Audiovisual STI

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Acceptable Audiovisual FormatsThere are several audiovisual formats that are acceptable for conference/event STI submissions. Among the list of acceptable audiovisual formats, some are content/audio-indexable while others are not. The list of both follow.   To ensure that the videos or audio files submitted by your site are content/audio-indexed, those videos must be in one of the following formats:

  • WMA - Windows Media Audio
  • WMV -  Windows Media Video
  • MPEG - Moving Picture Experts Group  (Family of open standards used for coding audiovisual material in a digital compressed format. 
  • MP2 -   This is one of the audio codings/formats defined in the MPEG family of standards.
  • MP3 -   This is one of the audio codings/formats defined in the MPEG family of standards.
  • MP4 -  This is one of the audio codings/formats defined in the MPEG family of standards.

There are several other common formats that OSTI cannot currently index, but these formats will successfully be processed through OSTI’s systems.  The indexing will be of the metadata only, not the spoken content.  These formats are:

  • ASF  (Advanced Systems Format)
  • AVI - (Audio Video Interleaved)
  • Apple Core Video
  • DV Core Video
  • Adobe Flash
  • QuickTime
  • RealMedia

  For audio-visual STI submissions that include the URL in the metadata there are a couple of things to consider.

  • If the URL begins with http:// and if the STI video is not embedded in a proprietary player, OSTI will automatically cache a copy of the video for preservation.
  • If your site is not hosting the STI video and you plan to upload instead, you will need to coordinate with OSTI to receive a password that will allow access to an FTP area to which audiovisual material can be sent.

Like full-text indexing of a document, content indexing of an audio or video file greatly enhances the retrievability of the STI product as a whole and also enables a user to find the exact place in the video where the term he/she is searching on was actually spoken by the presenter or the narrator.

Last updated: September 13, 2011