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Title: Direct observation and imaging of a spin-wave soliton with p-like symmetry

Spin waves, the collective excitations of spins, can emerge as nonlinear solitons at the nanoscale when excited by an electrical current from a nanocontact. These solitons are expected to have essentially cylindrical symmetry (that is, s-like), but no direct experimental observation exists to confirm this picture. Using a high-sensitivity time-resolved magnetic X-ray microscopy with 50 ps temporal resolution and 35 nm spatial resolution, we are able to create a real-space spin-wave movie and observe the emergence of a localized soliton with a nodal line, that is, with p-like symmetry. Moreover, micromagnetic simulations explain the measurements and reveal that the symmetry of the soliton can be controlled by magnetic fields. Our results broaden the understanding of spin-wave dynamics at the nanoscale, with implications for the design of magnetic nanodevices.
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [3] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [2] ;  [6] ;  [4] ;  [7] ;  [5] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [2]
  1. Stanford Univ., CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
  2. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
  3. Univ. of Barcelona (Spain)
  4. KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)
  5. New York Univ. (NYU), NY (United States)
  6. HGST Inc., San Jose, CA (United States)
  7. Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
Report Number(s):
Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723; ncomms9889
Grant/Contract Number:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723
Nature Publishing Group
Research Org:
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
Country of Publication:
United States
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS physical sciences; condensed matter