At higher gas pressures, the CWMD are deselected in favor of the volatile organics. We will also demonstrate the integration of various NFM on the surface of microcantiliver arrays, QCM crystals, and SAW devices, and describe new synthetic methods developed to improve the quality of NFM coatings. Finally, MOF-coated MEMS devices show how temperature changes can be tuned to improve response times, selectivity, and sensitivity.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1002100
Report Number(s):
SAND2010-2151C
TRN: US201102%%592
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the MRS Spring Meeting held April 5-9, 2010 in San Francisco, CA.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ACOUSTICS; COATINGS; DETECTION; EXPLOSIVES; FLEXIBILITY; MICROBALANCES; NERVES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC POLYMERS; QUARTZ; SENSITIVITY; SIMULATION; SURFACE AREA; TRANSPORT; TUNING; WATER VAPOR

Citation Formats

Lee, Jin-Hwan, Skinner, Jack L, Houk, Ronald J. T., Fischer, Roland A, Robinson, Alex Lockwood, Allendorf, Mark D, Yusenko, Kirill, Meilikhov, Mikhail, Hesketh, Peter J, Venkatasubramanian, Anandram, and Thornberg, Steven Michael. Nanoporous framework materials interfaced with mechanical sensors for highly-sensitive chemical sensing.. United States: N. p., 2010. Web.
Lee, Jin-Hwan, Skinner, Jack L, Houk, Ronald J. T., Fischer, Roland A, Robinson, Alex Lockwood, Allendorf, Mark D, Yusenko, Kirill, Meilikhov, Mikhail, Hesketh, Peter J, Venkatasubramanian, Anandram, & Thornberg, Steven Michael. Nanoporous framework materials interfaced with mechanical sensors for highly-sensitive chemical sensing.. United States.
Lee, Jin-Hwan, Skinner, Jack L, Houk, Ronald J. T., Fischer, Roland A, Robinson, Alex Lockwood, Allendorf, Mark D, Yusenko, Kirill, Meilikhov, Mikhail, Hesketh, Peter J, Venkatasubramanian, Anandram, and Thornberg, Steven Michael. Thu . "Nanoporous framework materials interfaced with mechanical sensors for highly-sensitive chemical sensing.". United States.
@article{osti_1002100,
title = {Nanoporous framework materials interfaced with mechanical sensors for highly-sensitive chemical sensing.},
author = {Lee, Jin-Hwan and Skinner, Jack L and Houk, Ronald J. T. and Fischer, Roland A and Robinson, Alex Lockwood and Allendorf, Mark D and Yusenko, Kirill and Meilikhov, Mikhail and Hesketh, Peter J and Venkatasubramanian, Anandram and Thornberg, Steven Michael},
abstractNote = {We will describe how novel nanoporous framework materials (NFM) such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) can be interfaced with common mechanical sensors, such as surface acoustic wave (SAW), microcantilever array, and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) devices, and subsequently be used to provide selectivity and sensitivity to a broad range of analytes including explosives, nerve agents, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). NFM are highly ordered, crystalline materials with considerable synthetic flexibility resulting from the presence of both organic and inorganic components within their structure. Chemical detection using micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) devices (i.e. SAWs, microcantilevers) requires the use of recognition layers to impart selectivity. Unlike traditional organic polymers, which are dense, the nanoporosity and ultrahigh surface areas of NFM allow for greater analyte uptake and enhance transport into and out of the sensing layer. This enhancement over traditional coatings leads to improved response times and greater sensitivity, while their ordered structure allows chemical tuning to impart selectivity. We describe here experiments and modeling aimed at creating NFM layers tailored to the detection of water vapor, explosives, CWMD, and volatile organic compound (VOCs), and their integration with the surfaces of MEMS devices. Molecular simulation shows that a high degree of chemical selectivity is feasible. For example, a suite of MOFs can select for strongly interacting organics (explosives, CWMD) vs. lighter volatile organics at trace concentrations. At higher gas pressures, the CWMD are deselected in favor of the volatile organics. We will also demonstrate the integration of various NFM on the surface of microcantiliver arrays, QCM crystals, and SAW devices, and describe new synthetic methods developed to improve the quality of NFM coatings. Finally, MOF-coated MEMS devices show how temperature changes can be tuned to improve response times, selectivity, and sensitivity.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2010},
month = {4}
}

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