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Title: Neutron Detection Alternatives to 3He for National Security Applications

Abstract

One of the main uses for 3He is in gas proportional counters for neutron detection. Large radiation detection systems deployed for homeland security and proliferation detection applications use such systems. Due to the large increase in use of 3He for homeland security and basic research, the supply has dwindled, and can no longer meet the demand. This has led to the search for an alternative technology to replace the use of 3He-based neutron detectors. In this paper, we review the testing of currently commercially available alternative technologies for neutron detection in large systems used in various national security applications.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1001107
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-72544
NN2001000; TRN: US201101%%841
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research. Section A, Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, 623(3):1035-1045; Journal Volume: 623; Journal Issue: 3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; HELIUM 3; NATIONAL SECURITY; NEUTRON DETECTION; NEUTRON DETECTORS; PROLIFERATION; PROPORTIONAL COUNTERS; RADIATION DETECTION; TESTING; neutron detection; helium-3; radiation detection; homeland security; national security; MCNP

Citation Formats

Kouzes, Richard T., Ely, James H., Erikson, Luke E., Kernan, Warnick J., Lintereur, Azaree T., Siciliano, Edward R., Stephens, Daniel L., Stromswold, David C., Van Ginhoven, Renee M., and Woodring, Mitchell L. Neutron Detection Alternatives to 3He for National Security Applications. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1016/j.nima.2010.08.021.
Kouzes, Richard T., Ely, James H., Erikson, Luke E., Kernan, Warnick J., Lintereur, Azaree T., Siciliano, Edward R., Stephens, Daniel L., Stromswold, David C., Van Ginhoven, Renee M., & Woodring, Mitchell L. Neutron Detection Alternatives to 3He for National Security Applications. United States. doi:10.1016/j.nima.2010.08.021.
Kouzes, Richard T., Ely, James H., Erikson, Luke E., Kernan, Warnick J., Lintereur, Azaree T., Siciliano, Edward R., Stephens, Daniel L., Stromswold, David C., Van Ginhoven, Renee M., and Woodring, Mitchell L. 2010. "Neutron Detection Alternatives to 3He for National Security Applications". United States. doi:10.1016/j.nima.2010.08.021.
@article{osti_1001107,
title = {Neutron Detection Alternatives to 3He for National Security Applications},
author = {Kouzes, Richard T. and Ely, James H. and Erikson, Luke E. and Kernan, Warnick J. and Lintereur, Azaree T. and Siciliano, Edward R. and Stephens, Daniel L. and Stromswold, David C. and Van Ginhoven, Renee M. and Woodring, Mitchell L.},
abstractNote = {One of the main uses for 3He is in gas proportional counters for neutron detection. Large radiation detection systems deployed for homeland security and proliferation detection applications use such systems. Due to the large increase in use of 3He for homeland security and basic research, the supply has dwindled, and can no longer meet the demand. This has led to the search for an alternative technology to replace the use of 3He-based neutron detectors. In this paper, we review the testing of currently commercially available alternative technologies for neutron detection in large systems used in various national security applications.},
doi = {10.1016/j.nima.2010.08.021},
journal = {Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research. Section A, Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, 623(3):1035-1045},
number = 3,
volume = 623,
place = {United States},
year = 2010,
month =
}
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