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Title: Particle Physics after the Higgs-Boson Discovery: Opportunities for the Large Hadron Collider

The first run of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN brought the discovery of the Higgs boson, an apparently elementary scalar particle with a mass of 125 GeV, the avatar of the mechanism that hides the electroweak symmetry. Then, a new round of experimentation is beginning, with the energy of the proton–proton colliding beams raised to 6.5 TeV per beam, from 4 TeV at the end of the first run. I summarize what we have learned about the Higgs boson, and calls attention to some issues that will be among our central concerns in the near future.
Authors:
 [1]
  1. Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Laboratoire de Physique Theorique de l'Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
1223224
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-PUB--15-290-T
Journal ID: ISSN 1366-5812; arXiv eprint number arXiv:1507.02977
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Contemporary Physics (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Contemporary Physics (Online); Journal ID: ISSN 1366-5812
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Research Org:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS electroweak symmetry breaking; Higgs boson; Large Hadron Collider; new particles and interactions