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Title: Chemistry implications of climate change

Chemistry implications of climate change Since preindustrial times, the concentrations of a number of key greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}) and the nitric oxides (N{sub 2}O) have increased. Additionally, the concentrations of anthropogenic aerosols have also increased during the same time period. Increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases are expected to increase temperature, while the aerosols tend to have a net cooling effect. Taking both of these effects into account, the current best scientific estimate is that the global average surface temperature is expected to increase by 2{degrees}C between the years 1990 to 2100. A climate change if this magnitude will both directly and indirectly impact atmospheric chemistry. For example, many important tropospheric reactions have a temperature dependence (either Arrhenius or otherwise). Thus, if temperature increase, reaction rates will also increase.
Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:611769
Report Number(s):UCRL-JC--127340; CONF-970207--
ON: DE98051117
DOE Contract Number:W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:Conference
Data Type:
Resource Relation:Conference: 77. annual meeting of the American Meteorological Society, Long Beach, CA (United States), 2-7 Feb 1997; Other Information: PBD: 1 May 1997
Research Org:Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
Country of Publication:United States
Language:English
Subject: 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY; CARBON DIOXIDE; NITROGEN OXIDES; METHANE; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; REACTION KINETICS; TROPOSPHERE