SciTech Connect

Title: Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel Commercial Lawn Equipment (Brochure)

Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel Commercial Lawn Equipment (Brochure) Guide explains the different types of alternative fuel commercial mowers and lists the makes and models of the ones available on the market. Turf grass is a fixture of the American landscape and the American economy. It is the nation's largest irrigated crop, covering more than 40 million acres. Legions of lawnmowers care for this expanse during the growing season-up to year-round in the warmest climates. The annual economic impact of the U.S. turf grass industry has been estimated at more than $62 billion. Lawn mowing also contributes to the nation's petroleum consumption and pollutant emissions. Mowers consume 1.2 billion gallons of gasoline annually, about 1% of U.S. motor gasoline consumption. Commercial mowing accounts for about 35% of this total and is the highest-intensity use. Large property owners and mowing companies cut lawns, sports fields, golf courses, parks, roadsides, and other grassy areas for 7 hours per day and consume 900 to 2,000 gallons of fuel annually depending on climate and length of the growing season. In addition to gasoline, commercial mowing consumes more than 100 million gallons of diesel annually. Alternative fuel mowers are one way to reduce the energy and environmental impacts of commercial lawn mowing. They can more » reduce petroleum use and emissions compared with gasoline- and diesel-fueled mowers. They may also save on fuel and maintenance costs, extend mower life, reduce fuel spillage and fuel theft, and promote a 'green' image. And on ozone alert days, alternative fuel mowers may not be subject to the operational restrictions that gasoline mowers must abide by. To help inform the commercial mowing industry about product options and potential benefits, Clean Cities produced this guide to alternative fuel commercial lawn equipment. Although the guide's focus is on original equipment manufacturer (OEM) mowers, some mowers can be converted to run on alternative fuels. For more information about propane conversions. This guide may be particularly helpful for organizations that are already using alternative fuels in their vehicles and have an alternative fuel supply or electric charging in place (e.g., golf cart charging stations at most golf courses). On the flip side, experiencing the benefits of using alternative fuels in mowing equipment may encourage organizations to try them in on-road vehicles as well. Whatever the case, alternative fuel commercial lawnmowers are a powerful and cost-effective way to reduce U.S. petroleum dependence and help protect the environment. « less
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:1029420
Report Number(s):DOE/GO-102011-3364
TRN: US201201%%118
DOE Contract Number:AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:Technical Report
Resource Relation:Related Information: Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)
Research Org:National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO.
Sponsoring Org:USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
Country of Publication:United States
Language:English
Subject: 02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; 09 BIOMASS FUELS; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; ALTERNATIVE FUELS; AVAILABILITY; CLIMATES; ECONOMIC IMPACT; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; GASOLINE; GRAMINEAE; MAINTENANCE; MANUFACTURERS; MARKET; MOTORS; OZONE; PETROLEUM; POLLUTANTS; PROPANE; THEFT COMMERCIAL MOWER; PROPANE; LPG; COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS; CNG; ELECTRIC; BIODIESEL; ALTERNATIVE FUEL; CLEAN CITIES; LAWN; TURF; Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Market Transformation