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Title: Defects localization and nature in bulk and thin film ultrananocrystalline diamond.

Abstract

We report about the electron paramagnetic resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance signals in bulk and thin film-type ultrananocrystalline diamond with and without nitrogen. The localization and nature of defects for powder and compact film samples were analyzed. From the analysis of spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times, we have found that spin states sit in sp{sup 2} enriched region belonging to the grain boundaries.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1001628
Report Number(s):
ANL/MSD/JA-68763
Journal ID: 0925-9635; TRN: US201102%%261
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Diamond Related Mater.; Journal Volume: 16; Journal Issue: 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; DEFECTS; DIAMONDS; ELECTRON SPIN RESONANCE; GRAIN BOUNDARIES; NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE; SPIN-SPIN RELAXATION; THIN FILMS; NANOSTRUCTURES; SPIN-LATTICE RELAXATION

Citation Formats

Shames, A. I., Panich, A. M., Porro, S., Rovere, M., Musso, S., Tagliaferro, A., Baidakova, M. V., Osipov, V. Yu., Vul, A. Ya., Enoki, T., Takahashi, M., Osawa, E., Williams, O. A., Bruno, P., Gruen, D. M., Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Politecnico, Ioffe Physico-Technical Inst., Tokyo Inst. of Tech., and NanoCarbon Research Inst. Defects localization and nature in bulk and thin film ultrananocrystalline diamond.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.diamond.2007.08.026.
Shames, A. I., Panich, A. M., Porro, S., Rovere, M., Musso, S., Tagliaferro, A., Baidakova, M. V., Osipov, V. Yu., Vul, A. Ya., Enoki, T., Takahashi, M., Osawa, E., Williams, O. A., Bruno, P., Gruen, D. M., Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Politecnico, Ioffe Physico-Technical Inst., Tokyo Inst. of Tech., & NanoCarbon Research Inst. Defects localization and nature in bulk and thin film ultrananocrystalline diamond.. United States. doi:10.1016/j.diamond.2007.08.026.
Shames, A. I., Panich, A. M., Porro, S., Rovere, M., Musso, S., Tagliaferro, A., Baidakova, M. V., Osipov, V. Yu., Vul, A. Ya., Enoki, T., Takahashi, M., Osawa, E., Williams, O. A., Bruno, P., Gruen, D. M., Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Politecnico, Ioffe Physico-Technical Inst., Tokyo Inst. of Tech., and NanoCarbon Research Inst. Mon . "Defects localization and nature in bulk and thin film ultrananocrystalline diamond.". United States. doi:10.1016/j.diamond.2007.08.026.
@article{osti_1001628,
title = {Defects localization and nature in bulk and thin film ultrananocrystalline diamond.},
author = {Shames, A. I. and Panich, A. M. and Porro, S. and Rovere, M. and Musso, S. and Tagliaferro, A. and Baidakova, M. V. and Osipov, V. Yu. and Vul, A. Ya. and Enoki, T. and Takahashi, M. and Osawa, E. and Williams, O. A. and Bruno, P. and Gruen, D. M. and Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev and Politecnico and Ioffe Physico-Technical Inst. and Tokyo Inst. of Tech. and NanoCarbon Research Inst.},
abstractNote = {We report about the electron paramagnetic resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance signals in bulk and thin film-type ultrananocrystalline diamond with and without nitrogen. The localization and nature of defects for powder and compact film samples were analyzed. From the analysis of spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times, we have found that spin states sit in sp{sup 2} enriched region belonging to the grain boundaries.},
doi = {10.1016/j.diamond.2007.08.026},
journal = {Diamond Related Mater.},
number = 2007,
volume = 16,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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