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Title: The Perils of Paul: Near Disasters in Airborne Radiochemical Sampling

Beginning with the Trinity test in July 1945, Laboratory radiochemists have collected debris from nuclear tests by various means. At Trinity, two United States Army Sherman tanks were used. One tank was a launch platform or several rocket-propelled scoops. Each scoop was attached to a wire so that the scoops could be retrieved. A second Sherman tank was fitted with lead shielding and driven into ground zero. Beginning with Operation Crossroads and continuing throughout atmospheric testing, aircraft were used to fly in and around mushroom clouds to collect debris. One of the first aircraft to be used for this purpose was the famous Flying Fortress of World War II, the B-17. These sampling operations were dangerous for both the aircrews flying the recovery operations and the ground crews that handled, packaged, and transported the debris to Los Alamos. During the 1948 Sandstone test series, three LANL radiochemists received beta burns while recovering filter papers from one of the B-17 sampler aircraft.
Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
1329608
Report Number(s):
LA-UR--16-27446
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Research Org:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
38 RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY