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Title: In search of the dead zone: Use of otoliths for tracking fish exposure to hypoxia

Otolith chemistry is often useful for tracking provenance of fishes, as well as examining migration histories. Whereas elements such as strontium and barium correlate well with salinity and temperature, experiments that examine manganese uptake as a function of these parameters have found no such correlation. Instead, dissolved manganese is available as a redox product, and as such, is indicative of low-oxygen conditions. Here we present evidence for that mechanism in a range of habitats from marine to freshwater, across species, and also present ancillary proxies that support the mechanism as well. For example, iodine is redox-sensitive and varies inversely with Mn; and sulfur stable isotope ratios provide evidence of anoxic sulfate reduction in some circumstances.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [2] ;  [5] ;  [6] ;  [7] ;  [8]
  1. State Univ. of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, NY (United States)
  2. The Univ. of Texas at Austin, Port Aransas, TX (United States)
  3. Syracuse Univ., Syracuse, NY (United States)
  4. Queens College, Flushing, NY (United States)
  5. Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Karlskrona (Sweden)
  6. Uppsala Univ., Visby (Sweden)
  7. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  8. Univ. of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
1201670
Grant/Contract Number:
DMR00936384
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Marine Systems
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 141; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0924-7963
Publisher:
Elsevier
Research Org:
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY fish otoliths; biogeochemical markers; hypoxia proxies