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Title: Light self-focusing in the atmosphere: Thin window model

Ultra-high power (exceeding the self-focusing threshold by more than three orders of magnitude) light beams from ground-based laser systems may find applications in space-debris cleaning. The propagation of such powerful laser beams through the atmosphere reveals many novel interesting features compared to traditional light self-focusing. It is demonstrated here that for the relevant laser parameters, when the thickness of the atmosphere is much shorter than the focusing length (that is, of the orbit scale), the beam transit through the atmosphere in lowest order produces phase distortion only. This means that by using adaptive optics it may be possible to eliminate the impact of self-focusing in the atmosphere on the laser beam. Furthermore, the area of applicability of the proposed “thin window” model is broader than the specific physical problem considered here. For instance, it might find applications in femtosecond laser material processing.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4]
  1. Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Novosibirsk (Russia)
  2. Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Novosibirsk (Russia); Novosibirsk State Univ., Novosibirsk (Russia)
  3. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  4. Novosibirsk State Univ., Novosibirsk (Russia); Aston Univ., Birmingham (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
1297640
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL--679896
Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Research Org:
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS laser; self-focusing; space debris