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Title: The future of electron microscopy

Seeing is believing. So goes the old adage and seen evidence is undoubtedly satisfying because it can be interpreted easily, though not always correctly. For centuries, humans have developed such instruments as telescopes that observe the heavens and microscopes that reveal bacteria and viruses. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William Moerner for their foundational work on superresolution fluorescence microscopy in which they overcame the Abbe diffraction limit for the resolving power of conventional light microscopes. (See Physics Today, December 2014, page 18.) That breakthrough enabled discoveries in biological research and testifies to the importance of modern microscopy.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2]
  1. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
  2. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
1228826
Report Number(s):
BNL--108108-2015-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 0031-9228; PHTOAD; R&D Project: MA015MACA; KC0201010
Grant/Contract Number:
SC00112704
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physics Today
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 68; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 0031-9228
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Research Org:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY