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Title: Directed Synthesis of Nanoporous Carbons from Task-Specific Ionic Liquid Precursors for the Adsorption of CO2

Postcombustion CO2 capture has become a key component of greenhouse-gas reduction as anthropogenic emissions continue to impact the environment. In this paper, we report a one-step synthesis of porous carbon materials using a series of task-specific ionic liquids for the adsorption of CO2. By varying the structure of the ionic liquid precursor, we were able to control pore architecture and surface functional groups of the carbon materials in this one-step synthesis process leading to adsorbents with high CO2 sorption capacities (up to 4.067 mmol g-1) at 0 °C and 1 bar. Finally, added nitrogen functional groups led to high CO2/N2 adsorption-selectivity values ranging from 20 to 37 whereas simultaneously the interaction energy was enhanced relative to carbon materials with no added nitrogen.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Chemical Sciences Division
  2. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry
  3. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division
  4. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Chemical Sciences Division; Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
1286704
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
ChemSusChem
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 12; Journal ID: ISSN 1864-5631
Publisher:
ChemPubSoc Europe
Research Org:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
Contributing Orgs:
Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES adsorption; carbon capture; electron microscopy; functionalization; ionic liquids