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Title: Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Furthermore, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [1]
  1. Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)
  2. Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
Grant/Contract Number:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723
Nature Publishing Group
Research Org:
Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
Country of Publication:
United States
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE physical sciences; materials science