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Title: Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development

An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth of IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [1]
  1. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)
  2. JPT Peptide Technologies, Berlin (Germany)
  3. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
1201749
Grant/Contract Number:
AI060354; AI078526; AI084794; AI095985; AI096040; OPP1033091; OPP1040741
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Immunological Methods
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 416; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-1759
Publisher:
Elsevier
Research Org:
Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES HIV; peptide microarray; diversity; antibody; vaccine