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Title: Doping evolution of spin and charge excitations in the Hubbard model

We shed light on how electronic correlations vary across the phase diagram of the cuprate superconductors, examining the doping evolution of spin and charge excitations in the single-band Hubbard model using determinant quantum Monte Carlo (DQMC). In the single-particle response, we observe that the effects of correlations weaken rapidly with doping, such that one may expect the random phase approximation (RPA) to provide an adequate description of the two-particle response. In contrast, when compared to RPA, we find that significant residual correlations in the two-particle excitations persist up to 40% hole and 15% electron doping (the range of dopings achieved in the cuprates). Ultimately, these fundamental differences between the doping evolution of single- and multi-particle renormalizations show that conclusions drawn from single-particle processes cannot necessarily be applied to multi-particle excitations. Eventually, the system smoothly transitions via a momentum-dependent crossover into a weakly correlated metallic state where the spin and charge excitation spectra exhibit similar behavior and where RPA provides an adequate description.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [6] ;  [7]
  1. Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science (SIMES)
  2. Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science (SIMES); Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)
  3. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science (SIMES); Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics
  4. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics; Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Joint Institute for Advanced Materials
  5. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science (SIMES); Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)
  6. Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics
  7. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science (SIMES); Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Geballe Lab. for Advanced Materials
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
1253321
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515; AC02-05CH11231; 1147470
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 92; Journal Issue: 19; Journal ID: ISSN 1098-0121
Publisher:
American Physical Society (APS)
Research Org:
Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS