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Title: Erosive granular avalanches : a cross confrontation between theory and experiment.

Abstract

Results on two laboratory scale avalanches experiments taking place both in the air and under-water, are presented. In both cases a family of solitary erosion/deposition waves are observed. At higher inclination angles, we show the existence of a long wavelength transverse instability followed by a coarsening and the onset of a fingering pattern. While the experiments strongly differ by the spatial and time scales, the agreement between the stability diagram, the wavelengths selection and the avalanche morphology suggest a common erosion/deposition scenario. These experiments are studied theoretically in the framework of the 'partial fluidization' model of dense granular flows. This model identifies a family of propagating solitary waves displaying a behavior similar to the experimental observation. A primary cause for the transverse instability is related to the dependence of avalanche velocity on the granular mass trapped by the flow.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); ANR project
OSTI Identifier:
1000680
Report Number(s):
ANL/MSD/JA-68679
Journal ID: 1434-7636; TRN: US201101%%355
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Granular Matter; Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 1 ; 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; GRANULAR MATERIALS; LANDSLIDES; FLUIDIZATION; INCLINATION; INSTABILITY; MORPHOLOGY; BENCH-SCALE EXPERIMENTS; EROSION; SOLIDS FLOW; FLOW MODELS

Citation Formats

Clement, E., Malloggi, F., Andreotti, B., Aranson, I. S., Materials Science Division, ESPCI-Univ. Paris, and Univ. of Twente. Erosive granular avalanches : a cross confrontation between theory and experiment.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1007/s10035-007-0053-3.
Clement, E., Malloggi, F., Andreotti, B., Aranson, I. S., Materials Science Division, ESPCI-Univ. Paris, & Univ. of Twente. Erosive granular avalanches : a cross confrontation between theory and experiment.. United States. doi:10.1007/s10035-007-0053-3.
Clement, E., Malloggi, F., Andreotti, B., Aranson, I. S., Materials Science Division, ESPCI-Univ. Paris, and Univ. of Twente. Mon . "Erosive granular avalanches : a cross confrontation between theory and experiment.". United States. doi:10.1007/s10035-007-0053-3.
@article{osti_1000680,
title = {Erosive granular avalanches : a cross confrontation between theory and experiment.},
author = {Clement, E. and Malloggi, F. and Andreotti, B. and Aranson, I. S. and Materials Science Division and ESPCI-Univ. Paris and Univ. of Twente},
abstractNote = {Results on two laboratory scale avalanches experiments taking place both in the air and under-water, are presented. In both cases a family of solitary erosion/deposition waves are observed. At higher inclination angles, we show the existence of a long wavelength transverse instability followed by a coarsening and the onset of a fingering pattern. While the experiments strongly differ by the spatial and time scales, the agreement between the stability diagram, the wavelengths selection and the avalanche morphology suggest a common erosion/deposition scenario. These experiments are studied theoretically in the framework of the 'partial fluidization' model of dense granular flows. This model identifies a family of propagating solitary waves displaying a behavior similar to the experimental observation. A primary cause for the transverse instability is related to the dependence of avalanche velocity on the granular mass trapped by the flow.},
doi = {10.1007/s10035-007-0053-3},
journal = {Granular Matter},
number = 1 ; 2007,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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