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Title: Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator

Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. In this study, we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel is created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m-1 is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [3] ;  [1] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [3] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [5] ;  [3] ;  [3] ;  [1] more »;  [3] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] « less
  1. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
  2. Univ. of Oslo (Norway)
  3. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
  4. Univ. Paris-Saclay, Palaiseau (France)
  5. Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
1272150
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Research Org:
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS