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Title: Solar energy conversion.

Abstract

The Sun provides Earth with a staggering amount of energy - enough to power the great oceanic and atmospheric currents, the cycle of evaporation and condensation that brings fresh water inland and drives river flow, and the typhoons, hurricanes, and tornadoes that so easily destroy the natural and built landscape. The San Francisco earthquake of 1906, with magnitude 7.8, released an estimated 10{sup 17} joules of energy, the amount the Sun delivers to Earth in one second. Earth's ultimate recoverable resource of oil, estimated at 3 trillion barrels, contains 1.7 x 10{sup 22} joules of energy, which the Sun supplies to Earth in 1.5 days. The amount of energy humans use annually, about 4.6 x 10{sup 20} joules, is delivered to Earth by the Sun in one hour. The enormous power that the Sun continuously delivers to Earth, 1.2 x 10{sup 5} terawatts, dwarfs every other energy source, renewable or nonrenewable. It dramatically exceeds the rate at which human civilization produces and uses energy, currently about 13 TW.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1000184
Report Number(s):
ANL/MSD/JA-57715
Journal ID: 0031-9228; TRN: US201024%%335
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Phys. Today
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 60; Journal Issue: 3 ; Mar. 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; ENERGY SOURCES; EVAPORATION; FRESH WATER; RIVERS; SOLAR ENERGY CONVERSION; SUN

Citation Formats

Crabtree, G. W., Lewis, N. S., Materials Science Division, and Cal Tech. Solar energy conversion.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2718755.
Crabtree, G. W., Lewis, N. S., Materials Science Division, & Cal Tech. Solar energy conversion.. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2718755.
Crabtree, G. W., Lewis, N. S., Materials Science Division, and Cal Tech. Thu . "Solar energy conversion.". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2718755.
@article{osti_1000184,
title = {Solar energy conversion.},
author = {Crabtree, G. W. and Lewis, N. S. and Materials Science Division and Cal Tech},
abstractNote = {The Sun provides Earth with a staggering amount of energy - enough to power the great oceanic and atmospheric currents, the cycle of evaporation and condensation that brings fresh water inland and drives river flow, and the typhoons, hurricanes, and tornadoes that so easily destroy the natural and built landscape. The San Francisco earthquake of 1906, with magnitude 7.8, released an estimated 10{sup 17} joules of energy, the amount the Sun delivers to Earth in one second. Earth's ultimate recoverable resource of oil, estimated at 3 trillion barrels, contains 1.7 x 10{sup 22} joules of energy, which the Sun supplies to Earth in 1.5 days. The amount of energy humans use annually, about 4.6 x 10{sup 20} joules, is delivered to Earth by the Sun in one hour. The enormous power that the Sun continuously delivers to Earth, 1.2 x 10{sup 5} terawatts, dwarfs every other energy source, renewable or nonrenewable. It dramatically exceeds the rate at which human civilization produces and uses energy, currently about 13 TW.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2718755},
journal = {Phys. Today},
number = 3 ; Mar. 2007,
volume = 60,
place = {United States},
year = {2007},
month = {3}
}