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Title: Final Report on California Regional Wind Energy Forecasting Project:Application of NARAC Wind Prediction System

Final Report on California Regional Wind Energy Forecasting Project:Application of NARAC Wind Prediction System Wind power is the fastest growing renewable energy technology and electric power source (AWEA, 2004a). This renewable energy has demonstrated its readiness to become a more significant contributor to the electricity supply in the western U.S. and help ease the power shortage (AWEA, 2000). The practical exercise of this alternative energy supply also showed its function in stabilizing electricity prices and reducing the emissions of pollution and greenhouse gases from other natural gas-fired power plants. According to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the world's winds could theoretically supply the equivalent of 5800 quadrillion BTUs of energy each year, which is 15 times current world energy demand (AWEA, 2004b). Archer and Jacobson (2005) also reported an estimation of the global wind energy potential with the magnitude near half of DOE's quote. Wind energy has been widely used in Europe; it currently supplies 20% and 6% of Denmark's and Germany's electric power, respectively, while less than 1% of U.S. electricity is generated from wind (AWEA, 2004a). The production of wind energy in California ({approx}1.2% of total power) is slightly higher than the national average (CEC & EPRI, 2003). With the recently enacted Renewable Portfolio Standards calling for 20% of renewables in more » California's power generation mix by 2010, the growth of wind energy would become an important resource on the electricity network. Based on recent wind energy research (Roulston et al., 2003), accurate weather forecasting has been recognized as an important factor to further improve the wind energy forecast for effective power management. To this end, UC-Davis (UCD) and LLNL proposed a joint effort through the use of UCD's wind tunnel facility and LLNL's real-time weather forecasting capability to develop an improved regional wind energy forecasting system. The current effort of UC-Davis is aimed at developing a database of wind turbine power curves as a function of wind speed and direction, using its wind tunnel facility at the windmill farm at the Altamont Pass. The main objective of LLNL's involvement is to provide UC-Davis with improved wind forecasts to drive the parameterization scheme of turbine power curves developed from the wind tunnel facility. Another objective of LLNL's effort is to support the windmill farm operation with real-time wind forecasts for the effective energy management. The forecast skill in capturing the situation to meet the cut-in and cutout speed of given turbines would help reduce the operation cost in low and strong wind scenarios, respectively. The main focus of this report is to evaluate the wind forecast errors of LLNL's three-dimensional real-time weather forecast model at the location with the complex terrain. The assessment of weather forecast accuracy would help quantify the source of wind energy forecast errors from the atmospheric forecast model and/or wind-tunnel module for further improvement in the wind energy forecasting system. « less
Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:919208
Report Number(s):UCRL-TR-214046
TRN: US200825%%219
DOE Contract Number:W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:Technical Report
Data Type:
Research Org:Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA
Sponsoring Org:USDOE
Country of Publication:United States
Language:English
Subject: 17 WIND ENERGY; CALIFORNIA; COMPLEX TERRAIN; ELECTRIC POWER; ELECTRICITY; ENERGY DEMAND; ENERGY MANAGEMENT; FORECASTING; GREENHOUSE GASES; LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY; POWER GENERATION; POWER PLANTS; WEATHER; WIND POWER; WIND TUNNELS; WIND TURBINES