Sample records for zinc sulfide aggregation

  1. Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and metals, particularly how organics affect mobility, and its potential for bioremediation. It is known that some organics promote aggregation. Amine-bearing molecules, for...

  2. Zinc sulfide liquefaction catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the liquefaction of carbonaceous material, such as coal, is set forth wherein coal is liquefied in a catalytic solvent refining reaction wherein an activated zinc sulfide catalyst is utilized which is activated by hydrogenation in a coal derived process solvent in the absence of coal.

  3. Acid treatment removes zinc sulfide scale restriction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, K. (Kerr McGee Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Allison, D. (Otis Engineering Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Ford, W.G.F. (Halliburton Co., Duncan, OK (United States))

    1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that removal of zinc sulfide (ZnS) scale with acid restored an offshore Louisiana well's production to original rates. The zinc sulfide scale was determined to be in the near well bore area. The selected acid had been proven to control iron sulfide (FeS) scales in sour wells without causing harm to surface production equipment, tubing, and other downhole hardware. The successful removal of the blockage re-established previous production rates with a 105% increase in flowing tubing pressure. On production for a number of months, a high rate, high-pressure offshore well was experiencing unusually rapid pressure and rate declines. A small sample of the restrictive material was obtained during the wire line operations. The well was subsequently shut in while a laboratory analysis determined that zinc sulfide was the major component of the obstruction.

  4. Cadmium zinc sulfide by solution growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA)

    1992-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for depositing thin layers of a II-VI compound cadmium zinc sulfide (CdZnS) by an aqueous solution growth technique with quality suitable for high efficiency photovoltaic or other devices which can benefit from the band edge shift resulting from the inclusion of Zn in the sulfide. A first solution comprising CdCl.sub.2 2.5H.sub.2 O, NH.sub.4 Cl, NH.sub.4 OH and ZnCl.sub.2, and a second solution comprising thiourea ((NH.sub.2).sub.2 CS) are combined and placed in a deposition cell, along with a substrate to form a thin i.e. 10 nm film of CdZnS on the substrate. This process can be sequentially repeated with to achieve deposition of independent multiple layers having different Zn concentrations.

  5. Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1,EnergyExploring the NatureDepartment

  6. Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1,EnergyExploring the NatureDepartmentExtracellular

  7. Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1,EnergyExploring the

  8. Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1,EnergyExploring theExtracellular Proteins Promote

  9. Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) /EmailMolecularGE, Ford, University

  10. Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) /EmailMolecularGE, Ford, UniversityExtracellular

  11. Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) /EmailMolecularGE, Ford,

  12. Chemical Vapor Deposited Zinc Sulfide. SPIE Press Monograph

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCloy, John S.; Tustison, Randal W.

    2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Zinc sulfide has shown unequaled utility for infrared windows that require a combination of long-wavelength infrared transparency, mechanical durability, and elevated-temperature performance. This book reviews the physical properties of chemical vapor deposited ZnS and their relationship to the CVD process that produced them. An in-depth look at the material microstructure is included, along with a discussion of the material's optical properties. Finally, because the CVD process itself is central to the development of this material, a brief history is presented.

  13. Nontoxic and Abundant Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide Nanocrystals for Potential High-Temperature Thermoelectric Energy Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yong P.

    and abundant copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS) nanocrystals for potential thermoelectric applications. The CZTS sulfide (CZTS) as a nontoxic and abundant thermoelectric material and characterized its thermoelectric materials, the elements in the composition of CZTS are in extremely high abundancethe natural reserves

  14. Successful removal of zinc sulfide scale restriction from a hot, deep, sour gas well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenrick, A.J.; Ali, S.A. [Chevron USA Production Co., New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Removal of zinc sulfide scale with hydrochloric acid from a hot, deep, Norphlet Sandstone gas well in the Gulf of Mexico resulted in a 29% increase in the production rates. The zinc sulfide scale was determined to be in the near-wellbore area. The presence of zinc sulfide is explained by the production of 25 ppm H{sub 2}S gas, and the loss of 50--100 bbl of zinc bromide fluid to the formation. Although zinc sulfide scale has been successfully removed with hydrochloric acid in low-to-moderate temperature wells, no analogous treatment data were available for high temperature, high pressure (HTHP) Norphlet wells. Therefore laboratory testing was initiated to identify suitable acid systems for scale removal, and select a high quality corrosion inhibitor that would mitigate detrimental effects of the selected acid on downhole tubulars and surface equipment. This case history presents the first successful use of hydrochloric acid in removing zinc sulfide scale from a HTHP Norphlet sour gas well.

  15. Structure in multilayer films of zinc sulfide and copper sulfide via atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, Andrew; Jewell, Leila; Bielecki, Anthony; Keiber, Trevor; Bridges, Frank; Carter, Sue; Alers, Glenn, E-mail: galers@ucsc.edu [Department of Physics, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Multilayer film stacks of ZnS and Cu{sub x}S (x???2) were made via atomic layer deposition. The precursors were bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato)zinc, bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato)copper, and H{sub 2}S generated in situ for sulfur. Samples were deposited at 200?°C, in layers ranging from approximately 2 to 20 nm thick, based on binary growth rates. The properties of the film stacks were studied with atomic force microscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, and extended x-ray absorption fine structure. The results demonstrate that the structure of films with the thinnest layers is dominated by Cu{sub x}S, whereas in the thicker films, the structure is determined by whichever material is first deposited. This can be attributed to the crystal structure mismatch of ZnS and Cu{sub x}S.

  16. Photoelectrical, optical, and transport properties of poly (3-hexylthiophene)-zinc sulfide hybrid nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Beerandra; Kaur, Amarjeet, E-mail: amarkaur@physics.du.ac.in [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007 (India)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have synthesized nanocomposites of poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) at 273?K and zinc sulfide (ZnS) nanoparticles at 353?K by the chemical route method. The synthesis of these nanocomposites is confirmed by UV-visible, high resolution transmission electron microscope, and Raman spectroscopy. We have measured photocurrent of P3HT using 50?W tungsten lamp. The photoconductivity increases with concentration of ZnS in P3HT-ZnS composite. Temperature dependent dc conductivity of P3HT and its nanocomposites have been thoroughly investigated in light of Mott's variable range hopping.

  17. Method of removing hydrogen sulfide from gases utilizing a zinc oxide sorbent and regenerating the sorbent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jalan, Vinod M. (Concord, MA); Frost, David G. (Maynard, MA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A spent solid sorbent resulting from the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a fuel gas flow is regenerated with a steam-air mixture. The mixture of steam and air may also include additional nitrogen or carbon dioxide. The gas mixture contacts the spent sorbent containing metal sulfide at a temperature above 500.degree. C. to regenerate the sulfide to metal oxide or carbonate. Various metal species including the period four transition metals and the lanthanides are suitable sorbents that may be regenerated by this method. In addition, the introduction of carbon dioxide gas permits carbonates such as those of strontium, barium and calcium to be regenerated. The steam permits regeneration of spent sorbent without formation of metal sulfate. Moreover, the regeneration will proceed with low oxygen concentrations and will occur without the increase in temperature to minimize the risk of sintering and densification of the sorbent.

  18. Mineralogical characterization of steel industry hazardous waste and refractory sulfide ores for zinc and gold recovery processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagni, A.M.; Hagni, R.D. (Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States). Geology Geophysics Dept.)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The steel industry generates dust as a waste product from high temperature electric arc furnaces (EAF), which is a major step in processing scrap metal into steel. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has classified EAF dust as KO61 hazardous waste, due to its lead, cadmium, and chromium content. The dust also contains valuable zinc, averaging 19%. Detailed mineralogical characterization show the zinc is present as crystals of franklinite-magnetite-jacobsite solid solutions in calcium-iron-silicate glass spheres and as zincite mostly as very small individual spheres. Much of the chromium is present in an insoluble form in solid solution in the iron spinels. This microscopic research is a valuable tool in determining treatment processes for the 600,000 tons of dust generated annually in the US. Refractory gold ores, pyrite and arsenopyrite, have been studied to determine additional, cost-effective methods of processing. One technique under investigation involves roasting sulfide mineral particles to hematite to create porosity through which a leach can permeate to recover the gold. Portlandite, Ca(OH)[sub 2], is added to the roast for retention of hazardous sulfur and arsenic. Modern microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, such electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, cathodoluminescence microscopy, and electron microprobe, have been applied, as well as reflected light and dark field microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy to determine the mineralogy of the sulfur, arsenic, and iron phases, and the extent of porosity, permeability, and oxidation state of the ore particles at various roasting temperatures. It is concluded that mineralogical techniques can be effectively applied to the solution of environmental problems.

  19. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the cubic and hexagonal polytypes of zinc sulfide B. Gilbert,1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haskel, Daniel

    in the zinc-blende and wurtzite modifications of ZnS. We demon- strate that d-like unoccupied bands temperature, while wurtzite, the less dense hexagonal form, is stable above 1020 °C at atmospheric pres- sure cubic or zinc blende phase and wurtzite hexagonal are given in Fig. 1. When the comparison of cubic

  20. Dye-sensitized solar cell employing zinc oxide aggregates grown in the presence of lithium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Qifeng; Cao, Guozhong

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided are a novel ZnO dye-sensitized solar cell and method of fabricating the same. In one embodiment, deliberately added lithium ions are used to mediate the growth of ZnO aggregates. The use of lithium provides ZnO aggregates that have advantageous microstructure, morphology, crystallinity, and operational characteristics. Employing lithium during aggregate synthesis results in a polydisperse collection of ZnO aggregates favorable for porosity and light scattering. The resulting nanocrystallites forming the aggregates have improved crystallinity and more favorable facets for dye molecule absorption. The lithium synthesis improves the surface stability of ZnO in acidic dyes. The procedures developed and disclosed herein also help ensure the formation of an aggregate film that has a high homogeneity of thickness, a high packing density, a high specific surface area, and good electrical contact between the film and the fluorine-doped tin oxide electrode and among the aggregate particles.

  1. The effect of particle size on the structural transitions in zinc sulfide S. B. Qadri and E. F. Skelton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinsmore, Tony

    radiation were carried out to 20.0 GPa. Nanoparticles initially in the zinc-blende and wurtzite phases both.8 nm size, and the wurtzite particles, which were of 25.3 nm size, transformed to the NaCl phase at 19.0 and 15.0 GPa, respectively. Nanoparticles of the wurtzite phase never regained their initial wurtzite

  2. Performance Enhancement of a Graphene-Zinc Phosphide Solar Cell Using the Electric Field-Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javey, Ali

    implementation at lower costs, such as zinc phosphide (Zn3P2), copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS), cuprous oxide (Cu2

  3. Guidance Document Safe Handling of Sulfides and Hydrogen Sulfide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sulfide gas. At high levels, hydrogen sulfide may paralyze the lungs, prohibiting a victim from escaping

  4. High temperature regenerable hydrogen sulfide removal agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Copeland, Robert J. (Wheat Ridge, CO)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for high temperature desulfurization of coal-derived gases using regenerable sorbents. One sorbent is stannic oxide (tin oxide, SnO.sub.2), the other sorbent is a metal oxide or mixed metal oxide such as zinc ferrite (ZnFe.sub.2 O.sub.4). Certain otherwise undesirable by-products, including hydrogen sulfide (H.sub.2 S) and sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) are reused by the system, and elemental sulfur is produced in the regeneration reaction. A system for refabricating the sorbent pellets is also described.

  5. anionic surfactant aggregation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ZnO nanostructures formation from zinc nanoclasters size of several nanometers to ZnO fractal aggregates (FA) size up to hundreds of nanometers. Determinants of this process are...

  6. Geothermal hydrogen sulfide removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urban, P.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UOP Sulfox technology successfully removed 500 ppM hydrogen sulfide from simulated mixed phase geothermal waters. The Sulfox process involves air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide using a fixed catalyst bed. The catalyst activity remained stable throughout the life of the program. The product stream composition was selected by controlling pH; low pH favored elemental sulfur, while high pH favored water soluble sulfate and thiosulfate. Operation with liquid water present assured full catalytic activity. Dissolved salts reduced catalyst activity somewhat. Application of Sulfox technology to geothermal waters resulted in a straightforward process. There were no requirements for auxiliary processes such as a chemical plant. Application of the process to various types of geothermal waters is discussed and plans for a field test pilot plant and a schedule for commercialization are outlined.

  7. Purification of sulfide oxidase from rat liver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pu, Lixia

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present study represents an initial investigative effort to purify sulfide oxidase from rat liver. Two methods to determine sulfide oxidase activity have been established and both are based on measuring substrate disappearance of sulfide. Both...

  8. Oxidative Remobilization of Technetium Sequestered by Sulfide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Remobilization of Technetium Sequestered by Sulfide-Transformed Nano Zerovalent Iron. Oxidative Remobilization of Technetium Sequestered by Sulfide-Transformed Nano Zerovalent...

  9. Lithium and Zinc Sulfide Coated Plastic Neutron Detector Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.

    2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. In addition, a few other companies have detector technologies that might be competitive in the near term as an alternative technology. Reported here are the results of tests of 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated scintillator paddles. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Symetrica.

  10. Zinc electrode with cement additive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Charkey, Allen (Brookfield, CT)

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A zinc electrode having a cement additive, preferably, Portland Cement, distributed in the zinc active material.

  11. Production of zinc pellets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries.

  12. Production of zinc pellets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, J.F.

    1996-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries. 6 figs.

  13. Durable zinc ferrite sorbent pellets for hot coal gas desulfurization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jha, Mahesh C. (Arvada, CO); Blandon, Antonio E. (Thornton, CO); Hepworth, Malcolm T. (Edina, MN)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Durable, porous sulfur sorbents useful in removing hydrogen sulfide from hot coal gas are prepared by water pelletizing a mixture of fine zinc oxide and fine iron oxide with inorganic and organic binders and small amounts of activators such as sodium carbonate and molybdenite; the pellets are dried and then indurated at a high temperature, e.g., 1800.degree. C., for a time sufficient to produce crush-resistant pellets.

  14. REVISED HYDROGEN SULFIDE DRILLING CONTINGENCY PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REVISED HYDROGEN SULFIDE DRILLING CONTINGENCY PLAN OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY;PREFACE Attached is the "REVISED HYDROGEN SULFIDE DRILLING CONTINGENCY PLAN" that will be used for ODP coring and drilling operations on legs where hydrogen sulfide is likely to be encountered. Prior

  15. CODE OF PRACTICE HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    thus make it non-detectable. Hydrogen sulfide is very quickly absorbed into the lungs. Short term exposure may cause irritation of nose, throat, eyes and lungs. The Alberta Occupational Exposure Limit (O, possible nausea, tearing of the eyes or headaches with prolonged exposure. 20 ­ 50 Nose, throat and lung

  16. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maroni, V.A.; Iton, L.E.; Pasterczyk, J.W.; Winterer, M.; Krause, T.R.

    1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A zeolite-based catalyst is described for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C[sub 2]+ hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  17. Zinc oxyfluoride transparent conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, Roy G. (Cambridge, MA)

    1991-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparent, electrically conductive and infrared-reflective films of zinc oxyfluoride are produced by chemical vapor deposition from vapor mixtures of zinc, oxygen and fluorine-containing compounds. The substitution of fluorine for some of the oxygen in zinc oxide results in dramatic increases in the electrical conductivity. For example, diethyl zinc, ethyl alcohol and hexafluoropropene vapors are reacted over a glass surface at 400.degree. C. to form a visibly transparent, electrically conductive, infrared reflective and ultraviolet absorptive film of zinc oxyfluoride. Such films are useful in liquid crystal display devices, solar cells, electrochromic absorbers and reflectors, energy-conserving heat mirrors, and antistatic coatings.

  18. Analytical modeling of localized surface plasmon resonance in heterostructure copper sulfide nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, Andrew H.; Ha, Don-Hyung; Robinson, Richard D., E-mail: rdr82@cornell.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Ding, Xiaoyue [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in semiconductor nanocrystals is a relatively new field of investigation that promises greater tunability of plasmonic properties compared to metal nanoparticles. A novel process by which the LSPR in semiconductor nanocrystals can be altered is through heterostructure formation arising from solution-based cation exchange. Herein, we describe the development of an analytical model of LSPR in heterostructure copper sulfide-zinc sulfide nanocrystals synthesized via a cation exchange reaction between copper sulfide (Cu{sub 1.81}S) nanocrystals and Zn ions. The cation exchange reaction produces dual-interface, heterostructure nanocrystals in which the geometry of the copper sulfide phase can be tuned from a sphere to a thin disk separating symmetrically-grown sulfide (ZnS) grains. Drude model electronic conduction and Mie-Gans theory are applied to describe how the LSPR wavelength changes during cation exchange, taking into account the morphology evolution and changes to the local permittivity. The results of the modeling indicate that the presence of the ZnS grains has a significant effect on the out-of-plane LSPR mode. By comparing the results of the model to previous studies on solid-solid phase transformations of copper sulfide in these nanocrystals during cation exchange, we show that the carrier concentration is independent of the copper vacancy concentration dictated by its atomic phase. The evolution of the effective carrier concentration calculated from the model suggests that the out-of-plane resonance mode is dominant. The classical model was compared to a simplified quantum mechanical model which suggested that quantum mechanical effects become significant when the characteristic size is less than ?8 nm. Overall, we find that the analytical models are not accurate for these heterostructured semiconductor nanocrystals, indicating the need for new model development for this emerging field.

  19. Use of ferric sulfate: acid media for the desulfurization of model compounds of coal. [Dibenzothiophene, diphenyl sulfide, di-n-butyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clary, L.R.; Vermeulen, T.; Lynn, S.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work has been to investigate the ability of ferric sulfate-acid leach systems to oxidize the sulfur in model compounds of coal. Ferric iron-acid leach systems have been shown to be quite effective at removal of inorganic sulfur in coal. In this study, the oxidative effect of ferric iron in acid-leach systems was studied using dibenzothiophene, diphenyl sulfide, and di-n-butyl sulfide as models of organic sulfur groups in coal. Nitrogen and oxygen, as well as various transition metal catalysts and oxidants, were utilized in this investigation. Dibenzothiophene was found to be quite refractory to oxidation, except in the case where metavanadate was added, where it appears that 40% oxidation to sulfone could have occurred per hour at 150/sup 0/C and mild oxygen pressure. Diphenyl sulfide was selectively oxidized to sulfoxide and sulfone in an iron and oxygen system. Approximately 15% conversion to sulfone occurred per hour under these conditions. Some of the di-n-butyl sulfide was cracked to 1-butene and 1-butanethiol under similar conditions. Zinc chloride and ferric iron were used at 200/sup 0/C in an attempt to desulfonate dibenzothiophene sulfone, diphenyl sulfone, and di-n-butyl sulfone. Di-n-butyl sulfone was completely desulfurized on one hour and fragmented to oxidized parafins, while dibenzothiophene sulfone and diphenyl sulfone were unaffected. These results suggest that an iron-acid leach process could only selectively oxidize aryl sulfides under mild conditions, representing only 20% of the organic sulfur in coal (8% of the total sulfur). Removal through desulfonation once selective sulfur oxidation had occurred was only demonstrated for alkyl sulfones, with severe oxidation of the fragmented paraffins also occurring in one hour.

  20. Theoretical Electron Density Distributions for Fe- and Cu-Sulfide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Density Distributions for Fe- and Cu-Sulfide Earth Materials: A Connection between Bond Length, Bond Theoretical Electron Density Distributions for Fe- and Cu-Sulfide...

  1. Hydrogen Sulfide in Drinking Water: Causes and Treatment Alternatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, Mark L.; Provin, Tony

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    If drinking water has a nuisance "rotten egg odor, it contains hydrogen sulfide. This leaflet discusses how hydrogen sulfide is formed and how the problem can be corrected....

  2. Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V. (Morgantown, WV)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are prepared in durable form usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.

  3. Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siriwardane, R.V.

    1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are prepared in durable form usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.

  4. Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siriwardane, R.V.

    1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are prepared in durable form, usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.

  5. Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide coal gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V. (Morgantown, WV)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are prepared in durable form, usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.

  6. Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, Gabriel (Chihuahua, MX); Chianelli, Russell R. (El Paso, TX); Fuentes, Sergio (Ensenada, MX); Torres, Brenda (El Paso, TX)

    2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

  7. Improved zinc electrode and rechargeable zinc-air battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ross, P.N. Jr.

    1988-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention comprises an improved rechargeable zinc-air cell/battery having recirculating alkaline electrolyte and a zinc electrode comprising a porous foam support material which carries the active zinc electrode material. 5 figs.

  8. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

  9. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, T.

    1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

  10. Characterization of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Semiconductors....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Semiconductors. Characterization of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Semiconductors. Abstract: Amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO) was investigated to determine the...

  11. Zinc electrode and rechargeable zinc-air battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ross, Jr., Philip N. (Kensington, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved zinc electrode is disclosed for a rechargeable zinc-air battery comprising an outer frame and a porous foam electrode support within the frame which is treated prior to the deposition of zinc thereon to inhibit the formation of zinc dendrites on the external surface thereof. The outer frame is provided with passageways for circulating an alkaline electrolyte through the treated zinc-coated porous foam. A novel rechargeable zinc-air battery system is also disclosed which utilizes the improved zinc electrode and further includes an alkaline electrolyte within said battery circulating through the passageways in the zinc electrode and an external electrolyte circulation means which has an electrolyte reservoir external to the battery case including filter means to filter solids out of the electrolyte as it circulates to the external reservoir and pump means for recirculating electrolyte from the external reservoir to the zinc electrode.

  12. Process for producing cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levi, Dean H. (Lakewood, CO); Nelson, Art J. (Longmont, CO); Ahrenkiel, Richard K. (Lakewood, CO)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing a layer of cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface to be employed in a photovoltaic device. The process comprises providing a cadmium telluride surface which is exposed to a hydrogen sulfide plasma at an exposure flow rate, an exposure time and an exposure temperature sufficient to permit reaction between the hydrogen sulfide and cadmium telluride to thereby form a cadmium sulfide layer on the cadmium telluride surface and accomplish passivation. In addition to passivation, a heterojunction at the interface of the cadmium sulfide and the cadmium telluride can be formed when the layer of cadmium sulfide formed on the cadmium telluride is of sufficient thickness.

  13. Membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Pradeep K.

    2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide is provided. The membrane comprises a substrate, a hydrogen permeable first membrane layer deposited on the substrate, and a second membrane layer deposited on the first layer. The second layer contains sulfides of transition metals and positioned on the on a feed side of the hydrogen sulfide stream. The present invention also includes a method for the direct decomposition of hydrogen sulfide to hydrogen and sulfur.

  14. Imaging mobile zinc in biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomat, Elisa

    Trafficking and regulation of mobile zinc pools influence cellular functions and pathological conditions in multiple organs, including brain, pancreas, and prostate. The quest for a dynamic description of zinc distribution ...

  15. PORTAL Aggregation Analysis and Documentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    PORTAL Aggregation Analysis and Documentation Kristin A. Tufte Portland State University Introduction This document describes the aggregation procedures for PORTAL . Analysis of different aggregation system. Details on the status values and their descriptions can be found in the SWARM documentation

  16. Photovoltaic cells employing zinc phosphide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnett, Allen M. (Newark, DE); Catalano, Anthony W. (Wilmington, DE); Dalal, Vikram L. (Newark, DE); Masi, James V. (Wilbraham, MA); Meakin, John D. (Newark, DE); Hall, Robert B. (Newark, DE)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic cell having a zinc phosphide absorber. The zinc phosphide can be a single or multiple crystal slice or a thin polycrystalline film. The cell can be a Schottky barrier, heterojunction or homojunction device. Methods for synthesizing and crystallizing zinc phosphide are disclosed as well as a method for forming thin films.

  17. Process for producing hydrogen and carbonyl sulfide from hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide using a heteropolyanionic metal complex catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuch, Ph. L.

    1984-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen and carbonyl sulfide are produced by a process comprising contracting gaseous hydrogen sulfide with gaseous carbon monoxide in the presence of a heteropolymolybdate or tungstate complex. Use of these catalysts reduce the amount of by-product carbon dioxide and methane formation and thus enhance the make of hydrogen and carbonyl sulfide.

  18. Zinc titanate sorbents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.; Jain, S.C.

    1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a zinc titanate sorbent material useful in desulfurization applications. The zinc titanate material is in the form of generally spherical particles of substantially uniform chemical distribution. The sorbent material is capable of absorbing sulfur compounds from a gaseous feed in an amount of at least about 15 weight percent based on the weight of the sorbent. The sorbent material is prepared by a process including: (a) forming a zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, (b) preparing a substantially uniform aqueous slurry comprising the zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, organic binder, and at least about 1 weight percent inorganic binder based on the solids weight of the slurry, (c) spray drying the slurry to produce substantially spherical particles, and (d) calcining the particles at a temperature of between about 750 to about 950 C. The dry blend is formed by mixing between about 0.5 to about 2 parts zinc oxide having a median particle size of less than about 0.5 microns, and about 1 part titanium dioxide having a median particle size of less than about 1 micron. The slurry contains substantially no free silica and may be prepared by the process including (1) preparing an aqueous solution of organic binder, (2) adding the dry blend to the aqueous solution of organic binder, and (3) adding the inorganic binder to the solution of organic binder, and blend. Additional reagents, such as a surfactant, may also be incorporated into the sorbent material. The present invention also provides a process for desulfurizing a gaseous stream. The process includes passing a gaseous stream through a reactor containing an attrition resistant zinc titanate sorbent material of the present invention.

  19. Formation of selenide, sulfide or mixed selenide-sulfide films on metal or metal coated substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eser, Erten; Fields, Shannon

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and composition for preventing cracking in composite structures comprising a metal coated substrate and a selenide, sulfide or mixed selenide sulfide film. Specifically, cracking is prevented in the coating of molybdenum coated substrates upon which a copper, indium-gallium diselenide (CIGS) film is deposited. Cracking is inhibited by adding a Se passivating amount of oxygen to the Mo and limiting the amount of Se deposited on the Mo coating.

  20. HYDROGEN SULFIDE -HIGH TEMPERATURE DRILLING CONTINGENCY PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYDROGEN SULFIDE - HIGH TEMPERATURE DRILLING CONTINGENCY PLAN OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Technical Note 16 Steven P. Howard Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, TX 77845-9547 Daniel H. Reudelhuber Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University

  1. Method of washing hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas by the ammonium sulfide method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritter, H.

    1985-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved coke oven gas washing process for removing hydrogen sulfide is proposed wherein the coke oven gas is treated in a hydrogen sulfide scrubber by counterflow with an aqueous ammonia wash water. A stream of aqueous weak ammonia liquor is cooled and sprayed through nozzles in the mid-region of the hydrogen sulfide scrubber. A quantity of aqueous ammonia liquor, corresponding to the quantity which is sprayed through the said nozzles, is withdrawn from the hydrogen sulfide scrubber at a level below the nozzles and is introduced into the top of the said hydrogen sulfide scrubber. Ammonia vapor released at the nozzles has a higher partial pressure than the ammonia partial pressure of the coke oven gas in the region of the nozzle. The aqueous ammonia liquor from the deacidifier is the source of the cooled aqueous ammonia liquor which is introduced through the nozzles. A portion of the aqueous ammonia liquor from the deacidifier is introduced directly into the top of the hydrogen sulfide scrubber as a portion of the required aqueous ammonia wash water.

  2. Doped zinc oxide microspheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Bond, W.D.; Lauf, R.J.

    1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A new composition and method of making same for a doped zinc oxide microsphere and articles made therefrom for use in an electrical surge arrestor which has increased solid content, uniform grain size and is in the form of a gel. 4 figures.

  3. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  4. Single-layer transition metal sulfide catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thoma, Steven G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition Metal Sulfides (TMS), such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2), are the petroleum industry's "workhorse" catalysts for upgrading heavy petroleum feedstocks and removing sulfur, nitrogen and other pollutants from fuels. We have developed an improved synthesis technique to produce SLTMS catalysts, such as molybdenum disulfide, with potentially greater activity and specificity than those currently available. Applications for this technology include heavy feed upgrading, in-situ catalysis, bio-fuel conversion and coal liquefaction.

  5. Subsurface heaters with low sulfidation rates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    John, Randy Carl; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for heating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a heater having an elongated ferromagnetic metal heater section. The heater is located in an opening in a formation. The heater section is configured to heat the hydrocarbon containing formation. The exposed ferromagnetic metal has a sulfidation rate that goes down with increasing temperature of the heater, when the heater is in a selected temperature range.

  6. Process for producing cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levi, D.H.; Nelson, A.J.; Ahrenkiel, R.K.

    1996-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for producing a layer of cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface to be employed in a photovoltaic device. The process comprises providing a cadmium telluride surface which is exposed to a hydrogen sulfide plasma at an exposure flow rate, an exposure time and an exposure temperature sufficient to permit reaction between the hydrogen sulfide and cadmium telluride to thereby form a cadmium sulfide layer on the cadmium telluride surface and accomplish passivation. In addition to passivation, a heterojunction at the interface of the cadmium sulfide and the cadmium telluride can be formed when the layer of cadmium sulfide formed on the cadmium telluride is of sufficient thickness. 12 figs.

  7. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.

    1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing gas. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream. 1 fig.

  8. Sulfide scaling in low enthalpy geothermal environments; A survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Criaud, A.; Fouillac, C. (Bureau de Recherches Geologiques et Minieres (BRGM), 45 - Orleans (France))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the sulfide scaling phenomena in low-temperature environments is presented. While high-temperature fluids tend to deposit metal sulfides because of their high concentrations of dissolved metals and variations of temperature, pressure and fluid chemistry, low temperature media are characterized by very low metal content but much higher dissolved sulfide. In the case of the goethermal wells of the Paris Basin, detailed studies demonstrate that the relatively large concentrations of chloride and dissolved sulfide are responsible for corrosion and consequent formation of iron sulfide scale composed of mackinawite, pyrite and pyrrhotite. The effects of the exploitation schemes are far less important than the corrosion of the casings. The low-enthalpy fluids that do not originate from sedimentary aquifers (such as in Iceland and Bulgaria), have a limited corrosion potential, and the thin sulfide film that appears may prevent the progress of corrosion.

  9. Vaporization of zinc from scrap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozturk, B.; Fruehan, R.J. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of zinc vaporization from galvanized scrap was measured using a thermogravimetric apparatus along with chemical analysis. It is found that the rate of zinc vaporization is very fast in nitrogen and carbon monoxide atmospheres at temperatures higher than 950 C. At lower temperature rate decreases with decreasing temperature and is controlled by the gas phase mass transport. The simultaneous oxidation and vaporization of zinc occurs when the samples were heated in carbon dioxide and air. The current experimental results indicate that almost all of the zinc from scrap vaporizes during the heating process in a very short period of time after the temperature reaches above 850 C.

  10. Ocean color and atmospheric dimethyl sulfide: On their mesoscale variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrai, Patricia A; Balch, William M; Cooper, David J; Saltzman, Eric S

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    periods of' time, covering mesoscale Campbell, J. W. and W.Dimethyl Sulfide' On Their Mesoscale Variability PATRICIA A.Miami, Miami, Florida The mesoscale variability of dimethyl

  11. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF THE LITHIUM-ALUMINUM, IRON SULFIDE BATTERY. I. GALVONOSTATIC DISCHARGE BEHAVIOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollard, Richard

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    composition profiles in lithium/sulfur battery analogues hasTHE LITHIUM-ALUMINUM, IRON SULFIDE BATTERY. I. GALVONOSTATICthe Lithium-Aluminum, Iron Sulfide Battery I. Galvanostatic

  12. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Pure r-Phase Manganese(II) Sulfide without the Use of Organic Reagents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, F.M.; Schoonen, M.A.A.; Zhang, X.V.; Martin, S.T.; Parise, J.B. (SBU); (Harvard)

    2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies exploring the role of metal sulfides as (photo)catalysts in prebiotic synthesis reactions provide the impetus for finding carbon-free synthesis methods for metal sulfides. The decomposition of organosulfur and organometallic precursor compounds is often the protocol for synthesizing bulk metal chalcogenides, such as manganese sulfide (MnS). Here we report a hydrothermal synthesis method for the formation of MnS in which a MnCl{sub 2} solution is injected into a preheated sulfide solution. By varying the temperature of injection and subsequent aging time, we can control the specific crystal phase of the product. Three MnS polymorphs are known, and two of these, {alpha}-MnS and {gamma}-MnS, form as pure phases in aqueous systems. The initial precipitate formed upon mixing of aqueous solutions of Mn{sup 2+} and S{sup 2-} at ambient temperature is nanocrystalline and is composed of a mixture of {gamma}-MnS (wurtzite structure) and {beta}-MnS (zinc blende structure). {beta}-MnS has not previously been identified as forming under aqueous conditions. The initial binary-phase precipitate can be transformed to pure, highly crystalline {gamma}-MnS by aging at temperatures as low as 150 C within 3 days. Aging to yield pure {alpha}-MnS requires temperatures in excess of 200 C for 3 days. Characterization of the products was performed using powder X-ray diffraction, total scattering and pair distribution function analysis, dynamic light scattering, and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Chemical analyses were performed using colorimetric techniques.

  13. Process for the production of hydrogen and carbonyl sulfide from hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide using a multi-metal oxide/sulfide catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jevnikar, M. G.; Kuch, Ph. L.

    1985-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen and carbonyl sulfide are produced by a process comprising contacting gaseous hydrogen sulfide with gaseous carbon monoxide in the presence of a catalytic composition containing an oxide and/or sulfide of at least one of molybdenum, tungsten, iron, chromium and vanadium in combination with at least one promoter metal, e.g. a catalyst of the formula Cs Cu /SUB 0.2/ Zn /SUB 0.5/ Mn /SUB 0.5/ Sn /SUB 2.4/ Mo O /SUB x/ S /SUB y/ .

  14. High-Quality Manganese-Doped Zinc Sulfide Quantum Rods with Tunable

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet WhenHiggsmiddlewareHigh-Pressure

  15. Preventing oxidation of iron sulfide minerals by polyethylene polyamines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belzile, Nelson

    processes of sulfide minerals still remains an important issue for both mineral extraction and environmentalPreventing oxidation of iron sulfide minerals by polyethylene polyamines Yu-Wei Chen a,*, Yuerong on the passivation of pyrite and pyrrhotite minerals. Polyethylene polyamines, such as triethylenetetramine (TETA

  16. MICROSTRUCTURE-PROPERTY RELATIONSHIPS OF A ZINC OXIDE VARISTOR MATERIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williama, Pamela Louise

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RELATIONSHIPS OF A ZINC OXIDE VARISTOR MATERIAL Pamelaresistors, and zinc oxide varistors are semiconductorRELATIONSHIPS OF A ZINC OXIDE VARISTOR MATERIAL CONTENTS

  17. Use of sulfide-containing liquors for removing mercury from flue gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nolan, Paul S. (North Canton, OH); Downs, William (Alliance, OH); Bailey, Ralph T. (Uniontown, OH); Vecci, Stanley J. (Alliance, OH)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for reducing and removing mercury in industrial gases, such as a flue gas, produced by the combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal, adds sulfide ions to the flue gas as it passes through a scrubber. Ideally, the source of these sulfide ions may include at least one of: sulfidic waste water, kraft caustic liquor, kraft carbonate liquor, potassium sulfide, sodium sulfide, and thioacetamide. The sulfide ion source is introduced into the scrubbing liquor as an aqueous sulfide species. The scrubber may be either a wet or dry scrubber for flue gas desulfurization systems.

  18. Use of sulfide-containing liquors for removing mercury from flue gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nolan, Paul S.; Downs, William; Bailey, Ralph T.; Vecci, Stanley J.

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for reducing and removing mercury in industrial gases, such as a flue gas, produced by the combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal, adds sulfide ions to the flue gas as it passes through a scrubber. Ideally, the source of these sulfide ions may include at least one of: sulfidic waste water, kraft caustic liquor, kraft carbonate liquor, potassium sulfide, sodium sulfide, and thioacetamide. The sulfide ion source is introduced into the scrubbing liquor as an aqueous sulfide species. The scrubber may be either a wet or dry scrubber for flue gas desulfurization systems.

  19. Hydrogen and sulfur recovery from hydrogen sulfide wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harkness, John B. L. (Naperville, IL); Gorski, Anthony J. (Woodridge, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for generating hydrogen and elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide waste in which the hydrogen sulfide is associated under plasma conditions and a portion of the hydrogen output is used in a catalytic reduction unit to convert sulfur-containing impurities to hydrogen sulfide for recycle, the process also including the addition of an ionizing gas such as argon to initiate the plasma reaction at lower energy, a preheater for the input to the reactor and an internal adjustable choke in the reactor for enhanced coupling with the microwave energy input.

  20. Hydrogen and sulfur recovery from hydrogen sulfide wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harkness, J.B.L.; Gorski, A.J.; Daniels, E.J.

    1993-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for generating hydrogen and elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide waste in which the hydrogen sulfide is [dis]associated under plasma conditions and a portion of the hydrogen output is used in a catalytic reduction unit to convert sulfur-containing impurities to hydrogen sulfide for recycle, the process also including the addition of an ionizing gas such as argon to initiate the plasma reaction at lower energy, a preheater for the input to the reactor and an internal adjustable choke in the reactor for enhanced coupling with the microwave energy input.

  1. Micro-PIXE Analysis of Trace Elements in Sulfides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickmott, D.D.; Wetteland, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Stimac, J. [Philippine Geothermal, Makati City, (Philippines); Larocque, A.C.L. [Dept. of Geol. Sci., Univ. Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Brearley, A. [Dept. Earth and Planet. Sci., Univ. New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Micro-scale Proton-induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) of trace elements (TE) in sulfides provides insights into geologic processes including magmatic system evolution, ore forming events, and fluid-flow processes. The Los Alamos nuclear microprobe was used to determine TE concentrations and ratios in sulfides from diverse geologic environments including hydrothermal ore deposits, coal seams, and metamorphic rocks. Pyrrhotite (Po) from silicic volcanics contains high Cu and Ni; Po from the Clear Lake volcanic field has higher Mo than does Po from other volcanic fields. Coal pyrites contain high Cu, As, Se, Mo and Pb, and show high As/Se and Mo/Se in marine influenced sulfides from the Lower Kittanning coal, but not in other marine-influenced coals. Sulfides are amenable to micro-PIXE studies because of the difficulties in obtaining the homogeneous standards required for many other TE microanalytical techniques.

  2. Hydrogen and Sulfur Production from Hydrogen Sulfide Wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harkness, J.; Doctor, R. D.

    A new hydrogen sulfide waste-treatment process that uses microwave plasma-chemical technology is currently under development in the Soviet Union and in the United States. Whereas the present waste treatment process only recovers sulfur at best...

  3. Design and fabrication of a tin-sulfide annealing furnace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Raymond (Raymond A.)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A furnace was designed and its heat transfer properties were analyzed for use in annealing thin-film tins-ulfide solar cells. Tin sulfide has been explored as an earth abundant solar cell material, and the furnace was ...

  4. Partition coefficients of chalcophile elements between sulfide and silicate melts and the early crystallization history of sulfide liquid: LA-ICP-MS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the crystallization history of the sulfide liquid is ignored in most studies. Here we present laser ablation

  5. Chromium(VI) Reduction by Hydrogen Sulfide in Aqueous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Baolin

    experiments with excess [Cr(VI)] over [H2S]T indicated that the molar amount of sulfide required for the reduction of 1 M Cr(VI) was 1.5, suggesting the following stoichi- ometry: 2CrO4 2- + 3H2S + 4H+ f 2Cr(OH)3 of fully protonated sulfide (H2S) in the pH range of 6.5-10. The nature of buffers did not influence

  6. Process for thin film deposition of cadmium sulfide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muruska, H. Paul (East Windsor, NJ); Sansregret, Joseph L. (Scotch Plains, NJ); Young, Archie R. (Montclair, NJ)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention teaches a process for depositing layers of cadmium sulfide. The process includes depositing a layer of cadmium oxide by spray pyrolysis of a cadmium salt in an aqueous or organic solvent. The oxide film is then converted into cadmium sulfide by thermal ion exchange of the O.sup.-2 for S.sup.-2 by annealing the oxide layer in gaseous sulfur at elevated temperatures.

  7. Quantitative evaluation of hydrogen sulfide at 0.3 M and 1.0 M-hydrogen-ion concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Albert R.

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentration................. 14 1. Precipitation of Arsenic (III) sulfide....................... 15 2. Precipitation of Nickel (II) sulfide....................... 16 3* Precipitation of Manganese (II) sulfide....................... 17 4. Arsenic... (III) - Manganese (II) Separation................... 18 5- Arsenic (III) - Nickel (II) Separation................... 19 6. Precipitation of Bismuth. (Ill) sulfide....................... 20 7. Precipitation of Cobalt (II) sulfide...

  8. Characterisation of endogenous KRAB zinc finger proteins 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Catherine

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) zinc finger protein (ZFP) genes comprise one of the largest gene families in the mammalian genome, encoding transcription factors with an N-terminal KRAB domain and C-terminal zinc ...

  9. Zinc oxide varistors and/or resistors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jr., Wesley D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bond, Walter D. (Knoxville, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Varistors and/or resistors that includes doped zinc oxide gel microspheres. The doped zinc oxide gel microspheres preferably have from about 60 to about 95% by weight zinc oxide and from about 5 to about 40% by weight dopants based on the weight of the zinc oxide. The dopants are a plurality of dopants selected from silver salts, boron oxide, silicon oxide and hydrons oxides of aluminum, bismuth, cobalt, chromium, manganese, nickel, and antimony.

  10. Zinc oxide varistors and/or resistors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Bond, W.D.; Lauf, R.J.

    1993-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Varistors and/or resistors are described that include doped zinc oxide gel microspheres. The doped zinc oxide gel microspheres preferably have from about 60 to about 95% by weight zinc oxide and from about 5 to about 40% by weight dopants based on the weight of the zinc oxide. The dopants are a plurality of dopants selected from silver salts, boron oxide, silicon oxide and hydrons oxides of aluminum, bismuth, cobalt, chromium, manganese, nickel, and antimony.

  11. Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size Distribution and Growth Rate. Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size...

  12. aggregation aggregate strength: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of these quantum diffusion-limited aggregates vary between 1.43 and 2, depending on the size of the initial wave packet. David B. Johnson; Gonzalo Ordez 2011-11-02 60...

  13. Dimethyl sulfide in the Amazon rain forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jardine, Kolby; Yanez-Serrano, A. M.; Williams, J.; Kunert, N.; Jardine, A.; Taylor, T.; Abrell, L.; Artaxo, Paulo; Guenther, Alex B.; Hewitt, C. N.; House, E.; Florentino, A. P.; Manzi, A.; Higuchi, N.; Kesselmeier, J.; Behrendt, T.; Veres, P. R.; Derstroff, B.; Fuentes, J.; Martin, Scot T.; Andreae, M. O.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface-to-atmosphere emissions of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) may impact global climate 44 through the formation of gaseous sulfuric acid, which can yield secondary sulfate 45 aerosols and contribute to new particle formation. While oceans are generally 46 considered the dominant source of DMS, a shortage of ecosystem observations prevents 47 an accurate analysis of terrestrial DMS sources. Using mass spectrometry, we quantified 48 ambient DMS mixing ratios within and above a primary rainforest ecosystem in the 49 central Amazon Basin in real-time (2010-2011) and at high vertical resolution (2013-50 2014). Elevated but highly variable DMS mixing ratios were observed within the 51 canopy, showing clear evidence of a net ecosystem source to the atmosphere during 52 both day and night in both the dry and wet seasons. Periods of high DMS mixing ratios 53 lasting up to 8 hours (up to 160 ppt) often occurred within the canopy and near the 54 surface during many evenings and nights. Daytime gradients showed mixing ratios (up 55 to 80 ppt) peaking near the top of the canopy as well as near the ground following a rain 56 event. The spatial and temporal distribution of DMS suggests that ambient levels and 57 their potential climatic impacts are dominated by local soil and plant emissions. A soil 58 source was confirmed by measurements of DMS emission fluxes from Amazon soils as 59 a function of temperature and soil moisture. Furthermore, light and temperature 60 dependent DMS emissions were measured from seven tropical tree species. Our study 61 has important implications for understanding terrestrial DMS sources and their role in 62 coupled land-atmosphere climate feedbacks. 63

  14. Method for removing hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritter, H.

    1982-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved sulfur-ammonia process is disclosed for removing hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gases. In the improved process, a concentrator formerly used for standby operation is used at all normal times as an ammonia scrubber to improve the efficiency of gas separation during normal operation and is used as a concentrator for its intended standby functions during the alternative operations. In its normal function, the concentrator/scrubber functions as a scrubber to strip ammonia gas from recirculating liquid streams and to permit introduction of an ammonia-rich gas into a hydrogen sulfide scrubber to increase the separation efficiency of that unit. In the standby operation, the same concentrator/scrubber serves as a concentrator to concentrate hydrogen sulfide in a ''strong liquor'' stream for separate recovery as a strong liquor.

  15. Method for the regeneration of spent molten zinc chloride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zielke, Clyde W. (McMurray, PA); Rosenhoover, William A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a process for regenerating spent molten zinc chloride which has been used in the hydrocracking of coal or ash-containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbonaceous materials derived therefrom and which contains zinc chloride, zinc oxide, zinc oxide complexes and ash-containing carbonaceous residue, by incinerating the spent molten zinc chloride to vaporize the zinc chloride for subsequent condensation to produce a purified molten zinc chloride: an improvement comprising the use of clay in the incineration zone to suppress the vaporization of metals other than zinc. Optionally water is used in conjunction with the clay to further suppress the vaporization of metals other than zinc.

  16. Zinc-catalyzed copolymerization of carbon dioxide and propylene oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsurao, Takumi

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    insolubility, some other zinc compounds were studied. A homogeneous catalyst, bis(ethyl fumarato)zinc, showed similar polycarbonate yield to zinc glutarate, and the method of the catalyst preparation affected its catalytic activity. Only a small amount...

  17. Turbulent breakage of ductile aggregates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchioli, Cristian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study breakage rate statistics of small colloidal aggregates in non-homogeneous anisotropic turbulence. We use pseudo-spectral direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow and Lagrangian tracking to follow the motion of the aggregates, modelled as sub-Kolmogorov massless particles. We focus specifically on the effects produced by ductile rupture: This rupture is initially activated when fluctuating hydrodynamic stresses exceed a critical value, $\\sigma>\\sigma_{cr}$, and is brought to completion when the energy absorbed by the aggregate meets the critical breakage value. We show that ductile rupture breakage rates are significantly reduced with respect to the case of instantaneous brittle rupture (i.e. breakage occurs as soon as $\\sigma>\\sigma_{cr}$). These discrepancies are due to the different energy values at play as well as to the statistical features of energy distribution in the anisotropic turbulence case examined.

  18. INTRODUCTION The massive sulfide deposits of southern Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Geen, Alexander

    INTRODUCTION The massive sulfide deposits of southern Spain and Portugal were formed about 300 Ma). Spain became a Roman province, and mining of the rich deposits of the Iberian pyrite belt for copper, California 94025 A. Palanques Instituto de Ciencias del Mar, 08039 Barcelona, Spain ABSTRACT A metal

  19. Adsorption of carbonyl sulfide on nickel and tungsten films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saleh, J.M.; Nasser, F.A.K.

    1985-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of carbonyl sulfide with evaporated nickel and tungsten films has been investigated in the temperature range 195-450 K using gas pressures ranging from 1 to 13 N m/sup -2/. Rapid but mainly associative chemisorption of COS occurred on both metals at 195 K. Further adsorption of COS on W at temperatures 293-450 K was extremely slow and accompanied by more CO desorption than COS adsorbed. Sulfidation of Ni film by COS occurred at temperatures greater than or equal to 293 K with the liberation of carbon monoxide. The rate of adsorption increased with temperature but was independent of COS pressure. The activation energy (E/sub x/) increased with extent (X) of sulfidation to a limiting value of 97 kJ mol/sup -1/. A linear relationship was obtained from the plot of E/sub x/ against 1/X, suggesting the applicability of Cabrera-Mott theory to the sulfidation of Ni film by COS. 20 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  20. Kinetic study of hydrogen sulfide absorption in aqueous chlorine solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    rate. To design, optimize and scale-up scrubbers, knowledge of the reaction kinetics and mechanism-1 s-1 ). Keywords Hydrogen sulfide, chlorine, kinetics, mass transfer, absorption, scrubber located at the bottom of the scrubber and is recirculated. pH and chlorine concentration are regulated

  1. L-Cysteine, Hydrogen Sulfide, and Insulin Signaling in Diabetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    L-Cysteine, Hydrogen Sulfide, and Insulin Signaling in Diabetes Prasenjit Manna LSU Health Sciences Center Diabetes has become an epidemic and remains a major public health issue worldwide. of L in diabetic animal studies. However, the molecular mechanism by which LC increases glucose utilization

  2. The marine biogeochemistry of zinc isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Seth G

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zinc (Zn) stable isotopes can record information about important oceanographic processes. This thesis presents data on Zn isotopes in anthropogenic materials, hydrothermal fluids and minerals, cultured marine phytoplankton, ...

  3. Methods for producing hydrogen (BI) sulfide and/or removing metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Truex, Michael J [Richland, WA; Peyton, Brent M [Pullman, WA; Toth, James J [Kennewick, WA

    2002-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a process wherein sulfide production by bacteria is efficiently turned on and off, using pH adjustment. The adjustment of pH impacts sulfide production by bacteria by altering the relative amounts of H.sub.2 S and HS-- in solution and thereby control the inhibition of the bacterial metabolism that produces sulfide. This process can be used to make a bioreactor produce sulfide "on-demand" so that the production of sulfide can be matched to its use as a metal precipitation reagent. The present invention is of significance because it enables the use of a biological reactor, a cost effective sulfide production system, by making the biological reactor produce hydrogen sulfide "on demand", and therefore responsive to production schedules, waste stream generation rate, and health and safety requirements/goals.

  4. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2002, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production% of production. Two primary and 13 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal of commercial principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining

  5. arabidopsis tandem zinc: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1999, based on contained zinc recoverable from Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

  6. Improved Stability Of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Thin Film Transistors...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stability Of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Thin Film Transistors Using Molecular Passivation. Improved Stability Of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Thin Film Transistors Using Molecular...

  7. anaerobic aggregates determined: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    forest road aggregate 8 Determination of branch fraction and minimum dimension of mass-fractal aggregates G. Beaucage* Materials Science Websites Summary: . Branched aggregates...

  8. Data aggregation for capacity management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yong Woo

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a methodology for data aggregation for capacity management. It is assumed that there are a very large number of products manufactured in a company and that every product is stored in the database with its standard unit per hour...

  9. Mapping of two-photon luminescence amplification in zinc-oxide microstructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Semin, S. V., E-mail: sv_semin@mail.ru; Sherstyuk, N. E.; Mishina, E. D. [Moscow State Technical University of Radio Engineering, Electronics and Automation (Russian Federation); Gherman, C.; Kulyuk, L. [Academy of Sciences of Moldova, Institute of Applied Physics (Moldova, Republic of); Rasing, Th. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Institute for Molecules and Materials (Netherlands); Peng, L.-H. [National Taiwan University, Department of Electrical Engineering and Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics (China)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The mapping of two-photon excited luminescence in aggregations of free-standing zinc oxide microrods has been carried out at room temperature. Two-photon luminescence spectra in the excitonic region for individual microrods have been recorded. The luminescence intensity exhibits a power-law dependence on the optical pump power with the exponent n > 2. This fact, along with the existence of a threshold power above which the dependence in the exciton region deviates from a quadratic one, indicates the onset of light amplification in individual ZnO microrods and the conditions preceding laser oscillation.

  10. Evaluation of superpave fine aggregate specification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chowdhury, Md. Tahjib-Ul-Arif

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aggregate resistance (CAR) test, image analysis Hough transform, and visual inspection. The results from those tests were compared with the available performance history. The FAA test method does not consistently identify angular, cubical aggregates as high...

  11. Essays on aggregate and individual consumption fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Youngjin

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis consists of three essays on aggregate and individual consumption fluctuations. Chapter 1 develops a quantitative model to explore aggregate and individual consumption dynamics when the income process exhibits ...

  12. Rational Design of Zinc Phosphide Heterojunction Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    Rational Design of Zinc Phosphide Heterojunction Photovoltaics Thesis by Jeffrey Paul Bosco would meet me with the same energy and enthusiasm regarding the topic of zinc phosphide photovoltaics to the field of earth-abundant photovoltaics has been indispensable to my work. Greg also made a great mentor

  13. ALTERNATE ACCEPTANCE OF WULFENSTEIN PIT AGGREGATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. W. Keifer

    1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this calculation is to evaluate Wulfenstein fine aggregate for acceptability under ASTM C 33 standard specification.

  14. Interpreting the Aggregation Kinetics of Amyloid Peptides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caflisch, Amedeo

    Amyloid fibrils are insoluble mainly -sheet aggregates of proteins or peptides. The multi-step process) and amyloid-protected states, is used to investigate the kinetics of aggregation and the pathways of fibril state. The minimal-size aggregate able to form a fibril is generated by collisions of oligomers

  15. Secure and Energy-Efficient Data Aggregation with Malicious Aggregator Identification in Wireless Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stojmenovic, Ivan

    Secure and Energy-Efficient Data Aggregation with Malicious Aggregator Identification in Wireless. In this paper, we propose a secure and energy-efficient data aggregation scheme that can detect the malicious­13, 2011. c Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011 #12;Secure and Energy-Efficient Data Aggregation 3

  16. Wet oxidation of oil-bearing sulfide wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.L.; Hotz, N.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil-bearing metal sulfide sludges produced in treatment of an industrial wastewater, which includes plating wastes, have yielded to treatment by electrooxidation and hydrogen peroxide processes. The oxidation can be controlled to be mild enough to avoid decomposition of the organic phase while oxidizing the sulfides to sulfates. The pH is controlled to near neutral conditions where iron, aluminum and chromium(III) precipitate as hydrous oxides. Other metals, such as lead and barium, may be present as sulfate precipitates with limited solubility, while metals such as nickel and cadmium would be present as complexed ions in a sulfate solution. The oxidations were found to proceed smoothly, without vigorous reaction; heat liberation was minimal. 2 refs., 12 figs.

  17. Kinetics of the reduction of the zinc oxide in zinc ferrite with iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald, J.R.; Pickles, C.A. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric arc furnace (EAF) dust, which can be considered as a by-product of the steel recycling process, contains significant quantities of recoverable zinc and iron, as well as hazardous elements such as cadmium, lead and chromium, which can be leached by ground water. The zinc in the EAF dust is found almost entirely in the form of either zinc oxide or zinc ferrite, the latter accounting for 20 to 50 percent of the total zinc. It is important that an efficient process be developed which renders the dust inert, while reclaiming the valuable metals to off-set processing costs. During the conventional carbothermic reduction processes, iron is formed, and this iron can participate in the reduction of the zinc oxide in zinc ferrite. In the present work, the reduction of the zinc oxide in zinc ferrite by iron according to the following reaction: ZnO{sup {sm_bullet}}Fe{sub 2}O{sub (s.s.)} + 2 Fe{sub (s)} = Zn{sub (g)} + 4 FeO{sub (s)} was studied in an argon atmosphere using a thermogravimetric technique. First, a thermodynamic analysis was performed using the F*A*C*T computational system. Then, the effects of briquette aspect ratio (l/d), temperature, zinc ferrite particle size, amount of iron added, as well as additions such as lime, sodium chloride, and calcium fluoride were investigated.

  18. Zinc abundances of planetary nebulae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Christina L; Dinerstein, Harriet L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zinc is a useful surrogate element for measuring Fe/H as, unlike iron, it is not depleted in the gas phase media. Zn/H and O/Zn ratios have been derived using the [Zn IV] emission line at 3.625um for a sample of nine Galactic planetary nebulae, seven of which are based upon new observations using the VLT. Based on photoionization models, O/O++ is the most reliable ionisation correction factor for zinc that can readily be determined from optical emission lines, with an estimated accuracy of 10% or better for all targets in our sample. The majority of the sample is found to be sub-solar in [Zn/H]. [O/Zn] in half of the sample is found to be consistent with Solar within uncertainties, whereas the remaining half are enhanced in [O/Zn]. [Zn/H] and [O/Zn] as functions of Galactocentric distance have been investigated and there is little evidence to support a trend in either case.

  19. Highly Attrition Resistant Zinc Oxide-Based Sorbents for H2S Removal by Spray Drying Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryu, C.K.; Lee, J.B.; Ahn, D.H.; Kim, J.J.; Yi, C.K.

    2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Primary issues for the fluidized-bed/transport reactor process are high attrition resistant sorbent, its high sorption capacity and regenerability, durability, and cost. The overall objective of this project is the development of a superior attrition resistant zinc oxide-based sorbent for hot gas cleanup in integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC). Sorbents applicable to a fluidized-bed hot gas desulfurization process must have a high attrition resistance to withstand the fast solid circulation between a desulfurizer and a regenerator, fast kinetic reactions, and high sulfur sorption capacity. The oxidative regeneration of zinc-based sorbent usually initiated at greater than 600 C with highly exothermic nature causing deactivation of sorbent as well as complication of sulfidation process by side reaction. Focusing on solving the sorbent attrition and regenerability of zinc oxide-based sorbent, we have adapted multi-binder matrices and direct incorporation of regeneration promoter. The sorbent forming was done with a spray drying technique that is easily scalable to commercial quantity.

  20. ZINC MITIGATION INTERIM REPORT - THERMODYNAMIC STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.

    2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental program was initiated in order to develop and validate conditions that will effectively trap Zn vapors that are released during extraction. The proposed work is broken down into three tasks. The first task is to determine the effectiveness of various pore sizes of filter elements. The second task is to determine the effect of filter temperature on zinc vapor deposition. The final task is to determine whether the zinc vapors can be chemically bound. The approach for chemically binding the zinc vapors has two subtasks, the first is a review of literature and thermodynamic calculations and the second is an experimental approach using the best candidates. This report details the results of the thermodynamic calculations to determine feasibility of chemically binding the zinc vapors within the furnace module, specifically the lithium trap (1). A review of phase diagrams, literature, and thermodynamic calculations was conducted to determine if there are suitable materials to capture zinc vapor within the lithium trap of the extraction basket. While numerous elements exist that form compounds with zinc, many of these also form compounds with hydrogen or the water that is present in the TPBARs. This relatively comprehensive review of available data indicates that elemental cobalt and copper and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) may have the requisite properties to capture zinc and yet not be adversely affected by the extraction gases and should be considered for testing.

  1. EAF dust as an electrolytic zinc resource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zunkel, A.D. [A.D. Zunkel Consultants Inc., Vancouver, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Two viable options are presently available to the electrolytic zinc producer to supplement the zinc production capability significantly by using electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) or leady ZnO products derived from EAFD: Integrated processing of the materials using the Modified Zincex Process and commingling the zinc sulfate solution from that process with the neutral solution from the calcine leaching circuit; Installing a completely separate circuit for treating the material using technologies such as the Modified Zincex or Esinex Processes. EAFD and halogen-bearing EAFD derived products are a zinc resource which is virtually untapped by new or existing electrolytic zinc producers and which offers them, with the advent of new technologies able to deal with halides, the opportunity to maintain or increase their zinc production from a relatively cheap, if not ``free``, and already mined zinc source. Such an approach would also provide the EAFD producer an alternative, perhaps lower cost, outlet for their material to the currently rather closely held EAFD processing industry.

  2. Synthesis of Low-Melting Metal Oxide and Sulfide Nanowires and Nanobelts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    such as oxygen/hydrogen mixture for oxides and H2S for sulfides. In the case of b-Ga2O3 and SnO2, a change with the sulfide nanowires suggest that H2S reacts directly at the molten metal surface to form gallium sulfide to either oxygen or H2S at an elevated temperature. EXPERIMENTAL The synthesis of the nanowires

  3. New therapeutic targets in Alzheimer's disease: brain deregulation of calcium and zinc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corona, C; Pensalfini, A; Frazzini, V; Sensi, S L

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    39;s disease: brain deregulation of calcium and zinc [39;s disease: brain deregulation of calcium and zinc39;s disease: brain deregulation of calcium and zinc Gotz

  4. Spectral induced polarization and electrodic potential monitoring of microbially mediated iron sulfide transformations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan; Personna, Y.R.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L.; Yee, N.; O'Brien, M.; Hubbard, S.

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Stimulated sulfate-reduction is a bioremediation technique utilized for the sequestration of heavy metals in the subsurface.We performed laboratory column experiments to investigate the geoelectrical response of iron sulfide transformations by Desulfo vibriovulgaris. Two geoelectrical methods, (1) spectral induced polarization (SIP), and (2) electrodic potential measurements, were investigated. Aqueous geochemistry (sulfate, lactate, sulfide, and acetate), observations of precipitates (identified from electron microscopy as iron sulfide), and electrodic potentials on bisulfide ion (HS) sensitive silver-silver chloride (Ag-AgCl) electrodes (630 mV) were diagnostic of induced transitions between an aerobic iron sulfide forming conditions and aerobic conditions promoting iron sulfide dissolution. The SIP data showed 10m rad anomalies during iron sulfide mineralization accompanying microbial activity under an anaerobic transition. These anomalies disappeared during iron sulfide dissolution under the subsequent aerobic transition. SIP model parameters based on a Cole-Cole relaxation model of the polarization at the mineral-fluid interface were converted to (1) estimated biomineral surface area to pore volume (Sp), and (2) an equivalent polarizable sphere diameter (d) controlling the relaxation time. The temporal variation in these model parameters is consistent with filling and emptying of pores by iron sulfide biofilms, as the system transitions between anaerobic (pore filling) and aerobic (pore emptying) conditions. The results suggest that combined SIP and electrodic potential measurements might be used to monitor spatiotemporal variability in microbial iron sulfide transformations in the field.

  5. Malarial Parasites Accumulate Labile Zinc Pools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niles, Jacquin

    The malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, is an intracellular pathogen and partially dependent on nutrient uptake for survival. In this issue of Chemistry & Biology, Marvin et al. demonstrate that zinc is essential for ...

  6. Flow Partitioning in Fully Saturated Soil Aggregates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Richmond, Marshall C.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Perkins, William A.; Resat, Haluk

    2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbes play an important role in facilitating organic matter decomposition in soils, which is a major component of the global carbon cycle. Microbial dynamics are intimately coupled to environmental transport processes, which control access to labile organic matter and other nutrients that are needed for the growth and maintenance of microorganisms. Transport of soluble nutrients in the soil system is arguably most strongly impacted by preferential flow pathways in the soil. Since the physical structure of soils can be characterized as being formed from constituent micro aggregates which contain internal porosity, one pressing question is the partitioning of the flow among the “inter-aggregate” and “intra-aggregate” pores and how this may impact overall solute transport within heterogeneous soil structures. The answer to this question is particularly important in evaluating assumptions to be used in developing upscaled simulations based on highly-resolved mechanistic models. We constructed a number of diverse multi-aggregate structures with different packing ratios by stacking micro-aggregates containing internal pores and varying the size and shape of inter-aggregate pore spacing between them. We then performed pore-scale flow simulations using computational fluid dynamics methods to determine the flow patterns in these aggregate-of-aggregates structures and computed the partitioning of the flow through intra- and inter-aggregate pores as a function of the spacing between the aggregates. The results of these numerical experiments demonstrate that soluble nutrients are largely transported via flows through inter-aggregate pores. Although this result is consistent with intuition, we have also been able to quantify the relative flow capacity of the two domains under various conditions. For example, in our simulations, the flow capacity through the aggregates (intra-aggregate flow) was less than 2% of the total flow when the spacing between the aggregates was larger than 18 micron. Inter-aggregate pores continued to be the dominant flow pathways even at much smaller spacing; intra-aggregate flow was less than 10% of the total flow when the inter- and intra-aggregate pore sizes were comparable. Such studies are making it possible to identify which model upscaling assumptions are realistic and what computational methods are required for detailed numerical investigation of microbial carbon cycling dynamics in soil systems.

  7. Fracture model for cemented aggregates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zubelewicz, Aleksander; Thompson, Darla G.; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin; Ionita, Axinte; Shunk, Devin; Lewis, Matthew W.; Lawson, Joe C.; Kale, Sohan; Koric, Seid

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mechanisms-based fracture model applicable to a broad class of cemented aggregates and, among them, plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) composites, is presented. The model is calibrated for PBX 9502 using the available experimental data under uniaxial compression and tension gathered at various strain rates and temperatures. We show that the model correctly captures inelastic stress-strain responses prior to the load peak and it predicts the post-critical macro-fracture processes, which result from the growth and coalescence of micro-cracks. In our approach, the fracture zone is embedded into elastic matrix and effectively weakens the material's strength along the plane of the dominant fracture.

  8. Sulfide-Driven Arsenic Mobilization from Arsenopyrite and Black Shale Pyrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, W.; Young, L; Yee, N; Serfes, M; Rhine, E; Reinfelder, J

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examined the hypothesis that sulfide drives arsenic mobilization from pyritic black shale by a sulfide-arsenide exchange and oxidation reaction in which sulfide replaces arsenic in arsenopyrite forming pyrite, and arsenide (As-1) is concurrently oxidized to soluble arsenite (As+3). This hypothesis was tested in a series of sulfide-arsenide exchange experiments with arsenopyrite (FeAsS), homogenized black shale from the Newark Basin (Lockatong formation), and pyrite isolated from Newark Basin black shale incubated under oxic (21% O2), hypoxic (2% O2, 98% N2), and anoxic (5% H2, 95% N2) conditions. The oxidation state of arsenic in Newark Basin black shale pyrite was determined using X-ray absorption-near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES). Incubation results show that sulfide (1 mM initial concentration) increases arsenic mobilization to the dissolved phase from all three solids under oxic and hypoxic, but not anoxic conditions. Indeed under oxic and hypoxic conditions, the presence of sulfide resulted in the mobilization in 48 h of 13-16 times more arsenic from arsenopyrite and 6-11 times more arsenic from isolated black shale pyrite than in sulfide-free controls. XANES results show that arsenic in Newark Basin black shale pyrite has the same oxidation state as that in FeAsS (-1) and thus extend the sulfide-arsenide exchange mechanism of arsenic mobilization to sedimentary rock, black shale pyrite. Biologically active incubations of whole black shale and its resident microorganisms under sulfate reducing conditions resulted in sevenfold higher mobilization of soluble arsenic than sterile controls. Taken together, our results indicate that sulfide-driven arsenic mobilization would be most important under conditions of redox disequilibrium, such as when sulfate-reducing bacteria release sulfide into oxic groundwater, and that microbial sulfide production is expected to enhance arsenic mobilization in sedimentary rock aquifers with major pyrite-bearing, black shale formations.

  9. SUMMARY REPORT FOR ZINC 65 CONTAMINATION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.

    2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive zinc, {sup 65}Zn, was detected after extraction of 215 TPBARs in from TVA reactor fuel cycle 6. A team consisting of Tritium Engineering, Tritium Operations, Tritium Radiation Control, and Savannah River National Laboratory personnel evaluated the risk and response and developed short, medium and long term goals for contamination control. One of the goals was incorporated into site Performance Based Incentive CO 3.4, to optimize the filter geometry and operating conditions for the Tritium Extraction Facility. This goal included a scoping study to determine if the contamination could be contained within the high radiation environment of the furnace module as well. In order to optimize the filters studies were conducted to independently evaluate the effect of pore size on pumping efficiency and zinc trapping efficiency (1). A study was also conducted to evaluate the effect of temperature on the trapping efficiency and adhesion (2). In addition, the potential for chemically trapping zinc in the lithium trap was evaluated using a thermodynamic study (3) followed by preliminary experimental testing (4). Based on the work that was completed it is determined that a 20 {mu}m filter heated to between 120 and 200 C will act as an effective physical trap for zinc vapors. It may be possible to chemically react zinc with copper or cobalt to form zinc intermetallic compounds or alloys but additional work under more prototypic conditions are required.

  10. Hyper-dendritic nanoporous zinc foam anodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chamoun, Mylad [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hertzberg, Benjamin J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Gupta, Tanya [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Davies, Daniel [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Bhadra, Shoham [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Van Tassell, Barry. [City College of New York, NY (United States); Erdonmez, Can [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Steingart, Daniel A. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2015-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The low cost, significant reducing potential, and relative safety of the zinc electrode is a common hope for a reductant in secondary batteries, but it is limited mainly to primary implementation due to shape change. In this work we exploit such shape change for the benefit of static electrodes through the electrodeposition of hyper-dendritic nanoporous zinc foam. Electrodeposition of zinc foam resulted in nanoparticles formed on secondary dendrites in a three-dimensional network with a particle size distribution of 54.1 - 96.0 nm. The nanoporous zinc foam contributed to highly oriented crystals, high surface area and more rapid kinetics in contrast to conventional zinc in alkaline mediums. The anode material presented had a utilization of ~ 88% at full depth-of-discharge at various rates indicating a superb rate-capability. The rechargeability of Zn?/Zn˛? showed significant capacity retention over 100 cycles at a 40% depth-of-discharge to ensure that the dendritic core structure was imperforated. The dendritic architecture was densified upon charge-discharge cycling and presented superior performance compared to bulk zinc electrodes.

  11. Hyper-dendritic nanoporous zinc foam anodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chamoun, Mylad; Hertzberg, Benjamin J.; Gupta, Tanya; Davies, Daniel; Bhadra, Shoham; Van Tassell, Barry.; Erdonmez, Can; Steingart, Daniel A.

    2015-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The low cost, significant reducing potential, and relative safety of the zinc electrode is a common hope for a reductant in secondary batteries, but it is limited mainly to primary implementation due to shape change. In this work we exploit such shape change for the benefit of static electrodes through the electrodeposition of hyper-dendritic nanoporous zinc foam. Electrodeposition of zinc foam resulted in nanoparticles formed on secondary dendrites in a three-dimensional network with a particle size distribution of 54.1 - 96.0 nm. The nanoporous zinc foam contributed to highly oriented crystals, high surface area and more rapid kinetics in contrastmore »to conventional zinc in alkaline mediums. The anode material presented had a utilization of ~ 88% at full depth-of-discharge at various rates indicating a superb rate-capability. The rechargeability of Zn?/Zn˛? showed significant capacity retention over 100 cycles at a 40% depth-of-discharge to ensure that the dendritic core structure was imperforated. The dendritic architecture was densified upon charge-discharge cycling and presented superior performance compared to bulk zinc electrodes.« less

  12. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2006, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    186 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production accounted for about 80% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting, in order of decreasing tonnage, were

  13. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2003, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production three-fourths of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber

  14. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2004, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts

  15. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2005, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    accounted for 86% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters Production: Mine, zinc in ore1 842 780 768 739 760 Primary slab zinc 203 182 187 189 250 Secondary slab zinc a major price recovery that started in the third quarter of 2004 and picked up renewed momentum

  16. Public Sector Energy Efficiency Aggregation Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) administers the Illinois Energy Now programs, including the Public Sector Energy Efficiency Aggregation Program. The program will...

  17. Improved oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Natesan, K.; Baxter, D.J.

    1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1 to 8 wt % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500 to 1000/sup 0/C.

  18. Oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Natesan, Ken (Naperville, IL); Baxter, David J. (Woodridge, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1-8 wt. % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500.degree.-1000.degree. C.

  19. The selective adsorption of hydrogen sulfide from natural gas streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fails, James Clayton

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of hydrogen sulfide. However, with its larger capillaries it also adsorbs more carbon dioxide. The Molecular S1eve f15-X is a new modificat1on of the sodium-substituted alumina-silicate. It approaches a cubic crystal. Details have not been released... act. alumina) + 90oF 80 +001 0 ' 0016 Atmospheric Pressure Tests on Activated Alumina (F-1) 26 42 +013 0. 094 0@0072 0 ' 14 e0097 ~ 0090 ~ 025 . 014 ~ 033 ~ 037 ~ 011 F 011 +Silica gel type adsorbent with modified act. alumina added. (See...

  20. Effects of Hydrogen Sulfide on the Performance of a PEMFC R. Mohtadi,a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Zee, John W.

    October 7, 2003. In a ``hydrogen challenged'' economy, the fuel for proton ex- change membrane fuel cellsEffects of Hydrogen Sulfide on the Performance of a PEMFC R. Mohtadi,a, * W.-k. Lee,a, ** S. Cowan-products, such as carbon monoxide, ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide. While it is well known that H2S severely poisons Pt

  1. Synthesis of metal sulfide nanomaterials via thermal decomposition of single-source precursors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong

    generation lower-cost alternative to traditional silicon based solar cells.1 Towards this end, the formation sulfide materials. Introduction Nanocrystal based solar cells have been demonstrated as a possible next in large-scale solar cell applications.2 One such material candidate is cuprous sulfide (Cu2S), a naturally

  2. Europium and samarium doped calcium sulfide thin films grown by PLD S. Christoulakis a,c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Europium and samarium doped calcium sulfide thin films grown by PLD S. Christoulakis a,c , M Suchea Abstract Europium and samarium doped calcium sulfide thin films (CaS:Eu,Sm) with different thickness were and crystallinity. In this work we present preliminary results related to the deposition of europium and samarium

  3. Adenylate pool and radiological tracer studies of the metabolism of micro-metazoans of the sulfide system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Catherine Alice

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sulfide biome is the oxygen poor, sulfide rich ecosystem underlying the oxidized layers of most shallow water sea bottoms (Fenchel g Riedl, 1970). The organisms inhabiting this area of low redox potential are termed the "thiobios" (Boaden g Platt, 1971... habitats of the sulfide system (Fenchel g Riedl, 1970), viz. (1) the low energy surface layer? characterized by the continuous presence of oxygen and the absence of sulfide; (2) the redox potential discontinuity layer or chemocline where the upper...

  4. THE MICROSTRUCTURAL LOCATION OF THE INTERGRANULAR METAL OXIDE PHASE IN A ZINC OXIDE VARISTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, D. E

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OXIDE PHASE IN A ZINC OXIDE VARISTOR MICROSI'RUCTIJRALMETAL OXIDE PHASE IN A ZINC OXIDE VARISTOR David R. Clarke

  5. Process for removing hydrogen sulfide from gases particularly coal pyrolysis gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritter, H.; Herpers, E.T.

    1985-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen sulfide is first removed by ammoniacal liquor from coke oven gas in the bottom part of a gas scrubber. In the top part of the scrubber, two consecutively-arranged fine scrubbing stages remove hydrogen sulfide by treating the gases, in the upper stage, with a caustic soda solution or a caustic potash solution. Beneath the upper scrubbing stage is the second fine scrubbing stage fed with a subflow of an aqueous carbonate solution collecting at the outlet of the upper fine scrubbing stage and a subflow of cooled, regenerated carbonate solution discharged from the hydrogen-sulfide/hydrogen-cyanide stripper. From the hydrogen-sulfide/hydrogen-cyanide stripper, a second subflow is admixed with coal liquor for removing fixed ammonia therefrom in a separator. The separator produces water vapor with carbon dioxide vapors that are delivered to the hydrogen-sulfide/hydrogen-cyanide stripper for regenerating the aqueous carbonate washing solution.

  6. Catalysts for the selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srinivas, Girish (Thornton, CO); Bai, Chuansheng (Baton Rouge, LA)

    2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides catalysts for the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide. In particular, the invention provides catalysts for the partial oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur and water. The catalytically active component of the catalyst comprises a mixture of metal oxides containing titanium oxide and one or more metal oxides which can be selected from the group of metal oxides or mixtures of metal oxides of transition metals or lanthanide metals. Preferred metal oxides for combination with TiO.sub.2 in the catalysts of this invention include oxides of V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Hf, Ta, W, Au, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu. Catalysts which comprise a homogeneous mixture of titanium oxide and niobium (Nb) oxide are also provided. A preferred method for preparing the precursor homogenous mixture of metal hydroxides is by coprecipitation of titanium hydroxide with one or more other selected metal hydroxides. Catalysts of this invention have improved activity and/or selectivity for elemental sulfur production. Further improvements of activity and/or selectivity can be obtained by introducing relatively low amounts (up to about 5 mol %)of a promoter metal oxide (preferably of metals other than titanium and that of the selected second metal oxide) into the homogeneous metal/titanium oxide catalysts of this invention.

  7. PROCEDURES FOR ALLOCATION AND AGGREGATION OF RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Chapter AA PROCEDURES FOR ALLOCATION AND AGGREGATION OF RESOURCES By Ronald R. Charpentier, T.......................................................................................................AA-7 Appendix 1 Aggregation of Undiscovered Oil, Gas, and NGL Volumes Of Regions to World Total Monte RH. The separate reporting of onshore versus offshore undiscovered resources is important to economic

  8. Modeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers G. Di Bella, L. Giarr`e, M. Ippolito, A. Jean-Marie, G. Neglia and I. Tinnirello § January 2, 2014 Abstract Energy demand aggregators are new actors in the energy scenario: they gather a group of energy consumers and implement a demand

  9. Aggregate Issuance and Savings Waves Andrea Eisfeldt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    is as follows: Firms which raise costly external finance can invest the issuance proceeds in productive capital. Our study is aimed at providing an estimate of a "revealed preference" measure of the aggregate cost their sources and uses of funds in order to make inferences about the aggregate cost of external finance

  10. Dispenser Printed Zinc Microbattery with an Ionic Liquid Gel Electrolyte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Christine Chihfan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and zinc foil electrode. The EIS scans were recorded at theand zinc foil electrode. The EIS scans were recorded at the159 9.3.1 EIS Equivalent Electrical Circuit

  11. GEOMETRIC CROSS SECTIONS OF DUST AGGREGATES AND A COMPRESSION MODEL FOR AGGREGATE COLLISIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suyama, Toru [Nagano City Museum, Hachimanpara Historical Park Ojimada-machi, Nagano 381-2212 (Japan); Wada, Koji [Planetary Exploration Research Center, Chiba Institute of Technology, Tsudanuma 2-17-1, Narashino, Chiba 275-0016 (Japan); Tanaka, Hidekazu [Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, N19-W8, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan); Okuzumi, Satoshi, E-mail: museum@city.nagano.lg.jp [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan)

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Geometric cross sections of dust aggregates determine their coupling with disk gas, which governs their motions in protoplanetary disks. Collisional outcomes also depend on geometric cross sections of initial aggregates. In a previous paper, we performed three-dimensional N-body simulations of sequential collisions of aggregates composed of a number of sub-micron-sized icy particles and examined radii of gyration (and bulk densities) of the obtained aggregates. We showed that collisional compression of aggregates is not efficient and that aggregates remain fluffy. In the present study, we examine geometric cross sections of the aggregates. Their cross sections decrease due to compression as well as to their gyration radii. It is found that a relation between the cross section and the gyration radius proposed by Okuzumi et al. is valid for the compressed aggregates. We also refine the compression model proposed in our previous paper. The refined model enables us to calculate the evolution of both gyration radii and cross sections of growing aggregates and reproduces well our numerical results of sequential aggregate collisions. The refined model can describe non-equal-mass collisions as well as equal-mass cases. Although we do not take into account oblique collisions in the present study, oblique collisions would further hinder compression of aggregates.

  12. Managing Attack Graph Complexity Through Visual Hierarchical Aggregation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noel, Steven

    Managing Attack Graph Complexity Through Visual Hierarchical Aggregation Steven Noel Center a framework for managing network attack graph complexity through interactive visualization, which includes hierarchical aggregation of graph elements. Aggregation collapses non-overlapping subgraphs of the attack graph

  13. aggregate form size: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of exceedence of the aggregate-size provide a meaningful estimate of the same fractal dimension. Systems aggregate because of the influence exerted by a physical or...

  14. aggregate processing technology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    London 10 Particle-based modelling of aggregation and fragmentation processes: Fractal-like aggregates Nonlinear Sciences (arXiv) Summary: The incorporation of particle...

  15. aggregate tests: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    parameter to aggregation. By using the local Whittle estimator, the statistic takes Weber, Stefan 3 A. SCOPE METHOD OF TEST FOR PROPORTIONS OF COARSE AGGREGATE IN FRESH...

  16. aggregations modeling scientific: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A N; Brilliantov, N V 2011-01-01 18 Aggregation of Composite Solutions: strategies, models, examples CERN Preprints Summary: The paper addresses aggregation issues for...

  17. Data Aggregation Strategies for Evaluation and Reporting | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aggregation Strategies for Evaluation and Reporting Data Aggregation Strategies for Evaluation and Reporting BetterBuildings: Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call: Data...

  18. Highly Stable Trypsin-Aggregate Coatings on Polymer Nanofibers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stable Trypsin-Aggregate Coatings on Polymer Nanofibers for Repeated Protein Digestion. Highly Stable Trypsin-Aggregate Coatings on Polymer Nanofibers for Repeated Protein...

  19. Effect of Sodium Sulfide on Ni-Containing Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian Feng; Paul A. Lindahl

    2004-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 The structure of the active-site C-cluster in CO dehydrogenase from Carboxythermus hydrogenoformans includes a {mu}{sup 2}-sulfide ion bridged to the Ni and unique Fe, while the same cluster in enzymes from Rhodospirillum rubrum (CODH{sub Rr}) and Moorella thermoacetica (CODH{sub Mt}) lack this ion. This difference was investigated by exploring the effects of sodium sulfide on activity and spectral properties. Sulfide partially inhibited the CO oxidation activity of CODH{sub Rr} and generated a lag prior to steady-state. CODH{sub Mt} was inhibited similarly but without a lag. Adding sulfide to CODH{sub Mt} in the C{sub red1} state caused the g{sub av} = 1.82 EPR signal to decline and new features to appear, including one with g = 1.95, 1.85 and (1.70 or 1.62). Removing sulfide caused the g{sub av} = 1.82 signal to reappear and activity to recover. Sulfide did not affect the g{sub av} = 1.86 signal from the C{sub red2} state. A model was developed in which sulfide binds reversibly to C{sub red1}, inhibiting catalysis. Reducing this adduct causes sulfide to dissociate, C{sub red2} to develop, and activity to recover. Using this model, apparent K{sub I} values are 40 {+-} 10 nM for CODH{sub Rr} and 60 {+-} 30 {micro}M for CODH{sub Mt}. Effects of sulfide are analogous to those of other anions, including the substrate hydroxyl group, suggesting that these ions also bridge the Ni and unique Fe. This proposed arrangement raises the possibility that CO binding labilizes the bridging hydroxyl and increases its nucleophilic tendency towards attacking Ni-bound carbonyl.

  20. Specified pipe fittings susceptible to sulfide stress cracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntyre, D.R.; Moore, E.M. Jr. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NACE Standard MR0175 limit of HRC 22 is too high for cold-forged and stress-relieved ASTM A234 WPB pipe fittings. Hardness surveys and sulfide stress cracking test results per ASTM G 39 and NACE TM0177 Method B are presented to support this contention. More stringent inspection and a hardness limit of HB 197 (for cold-forged and stress-relieved fittings only) are recommended. The paper describes a case in which fittings were welded in place in wet sour service flow lines and gas-oil separating plants which were ready to start. The failure of a welded fitting shortly after start-up led to extensive field hardness testing on all fittings from this manufacturer.

  1. Lithium sulfide compositions for battery electrolyte and battery electrode coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liang, Chengdu; Liu, Zengcai; Fu, Wujun; Lin, Zhan; Dudney, Nancy J; Howe, Jane Y; Rondinone, Adam J

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Method of forming lithium-containing electrolytes are provided using wet chemical synthesis. In some examples, the lithium containing electrolytes are composed of .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7. The solid electrolyte may be a core shell material. In one embodiment, the core shell material includes a core of lithium sulfide (Li.sub.2S), a first shell of .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7, and a second shell including one of .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7 and carbon. The lithium containing electrolytes may be incorporated into wet cell batteries or solid state batteries.

  2. Lithium sulfide compositions for battery electrolyte and battery electrode coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Chengdu; Liu, Zengcai; Fu, Wunjun; Lin, Zhan; Dudney, Nancy J; Howe, Jane Y; Rondinone, Adam J

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of forming lithium-containing electrolytes are provided using wet chemical synthesis. In some examples, the lithium containing electroytes are composed of .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7. The solid electrolyte may be a core shell material. In one embodiment, the core shell material includes a core of lithium sulfide (Li.sub.2S), a first shell of .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7, and a second shell including one or .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7 and carbon. The lithium containing electrolytes may be incorporated into wet cell batteries or solid state batteries.

  3. Changes in Dimethyl Sulfide Oceanic Distribution due to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron-Smith, P; Elliott, S; Maltrud, M; Erickson, D; Wingenter, O

    2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is one of the major precursors for aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer over much of the remote ocean. Here they report on coupled climate simulations with a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemical model for DMS distribution and fluxes using present-day and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. They find changes in zonal averaged DMS flux to the atmosphere of over 150% in the Southern Ocean. This is due to concurrent sea ice changes and ocean ecosystem composition shifts caused by changes in temperature, mixing, nutrient, and light regimes. The largest changes occur in a region already sensitive to climate change, so any resultant local CLAW/Gaia feedback of DMS on clouds, and thus radiative forcing, will be particularly important. A comparison of these results to prior studies shows that increasing model complexity is associted with reduced DMS emissions at the equator and increased emissions at high latitudes.

  4. Metal?organic frameworks for the storage and delivery of biologically active hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allan, Phoebe K.; Wheatley, Paul S.; Aldous, David; Mohideen, M. Infas; Tang, Chiu; Hriljac, Joseph A.; Megson, Ian L.; Chapman, Karena W.; De Weireld, Guy; Vaesen, Sebastian; Morris, Russell E. (St Andrews)

    2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen sulfide is an extremely toxic gas that is also of great interest for biological applications when delivered in the correct amount and at the desired rate. Here we show that the highly porous metal-organic frameworks with the CPO-27 structure can bind the hydrogen sulfide relatively strongly, allowing the storage of the gas for at least several months. Delivered gas is biologically active in preliminary vasodilation studies of porcine arteries, and the structure of the hydrogen sulfide molecules inside the framework has been elucidated using a combination of powder X-ray diffraction and pair distribution function analysis.

  5. Process for preparing zinc oxide-based sorbents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gangwal, Santosh Kumar (Cary, NC); Turk, Brian Scott (Durham, NC); Gupta, Raghubir Prasad (Durham, NC)

    2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to zinc oxide-based sorbents, and processes for preparing and using them. The sorbents are preferably used to remove one or more reduced sulfur species from gas streams. The sorbents comprise an active zinc component, optionally in combination with one or more promoter components and/or one or more substantially inert components. The active zinc component is a two phase material, consisting essentially of a zinc oxide (ZnO) phase and a zinc aluminate (ZnAl.sub.2O.sub.4) phase. Each of the two phases is characterized by a relatively small crystallite size of typically less than about 500 Angstroms. Preferably the sorbents are prepared by converting a precursor mixture, comprising a precipitated zinc oxide precursor and a precipitated aluminum oxide precursor, to the two-phase, active zinc oxide containing component.

  6. Costs of aggregate hydrocarbon reserve additions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adelman, Morris Albert

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In what follows, we highlight problems created by aggregation using fixed conversion coefficients (Section 1). We then offer an economic index approach as an alternative, one that recognizes changing relative values of oil ...

  7. aggregates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of these quantum diffusion-limited aggregates vary between 1.43 and 2, depending on the size of the initial wave packet. David B. Johnson; Gonzalo Ordez 2011-11-02 48...

  8. aggregation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of these quantum diffusion-limited aggregates vary between 1.43 and 2, depending on the size of the initial wave packet. David B. Johnson; Gonzalo Ordez 2011-11-02 48...

  9. Diffusion-Limited Aggregation on Curved Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, J.

    We develop a general theory of transport-limited aggregation phenomena occurring on curved surfaces, based on stochastic iterated conformal maps and conformal projections to the complex plane. To illustrate the theory, we ...

  10. Three-dimensional defect characterization : focused ion beam tomography applied to tin sulfide thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Youssef, Amanda

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Porosity is postulated to be one of the reasons for the low efficiency of tin sulfide-based devices. This work is a preliminary investigation of the effects of two film growth parameters deposition rate and substrate ...

  11. Doctoral Defense "Investigating the Role of Iron Sulfide on the Long-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    and improper disposal of radioactive waste from extensive extraction and processing activities have caused oxidants re-enter the reducing zone. Previous studies reported that iron sulfide minerals formed during

  12. Arsenate and Arsenite Retention and Release in Oxide and Sulfide Dominated Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loeppert, Richard H.; Jain, Amita; Raven, Klaus; Wang, Jianlin

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oxidation states (depending on redox potential), and its reactions in soils and sediments are influenced by pH, redox potential, dissolved organic or inorganic components, and sediment colloids (especially Fe sulfides and Fe, Mn, and Al oxides and hydroxides...

  13. NADIM-Travel: A Multiagent Platform for Travel Services Aggregation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kropf, Peter

    services aggregators are increasingly in demand. A travel services aggregation platform should be able-coordinator agent manages users' requests as well as the response aggregation process. Service agents, on their partNADIM-Travel: A Multiagent Platform for Travel Services Aggregation Houssein Ben-Ameur a , François

  14. SUBGRADE AGGREGATE, SPECIAL (Tollway) Effective: October 29, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of porous granular embankment material of the specified thickness for the SUBGRADE AGGREGATE, SPECIAL item AGGREGATE, SPECIAL shall consist of the following: The coarse aggregate for porous granular embankment shall) particles, or crushed concrete. Virgin steel slag aggregates and other expansive materials as determined

  15. Metal sulfide and rare-earth phosphate nanostructures and methods of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Stanislaus; Zhang, Fen

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method of producing a crystalline metal sulfide nanostructure. The metal is a transitional metal or a Group IV metal. In the method, a porous membrane is placed between a metal precursor solution and a sulfur precursor solution. The metal cations of the metal precursor solution and sulfur ions of the sulfur precursor solution react, thereby producing a crystalline metal sulfide nanostructure.

  16. The solubility of elemental sulfur in methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wieland, Denton R.

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT The object of the work reported In this dissertation was to determine the solubility of sulfur in gaseous methane carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide and in mixtures of these gases, at various pressures and temperatures* Sulfur solubility... of methane and propane (which has a critical pressure of approximately the same value of hydrogen sulfide) is 1500 psia. To have liquid in this system at 1500 psia, however, would require a maximum temperature of 20?F which is well below the minimum...

  17. Effect of sulfidity on the corrosivity of white, green, and black liquors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wensley, A.; Champagne, P.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion testing was performed in white, green, and black liquors from a kraft mill. The liquors were modified in composition to simulate conditions of high (40%) sulfidity and low (30%) sulfidity, and then heated in laboratory autoclaves to the temperatures of the respective tanks from which the samples were taken. Specimens of carbon and stainless steels were exposed under free corrosion potential conditions, and their corrosion rates determined from weight loss measurements. In white, green, 45% solids black, and flash tank liquors, active corrosion rates for the carbon steels were typically 20 to 75% higher in the higher sulfidity liquors. In 15% solids weak black liquor there was no appreciable difference in corrosion rates, with carbon steels remaining passive in both low and high sulfidity. In 26% solids intermediate black liquor there were large increases in the corrosion rates of carbon steel between low and high sulfidity liquors, resulting from a change from passive to active conditions. Stainless steels UNS S30403, S32304, and S31803 had very low corrosion rates in all the liquors tested, regardless of sulfidity.

  18. Reduced ternary molybdenum and tungsten sulfides and hydroprocessing catalysis therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hilsenbeck, S.J.; McCarley, R.E.; Schrader, G.L.; Xie, X.B.

    1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    New amorphous molybdenum/tungsten sulfides with the general formula M{sup n+}{sub 2x/n}(L{sub 6}S{sub 8})S{sub x}, where L is molybdenum or tungsten and M is a ternary metal, has been developed. Characterization of these amorphous materials by chemical and spectroscopic methods (IR, Raman, PES) shows that the (M{sub 6}S{sub 8}){sup 0} cluster units are present. Vacuum thermolysis of the amorphous Na{sub 2x}(Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8})S{sub x}{hor_ellipsis}yMeOH first produces poorly crystalline NaMo{sub 6}S{sub 8} by disproportionation at 800 C and well-crystallized NaMo{sub 6}S{sub 8} at {>=} 900 C. Ion-exchange of the sodium material in methanol with soluble M{sup 2+} and M{sup 3+} salts (M=Sn, Co, Ni, Pb, La, Ho) produces the M{sup n+}{sub 2x/n}(Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8})S{sub x}{hor_ellipsis}yMeOH compounds. Additionally, the new reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides with the general formula M{sup n+}{sub 2x/n}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8+x}(MeOH){sub y}[MMOS] (M=Sn, Co, Ni) is an effective hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst both as-prepared and after a variety of pretreatment conditions. Under specified pretreatment conditions with flowing hydrogen gas, the SnMoS type catalyst can be stabilized, and while still amorphous, can be considered as ``Chevrel phase-like`` in that both contain Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8} cluster units. Furthermore, the small cation NiMoS and CoMoS type pretreated catalyst is shown to be very active HDS catalysts with rates that exceeded the model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS{sub 2} catalysts. 9 figs.

  19. Reduced ternary molybdenum and tungsten sulfides and hydroprocessing catalysis therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hilsenbeck, Shane J. (Ames, IA); McCarley, Robert E. (Ames, IA); Schrader, Glenn L. (Ames, IA); Xie, Xiaobing (College Station, TX)

    1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    New amorphous molybdenum/tungsten sulfides with the general formula M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n (L.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x, where L is molybdenum or tungsten and M is a ternary metal, has been developed. Characterization of these amorphous materials by chemical and spectroscopic methods (IR, Raman, PES) shows that the (M.sub.6 S.sub.8).sup.0 cluster units are present. Vacuum thermolysis of the amorphous Na.sub.2x (Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x .multidot.yMeOH first produces poorly crystalline NaMo.sub.6 S.sub.8 by disproportionation at 800.degree. C. and well-crystallized NaMo.sub.6 S.sub.8 at .gtoreq. 900.degree. C. Ion-exchange of the sodium material in methanol with soluble M.sup.2+ and M.sup.3+ salts (M=Sn, Co, Ni, Pb, La, Ho) produces the M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n (Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x .multidot.yMeOH compounds. Additionally, the new reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides with the general formula M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8+x (MeOH).sub.y ›MMOS! (M=Sn, Co, Ni) is an effective hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst both as-prepared and after a variety of pretreatment conditions. Under specified pretreatment conditions with flowing hydrogen gas, the SnMoS type catalyst can be stabilized, and while still amorphous, can be considered as "Chevrel phase-like" in that both contain Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8 cluster units. Furthermore, the small cation NiMoS and CoMoS type pretreated catalyst showed to be very active HDS catalysts with rates that exceeded the model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS.sub.2 catalysts.

  20. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2007, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production U.S. production. One primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting, in order

  1. Thermal treatment for recovery of manganese and zinc from zinc-carbon and alkaline spent batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belardi, G. [Institute for Environmental Engineering and Geosciences (CNR) Area della Ricerca CNR, via Salaria km 29,300, Monterotondo, 00016 Rome (Italy); Lavecchia, R.; Medici, F. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Environment, Sapienza University of Rome, via Eudossiana 84, 00184 Rome (Italy); Piga, L., E-mail: luigi.piga@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Environment, Sapienza University of Rome, via Eudossiana 84, 00184 Rome (Italy)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We separated Zn from Mn in zinc-carbon and alkaline batteries after removal of Hg. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Almost total removal of Hg is achieved at low temperature in air. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen atmosphere is needed to reduce zinc and to permit its volatilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high grade Zn concentrate was obtained with a high recovery at 1000-1200 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The grade of Mn in the residue was enhanced with complete recovery. - Abstract: The aim of this paper is the recovery of manganese and zinc from a mixture of zinc-carbon and alkaline spent batteries, containing 40.9% of Mn and 30.1% of Zn, after preliminary physical treatment followed by removal of mercury. Separation of the metals has been carried out on the basis of their different boiling points, being 357 Degree-Sign C and 906 Degree-Sign C the boiling point of mercury and zinc and 1564 Degree-Sign C the melting point of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Characterization by chemical analysis, TGA/DTA and X-ray powder diffraction of the mixture has been carried out after comminution sieving and shaking table treatment to remove the anodic collectors and most of chlorides contained in the mixture. The mixture has been roasted at various temperatures and resident times in a flow of air to set the best conditions to remove mercury that were 400 Degree-Sign C and 10 min. After that, the flow of air has been turned into a nitrogen one (inert atmosphere) and the temperatures raised, thus permitting the zinc oxide to be reduced to metallic zinc by the carbon present in the original mixture and recovered after volatilization as a high grade concentrate, while manganese was left in the residue. The recovery and the grade of the two metals, at 1000 Degree-Sign C and 30 min residence time, were 84% and 100% for zinc and 85% and 63% for manganese, respectively. The recovery of zinc increased to 99% with a grade of 97% at 1200 Degree-Sign C and 30 min residence time, while the recovery and grade of manganese were 86% and 87%, respectively, at that temperature. Moreover, the chlorinated compounds that could form by the combustion of the plastics contained in the spent batteries, are destroyed at the temperature required by the process.

  2. Improved cell design for lithium alloy/metal sulfide battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, T.D.

    1984-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosed lithium alloy/iron sulfide cell design provides loop-like positive and negative sheet metal current collectors electrically insulated from one another by separator means, the positive collector being located outwardly of the negative collector. The collectors are initially secured within an open-ended cell housing, which allows for collector pretesting for electrical shorts prior to adding any electrode materials and/or electrolyte to the cell. Separate chambers are defined outwardly of the positive collector and inwardly of the negative collector open respectively in opposite directions toward the open ends of the cell housing; and positive and negative electrode materials can be extruded into these respective chambers via the opposite open housing ends. The chambers and cell housing ends can then be sealed closed. A cross wall structurally reinforces the cell housing and also thereby defines two cavities, and paired positive and negative collectors are disposed in each cavity and electrically connected in parallel. The cell design provides for a high specific energy output and improved operating life in that any charge-discharge cycle swelling of the positive electrode material will be inwardly against only the positive collector to minimize shorts caused by the collectors shifting relative to one another.

  3. Cell design for lithium alloy/metal sulfide battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lennox, IL)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosed lithium alloy/iron sulfide cell design provides loop-like positive and negative sheet metal current collectors electrically insulated from one another by separator means, the positive collector being located outwardly of the negative collector. The collectors are initially secured within an open-ended cell housing, which allows for collector pretesting for electrical shorts prior to adding any electrode materials and/or electrolyte to the cell. Separate chambers are defined outwardly of the positive collector and inwardly of the negative collector open respectively in opposite directions toward the open ends of the cell housing; and positive and negative electrode materials can be extruded into these respective chambers via the opposite open housing ends. The chambers and cell housing ends can then be sealed closed. A cross wall structurally reinforces the cell housing and also thereby defines two cavities, and paired positive and negative collectors are disposed in each cavity and electrically connected in parallel. The cell design provides for a high specific energy output and improved operating life in that any charge-discharge cycle swelling of the positive electrode material will be inwardly against only the positive collector to minimize shorts caused by the collectors shifting relative to one another.

  4. Updated cost estimates of meeting geothermal hydrogen sulfide emission regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, K.D.; Currie, J.W.; Weakley, S.A.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A means of estimating the cost of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emission control was investigated. This study was designed to derive H/sub 2/S emission abatement cost functions and illustrate the cost of H/sub 2/S emission abatement at a hydrothermal site. Four tasks were undertaken: document the release of H/sub 2/S associated with geothermal development; review H/sub 2/S environmental standards; develop functional relationships that may be used to estimate the most cose-effective available H/sub 2/S abatement process; and use the cost functions to generate abatement cost estimates for a specific site. The conclusions and recommendations derived from the research are presented. The definition of the term impacts as used in this research is discussed and current estimates of the highest expected H/sub 2/S concentrations of in geothermal reservoirs are provided. Regulations governing H/sub 2/S emissions are reviewed and a review of H/sub 2/S control technology and a summary of the control cost functions are included. A case study is presented to illustrate H/sub 2/S abatement costs at the Baca KGRA in New Mexico.

  5. Mitigation of hydrogen sulfide emissions in The Geysers KGRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buell, R.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Violations of the ambient air quality standard (AAQS) for hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) are currently being experienced in The Geysers KGRA and could significantly increase in the future. Attainment and maintenance of the H/sub 2/S AAQS is a potential constraint to optimum development of this resource. The availability of reliable H/sub 2/S controls and the development of a validated air dispersion model are critical to alleviating this constraint. The purpose of this report is to assess the performance capabilities for state-of-the-art controls, to identify potential cost-effective alternative controls, and to identify the California Energy Commission (CEC) staff's efforts to develop a validated air dispersion model. Currently available controls (Stretford, Hydrogen Peroxide, and EIC) are capable of abating H/sub 2/S emissions from a proposed facility to five lbs/hr. Alternative controls, such as condensate stripping and condensate pH control, appear to be promising, cost-effective control options.

  6. Synthesis of actinide nitrides, phosphides, sulfides and oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Der Sluys, William G. (Missoula, MT); Burns, Carol J. (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, David C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of preparing an actinide compound of the formula An.sub.x Z.sub.y wherein An is an actinide metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, x is selected from the group consisting of one, two or three, Z is a main group element atom selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen and sulfur and y is selected from the group consisting of one, two, three or four, by admixing an actinide organometallic precursor wherein said actinide is selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, a suitable solvent and a protic Lewis base selected from the group consisting of ammonia, phosphine, hydrogen sulfide and water, at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an intermediate actinide complex, heating said intermediate actinide complex at temperatures and for time sufficient to form the actinide compound, and a process of depositing a thin film of such an actinide compound, e.g., uranium mononitride, by subliming an actinide organometallic precursor, e.g., a uranium amide precursor, in the presence of an effectgive amount of a protic Lewis base, e.g., ammonia, within a reactor at temperatures and for time sufficient to form a thin film of the actinide compound, are disclosed.

  7. Zinc and Health: Current Status and Future Directions Zinc Transport in the Brain: Routes of Zinc Influx and Efflux in Neurons1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the routes of entry and exit for zinc in different tissues and cell types have shown that zinc can use several pathways of exit or entry. In neurons, known pathways include (1) presynaptic release along channels and glutamate-gated channels that provide an entry route when cells are depolarized

  8. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1999, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    %. Three primary and eight secondary smelters refined zinc metal of commercial grade in 1999. Of zinc metal,500 Smelter primary, numbere 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 Net import reliance3 as a percent of apparent. The planned tripling of refinery capacity at the Clarksville, TN, smelter was suspended by Pasminco Ltd

  9. Occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis in a smelter exposed to zinc fumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ameille, J.; Brechot, J.M.; Brochard, P.; Capron, F.; Dore, M.F. (Consultation de Pathologie Professionnelle, Hopital Raymond Poincare, Garches, (France))

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A smelter exposed to zinc fumes reported severe recurrent episodes of cough, dyspnea and fever. Bronchoalveolar lavage showed a marked increase in lymphocytes count with predominance of CD8 T-lymphocytes. Presence of zinc in alveolar macrophages was assessed by analytic transmission electron microscopy. This is the first case of recurrent bronchoalveolitis related to zinc exposure in which the clinical picture and BAL results indicate a probable hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

  10. Fluorescent chemosensors for exploring zinc metalloneurochemistry and detecting mercury in aqueous solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolan, Elizabeth M. (Elizabeth Marie), 1978-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 1. An Introduction to Zinc Metalloneurochemistry and Zinc Detection in Biology. This chapter presents an overview of zinc neurophysiology and pathology, which provides motivation for the design of new tools and ...

  11. Flexographically Printed Rechargeable Zinc-based Battery for Grid Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zuoqian

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and rechargeable zinc-air battery,” U.S. Patent S. Müller,for the rechargeable zinc–air battery,” J Appl Electrochem,zinc-air. The four main types of commercially available rechargeable battery

  12. A NEW CONCEPT IN AN ELECTRICALLY RECHARGEABLE ZINC-AIR ALKALINE BATTERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, P.N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Study of a New Zinc-Air Battery Concept Using Flowingdiagram of the zinc-air battery single cell prototype usedRECHARGEABLE ZINC-AIR ALKALINE BATTERY Philip N. Ross

  13. Correlation of Structure and Function of Zinc Metalloproteins...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Structure and Function of Zinc Metalloproteins Via a Combined NMRMolecular Theory Approach Investigative Team: NMR: Andrew S. Lipton - PI (PNNL) and Paul D. Ellis...

  14. Small file aggregation in a parallel computing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faibish, Sorin; Bent, John M.; Tzelnic, Percy; Grider, Gary; Zhang, Jingwang

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques are provided for small file aggregation in a parallel computing system. An exemplary method for storing a plurality of files generated by a plurality of processes in a parallel computing system comprises aggregating the plurality of files into a single aggregated file; and generating metadata for the single aggregated file. The metadata comprises an offset and a length of each of the plurality of files in the single aggregated file. The metadata can be used to unpack one or more of the files from the single aggregated file.

  15. Sulfide controls on mercury speciation and bioavailability to methylating bacteria in sediment pore waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benoit, J.M. [Academy of Natural Sciences, St. Leonard, MD (United States). Estuarine Research Center] [Academy of Natural Sciences, St. Leonard, MD (United States). Estuarine Research Center; [Univ. of Maryland, Solomons, MD (United States); Gilmour, C.C.; Heyes, A. [Academy of Natural Sciences, St. Leonard, MD (United States). Estuarine Research Center] [Academy of Natural Sciences, St. Leonard, MD (United States). Estuarine Research Center; Mason, R.P. [Univ. of Maryland, Solomons, MD (United States)] [Univ. of Maryland, Solomons, MD (United States)

    1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical equilibrium model for Hg complexation in sediments with sulfidic pore waters is presented. The purpose of the model was to explain observed relationships between pore water sulfide, dissolved inorganic Hg (Hg{sub D}), and bulk methylmercury (MeHg) in surficial sediments of two biogeochemically different ecosystems, the Florida Everglades and Patuxent River, MD. The model was constructed to test the hypothesis that the availability of Hg for methylation in sediments is a function of the concentration of neutral dissolved Hg complexes rather than Hg{sup 2+} or total Hg{sub D}. The model included interaction of mercury with solids containing one or two sulfide groups, and it was able to reproduce observed Hg{sub D} and bulk MeHg trends in the two ecosystems. The model is consistent with HgS{sup 0} as the dominant neutral Hg complex and the form of Hg accumulated by methylating bacteria in sulfidic pore waters. The model-estimated decline in HgS{sup 0} with increasing sulfide was consistent with the observed decline in bulk sediments MeHg. Since bacterial Hg uptake rate is one of the factors affecting methylation rate, Hg complexation models such as the one presented are helpful in understanding the factors that control MeHg production and accumulation in aquatic ecosystems.

  16. Flexographically Printed Rechargeable Zinc-based Battery for Grid Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zuoqian

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    66 4.6. Zinc-based Battery Characterization in Controlled4.6. Zinc-based Battery Characterization in Controlledbattery cathode films flexographically printed, electrochemical characterizations

  17. Effect of pH, phosphorus, and water-extractable zinc of soil on plant growth and zinc absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karimian, Najafali

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF pH~ PHOSPHORilS, AND WATER-EXTRACTABLE ZINC OF SOIL ON PLANT GROWTH AND ZINC ABSORPT1ON A Thesis Najafali Karimian Submitted to the Graduate College cf Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1970 Major Sub ject: Soil Chemistry EFFECT OF pH, PHOSPHORUS, AND WATER-EXTRACTABLE ZINC OF SOIL ON PLANT GROWTH AND ZINC ABSORPTION A Thesis by NajafaIi Karimian Approved as to sty1e and content by: Chairman Committee...

  18. Arsenic Sulfide Nanowire Formation on Fused Quartz Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olmstead, J.; Riley, B.J.; Johnson, B.R.; Sundaram, S.K.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic sulfide (AsxSy) nanowires were synthesized by an evaporation-condensation process in evacuated fused quartz ampoules. During the deposition process, a thin, colored film of AsxSy was deposited along the upper, cooler portion of the ampoule. The ampoule was sectioned and the deposited film analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to characterize and semi-quantitatively evaluate the microstructural features of the deposited film. A variety of microstructures were observed that ranged from a continuous thin film (warmer portion of the ampoule), to isolated micron- and nano-scale droplets (in the intermediate portion), as well as nanowires (colder portion of the ampoule). Experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of ampoule cleaning methods (e.g. modify surface chemistry) and quantity of source material on nanowire formation. The evolution of these microstructures in the thin film was determined to be a function of initial pressure, substrate temperature, substrate surface treatment, and initial volume of As2S3 glass. In a set of two experiments where the initial pressure, substrate thermal gradient, and surface treatment were the same, the initial quantity of As2S3 glass per internal ampoule volume was doubled from one test to the other. The results showed that AsxSy nanowires were only formed in the test with the greater initial quantity of As2S3 per internal ampoule volume. The growth data for variation in diameter (e.g. nanowire or droplet) as a function of substrate temperature was fit to an exponential trendline with the form y = Aekx, where y is the structure diameter, A = 1.25×10-3, k = 3.96×10-2, and x is the temperature with correlation coefficient, R2 = 0.979, indicating a thermally-activated process.

  19. Exploring OLAP Aggregates with Hierarchical Visualization Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scholl, Marc H.

    interact with data in a predominantly "drill-down" fashion, i.e. from coarse grained aggregates towards-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP) has evolved into a core technology for comprehensive data analysis in business to be analyzed impose new requirements on OLAP systems. The goal of in- tegrating data from heterogeneous sources

  20. Exploring OLAP Aggregates with Hierarchical Visualization Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiterer, Harald

    with data cubes in a predominantly "drill- down" fashion, i.e. from coarse grained aggregates towards technology for comprehensive data analysis in business and, more recently, in various non-business environments. Growing complexity and volumes of the data to be analyzed impose new requirements on OLAP systems

  1. Physical controls on copepod aggregations in the Gulf of Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woods, Nicholas W

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the role that the circulation in the Gulf of Maine (GOM) plays in determining the distribution of dense aggregations of copepods. These aggregations are an important part of the marine ecosystem, ...

  2. Optical activity of electronically delocalized molecular aggregates: Nonlocal response formulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukamel, Shaul

    Optical activity of electronically delocalized molecular aggregates: Nonlocal response formulation and optical rotation in small optically active molecules, larger conjugated molecules, and molecular aggregates is developed using spatially nonlocal electric and magnetic optical response tensors (r

  3. Magnetic properties of aggregate polycrystalline diamond: implications for carbonado history

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kletetschka, Gunther

    Magnetic properties of aggregate polycrystalline diamond: implications for carbonado history Gu form 20 June 2000; accepted 25 June 2000 Abstract Carbonados are aggregate polycrystalline diamonds features; magnetic hysteresis 1. Introduction Carbonados are sintered polycrystalline micro- diamond

  4. Introduction Coordinated Aggregation Resource Scheduling Reserve Scheduling Coordinated Aggregation of Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resource Scheduling Reserve Scheduling Power Balance Available power g(t) - Bulk power B - Load Aggregation Resource Scheduling Reserve Scheduling Power Balance ... !" #$%&"'()*+" " ,*-*+.*-" " ,*/*)01" devil is in the details what variability? - variability in wind or rooftop solar? - what time scales

  5. From amorphous aggregates to polymer bundles: The role of stiffness on structural phases in polymer aggregation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannes Zierenberg; Wolfhard Janke

    2015-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the aggregation transition of a finite theta-polymer system in dependence on the bending stiffness $\\kappa$ with the help of parallel multicanonical simulations. In order to distinguish amorphous aggregates from polymer bundles we introduce an order parameter, measuring the correlation of the end-to-end vectors. With the help of this order parameter, we construct generic $T$-$\\kappa$ phase diagrams for systems with $2$ and $8$ polymers and discuss the occurring phases from amorphous aggregates to bundle structures. For an intermediate stiffness range we find multiple aggregated phases which change with increasing number of polymers and discuss their nature with the help of microcanonical analyses. We show that the stiffness of semiflexible theta polymers is the distinguishing parameter for the emergent structural motifs.

  6. Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sims, A.V.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction state. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process. Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination Process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure.

  7. Removal of hydrogen sulfide from waste treatment plant biogas using the apollo scrubber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.W.; Burrowes, P.A.; Gupta, A.; Walton, P.S.; Meffe, S.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The removal of hydrogen sulfide and other sulphur compounds from anaerobic digester gas streams prior to their use as fuel for boilers, stationary engines, and cogeneration units minimizes corrosion problems and reduces sulfur emission loadings. A research program at the Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto in the 1980`s demonstrated the use of a modified flotation cell for the absorption of hydrogen sulfide from a gas stream and its catalytic oxidation to sulfur. The essence of the technology was a proprietary gas liquid contactor which provided very high mass transfer rates at the interface. A bench scale contactor developed at the university achieved hydrogen sulfide removal efficiencies of over 99.9% at atmospheric pressure. A demonstration unit for digester gas scrubbing applications was designed, fabricated, and then installed and evaluated at the Metropolitan Toronto Works Department - Main Treatment Plant (MTP).

  8. Journal of Power Sources 135 (2004) 184191 A solid oxide fuel cell system fed with hydrogen sulfide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Power Sources 135 (2004) 184­191 A solid oxide fuel cell system fed with hydrogen for a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). This paper presents an examination of a simple hydrogen sulfide and natural gas-fed solid oxide fuel cell system. The possibility of utilization of hydrogen sulfide

  9. Experimental partitioning of uranium between liquid iron sulfide and liquid silicate: Implications for radioactivity in the Earth's core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minarik, William

    Experimental partitioning of uranium between liquid iron sulfide and liquid silicate: Implications Measurable uranium (U) is found in metal sulfide liquids in equilibrium with molten silicate at conditions shows that K is depleted in the Earth by $50%, while U and Th are slightly enriched (Palme and O

  10. Glutamine and zinc methionine supplementation to dairy calves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Robin Renee

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Glutamine and zinc play an important role in immune functions of animals. The objective of this research was to determine the effects of L-glutamine or zinc methionine supplementation on 1) plasma concentrations of minerals in dairy calves, and 2...

  11. Appearance of infused zinc ( sup 70 Zn) and oral zinc ( sup 68 Zn) in breast milk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser-Veillon, P.B.; Patterson, K.Y.; Mangels, A.R.; Wallace, G.F.; Veillon, C. (Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States) Dept. of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD (United States) Perkin-Elmer Corp., Rockville, MD (United States))

    1991-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to monitor the appearance of a simultaneous intravenous (IV) dose and oral dose of stable isotopes, {sup 70}Zn and {sup 68}Zn, respectively, in breast milk. Three lactating subjects, 2-3 months postpartum were fed a controlled diet which contained an average of 7.8 mg Zn/day. Subjects collected milk samples at the beginning of each feeding for a 24 hour period on the fifth day of the controlled diet. On day 7 of the controlled diet, a 160 ug IV dose of {sup 70}Zn as zinc chloride in saline was infused into each subject. The subjects also received 2 mg of {sup 68 }Zn as zinc chloride in 50 ml of orange juice. Following the stable isotope doses, subjects collected milk samples at the beginning of each feeding for 48 hours, weighing their infants before and after each feeding. The amount of natural Zn, {sup 70}Zn and {sup 68}Zn tracers in the milk was measured by isotope dilution mass spectrometry. The cumulative {sup 70}Zn excretion into breast milk over 48 hours was approximately 1% of the infused dose and the cumulative {sup 68}Zn excretion was smaller still. Thus, only a small fraction of a physiological IV or oral dose of zinc comes out in the milk. The small fraction of {sup 70}Zn and {sup 68}Zn appearing in the milk suggests that circulating zinc and dietary zinc are not rapidly or directly incorporated into breast milk in appreciable amounts.

  12. Characterization of aggregate shape properties using a computer automated system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Rousan, Taleb Mustafa

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Development Methodology?????.. 176 Statistical-Based Aggregate Shape Classification??............... 177 Analysis and Results???????...?????????. 181 Aggregate Texture versus Angularity????????? 181 Effect of Crushing and Size on Shape Properties...)?????????????.. 40 2.24 Laser-based Aggregate Scanning System (LASS) Hardware Architecture??????????????????????? 41 2.25 Illustration of the Erosion-Dilation and Fractal Behavior Method???????????????...????????? 48 2.26 Illustration of the Difference...

  13. Synthetic clay-magnetite aggregates designed for controlled deposition experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Synthetic clay-magnetite aggregates designed for controlled deposition experiments Feinberg, J M of synthetic clay-magnetite aggregates whose physical attributes can be tailored for controlled depositional orientation or oriented aggregation. Grain size distributions of magnetite in three different clay

  14. Thermodynamics and Structure of Peptide-Aggregates at Membrane Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Thermodynamics and Structure of Peptide- Aggregates at Membrane Surfaces INAUGURALDISSERTATION zur. Introduction 01 1.1 ­ Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation 01 1.2 ­ Formation of Protein Aggregates 03 1 and P-glycoprotein: Connecting Thermodynamics and Membrane Structure with Functional Activity 23 3

  15. Light scattering with oxide nanocrystallite aggregates for dye-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    Light scattering with oxide nanocrystallite aggregates for dye- sensitized solar cell application 4://spiedl.org/terms #12;Light scattering with oxide nanocrystallite aggregates for dye-sensitized solar cell application used for a photoelectrode in a dye-sensitized solar cell, the aggregates can be designed to generate

  16. Experimental Evaluation of New Generation Aggregate Image Measurement System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, Leslie L.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . 2003). The current Superpave methods do not measure aggregates texture, although it has significance influence on performance (Fletcher et al. 2002). In some cases, the fine aggregate angularity method does not distinguish between poor and high...) ......................................................... 14 Sphericity Index (3D Form Analysis) ................................................. 14 Sensitivity, Repeatability, and Reproducibility of AIMS ................................ 15 CHAPTER III IMPROVEMENTS OF THE AGGREGATE IMAGE...

  17. Energy-Efficient Aggregate Query Evaluation in Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Weifa

    Energy-Efficient Aggregate Query Evaluation in Sensor Networks Zhuoyuan Tu and Weifa Liang efficiently. This paper considers the aggregate query evaluation in a sensor network database to the base station, which is called in-network aggregation. In other words, a tree rooted at the base station

  18. New technology for sulfide reduction and increased oil recovery. Second quarter progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate reduction of sulfide contamination, as well as possible improvement of production in oil and gas production systems. This will be accomplished by application of the BioCompetitive Exclusion (BCX) process developed by GMT. A broad spectrum of well types and geographical locations is anticipated. The BCX process is designed to manipulate indigenous reservoir bacteria with the addition of synergistic inorganic chemical formulae. These treatments will stimulate growth of beneficial microbes, while suppressing metabolic activity of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), the primary source of harmful sulfide production. Progress in 7 oil and gas fields is summarized.

  19. A study of the reactions of arsinic and arsonic acids with hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen selenide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Applegate, Cynthia Annette

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -diarsa-2, 3, 5-triselenacyclopentane 35 Bond angles in 1, 4&ipheny1-1, 4-diarsa-2, 3, 5-triselenacyclopentane 79 80 INTRODUCTION Many arsenic sulfides occur naturally in the form of minerals due to the natural affinity of arsenic and sulfur for one... another [I]. Arsemc trisulfide, As, S, an orange or yellow powder, is found in nature as the mineral orpiment. Arsenic trisulfide can be prepared by passing a stream of hydrogen sulfide through an acidic solution of arsenic trioxide. Arsenic disulfide...

  20. Recent developments in zinc oxide target chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heaton, R.C.; Taylor, W.A.; Phillips, D.R.; Jamriska, D.J. Sr.; Garcia, J.B.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zinc oxide targets irradiated with high energy protons at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) contain a number of radioactive spallation products in quantities large enough to warrant recovery. This paper describes methods for recovering {sup 7}Be, {sup 46}Sc, and {sup 48}V from such targets and offers suggestions on possible ways to recover additional isotopes. The proposed methods are based on traditional precipitation and ion exchange techniques, are readily adaptable to hot cell use, and produce no hazardous waste components. The products are obtained in moderate to high yields and have excellent radiopurity.

  1. EFFECTIVENESS OF COPPER AND BRONZE FOR ZINC CAPTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P. S.

    2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments was conducted to determine the efficacy of using copper and bronze sheet and screen under high vacuum conditions to capture zinc vapor. The experiments were conducted in a parametric manner using a fixed zinc vaporization temperature (350°C) but varying the filter temperature from ambient to 550°C. Consistent with previous work, metallic zinc was deposited at low temperatures, but the deposit was non?adherent. At an intermediate temperature range (350?450°C), the deposit formed an alloy with both copper and bronze materials. At higher temperatures (> 500°C) the zinc did not deposit on the surfaces likely due to its high vapor pressure. Additional testing to optimize the zinc 'getter' chemistry and surface condition is warranted.

  2. 2-64 GEOLOGICAL & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Chemical Forms of Zinc in a Smelter-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    , and the application of sewage sludge and agrochemicals, soils are increasingly contaminated with zinc. In Switzerland

  3. Beyond Simple Aggregates: Indexing for Summary Queries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, Ke "Kevin"

    # of employees #12;3-1 Reporting vs. Aggregation Date Keyword 2011.04.08 Masters 2011 2011.04.08 Libya 2011.04.07 Japan nuclear crisis 2011.04.07 Libya · · · 2011.03.11 Japan earthquake 2011.03.11 Japan tsunami 2011 2011.04.08 Libya 2011.04.07 Japan nuclear crisis 2011.04.07 Libya · · · 2011.03.11 Japan earthquake

  4. On the friction coefficient of straight-chain aggregates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzo Isella; Yannis Drossinos

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology to calculate the friction coefficient of an aggregate in the continuum regime is proposed. The friction coefficient and the monomer shielding factors, aggregate-average or individual, are related to the molecule-aggregate collision rate that is obtained from the molecular diffusion equation with an absorbing boundary condition on the aggregate surface. Calculated friction coefficients of straight chains are in very good agreement with previous results, suggesting that the friction coefficients may be accurately calculated from the product of the collision rate and an average momentum transfer,the latter being independent of aggregate morphology. Langevin-dynamics simulations show that the diffusive motion of straight-chain aggregates may be described either by a monomer-dependent or an aggregate-average random force, if the shielding factors are appropriately chosen.

  5. Biodegradable branched poly(ethylenimine sulfide) for gene delivery Heebeom Koo 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jong-Sang

    Biodegradable branched poly(ethylenimine sulfide) for gene delivery Heebeom Koo 1 , Geun-woo Jin 1 , Hyunseo Kang, Yan Lee, Kihoon Nam, Cheng Zhe Bai, Jong-Sang Park* School of Chemistry & Molecular October 2009 Keywords: Gene transfer Biodegradation Cytotoxicity Cell viability Biocompatibility a b s t r

  6. Effect of redox potential, sulfide ions and a persulfide forming cysteine residue on carbon monoxide dehydrogenase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jian

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    of the cluster that reacts with CO. The structure of the active-site C-cluster in CO dehydrogenase from Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans (CODHCh) includes a ??2-sulfide ion bridged to the Ni and unique Fe, while the same cluster in enzymes from Rhodospirillum...

  7. HYDROGEN SULFIDE KINETICS ON PEM FUEL CELL ELECTRODES V. A. Sethuramana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sethuraman, Vijay A.

    for the poisoning kinetics of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on composite solid polymer electrolyte Pt (SPE-Pt) electrode and theoretically by a model, which predicts the oxidation current as a function of the applied potential. H2S) fuel cells, there is much less in the literature on H2S poisoning. Uribe et al showed

  8. Dynamic viscosity estimation of hydrogen sulfide using a predictive scheme based on molecular dynamics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    natural gases containing hydrogen sulfide H2S and/or carbon dioxide CO2) are often encountered properties are very scarce because of the very high toxicity of H2S which leads to very complicated safety procedures for the experimentalists. This is especially true for the high pressures and temperatures

  9. Nonexistent electron affinity of OCS and the stabilization of carbonyl sulfide anions by gas phase hydration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanov, Andrei

    Nonexistent electron affinity of OCS and the stabilization of carbonyl sulfide anions by gas phase hydration Eric Surber, S. P. Ananthavel, and Andrei Sanova) Department of Chemistry, University of Arizona the abundance of the hydrated anions is attributed to the stabilizing effect of hydration. These conclusions

  10. Zinc levels in hair of pre-adolescent females

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earp, Cheryl Fricke

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    values in the same row, bearing a, common super- script letter, are not (P+. 05) significantly different. 29 Figure 3. Zinc Content of Hair from Medium Income Females According to Age and Ethnic Origin. IOyr. olds 9 yr. olds cd I I yr. olds l50... loo Negro Ethnic Origin Mexican CaUcasian 31 Figure 4. Zinc Content oi Hair from Low Income Females According to age and Ethnic Origin. 9yr. olds O z lO r O C N II yr, olds 100 Negro Ethnic Origin Mexican Caucasian The hair zinc means...

  11. antifouling compound zinc: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with the DNA Segal, David J; Crotty, Justin W; Bhakta, Mital S; Barbas, Carlos F; Horton, Nancy C 2006-01-01 478 Specific Labeling of Zinc Finger Proteins using Noncanonical...

  12. alkaline zinc electrode: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    large fraction of power incident on a curved primary mirror using an on-axis secondary mirror Kik, Pieter 63 Adding Search to Zinc Reza Rafeh1 Computer Technologies and Information...

  13. AN INVENTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHS OF ZINC ELECTRODEPOSITED FROM ACID ELECTROLYTES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faltemier, J.L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for publication AN INVENTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHS OF ZINCemployer. LBL-16601 AN INVENTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHS OF ZINCNo. DE-AC03-76SF00098 AN INVENTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHS OF ZINC

  14. A preliminary study of zinc-catalyzed polycarbonate production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, Amy Elizabeth

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF ZINC-CATALYZED POLYCARBONATE PRODUCTION A Thesis by AMY ELIZABETH GRIFFITH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1992 Major Subject: Chemistry A PREUMINARY STUDY OF ZINC-CATALYZED POLYCARBONATE PRODUCTION A Thesis by AMY ELIZABETH GRIFFITH Approved as to style and content by; . J. Darensbour Chair of Co i ee) J. Kelly (Member) T. Hug anks (Me...

  15. Characterization and modeling of thermal diffusion and aggregation in nanofluids.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Goodson, Kenneth E. (Stanford University, Stanford, CA)

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluids with higher thermal conductivities are sought for fluidic cooling systems in applications including microprocessors and high-power lasers. By adding high thermal conductivity nanoscale metal and metal oxide particles to a fluid the thermal conductivity of the fluid is enhanced. While particle aggregates play a central role in recent models for the thermal conductivity of nanofluids, the effect of particle diffusion in a temperature field on the aggregation and transport has yet to be studied in depth. The present work separates the effects of particle aggregation and diffusion using parallel plate experiments, infrared microscopy, light scattering, Monte Carlo simulations, and rate equations for particle and heat transport in a well dispersed nanofluid. Experimental data show non-uniform temporal increases in thermal conductivity above effective medium theory and can be well described through simulation of the combination of particle aggregation and diffusion. The simulation shows large concentration distributions due to thermal diffusion causing variations in aggregation, thermal conductivity and viscosity. Static light scattering shows aggregates form more quickly at higher concentrations and temperatures, which explains the increased enhancement with temperature reported by other research groups. The permanent aggregates in the nanofluid are found to have a fractal dimension of 2.4 and the aggregate formations that grow over time are found to have a fractal dimension of 1.8, which is consistent with diffusion limited aggregation. Calculations show as aggregates grow the viscosity increases at a faster rate than thermal conductivity making the highly aggregated nanofluids unfavorable, especially at the low fractal dimension of 1.8. An optimum nanoparticle diameter for these particular fluid properties is calculated to be 130 nm to optimize the fluid stability by reducing settling, thermal diffusion and aggregation.

  16. NEBRASKA CENTER FOR MATERIALS AND NANOSCIENCE 2012 SEMINAR SERIES PRESENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    , and earth abundant, environmentally friendly quaternary semiconductor copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS

  17. Changes in sulfides and platinum-group minerals with the degree of alteration in the Roby, Twilight, and High

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    with laser ablation analysis of the sulfides was used to determine which phase controlled each of the PGE content of the rocks. Keywords Platinum-group elements . Platinum-group minerals . Laser ablation

  18. aggregate stimulates macrophages: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dobson, Christopher M. 2015-01-01 8 Laser-stimulated Synthesis of Large Nanostructured Fractal Silver Aggregates CERN Preprints Summary: A Laser-stimulated synthesis of large...

  19. aggregates by gradation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    seen between microgravity and ground experiments, both in the structure of the formed fractal aggregates as well as the kinetics of growth. Ground measurements are severely...

  20. aggregates by source: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    seen between microgravity and ground experiments, both in the structure of the formed fractal aggregates as well as the kinetics of growth. Ground measurements are severely...

  1. aggregates enhance recovery: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Prabir 28 Local anisotropy and giant enhancement of local electromagnetic fields in fractal aggregates of metal nanoparticles CERN Preprints Summary: We have shown within the...

  2. aggregates research icar: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more important properties of classical random walks, namely, their ability to build fractal structures in diffusion-limited aggregation, has been particularly noteworthy....

  3. aggregates by treatment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    seen between microgravity and ground experiments, both in the structure of the formed fractal aggregates as well as the kinetics of growth. Ground measurements are severely...

  4. aggregating material isolated: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more important properties of classical random walks, namely, their ability to build fractal structures in diffusion-limited aggregation, has been particularly noteworthy....

  5. aggregate base material: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    steady state particle size distributions in a paradigmatic 2d flow. We show how a fractal structure, typical for aggregates in natural systems, can be incorporated in an...

  6. Illinois Solar Energy Association- Renewable Energy Credit Aggregation Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Illinois Solar Energy Association offers the Renewable Energy Credit Aggregation Program (RECAP) to Illinois solar photovoltaic (PV) system owners, providing them with an opportunity to recei...

  7. amyloid peptide aggregation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Insights into Mechanisms and Structures of Metallopeptidases and Amyloid Beta Peptide Aggregation. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??In the present...

  8. aggregation induces phosphorylation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with experimental findings as a function of field strength and layer thickness. Our analysis yields a crossover in the exponent for the scaling behavior of the aggregate...

  9. Energy Department Announces Funding to Develop Aggregate Purchasing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    today announced up to 2 million to support aggregate purchasing models for plug-in electric and other alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles, subsystems,...

  10. Aggregated Purchasing and Workplace Charging Can Drive EV Market...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Standing before PG&E's new plug-in electric bucket truck, Secretary Moniz announced the Energy Department's notice of intent to support pilot aggregated purchasing models for...

  11. aggregates rock and stone: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CiteSeer Summary: Abstract. The main reason for usage of crushed stone mineral aggregate is need for concrete construction building with care about environmental...

  12. aggregate economic damage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    partition problem Barthelemy and LeClerc 1995 and clustering, JACM 2008 Tuesday, October 15, 13 12;Clustering aggregation Many different clusterings Terzi, Evimaria 28...

  13. Aggregation, Coarsening, and Phase Transformation in ZnSNanoparticles...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coarsening, and Phase Transformation in ZnS NanoparticlesStudied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations. Aggregation, Coarsening, and Phase Transformation in ZnS...

  14. Evaluation of synthetic aggregates for use in concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Hafizuddin

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydroxide (NaOH) tests were performed to evaluate the chemical reactivity of the aggregates. An aggre- gate freeze-thaw test was performed to study the physical durability of the aggregates. In addition, ASTII 067 (5-hr boiling test) was modi. fied... to deteranire the saturation coeificient as well as the freeze-thaw resistance of the aggregates. This test, called the 5-hr. boiling test, w . " shown to provide reliable information re- garding the freeze-thaw resistance of aggregates oi varying quali...

  15. Prediction Markets as an Aggregation Mechanism for Collective Intelligence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Jennifer H.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    through online prediction markets (undergraduate thesis).J. , & Zitzewitz, E. (2004). Prediction markets. Journal ofPrediction Markets as an Aggregation Mechanism for

  16. aggregation inhibitors reduce: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Morimoto, Richard 10 Reduced-Order Modeling of Aggregated Thermostatic Loads With Demand Response Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary:...

  17. aggregate electricity demand: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: LBNL-6417E Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part I: Load Availability Profiles Resources 4 12;12;12;CHAPTER 3:...

  18. New technology for sulfide reduction and increased oil recovery. Third quarter progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Project work was initiated by Geo-Microbial Technologies, Inc. (GMT), Ochelata, Oklahoma for Contract Number DE-FG01-97EE15659 on June 18, 1997. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate reduction of sulfide contamination, as well as possible improvement of production in oil and gas production systems. This will be accomplished by application of the BioCompetitive Exclusion (BCX) process developed by GMT. A broad spectrum of well types and geographical locations is anticipated. The BCX process is designed to manipulate indigenous reservoir bacteria with the addition of synergistic inorganic chemical formulae. These treatments will stimulate growth of beneficial microbes, while suppressing metabolic activity of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), the primary source of harmful sulfide production.

  19. Structure refinement of a new sulfide of copper and iron with layered structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Llanos, J.; Contreras-Ortega, C.; Mujica, C. (Univ. Catolica del Norte, Antofagasta (Chile). Dept. de Quimica); Schnering, H.G. von; Peters, K. (Max Planck Inst. fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the first publications on lamellar chalcogenides, the search for new compounds able to be used as cathode in secondary batteries, has led in appropriate investigations. As it has been shown that ternary sulfides of transition elements have a higher electrical conductivity than the binary sulfides, intensive research has been developed in this direction. NaCuFeS[sub 2], trigonal, P[bar 3]m1,(N[degree] 164), a=386,3(1), c=687.3(1)pm., Z=1, crystallizes in a layer type Li[sub 2]FeS[sub 2] - structure. In the hcp sublattice tetrahedral sites are statistically occupied by copper and iron forming CuFeS[sub 2]. The sodium ions are distributed in the octahedral sites between the sheets.

  20. Sulfide stress cracking susceptible pipe fittings bought to NACE MR0175

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntyre, D.R.; Moore, E.M. Jr. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NACE MR0175 limit of R{sub c} 22 is non-conservative for cold-forged and stress relieved ASTM A234 WPB pipe fittings. Hardness surveys and sulfide stress cracking test results per ASTM G39 and NACE TMO177 Method B are presented. More stringent inspection and a hardness limit of BHN 197 (for cold-forged and stress relieved fittings only) are recommended to rectify this situation.

  1. Synthesis Of [2h, 13c] And [2h3, 13c]Methyl Aryl Sulfides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martinez, Rodolfo A. (Santa Fe, NM); Alvarez, Marc A. (Santa Fe, NM); Silks, III, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfides wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms and the aryl group is selected from the group consisting of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, and R.sub.5 are each independently, hydrogen, a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, an amino group from the group consisting of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a phenyl, or an alkoxy group. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2,.sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfides wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to the labeled compounds of [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C]methyl iodide and [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C]methyl iodide.

  2. State-of-the-art hydrogen sulfide control for geothermal energy systems: 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, F.B.; Hill, J.H.; Phelps, P.L. Jr.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing state-of-the-art technologies for removal of hydrogen sulfide are discussed along with a comparative assessment of their efficiencies, reliabilities and costs. Other related topics include the characteristics of vapor-dominated and liquid-dominated resources, energy conversion systems, and the sources of hydrogen sulfide emissions. It is indicated that upstream control technologies are preferred over downsteam technologies primarily because upstream removal of hydrogen sulfide inherently controls all downstream emissions including steam-stacking. Two upstream processes for vapor-dominated resources appear promising; the copper sulfate (EIC) process, and the steam converter (Coury) process combined with an off-gas abatement system such as a Stretford unit. For liquid-dominated systems that produce steam, the process where the non-condensible gases are scrubbed with spent geothermal fluid appears to be promising. An efficient downstream technology is the Stretford process for non-condensible gas removal. In this case, partitioning in the surface condenser will determine the overall abatement efficiency. Recommendations for future environmental control technology programs are included.

  3. Involvement of ERK in NMDA receptor-independent cortical neurotoxicity of hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurokawa, Yuko; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Kubo, Satoko; Yamasaki, Yoshiko; Matsuda, Sachi; Okamoto, Yukari; Sekimoto, Teruki; Fukatsu, Anna; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki [Division of Pharmacology and Pathophysiology, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Pharmacology and Pathophysiology, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Kume, Toshiaki [Department of Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, 46-29 Yoshida-shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, 46-29 Yoshida-shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Fukushima, Nobuyuki [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Life Sciences, Kinki University School of Science and Engineering, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Life Sciences, Kinki University School of Science and Engineering, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Akaike, Akinori [Department of Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, 46-29 Yoshida-shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, 46-29 Yoshida-shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kawabata, Atsufumi, E-mail: kawabata@phar.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Pharmacology and Pathophysiology, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Pharmacology and Pathophysiology, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen sulfide causes NMDA receptor-independent neurotoxicity in mouse fetal cortical neurons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of ERK mediates the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Apoptotic mechanisms are involved in the hydrogen-induced cell death. -- Abstract: Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a gasotransmitter, exerts both neurotoxicity and neuroprotection, and targets multiple molecules including NMDA receptors, T-type calcium channels and NO synthase (NOS) that might affect neuronal viability. Here, we determined and characterized effects of NaHS, an H{sub 2}S donor, on cell viability in the primary cultures of mouse fetal cortical neurons. NaHS caused neuronal death, as assessed by LDH release and trypan blue staining, but did not significantly reduce the glutamate toxicity. The neurotoxicity of NaHS was resistant to inhibitors of NMDA receptors, T-type calcium channels and NOS, and was blocked by inhibitors of MEK, but not JNK, p38 MAP kinase, PKC and Src. NaHS caused prompt phosphorylation of ERK and upregulation of Bad, followed by translocation of Bax to mitochondria and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, leading to the nuclear condensation/fragmentation. These effects of NaHS were suppressed by the MEK inhibitor. Our data suggest that the NMDA receptor-independent neurotoxicity of H{sub 2}S involves activation of the MEK/ERK pathway and some apoptotic mechanisms.

  4. Lifting Integrity Constraints in Binary Aggregation Umberto Grandi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endriss, Ulle

    Lifting Integrity Constraints in Binary Aggregation Umberto Grandi and Ulle Endriss Institute language and we explore the question of whether or not a given aggregation procedure will lift a given, this discipline has received increasing attention in Artificial Intelligence (AI), as testified by a large number

  5. UNCORRECTEDPROOF The use of scintillometry for validating aggregation schemes over

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    evapotranspiration is based on the use of aggregation schemes in conjunction with energy-balance or land of the energy balance providing the estimates of the available energy (AE(=Rn Ŕ G), where Rn and G are the net the Marrakech city (Morocco), have been used to test the aggregation schemes. The Agdal oliveyard was made up

  6. Aggregation Behavior of Two Asphaltenic Fractions in Aromatic Solvents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loh, Watson

    Aggregation Behavior of Two Asphaltenic Fractions in Aromatic Solvents Rahoma S. Mohamed* and Anto. The results indicated possible asphaltene aggregation as well as the probable existence of critical micelle fraction. Average molecular areas for asphaltenes adsorbed at different interfaces estimated from surface

  7. A Single Disulfide Bond Differentiates Aggregation Pathways of 2-Microglobulin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    simulation; aggregation; domain swapping*Corresponding author Introduction Amyloid fibrils are insolubleA Single Disulfide Bond Differentiates Aggregation Pathways of ß2-Microglobulin Yiwen Chen1 at Chapel Hill Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA Deposition of wild-type ß2-microglobulin (ß2m) into amyloid

  8. Measurement and quantification of aggregate thermal coefficient of expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chande, Gautam U

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SRG 8 67 El Paso El Paso Granite Slag 5 9042 9. 31163 Panama 3/8" 10. 3914 Panama 1" 12 904 28 Figure 6. Measurement of CTE of aggregate sample Scanning electron microscopy and?i-ray microanaiysis It is known that the CTE of the aggregate...

  9. aggregating brain cell: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aggregating brain cell First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Biomimetic Dye Aggregate Solar...

  10. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2000, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    three-fourths of production. Three primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined 92 Employment: Mine and mill, numbere 2,700 2,500 2,400 2,500 2,600 Smelter primary, numbere 1,000 1 production of zinc concentrate by about 3% in 2000. U.S. mine production greatly exceeded smelter capacity

  11. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2001, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -fourths of production. Three primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal of commercial,500 2,600 2,400 Smelter primary, numbere 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 900 Net import reliance3 greatly exceeded smelter capacity, necessitating exports of concentrate. More than one-third of all

  12. EFFECT OF FILTER TEMPERATURE ON TRAPPING ZINC VAPOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.

    2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    To address the {sup 65}Zn contamination issue in the TEF, a multi-task experimental program was initiated. The first experimental task was completed and is reported in Ref. 1. The results of the second experimental task are reported here. This task examined the effect of filter temperature on trapping efficiency and deposit morphology. Based on the first experimental tasks that examined filter pore size and trapping efficiency, stainless steel filter media with a 20 {micro}m pore size was selected. A series of experiments using these filters was conducted during this second task to determine the effect of filter temperature on zinc vapor trapping efficiency, adhesion and morphology. The tests were conducted with the filters heated to 60, 120, and 200 C; the zinc source material was heated to 400 C for all the experiments to provide a consistent zinc source. The samples were evaluated for mass change, deposit adhesion and morphology. As expected from the physical vapor deposition literature, a difference in deposit morphology and appearance was observed between the three filter temperatures. The filter held at 60 C had the largest average mass gain while the 120 and 200 C filters exhibited similar but lower weight gains. The standard deviations were large and suggest that all three temperatures exhibited comparable gains. No zinc was detected on the backside surface of the filters indicating high efficiency for front and internal trapping. A zinc rich deposit was formed on the surface of the 60 C filter. Based on a simple tape adhesion test, the surface zinc was readily removed from the 60 C filter while less zinc deposit was removed from the 120 and 200 C filter samples. It is surmised that the higher temperatures enable the zinc to deposit within the filter media rather than on the surface. Based on the findings that all three statistically trapped the same quantity of zinc vapor and that the higher temperatures resulted in a more adherent/better trapped product, operating the filters at 120 to 200 C is recommended.

  13. Galvanostatic polarization of zinc microanodes in KOH electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, M.B.; Cook, G.M.; Yao, N.P.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes a critical review of the current literature on the anodic passivation of zinc electrodes, a description of supplementary experimental studies to extend the data to a low-current-density region and to provide a basis for evaluating conflicting results of published work, and a new interpretation of the anodic passivation mechanism. This work provides a starting point for understanding passivation phenomena in battery electrodes. The utilization of a zinc electrode in alkaline batteries depends on the ability of the electrode to remain active during the anodic dissolution process. This dissolution period is often terminated by the onset of passivation. Experiments were conducted on the effects of current density on passivation time of a small zinc anode (6.6 x 10/sup -3/ cm/sup 2/) in KOH at concentrations of 0.784, 2.92, 4.98 and 7.24M KOH as well as 7.24M KOH saturated with zinc oxide. It was concluded that there are two mechanisms for anodic passivation, one occurring at current densities below about 150 mA/cm/sup 2/ and another at higher current densities. Accordingly, in the overall mechanism, the total time to passivation includes the times to achieve the maximum zincate concentration as well as to form porous type I ZnO and compact type II ZnO. In Ni/Zn batteries under development for vehicle propulsion, the electrolyte is usually 30% KOH (7M) saturated with zinc oxide; and the zinc electrode is formed in-situ by electrodeposition of zinc onto the grid. For a current density of 20 mA/cm/sup 2/ in a Ni/Zn battery cycled at a 2-h rate and a zinc electrode with a porosity of 0.6 at the fully charged state, a current density of 338 mA/cm/sup 2/ was calculated to be that above which the passivation limits the utilization of the zinc electrode. 7 figures, 4 tables.

  14. Chronic exposure of sheep to a zinc smelter in Peru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reif, J.S.; Ameghino, E.; Aaronson, M.J.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liver levels of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, manganese, and zinc were assessed in adult female sheep living in the vicinity of a zinc smelter in Peru. The study was conducted on a large sheep-raising cooperative divided into seven management units, operated under a standardized husbandry system. Soil samples were analyzed for the same metals at varying distances from the smelter. A gradient of concentration of heavy metals in soil was found between 1 and 56 km from the smelter. Soil concentrations for all metals except manganese decreased significantly with increasing distance from the smelter. The strongest correlations were found for copper, lead, and zinc (P less than 0.001). Topographic features and prevailing wind direction appeared to play a role in the dispersion of pollutants. Liver samples were obtained from 153 sheep on five units of the cooperative. The centers of the units sampled were between 13 and 56 km from the smelter. Hepatic concentrations of arsenic, lead, manganese, and zinc decreased significantly with increasing distance from the smelter. Liver arsenic and liver zinc were significantly related to soil concentrations. Liver levels of arsenic, cadmium, lead, and manganese in sheep from the cooperative were significantly higher than those detected in control sheep from southern Peru. Sheep populations may serve as biological monitors for heavy metal accumulation and environmental carcinogenesis.

  15. Possible Regulatory Role for the Histidine-Rich Loop in the Zinc...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regulatory Role for the Histidine-Rich Loop in the Zinc Transport Protein, ZnuA. Possible Regulatory Role for the Histidine-Rich Loop in the Zinc Transport Protein, ZnuA. Abstract:...

  16. Zinc released from olfactory bulb glomeruli by patterned electrical stimulation of the olfactory nerve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blakemore, Laura J.

    Zinc is a trace element with a multitude of roles in biological systems including structural and cofactor functions for proteins. Although most zinc in the central nervous system (CNS) is protein bound, the CNS contains a ...

  17. HIGH-CURRENT ZINC-AIR MICROBATTERY BASED ON A MICROMACHINED MULTILAYER LATERAL METALLIC SCAFFOLD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    `skeleton'. This scaffold consists of alternating copper and nickel layers supporting zinc as electrodeposited anode material. A proof-of-concept zinc-air microbattery based on this technology was developed

  18. ZINC--2002 85.1 References that include a section mark () are found in the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) that applies to recycling of hazardous secondary materials to make zinc for hazardous secondary materials that are legitimately recycled to make zinc micronutrient fertilizers

  19. Role of Standard Demand Response Signals for Advanced Automated Aggregation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Kiliccote, Sila

    2011-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Emerging standards such as OpenADR enable Demand Response (DR) Resources to interact directly with Utilities and Independent System Operators to allow their facility automation equipment to respond to a variety of DR signals ranging from day ahead to real time ancillary services. In addition, there are Aggregators in today’s markets who are capable of bringing together collections of aggregated DR assets and selling them to the grid as a single resource. However, in most cases these aggregated resources are not automated and when they are, they typically use proprietary technologies. There is a need for a framework for dealing with aggregated resources that supports the following requirements: • Allows demand-side resources to participate in multiple DR markets ranging from wholesale ancillary services to retail tariffs without being completely committed to a single entity like an Aggregator; • Allow aggregated groups of demand-side resources to be formed in an ad hoc fashion to address specific grid-side issues and support the optimization of the collective response of an aggregated group along a number of different dimensions. This is important in order to taylor the aggregated performance envelope to the needs to of the grid; • Allow aggregated groups to be formed in a hierarchical fashion so that each group can participate in variety of markets from wholesale ancillary services to distribution level retail tariffs. This paper explores the issues of aggregated groups of DR resources as described above especially within the context of emerging smart grid standards and the role they will play in both the management and interaction of various grid-side entities with those resources.

  20. Automation of Capacity Bidding with an Aggregator Using Open Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    program, demand  response aggregator, demand response  vii WITH AN AGGREGATOR USING OPEN AUTOMATED DEMAND RESPONSE ThisWith an Aggregator Using Open Automated Demand Response is 

  1. Regenerable hydrogen chloride removal sorbent and regenerable multi-functional hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen chloride removal sorbent for high temperature gas streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siriwardane, Ranjani (Morgantown, WV)

    2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Regenerable hydrogen chloride removal sorbent and regenerable multi-functional hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen chloride removal sorbent for high temperature gas streams

  2. PRELIMINARY STUDY OF METHODS TO CHEMICALLY BIND ZINC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.

    2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    To address the {sup 65}Zn contamination issue in the TEF, a multi-task experimental program was initiated. The first two experimental tasks were completed. The results of the third experimental task are reported here. This task was conducted to determine if the zinc vapors could be chemically bound on two non hydrogen active substrates. Based on a thermodynamic study copper and cobalt were the most favorable for capturing zinc without forming hydrides. Within the experimental parameters tested, which include temperatures of 350, 400, and 450 C at pressures of nominally 20-40 millitorr, the zinc deposited on the both copper screen and cobalt rods but did not react to form a compound. The conditions that were tested are not prototypic and additional testing under higher vacuum conditions, i.e., .01 millitorr, may enhance the reactivity of the surfaces and is recommended.

  3. The effect of dietary zinc on the hypothalamo-adenohypophyseal-thyroid axis of male broiler chickens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, Carlton E.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the testes of zinc- 18 deficient rats have shown atrophy of the testicular tu- bules and decreased spermatogenesis. Abbasi et al. (72) demonstrated that mild zinc deficiency, induced by re- stricting dietary zinc to 2. 7 to 5. 0 mg/day, resulted...

  4. J Am Cerom Soc 73 [lo] 3026-32 (19901 Electrical Properties of Individual Zinc Oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrer, Gregory S.

    properties of single interfaces and grain boundaries. [Keywords: grain boundaries, zinc oxide, varistors semiconductor, zinc oxide (ZnO), which is used commercially as a varistor material. This is an excellentJ Am Cerom Soc 73 [lo] 3026-32 (19901 Electrical Properties of Individual Zinc Oxide Grain

  5. ccsd00000932 Electronic structure of wurtzite and zinc-blende AlN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ccsd­00000932 (version 1) : 10 Dec 2003 Electronic structure of wurtzite and zinc-blende AlN P. (December 10, 2003) Abstract The electronic structure of AlN in wurtzite and zinc-blende phases is studied in the calculations. Di#11;erences 1 #12; between the wurtzite and zinc-blende phases are small and re ect the slight

  6. The influence of sulfur supplementation (methionine and sulfate) on the zinc availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    availability of a poor diet in sheep M Lamand, C Lab, M Mignon, JC Tressol INRA, Laboratoire des Maladies availability in lambs. Increasing the sulfur level with methionine and sulfate, of such a diet, enhances zinc absorption. However, sul- fur is not the only factor limiting zinc availability in a hypoproteic diet. zinc

  7. Fuel additives and heat treatment effects on nanocrystalline zinc ferrite phase composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    Fuel additives and heat treatment effects on nanocrystalline zinc ferrite phase composition Ping Hu October 2010 Keywords: Zinc ferrite Fuel additive Heat treatment Phase composition a b s t r a c, carbamide and acrylic acid as fuel additives. Pure spinel zinc ferrite with the crystallite size of about 15

  8. Synthesis of Nickel-Zinc Ferrites in RF Thermal Plasma Reactor J. Szpvlgyi1,2*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gubicza, Jenő

    Synthesis of Nickel-Zinc Ferrites in RF Thermal Plasma Reactor J. Szépvölgyi1,2* , I. Mohai1 , L POB 32, Budapest, Hungary Abstract Nickel-zinc ferrites usually exhibit high saturation mag. In this paper results of thermal plasma synthesis of nanosized nickel-zinc ferrites from oxide powders

  9. The Electrical and Band-Gap Properties of Amorphous Zinc-Indium-Tin Oxide Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    MRSEC The Electrical and Band-Gap Properties of Amorphous Zinc-Indium-Tin Oxide Thin Films D Science & Engineering Center For zinc-indium-tin oxide (ZITO) films, grown by pulsed-laser deposition was replaced by substitution with zinc and tin in equal molar proportions (co-substitution). All ZITO films

  10. Separation and Purification Technology 40 (2004) 251257 Copper and zinc sorption by treated oil shale ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jordanian oil shale ash was used as an adsorbent for the removal of copper and zinc from aqueous solution.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Oil shale; Ash; Adsorption; Copper and zinc removal 1. IntroductionSeparation and Purification Technology 40 (2004) 251­257 Copper and zinc sorption by treated oil

  11. BTS: SEP How To Guide: Aggregate Under-served Markets to Buying...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    as community development funds. Can reduce energy costs through aggregation; alleviate drain on budget from high energy costs. Aggregate under-served markets into buying pools...

  12. alpha-synuclein processing aggregation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    London 17 Particle-based modelling of aggregation and fragmentation processes: Fractal-like aggregates Nonlinear Sciences (arXiv) Summary: The incorporation of particle...

  13. A STUDY OF AGGREGATION BIAS IN ESTIMATING THE MARKET FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING EQUIPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    models: aggregated by SMSA market share central cooling all gas space heat all oilmodels: aggregated by regions market share central cooling all gas space heat all oil

  14. Secondary battery containing zinc electrode with modified separator and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poa, D.S.

    1984-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A battery containing a zinc electrode with a porous separator between the anode and cathode. The separator is a microporous substrate carrying therewith an organic solvent of benzene, toluene or xylene with a tertiary organic amine therein, wherein the tertiary amine has three carbon chains each containing from six to eight carbon atoms. The separator reduces the rate of zinc dentrite growth in the separator during battery operation prolonging battery life by preventing short circuits. A method of making the separator is also disclosed.

  15. Secondary battery containing zinc electrode with modified separator and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poa, David S. (Naperville, IL); Yao, Neng-Ping (Clarendon Hills, IL)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A battery containing a zinc electrode with a porous separator between the anode and cathode. The separator is a microporous substrate carrying therewith an organic solvent of benzene, toluene or xylene with a tertiary organic amine therein, wherein the tertiary amine has three carbon chains each containing from six to eight carbon atoms. The separator reduces the rate of zinc dentrite growth in the separator during battery operation prolonging battery life by preventing short circuits. A method of making the separator is also disclosed.

  16. Fe(II)- and Sulfide-Facilitated Reduction of 99Tc(VII)O4- in Microbially Reduced Hyporheic Zone Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Heald, Steve M.; McKinley, James P.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Resch, Charles T.; Moore, Dean A.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Redox-reactive, biogeochemical phases generated by reductive microbial activity in hyporheic zone sediments from a dynamic groundwater-river interaction zone were evaluated for their ability to reduce soluble pertechnetate [99Tc(VII)O4-] to less soluble Tc(IV). The sediments were bioreduced by indigenous microorganisms that were stimulated by organic substrate addition in synthetic groundwater with or without sulfate. In most treatments, 20 µmol L-1 initial aqueous Tc(VII) was reduced to near or below detection (3.82×10-9 mol L-1) over periods of days to months in suspensions of variable solids concentrations. Native sediments containing significant lithogenic Fe(II) in various phases were, in contrast, unreactive with Tc(VII). The reduction rates in the bioreduced sediments increased with increases in sediment mass, in proportion to weak acid-extractable Fe(II) and sediment-associated sulfide (AVS). The rate of Tc(VII) reduction was first order with respect to both aqueous Tc(VII) concentration and sediment mass, but correlations between specific reductant concentrations and reaction rate were not found. X-ray microprobe measurements revealed a strong correlation between Tc hot spots and Fe-containing mineral particles in the sediment. However, only a portion of Fe-containing particles were Tc-hosts. The Tc-hot spots displayed a chemical signature (by EDXRF) similar to pyroxene. The application of autoradiography and electron microprobe allowed further isolation of Tc-containing particles that were invariably found to be ca 100 µm aggregates of primary mineral material embedded within a fine-grained phyllosilicate matrix. EXAFS spectroscopy revealed that the Tc(IV) within these were a combination of a Tc(IV)O2-like phase and Tc(IV)-Fe surface clusters, with a significant fraction of a TcSx-like phase in sediments incubated with SO42-. AVS was implicated as a more selective reductant at low solids concentration even though its concentration was below that required for stoichiometric reduction of Tc(VII). These results demonstrate that composite mineral aggregates may be redox reaction centers in coarse-textured hyporheic zone sediments regardless of the dominant anoxic biogeochemical processes.

  17. An Equilibrium Approach to the Aggregation of Beliefs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Yi; Zhang, Jianbo

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that satis?es Walras law Pz(P) #17; 0; then there is some P such that z(P) #20; 0: (see for example Varian pp321). The uniqueness of the equilibrium aggregation can be obtained by simply applying a theorem in Stella Dafermos (1990) pp396: Lemma 3 (Stella... the agents by varying his probabilities assigned to each state. When the aggregation reaches an equilibrium, all the claims from all agents are mutually covered for every realization of the state, and thus an aggregation 3 of individual beliefs is obtained...

  18. Early age delamination in concrete pavements made with gravel aggregates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Juanyu

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    , and application of ultra-fine fly ash among others. A fractional factorial design (Taguchi method) based on ?orthogonal array? (Taguchi et al. 1993) was used to evaluate the effects of various factors on the bonding strength. Test runs were made according... of the aggregate can be represented by an overall rating of the contribution of aggregate to the bonding performance. Non-aggregate factors include water/cementitious ratio (w/cm), cement factor, ultra-fly ash content, and curing quality. The overall effects...

  19. Manganese sulfide formation via concomitant microbial manganese oxide and thiosulfate reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kennedy, David W.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Moore, Dean A.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Reed, Samantha B.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 produced {gamma}-MnS (rambergite) nanoparticles during the concurrent reduction of MnO{sub 2} and thiosulfate coupled to H{sub 2} oxidation. To investigate effect of direct microbial reduction of MnO{sub 2} on MnS formation, two MR-1 mutants defective in outer membrane c-type cytochromes ({Delta}mtrC/{Delta}omcA and {Delta}mtrC/{Delta}omcA/{Delta}mtrF) were also used and it was determined that direct reduction of MnO{sub 2} was dominant relative to chemical reduction by biogenic sulfide generated from thiosulfate reduction. Although bicarbonate was excluded from the medium, incubations of strain MR-1 with lactate as the electron donor produced MnCO{sub 3} (rhodochrosite) as well as MnS in nearly equivalent amounts as estimated by micro X-ray diffraction (micro-XRD) analysis. It was concluded that carbonate released from lactate metabolism promoted MnCO{sub 3} formation and that Mn(II) mineralogy was strongly affected by carbonate ions even in the presence of abundant sulfide and weakly alkaline conditions expected to favor the precipitation of MnS. Formation of MnS, as determined by a combination of micro-XRD, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction analyses was consistent with equilibrium speciation modeling predictions. Biogenic manganese sulfide may be a manganese sink in the Mn biogeochemical cycle in select environments such as deep anoxic marine basins within the Baltic Sea.

  20. Alkali-aggregate reaction in concrete containing high-alkali cement and granite aggregate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owsiak, Z

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper discusses results of the research into the influence of high-alkali Portland cement on granite aggregate. The deformation of the concrete structure occurred after 18 months. The research was carried out by means of a scanning electron microscope equipped with a high-energy dispersive X-ray analyzer that allowed observation of unpolished sections of concrete bars exhibiting the cracking pattern typical of the alkali-silica reaction. Both the microscopic observation and the X-ray elemental analysis confirm the presence of alkali-silica gel and secondary ettringite in the cracks.

  1. Heat Transfer Characteristics of Sulfur and Sulfur Diluted with Hydrogen Sulfide Flowing Through Circular Tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Porter Walwyn

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, using water as a basis of comparison. For identical tube sizes and the same fluid velocity, both pure and dilute sulfur were found to have a film conductance ~- I less than ten percent that of water over most... the v x d curves for each concentration of diluent. Sulfur is diluted with H2S, added as persulfide Sulfur is diluted with H S, added as liquid 34 35 10. A Ratio of film conductance of pure sulfur to that of water versus temperature. The flow...

  2. Use of ethylenediamine to remove hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marakhovskii, L.F.; Popov, A.A.; Rezunenko, Yu.I.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The investigations of the equilibrium absorption of H/sub 2/S by an EDA solution which show that the solubility of hydrogen sulfide in ethylenediamine solutions is almost twice that in monoethanolamine solutions. Ethylenediamine may be used as an absorber for thorough removal of H/sub 2/S from coke oven gas in the presence of CO/sub 2/ and HCN. The hydrogen cyanide of coke oven gas, having practically no effect on the equilibrium absorption of H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/, may in this case be recovered in the form of ethylenethiourea - a marketable byproduct.

  3. The use of ethylenediamine to remove hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marakhovskii, L.F.; Rezunenko, Y.I.; Popov, A.A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The investigations of the equilibrium absorption of H/sub 2/S by an EDA solution showed the solubility of hydrogen sulfide in ethylenediamine solutions is almost twice that in monoethanolamine solutions. Ethylenediamine may be used as an absorber for thorough removal of H/sub 2/S from coke oven gas in the presence of CO/sub 2/ and HCN. The hydrogen cyanide of coke oven gas, having practically no effect on the equilibrium absorption of H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/, may in this case be used in the form of ethylenethiourea - a marketable byproduct.

  4. Sulfide distribution in chemosynthetic communities at hydrocarbon seeps in the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escorcia, Susie Patricia

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by symbiotic and free living chemoautotrophic prokaryotes, that couple the oxidation of sulfide (HtS), methane (CH, ), ammonia (NH, ) or metals (i. e. , Mn-', Fe +) with the reduction of inorganic carbon into organic biomass. The development and success of a... electrodes were made with a sensing tip diameter of approximately one mm. Gold wire, 100 Jim in diameter, was threaded through the tip and fused with the glass. The tip of the electrode was then sanded to expose the gold and the surface was polished...

  5. Prevention of iron-sulfide deposition in petroleum processing. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doctor, R. D.; Panchal, C. B.; Energy Systems

    2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this CRADA extension which effectively ended in 2003 was to quantify the effect of iron-sulfide formation on the fouling propensity of crude oil. The specific objectives are focused on fouling of the Crude Distillation Unit (CDU-1) at the Shell Refinery in Mobile, Alabama. The technical approach consists of analyzing the plant data, chemical analysis of crude oil to detect key precursors, performing refinery tests using the Argonne Field Fouling Unit, and verifying the effectiveness of a physical device of tube insert and enhanced tubes to change threshold conditions and thereby reducing fouling.

  6. Removal of hydrogen sulfide as ammonium sulfate from hydropyrolysis product vapors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marker, Terry L; Felix, Larry G; Linck, Martin B; Roberts, Michael J

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for processing biomass into hydrocarbon fuels that includes processing a biomass in a hydropyrolysis reactor resulting in hydrocarbon fuels and a process vapor stream and cooling the process vapor stream to a condensation temperature resulting in an aqueous stream. The aqueous stream is sent to a catalytic reactor where it is oxidized to obtain a product stream containing ammonia and ammonium sulfate. A resulting cooled product vapor stream includes non-condensable process vapors comprising H.sub.2, CH.sub.4, CO, CO.sub.2, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide.

  7. Nanocrystal/J-aggregate constructs : chemistry, energy transfer, and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Brian J. (Brian Jacob)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of light with matter is one of the most central subjects to modern chemistry. Two types of materials, semiconductor nanocrystals and J-aggregates of cyanine dyes, have been developed chiefly due to their ...

  8. Commercial Building Tenant Energy Usage Aggregation and Privacy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, Olga V.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Anderson, David M.; Wang, Na

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A growing number of building owners are benchmarking their building energy use. This requires the building owner to acquire monthly whole-building energy usage information, which can be challenging for buildings in which individual tenants have their own utility meters and accounts with the utility. Some utilities and utility regulators have turned to aggregation of customer energy use data (CEUD) as a way to give building owners whole-building energy usage data while protecting customer privacy. Meter profile aggregation adds a layer of protection that decreases the risk of revealing CEUD as the number of meters aggregated increases. The report statistically characterizes the similarity between individual energy usage patterns and whole-building totals at various levels of meter aggregation.

  9. aggregates colonization growth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lesanovsky, I; Booth, D; Shaffer, J P; Pfau, T; Lw, R 2014-01-01 6 Transition in the fractal properties from diffusion-limited aggregation to Laplacian growth via their...

  10. aggregating devices fads: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as compared with non-fractal aggregates (where the critical stress is practically size-independent). This is due to the fact that breaking up a fractal object leads to denser...

  11. aggregate utilizacao da: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of these quantum diffusion-limited aggregates vary between 1.43 and 2, depending on the size of the initial wave packet. David B. Johnson; Gonzalo Ordez 2011-11-02 52...

  12. aggregates involves smad: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of these quantum diffusion-limited aggregates vary between 1.43 and 2, depending on the size of the initial wave packet. David B. Johnson; Gonzalo Ordez 2011-11-02 96...

  13. adenosine diphosphate-induced aggregation: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of these quantum diffusion-limited aggregates vary between 1.43 and 2, depending on the size of the initial wave packet. David B. Johnson; Gonzalo Ordez 2011-11-02 68...

  14. aggregate mixtures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of these quantum diffusion-limited aggregates vary between 1.43 and 2, depending on the size of the initial wave packet. David B. Johnson; Gonzalo Ordez 2011-11-02 First Page...

  15. aggregative citrobacter freundii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of these quantum diffusion-limited aggregates vary between 1.43 and 2, depending on the size of the initial wave packet. David B. Johnson; Gonzalo Ordez 2011-11-02 53...

  16. aggregating proteoglycan aggrecan: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of these quantum diffusion-limited aggregates vary between 1.43 and 2, depending on the size of the initial wave packet. David B. Johnson; Gonzalo Ordez 2011-11-02 71...

  17. aggregate gradation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of these quantum diffusion-limited aggregates vary between 1.43 and 2, depending on the size of the initial wave packet. David B. Johnson; Gonzalo Ordez 2011-11-02 First Page...

  18. alter aggregate characteristics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    state particle size distributions in a 3-d synthetic turbulent flow. We show how a fractal-like structure, typical of aggregates in natural systems, can be incorporated in an...

  19. aggregate decay heat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as compared with non-fractal aggregates (where the critical stress is practically size-independent). This is due to the fact that breaking up a fractal object leads to denser...

  20. Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part I: Load Availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-6417E Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part I: Load Availability Profiles Resources 4 #12;#12;#12;CHAPTER 3: Results: DR Profiles 3.1 Projected Demand Response Availability in 2020

  1. Effect of red blood cells on platelet aggregation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karniadakis, George E.

    This study briefly reviews the model that describes platelet behavior resulting in aggregation and thrombus formation. This is followed by an overview of the basics of the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), the simulation ...

  2. Tangible interfaces for manipulating aggregates of digital information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullmer, Brygg Anders

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops new approaches for people to physically represent and interact with aggregates of digital information. These support the concept of Tangible User Interfaces (TUIs), a genre of human-computer interaction ...

  3. Water adsorption on aggregates of spherical aerosol nano particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nie, Chu

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three dimensional integral equation is developed in order to compute water adsorption onto aggregates of spherical aerosol nano particles. The integral equation is derived from molecular density functional theory, with a weighted density...

  4. Recycling of PET bottles as fine aggregate in concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frigione, Mariaenrica, E-mail: mariaenrica.frigione@unisalento.i [Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento, Via per Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An attempt to substitute in concrete the 5% by weight of fine aggregate (natural sand) with an equal weight of PET aggregates manufactured from the waste un-washed PET bottles (WPET), is presented. The WPET particles possessed a granulometry similar to that of the substituted sand. Specimens with different cement content and water/cement ratio were manufactured. Rheological characterization on fresh concrete and mechanical tests at the ages of 28 and 365 days were performed on the WPET/concretes as well as on reference concretes containing only natural fine aggregate in order to investigate the influence of the substitution of WPET to the fine aggregate in concrete. It was found that the WPET concretes display similar workability characteristics, compressive strength and splitting tensile strength slightly lower that the reference concrete and a moderately higher ductility.

  5. Distributed Regulation Allocation with Aggregator Coordinated Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Ben

    Distributed Regulation Allocation with Aggregator Coordinated Electric Vehicles Sun Sun, Min Dong, and Ben Liang Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, Canada Dept. of Electrical, Computer and Software Engineering, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Canada Email

  6. THE SPATIAL AGGREGATION LANGUAGE FOR MODELING AND CONTROLLING DISTRIBUTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    THE SPATIAL AGGREGATION LANGUAGE FOR MODELING AND CONTROLLING DISTRIBUTED PHYSICAL SYSTEMS study novel approaches to decentralized control de- sign, in the context of thermal regulation important science and engineering applications, such as predicting weather patterns, controlling

  7. artificial aggregates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    use of river sand less attractive, a substitute or replacement product for concrete industry needs to be found. River sand is most commonly used fine aggregate in the production...

  8. Aggregation of student answers in a classroom setting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Amanda C

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a typical class, an instructor does not have enough time to poll all students for answers to questions, although it would be the best method for discovering students' misconceptions. The aggregator module of a system ...

  9. Moisture Diffusion in Asphalt Binders and Fine Aggregate Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasconcelos, Kamilla L.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    cost in highway maintenance and vehicle operations. One key mechanism of how moisture reaches the asphalt-aggregate interface is by its permeation or diffusion through the asphalt binder or mastic. Different techniques are available for diffusion...

  10. Interpretation and aggregation of marks in classroom learning partner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Kenneth D

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the mark understanding problem in the context of a Tablet-PC-based classroom interaction system. It presents a novel method for interpreting digital ink strokes on background images, and aggregating ...

  11. Essays on Broad Divisia Monetary Aggregates: Admissibility and Practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattson, Ryan Scott

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The assumption of weak separability of goods and services in the utility function is ubiquitous in macroeconomic modeling. If the goods and services are weakly separable, they can be combined into an "admissible" aggregate. ...

  12. Electron Density Distributions Calculated for the Nickel Sulfides Millerite, Vaesite, and Heazlewoodite and Nickel Metal: A Case for the Importance of Ni-Ni Bond Paths for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert T.

    Electron Density Distributions Calculated for the Nickel Sulfides Millerite, Vaesite, and Heazlewoodite and Nickel Metal: A Case for the Importance of Ni-Ni Bond Paths for Electron Transport G. V. Gibbs's)) have been calculated for the bonded interactions comprising the nickel sulfide minerals millerite, Ni

  13. The 3-stage evolution of the Angouran Zn "oxide"-sulfide deposit, Iran Fakultt Chemie, Technische Universitt Mnchen, Germany albert.gilg@geo.tum.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boni, Maria

    The 3-stage evolution of the Angouran Zn "oxide"-sulfide deposit, Iran H.A. Gilg Fakultät Chemie@unina.it F. Moore Geological Department, University Shiraz, Iran moor@geology.susc.ac.ir Keywords: Angouran, Iran, sulfide, MVT, smithsonite, hypogene, supergene ABSTRACT: The giant Angouran Zn-Pb deposit (Zanjan

  14. Process for fabricating doped zinc oxide microsphere gel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Bond, W.D.; Lauf, R.J.

    1991-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are a new composition and method of making same for a doped zinc oxide microsphere and articles made therefrom for use in an electrical surge arrestor which has increased solid content, uniform grain size and is in the form of a gel. 4 figures.

  15. Process for fabricating doped zinc oxide microsphere gel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jr., Wesley D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bond, Walter D. (Knoxville, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new composition and method of making same for a doped zinc oxide microsphere and articles made therefrom for use in an electrical surge arrestor which has increased solid content, uniform grain size and is in the form of a gel.

  16. Mechanism of zinc-mediated inhibition of caspase-9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Jeanne

    of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 Received 9 February 2012-mediated inhibition is implicated in global caspase regulation, with relief of zinc- mediated inhibition central to both small-molecule and natively induced caspase activation. As an initiator, caspase-9 regulates

  17. Regulation of Zinc Transport in the Choroid Plexus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aquino, Mayra

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    -1, ZnT1 and Zip6 expression at 3 h. Zip1 expression decreased at 3 h. In isolated tissues zinc supplementation up-regulated MT-1 and ZnT1 expression, but did not alter Zip1 and Zip6 expression. These data indicate there is coordinated regulation...

  18. Speciation and bioavailability of zinc in amended sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Aaron G.B.; Scheckel, Kirk G.; McDermott, Gregory; Gratson, David; Neptune, Dean; Ryan, James A.

    2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The speciation and bioavailability of zinc (Zn) in smelter-contaminated sediments were investigated as a function of phosphate (apatite) and organic amendment loading rate. Zinc species identified in preamendment sediment were zinc hydroxide-like phases, sphalerite, and zinc sorbed to an iron oxide via X-ray adsorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Four months after adding the amendments to the contaminated sediment, hopeite, a Zn phosphate mineral, was identified indicating phosphate was binding and sequestering available Zn and Zn pore water concentrations were decreased at levels of 90% or more. Laboratory experiments indicate organic amendments exhibit a limited effect and may hinder sequestration of pore water Zn when mixed with apatite. The acute toxicity of the sediment Zn was evaluated with Hyalella azteca, and bioaccumulation of Zn with Lumbriculus variegates. The survivability of H. azteca increased as a function of phosphate (apatite) loading rate. In contaminated sediment without apatite, no specimens of H. azteca survived. The bioaccumulation of Zn in L. variegates also followed a trend of decreased bioaccumulation with increased phosphate loading in the contaminated sediment. The research supports an association between Zn speciation and bioavailability.

  19. Zinc Speciation in a Smelter-Contaminated Soil Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Zinc Speciation in a Smelter-Contaminated Soil Profile Using Bulk and Microspectroscopic Techniques minerals may have been aerially deposited from the smelter operation. Microspec- troscopy detected also in increased trace metal concentrations and acidic pH values in topsoils in the vicinity of smelter facilities

  20. ZINC--2000 86.1 By Jozef Plachy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , U.S. mine production greatly exceeded smelter capacity (table 6), necessitating exports to the Trail smelter in Canada; the remaining two-thirds went mainly to Asian markets (table 14). Primary zinc metal production by the three primary smelters decreased by more than 5% in 2000 (tables 4, 6). Apparent

  1. A framework for a coarse aggregate classification system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peapully, Srikrishna

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    System 1 . 4 . . 5 . . 6 II OVERVIEW OF EXISTING CLASSIFICATION SYSTEMS . . . . 8 8 14 Soil Classification Systems Rock Classification Systems Previous Efforts in Developing an Aggregate Classification System... for Rocks . . 19 3. 1 Characterization of Aggregate Shape Based on Form Factor Proposed by Folk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 3. 2 Four Shape Categories as Described by Zingg . . 41 3. 3 Surface Texture Characterization Proposed by Kummer . . 42 4. 1...

  2. Fractal and projected structure properties of soot aggregates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koeylue, U.O.; Faeth, G.M. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering] [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering; Farias, T.L.; Carvalho, M.G. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal). Mechanical Engineering Dept.] [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of soot aggregates was investigated, emphasizing the fractal properties as well as the relationship between the properties of actual and projected soot images. This information was developed by considering numerically simulated soot aggregates based on cluster-cluster aggregation as well as measured soot aggregates based on thermophoretic sampling and analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of soot for a variety of fuels (acetylene, propylene, ethylene, and propane) and both laminar and turbulent diffusion flame conditions. It was found that soot aggregate fractal properties are relatively independent of fuel type and flame condition, yielding a fractal dimension of 1.82 and a fractal prefactor of 8.5, with experimental uncertainties (95% confidence) of 0.08 and 0.5, respectively. Relationships between the actual and projected structure properties of soot, e.g., between the number of primary particles and the projected area and between the radius of gyration of an aggregate and its projected image, also are relatively independent of fuel type and flame condition.

  3. A Generalized Eigensolver based on Smoothed Aggregation (GES-SA) for Initializing Smoothed Aggregation Multigrid (SA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brezina, M; Manteuffel, T; McCormick, S; Ruge, J; Sanders, G; Vassilevski, P S

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Consider the linear system Ax = b, where A is a large, sparse, real, symmetric, and positive definite matrix and b is a known vector. Solving this system for unknown vector x using a smoothed aggregation multigrid (SA) algorithm requires a characterization of the algebraically smooth error, meaning error that is poorly attenuated by the algorithm's relaxation process. For relaxation processes that are typically used in practice, algebraically smooth error corresponds to the near-nullspace of A. Therefore, having a good approximation to a minimal eigenvector is useful to characterize the algebraically smooth error when forming a linear SA solver. This paper discusses the details of a generalized eigensolver based on smoothed aggregation (GES-SA) that is designed to produce an approximation to a minimal eigenvector of A. GES-SA might be very useful as a standalone eigensolver for applications that desire an approximate minimal eigenvector, but the primary aim here is for GES-SA to produce an initial algebraically smooth component that may be used to either create a black-box SA solver or initiate the adaptive SA ({alpha}SA) process.

  4. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2013, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , number 248 255 244 252 252 Net import reliance 5 as a percentage of apparent consumption (refined zinc materials included galvanizing residues and crude zinc oxide processed from electric arc furnace dust. Import Sources (2009­12): Ore and concentrate: Peru, 76%; Ireland, 8%; Mexico, 8%; Canada, 7%; and other

  5. RETURN ON INVESTMENT FROM ONLINE BANKING SERVICES: AN ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL ACCOUNT AGGREGATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melo de Brito Carvalho, Tereza

    2003-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The successful adoption of Financial Account Aggregation requires a careful analysis of the business

  6. Cleavage of carbon-sulfur bonds in coal and substituted dibenzyl sulfides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, T.K.; Wang, L.; Estill, W.J.; Bixler, B. [Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S-methylation of a bituminous coal using {sup 13}C-enriched methyl iodide in the presence of silver tetrafluoroborate produces significant quantities of trimethylsulfonium ion as determined by {sup 13}C NMR. This result suggests that carbon-sulfur bonds in coal are being cleaved. In an effort to determine the types of structures in coal responsible for this ion, a series of model substituted dibenzyl sulfides were S-methylated. The substrates included 4,4{prime}dimethoxydibenzylsulfide (1), 4,4{prime}dimethyldibenzylsulfide (2), dibenzylsulfide (3), 4,4{prime}dichlorodibenzylsufide (4). All substrates are cleaved to varying degrees in refluxing DCE (83{degrees}C) to produce a mixture of methyldibenzyl-, dimethylbenzyl- and trimethylsulfonium ions. The relative amounts of these ions depends on the substituent, with the degree of C-S bond cleavage increasing with the electron-donating ability of the substituent in the order (1) > (2) > (3) > (4). A mechanism is proposed consistent with this substituent effect which involves an intermediate benzyl carbocation - sulfide ion-dipole complex.

  7. DddD Is a CoA-Transferase/Lyase Producing Dimethyl Sulfide in the Marine Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tawfik, Dan S.

    features. The Marinomonas DddD gene14,15 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Purification using an NDddD Is a CoA-Transferase/Lyase Producing Dimethyl Sulfide in the Marine Environment Uria/year) and mediates a wide range of processes from regulating marine life forms to cloud formation. Nonetheless, none

  8. On the detection of higher order carbon sulfides (CSx; x = 46) in low temperature carbon disulfide ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    been exploited to trap and to produce carbon sulfur clusters. Pyro- lysis and ultra violet (UVOn the detection of higher order carbon sulfides (CSx; x = 4­6) in low temperature carbon disulfide (CS6, C2) ­ were detected for the first time via infrared spectroscopy in low temperature car- bon

  9. Geochemical, metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into trace metal utilization by methane-oxidizing microbial consortia in sulfidic marine sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, DR. Jennifer [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Yu, DR. Hang [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Steele, Joshua [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Dawson, Katherine [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Sun, S [University of California, San Diego; Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Orphan, V [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbes have obligate requirements for trace metals in metalloenzymes that catalyze important biogeochemical reactions. In anoxic methane- and sulfide-rich environments, microbes may have unique adaptations for metal acquisition and utilization due to decreased bioavailability as a result of metal sulfide precipitation. However, micronutrient cycling is largely unexplored in cold ( 10 C) and sulfidic (>1 mM H2S) deep-sea methane seep ecosystems. We investigated trace metal geochemistry and microbial metal utilization in methane seeps offshore Oregon and California, USA, and report dissolved concentrations of nickel (0.5-270 nM), cobalt (0.5-6 nM), molybdenum (10-5,600 nM) and tungsten (0.3-8 nM) in Hydrate Ridge sediment porewaters. Despite low levels of cobalt and tungsten, metagenomic and metaproteomic data suggest that microbial consortia catalyzing anaerobic oxidation of methane utilize both scarce micronutrients in addition to nickel and molybdenum. Genetic machinery for cobalt-containing vitamin B12 biosynthesis was present in both anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Proteins affiliated with the tungsten-containing form of formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase were expressed in ANME from two seep ecosystems, the first evidence for expression of a tungstoenzyme in psychrotolerant microorganisms. Finally, our data suggest that chemical speciation of metals in highly sulfidic porewaters may exert a stronger influence on microbial bioavailability than total concentration

  10. Generation of DNA-Damaging Reactive Oxygen Species via the Autoxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide under Physiologically Relevant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, Kent. S.

    Generation of DNA-Damaging Reactive Oxygen Species via the Autoxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide under found that micromolar concentrations of H2S generated single-strand DNA cleavage. Mechanistic studies indicate that this process involved autoxidation of H2S to generate superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and

  11. Linking Microbial Community Structure to ?-Glucosidic Function in Soil Aggregates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Vanessa L.; Fansler, Sarah J.; Stegen, James C.; McCue, Lee Ann

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To link microbial community 16S structure to a measured function in a natural soil we have scaled both DNA and ?-glucosidase assays down to a volume of soil that may approach a unique microbial community. ?-glucosidase activity was assayed in 450 individual aggregates which were then sorted into classes of high or low activities, from which groups of 10 or 11 aggregates were identified and grouped for DNA extraction and pyrosequencing. Tandem assays of ATP were conducted for each aggregate in order to normalize these small groups of aggregates for biomass size. In spite of there being no significant differences in the richness or diversity of the microbial communities associated with high ?-glucosidase activities compared with the communities associated with low ?-glucosidase communities, several analyses of variance clearly show that the communities of these two groups differ. The separation of these groups is partially driven by the differential abundances of members of the Chitinophagaceae family. It may be that observed functional differences in otherwise similar soil aggregates can be largely attributed to differences in resource availability, rather than to presence or absence of particular taxonomic groups.

  12. THE WEATHERING OF A SULFIDE OREBODY: SPECIATION AND FATE OF SOME POTENTIAL CONTAMINANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courtin-Nomade, Alexandra; Grosbois, Cecile; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Beny, Jean Michel; Foster, Andrea L.

    2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Various potentially toxic trace elements such as As, Cu, Pb and Zn have been remobilized by the weathering of a sulfide orebody that was only partially mined at Leona Heights, California. As a result, this body has both natural and anthropogenically modified weathering profiles only 500 m apart. The orebody is located in a heavily urbanized area in suburban Oakland, and directly affects water quality in at least one stream by producing acidic conditions and relatively high concentrations of dissolved elements (e.g., {approx}500 mg/L Cu, {approx}3700 mg/L Zn). Micrometric-scale mineralogical investigations were performed on the authigenic metal-bearing phases (less than 10 {mu}m in size) using electron-probe micro-analysis (EPMA), micro-Raman, micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy (mXAS), scanning X-ray diffraction (mSXRD) and scanning X-ray fluorescence (mSXRF) mapping techniques. Those measurements were coupled with classical mineralogical laboratory techniques, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Authigenic metal-bearing phases identified are mainly sulfates (jarosite, epsomite, schwertmannite), Fe (oxy-)hydroxides (goethite, hematite and poorly crystalline Fe products) and poorly crystalline Mn (hydr-)oxides. Sulfates and Fe (oxy-)hydroxides are the two main secondary products at both sites, whereas Mn (hydr-) oxides were only observed in the samples from the non-mining site. In these samples, the various trace elements show different affinities for Fe or Mn compounds. Lead is preferentially associated with Mn (hydr-)oxides and As with Fe (oxy-)hydroxides or sulfates. Copper association with Mn and Fe phases is questionable, and the results obtained rather indicate that Cu is present as individual Cu-rich grains (Cu hydroxides). Some ochreous precipitates were found at both sites and correspond to a mixture of schwertmannite, goethite and jarosite containing some potentially toxic trace elements such as Cu, Pb and Zn. According to the trace element distribution and relative abundance of the unweathered sulfides, this orebody still represents a significant reservoir of potential contaminants for the watershed, especially in the non-mining site, as a much greater proportion of sulfides is left to react and because of the lower porosity in this site.

  13. Structural and magnetic properties of chromium doped zinc ferrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sebastian, Rintu Mary; Thankachan, Smitha; Xavier, Sheena; Mohammed, E. M., E-mail: emmohammed2005@gmail.com [Research Department of Physics, Maharaja's College, Ernakulam, Kerala (India); Joseph, Shaji [Department of Physic, St. Albert's College, Ernakulam, Kerala (India)

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Zinc chromium ferrites with chemical formula ZnCr{sub x}Fe{sub 2?x}O{sub 4} (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0) were prepared by Sol - Gel technique. The structural as well as magnetic properties of the synthesized samples have been studied and reported here. The structural characterizations of the samples were analyzed by using X – Ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The single phase spinel cubic structure of all the prepared samples was tested by XRD and FTIR. The particle size was observed to decrease from 18.636 nm to 6.125 nm by chromium doping and induced a tensile strain in all the zinc chromium mixed ferrites. The magnetic properties of few samples (x = 0.0, 0.4, 1.0) were investigated using Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM)

  14. Electrical transport behavior of nonstoichiometric magnesium-zinc ferrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghatak, S. [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Deemed University, Mahatma Gandhi Avenue, Durgapur 713209, West Bengal (India)] [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Deemed University, Mahatma Gandhi Avenue, Durgapur 713209, West Bengal (India); Sinha, M. [Department of Physics, University of Burdwan, Golapbag, Burdwan 713104, West Bengal (India)] [Department of Physics, University of Burdwan, Golapbag, Burdwan 713104, West Bengal (India); Meikap, A.K., E-mail: meikapnitd@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Deemed University, Mahatma Gandhi Avenue, Durgapur 713209, West Bengal (India); Pradhan, S.K. [Department of Physics, University of Burdwan, Golapbag, Burdwan 713104, West Bengal (India)] [Department of Physics, University of Burdwan, Golapbag, Burdwan 713104, West Bengal (India)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the direct current conductivity, alternate current conductivity and dielectric properties of nonstoichiometric magnesium-zinc ferrite below room temperature. The frequency exponent (s) of conductivity shows an anomalous temperature dependency. The magnitude of the temperature exponent (n) of dielectric permittivity strongly depends on frequency and its value decreases with increasing frequency. The grain boundary contribution is dominating over the grain contribution in conduction process and the temperature dependence of resistance due to grain and grain boundary contribution exhibits two activation regions. The ferrite shows positive alternating current magnetoconductivity. The solid state processing technique was used for the preparation of nanocrystalline ferrite powder from oxides of magnesium, zinc and iron. The X-ray diffraction methods were used in determining the structure and composition of obtained ferrite, while multimeter, impedance analyzer, liquid nitrogen cryostat and electromagnet were used in the study of conducting and dielectric properties of ferrite.

  15. Complexation effects in the electrodeposition of nickel-zinc alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melville, A.; Harris, T. [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nickel-zinc alloy electrodeposition system exhibits a phenomenon known as anomalous codeposition, where the less noble metal (Zn) deposits preferentially to the more noble metal (Ni). One explanation for this behavior is that zinc hydroxide adsorbs to the surface of the electrode and inhibits the electrodeposition of the nickel. This mechanism is being tested through the use of {open_quotes}selective{close_quotes} complexing agents for Ni{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}. The complexation behavior of these ions with citrate, aspartate and pyrophosphate ions is being characterized by potentiometric titration and polarographic measurements. The effect of these complexants on the electrodeposition of the alloys is also being studied.

  16. Zinc Adsorption Effects on Arsenite Oxidation Kinetics at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Zinc Adsorption Effects on Arsenite Oxidation Kinetics at the Birnessite-Water Interface L A U R), directly oxidized As(III). However, these studies did not explore the role that cation adsorption has on As at the birnessite-water interface were investigated using batch adsorption experiments (0.1 g L-1; pH 4.5 and 6.0; I

  17. Natural Attenuation of Zinc Pollution in Smelter-Affected Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natural Attenuation of Zinc Pollution in Smelter-Affected Soil M . V E S P A , M . L A N S O N structural character- ization of the two types of Zn-containing phyllosilicate in slightly basic smelter to the smelter and wind direction, is ferruginous with an average Fe/Al atomic ratio of 1.1 ( 0.5. The Zn2

  18. Zinc sorption by iron oxides and soil samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yli-Halla, Markku Juhani

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Head of Department) May 1989 ABSTRACT Zinc Sorption by Iron Oxides and Soil Samples. (May 1989) Markku Juhani Yli-Halla, M. S. University of Helsinki, Finland Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Richard H. Loeppert Zn sorption by synthetic Fe oxide... and soil samples was studied. The purpose was to examine the effect of crystallinity and adsorbed silica on Zn adsorption by synthetic Fe oxide using goethite and ferrihydrite as test materials. Zn sorption by acid soil samples from Finland and a...

  19. Ferrofluid aggregates phase transitions in the planar magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. F. Kovalenko; M. V. Petrychuk; B. M. Tanygin; S. I. Shulyma

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of the cyclic heating and cooling on properties of the aggregates (aka "ferrofluid clusters") in a ferrofluid, which made on the basis of magnetite nanoparticles, are investigated. The heating of the ferrofluid layer with such aggregates leads to equalization of the concentration between high- and low-concentrated phases. The temperature of the equalization of the phase concentrations was determined at different values of an external constant magnetic field, which was applied parallel to the layer of the ferrofluid. The temperature of the destruction of a periodic structure of the magnetic aggregates, which were formed during cooling of a homogeneous phase of the ferrofluid, was obtained at the different values of the applied external magnetic field.

  20. Stray thermal influences in zinc fixed-point cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudtsch, S.; Aulich, A.; Monte, C. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)] [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of thermal effects is a major uncertainty contribution to the calibration of Standard Platinum Resistance Thermometers (SPRTs) in fixed-point cells. Axial heat losses strongly depend on the fixed-point temperature, constructional details of cells and SPRTs and the resulting heat transfer between cell, thermometer, furnace and environment. At the zinc point contributions by heat conduction and thermal radiation must be considered. Although the measurement of temperature gradients in the re-entrant well of a fixed-point cell provides very important information about the influence of axial heat losses, further investigations are required for a reliable estimate of the resulting uncertainty contribution. It is shown that specific modifications of a zinc fixed-point cell, following generally accepted principles, may result in systematic deviations of the measured fixed-point temperatures larger than typically stated in the uncertainty budget of National Metrology Institutes (NMIs). The underlying heat transport processes are investigated and the consequences for the construction of zinc cells are discussed.

  1. Lead-selective membrane potentiometric sensor based on a recently synthesized bis(anthraquinone) sulfide derivative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pouretedal, H.R.; Forghaniha, A.; Sharghi, H. [Shiraz Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry; Shamsipur, M. [Razi Univ., Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for monitoring of toxic heavy metal ions in environmental samples has prompted the development of ion-selective electrodes for these ions. A new PVC membrane electrode for lead ions, based on bis[(1-hydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone)-2-methyl]sulfide as membrane carrier, was prepared. The sensor exhibits a Nernstian response for Pb{sup 2+} over a wide concentration range (5.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}--4.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M). It has a response time of about 30 s and can be used for at least 3 months without any divergence in potentials. The proposed membrane sensor revealed good selectivities for Pb{sup 2+} over a wide variety of other metal ions. It was used as an indicator electrode in potentiometric titration of lead ion.

  2. Aqueous Dissolution of Silver Iodide and Associated Iodine Release Under Reducing Conditions with Sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaohiro Inagaki; Toshitaka Imamura; Kazuya Idemitsu; Tatsumi Arima [Kyushu University, Fukuoka, 819-0395 (Japan); Osamu Kato [Kobe Steel Inc., Kobe, 657-0845 (Japan); Hidekazu Asano; Tsutomu Nishimura [RWMC, Tokyo, 105-0001 (Japan)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aqueous dissolution tests of silver iodide (AgI) were performed in Na{sub 2}S solutions in order to evaluate, empirically, dissolution of AgI to release iodine under reducing conditions with sulfide. The results indicated that AgI dissolves to release iodine being controlled by mainly precipitation of Ag{sub 2}S. However, the dissolution of AgI can be depressed to proceed, and the thermodynamic equilibrium cannot be attained easily. Solid phase analysis for the reacted AgI suggested that a thin layer of solid silver forming at AgI surface may evolve to be protective against transportation of reactant species, which can lead to the depression in the dissolution of AgI. (authors)

  3. Method of recovering sulfur from the hydrogen sulfide contained in coke oven gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laufhutte, D.

    1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide are washed out of the coke oven gas and stripped from the wash liquor in the form of gases and fumes or vapors. The ammonia is decomposed in a nickel catalyzer and a small part of the decomposition gases is supplied directly to a combustion furnace, while the larger part of the combustion gases is first cooled and freed from condensate, and only then supplied to the combustion furnace. In the combustion furnace, the proportion of H/sub 2/S/SO/sub 2/ needed for the Claus process is adjusted by a partial combustion of the decomposition gases. The gases from the combustion furnace are then processed in the Claus plant to sulfur.

  4. The permanent electric dipole moment of thorium sulfide, ThS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le, Anh; Steimle, Timothy C., E-mail: Tsteimle@ASU.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604 (United States); Heaven, Michael C. [Department of Chemistry, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous rotational lines of the (18.26)1-X{sup 1}?{sup +} band system of thorium sulfide, ThS, were recorded near 547.6 nm at a resolution of approximately 30 MHz. Measurements were made under field-free conditions, and in the presence of a static electric field. The field-free spectrum was analyzed to produce rotational and ?-doubling parameters. The Stark shifts induced by the electric field were analyzed to determine permanent electric dipole moments, ?{sup -vector}{sub el}, of 4.58(10) D and 6.72(5) D for the X{sup 1}?{sup +} (v = 0) and (18.26)1 states, respectively. The results are compared with the predictions of previous and new electronic structure calculations for ThS, and the properties of isovalent ThO.

  5. Chemical bath deposition of cadmium sulfide on graphene-coated flexible glass substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Won-Oh; Jung, Younghun; Kim, Jihyun, E-mail: hyunhyun7@korea.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Korea University, Anam-dong, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jiwan [Flexible Display Research Center, Korea Electronics Technology Institute, Yatap-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-816 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Donghwan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a flexible structure of cadmium sulfide (CdS) on graphene-coated glass substrate, where CdS was deposited by the chemical bath deposition method on defective tri-layer graphene. The defects in graphene, confirmed by micro-Raman spectroscopy, were created by a ultra-violet treatment with varying exposure time from 10 to 60?min. The number of defect sites in the graphene as a seed layer was related to the quality of the CdS thin films determined from the results from X-ray diffraction, optical transmittance, scanning electron microscopy, and room temperature micro-photoluminescence. Our film-on-substrate structure of CdS-graphene-on-glass was maintained up to a tensile strain of 0.3%, where graphene with a high failure strain was employed as a transparent conductive layer.

  6. Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for Nonthermal Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris Argyle; John Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Gui-Bing Zhao; Sanil John; Ji-Jun Zhang; Linna Wang

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this experimental project was to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a nonthermal plasma and to recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), but it was not achieved at the moderate pressure conditions used in this study. However, H{sub 2}S was successfully decomposed at energy efficiencies higher than any other reports for the high H{sub 2}S concentration and moderate pressures (corresponding to high reactor throughputs) used in this study.

  7. Environmental effects of dredging: Naturally occurring levels of ammonia and sulfide in pore water: An assessment of the literature. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ammonia and sulfide are natural constituents of sediment. Both are very toxic to aquatic organisms. Consequently, their presence may bias dredged material toxicity bioassays that are designed to evaluate the toxicity of persistent contaminants such as heavy metals and petroleum and chlorinated hydrocarbons. The purpose of this technical note is to summarize published information on sediment pore water ammonia and sulfide concentrations that occur in situ. In a subsequent technical note, this exposure information will be coupled with ammonia and sulfide toxicity data to estimate the potential influence of these constituents on dredged material toxicity bioassays.

  8. Markov Modeling with Soft Aggregation for Safety and Decision Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    COOPER,J. ARLIN

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The methodology in this report improves on some of the limitations of many conventional safety assessment and decision analysis methods. A top-down mathematical approach is developed for decomposing systems and for expressing imprecise individual metrics as possibilistic or fuzzy numbers. A ''Markov-like'' model is developed that facilitates combining (aggregating) inputs into overall metrics and decision aids, also portraying the inherent uncertainty. A major goal of Markov modeling is to help convey the top-down system perspective. One of the constituent methodologies allows metrics to be weighted according to significance of the attribute and aggregated nonlinearly as to contribution. This aggregation is performed using exponential combination of the metrics, since the accumulating effect of such factors responds less and less to additional factors. This is termed ''soft'' mathematical aggregation. Dependence among the contributing factors is accounted for by incorporating subjective metrics on ''overlap'' of the factors as well as by correspondingly reducing the overall contribution of these combinations to the overall aggregation. Decisions corresponding to the meaningfulness of the results are facilitated in several ways. First, the results are compared to a soft threshold provided by a sigmoid function. Second, information is provided on input ''Importance'' and ''Sensitivity,'' in order to know where to place emphasis on considering new controls that may be necessary. Third, trends in inputs and outputs are tracked in order to obtain significant information% including cyclic information for the decision process. A practical example from the air transportation industry is used to demonstrate application of the methodology. Illustrations are given for developing a structure (along with recommended inputs and weights) for air transportation oversight at three different levels, for developing and using cycle information, for developing Importance and Sensitivity measures for soil aggregation, for developing dependence methodology, for constructing early alert logic, for tracking trends, for relating the Markov model to other (e.g., Reason) models, for developing and demonstrating rudimentary laptop software, and for developing an input/output display methodology.

  9. Manganese sulfide formation via concomitant microbial manganese oxide and thiosulfate reduction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kennedy, David W.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Moore, Dean A.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Reed, Samantha B.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 produced ?-MnS (rambergite) nanoparticles under the concurrent reduction of synthetic MnO2 and thiosulfate coupled to H2 oxidation. Using two MR-1 mutants defective in outer membrane c-type cytochromes (?mtrC/?omcA and ?mtrC/?omcA/?mtrF) to eliminate the direct reduction pathway for solid electron acceptors, it was determined that respiratory reduction of MnO2 was dominant relative to chemical reduction by biogenic sulfide generated from bacterial thiosulfate reduction. Although bicarbonate was excluded from the medium, incubations of MR-1 using lactate as the sole electron donor produced MnCO3 (rhodochrosite) as well as MnS in nearly equivalent amounts as estimated by micro X-ray diffraction (micro-XRD) analysis. It was concluded that carbonate released from lactate metabolism promoted MnCO3 formation and that Mn(II) mineralogy was strongly affected by carbonate ions even in the presence of abundant sulfide and weakly alkaline conditions that favor the precipitation of MnS. Formation of the biogenic MnS, as determined by a combination of micro-XRD, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction analyses was consistent with equilibrium speciation modeling predictions. Although biogenic MnS likely only forms and is stable over a relatively narrow range of conditions, it may be a significant sink for Mn in anoxic marine basins and terrestrial subsurface sediments where Mn and sulfur compounds are undergoing concurrent reduction.

  10. Municipal Aggregation and Retail Competition in the Ohio Energy Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Littlechild, Stephen C

    communities Actual number of aggregating communities Ratio Actual to Proportionate Average low income electricity bill 2002 First Energy CEI 0.7 31 104 3.35 $77 OE 1.1 49 65 1.33 $67 TE 0.3 13 14 1.08 CGE/Duke 0.7 31 8 0.26 $52... should be drawn? Is municipal aggregation an efficient competitive mechanism, more 4 NOPEC July 2004, cited in Colton (2006) pp. 6,7. 5 NOPEC Year-end Report 2005. 6 Ohio Regulatory Update, Strategic Energy at http...

  11. Aggregate productivity in the United States, 1929-82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosko, Linda Ann

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AGGREGATE PRODUCTIVITY IN THE UNITED STATES, 1929-82 A Thesis by LINDA ANN KOSKO submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1984 Major... Subject: Economics AGGREGATE PRODUCTIVITY IN THE UNITED STATES, 1929-82 A Thesis by LINDA ANN KOSKO Approved as to style and content by: Hae-Shin Hwa (Chairman of Comm ttee) Rudo h J. Freund ( mber) David P. Schutte (Member) John R. Moroney...

  12. Aggregation of induction machines for power system dynamic studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taleb, M.; Akbaba, M.; Abdullah, E.A. (Univ. of Bahrain, Isa Town (Bahrain). Electrical Engineering Dept.)

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes a method for the aggregation of induction motor loads. Thevenin theorem along with some transient characteristics of induction machine are used in calculating the parameters of the equivalent machine. The dynamic response of the resultant machine differs from the sum of the dynamic responses of the individual machines. For a diversified group of induction machines, at least two separate aggregate machines are needed to represent the overall dynamic performance of the machines. To this end, a handy index for the classification (grouping) of machines is suggested. Comparison between the results obtained from the proposed method and corresponding ones obtained from some of the published methods is also presented.

  13. Increasing the thermoelectric figure of merit of tetrahedrites by Co-doping with nickel and zinc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, X; Morelli, DT; Morelli, DT; Xia, Y; Ozolins, V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by  Co-­? doping  with  Nickel  and  Zinc   Xu  Lu 1 ,  t 2g   states   of   nickel   indeed   lie   in   the  of   the   dopant  nickel  ions.  While  one  could  

  14. Flexographically Printed Rechargeable Zinc-based Battery for Grid Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zuoqian

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integration with photovoltaic cells: Research on integrationof printable photovoltaic cell, zinc-based battery as wellpower harvesting using photovoltaic cells for lower-power

  15. Hydrocracking with molten zinc chloride catalyst containing 2-12% ferrous chloride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zielke, Clyde W. (McMurray, PA); Bagshaw, Gary H. (Library, PA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy aromatic polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce hydrocarbon fuels boiling below about 475.degree. C. by contacting the feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten zinc chloride catalyst and thereafter separating at least a major portion of the hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten zinc chloride catalyst, an improvement comprising: adjusting the FeCl.sub.2 content of the molten zinc chloride to from about 2 to about 12 mol percent based on the mixture of ferrous chloride and molten zinc chloride.

  16. Does convective aggregation need to be represented in cumulus parameterizations?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Does convective aggregation need to be represented in cumulus parameterizations? Isabelle Tobin,1 in phenomena such as ``hot spots'' or the Madden-Julian Oscillation. These findings support the need climate models lack any such representation. The ability of a cloud system- resolving model to reproduce

  17. Phase-locked rhythms in periodically stimulated heart cell aggregates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glass, Leon

    Phase-locked rhythms in periodically stimulated heart cell aggregates MICHAEL R. GUEVARA, ALVIN GUEVARA,MICHAEL R., ALVIN SHRIER,ANDLEONGLASS. Phase-locked rhythms in periodically stimulated heart cell, THE SINOATRIAL NODE acts as the pace- maker of the heart. As a result of the orderly spread of excitation

  18. Lattice Models of Peptide Aggregation: Evaluation of Conformational Search Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    , University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, United Kingdom 2 School of Computer Science and Information Technology represented by a face-centered cubic lattice model with the conformational energies calculated using or by partial unfolding of the protein from its native state. One striking feature of protein aggregation

  19. amyloid beta aggregation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    amyloid beta aggregation First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Computational Insights into...

  20. aggregated amyloid beta: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aggregated amyloid beta First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Computational Insights into...

  1. Effect of Dispersant on Asphaltene Suspension Dynamics: Aggregation and Sedimentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    processes, most involving scat- tering, either dynamic light scattering, static light scattering, or neutron on this aggregation behavior through the use of dynamic light scattering, showing that both the amount of dispersant asphaltene suspensions. The light scattering results match well with those obtained through the macroscopic

  2. Quantitative Models for Operational Risk: Extremes, Dependence and Aggregation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Embrechts, Paul

    risk data lend themselves easily to a full quantitative analysis. For example, legal risk defiesQuantitative Models for Operational Risk: Extremes, Dependence and Aggregation V. Chavez, the financial industry is looking for qualitative approaches to and quantitative models for operational risk

  3. BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS A probable spawning aggregation of the leather bass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of herbivores that facilitate leather bass predation on benthic fishes and crustaceans (Montgomery, 1975). Of the 122 reef fish species in Revillagigedo recorded on scuba dives in February 2006, the leather bassBRIEF COMMUNICATIONS A probable spawning aggregation of the leather bass Dermatolepis dermatolepis

  4. Medians and Beyond: New Aggregation Techniques for Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jie

    databases, Query processing General Terms Algorithms Keywords Sensor Networks, Aggregation, Approximation Algorithms, Dis­ tributed Algorithms # The authors were supported by NSF grant IIS­0121562 and Army Research Organisation grant DAAD19­03­D­0004 through the In­ stitute for Collaborative Biotechnologies. Permission

  5. Medians and Beyond: New Aggregation Techniques for Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Soma

    databases, Query processing General Terms Algorithms, Performance Keywords Sensor Networks, Aggregation, Approximation Algorithms, Dis- tributed Algorithms The authors were supported by NSF grant IIS-0121562 and Army Research Organisation grant DAAD19-03-D-0004 through the In- stitute for Collaborative Biotechnologies

  6. Intra-Aggregate Mass Transport-Limited Bioavailability of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockne, Karl J.

    and high octanol-water partition coef- ficients (1). In aquatic environments PAHs tend to partition Brunswick, New Jersey 08901 Biodegradation kinetics for three- and four-ring PAHs by Mycobacterium sp-aggregate mass transport limitations were compared with abiotic PAH desorption kinetics. The results indicate

  7. The Mathematical Analysis of Biological Aggregation and Dispersal: Progress,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Othmer, Hans

    . coli, to flocks of birds, schools of fish, and herds of ungulates. Aggregation is a broad term, which to an external signal specific terms may be used: swarming in insects, flocking in birds, schooling in fishes organization, such as alignment in fish schools, which undoubtedly involves at least nearest

  8. Aggregate Node Placements in Sensor Networks Weifa Liang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Weifa

    help prolong the lifetime of a sensor network substantially. Therefore, energy efficient data gatherAggregate Node Placements in Sensor Networks Weifa Liang DCS ANU Canberra, Australia Guanjun Ma DCS into a region of interest to form a sensor network and building a routing tree for data gathering at the same

  9. Slippery diffusion-limited aggregation Clair R. Seager1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Eric R.

    can translationally diffuse over the surface of the other. By contrast, shear-rigid bonding createsSlippery diffusion-limited aggregation Clair R. Seager1, * and Thomas G. Mason2, 1 Department attractions in liquids form irreversible "slippery" bonds that are not shear-rigid. Through event

  10. Minimum Cost Data Aggregation with Localized Processing for Statistical Inference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anandkumar, Animashree

    Minimum Cost Data Aggregation with Localized Processing for Statistical Inference Animashree--The problem of minimum cost in-network fusion of measurements, collected from distributed sensors via multihop, which implies that any Steiner- tree approximation can be employed for minimum cost fusion with the same

  11. Discrete molecular dynamics simulations of peptide aggregation B. Urbanc,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    may allow for further aggregation of model peptides to form elongated fibrils. DOI: 10.1103/Phys structural features for these amyloid fibrils: the presence of a 4.7­4.8 Ĺ interstrand spacing along of fibril formation, our knowledge of the de- tailed fibrillar structure and mechanisms of amyloid assem

  12. Statistical Analysis of Cellular Aggregates in Immunofluorescence Histology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Mike

    specific cell-surface molecules and conjugated to fluorophores. These light-sensitive dyes emit light aggregates in immunofluorescent images. We model the spatial distribution of cells as a heterogeneous point components of post-immunization lymph nodes such as B-cell follicles and germinal centers. 1 Introduction

  13. Hollow hemispherical titanium dioxide aggregates fabricated by coaxial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    hemispherical titanium dioxide aggregates fabricated by coaxial electrospray for dye-sensitized solar cell nanocrystallites were prepared by a coaxial electrospray method and applied to dye- sensitized solar cells (DSCs-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). [DOI: 10.1117/1.JNP.6.063519] Keywords dye-sensitized solar cells; hollow

  14. TIME-DECAYING SKETCHES FOR ROBUST AGGREGATION OF SENSOR DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cormode, Graham

    , AND BOJIAN XU§ Abstract. We present a new sketch for summarizing network data. The sketch has the follow- ing, such as sensor networks: the sketch is duplicate-insensitive, i.e. re-insertions of the same data will not affect. sensor network, data streams, time decay, asynchrony, data aggregation, duplicates AMS subject

  15. Stability and Aggregation of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles in Natural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardinale, Bradley J.

    dispersed three different metal oxide nanoparticles (TiO2, ZnO and CeO2) in samples taken from eight,river,andgroundwater,andmeasuredtheirelectrophoretic mobility, state of aggregation, and rate of sedimentation.g., sunscreens, paints, coatings, catalysts). A simplified con- ceptual model of a typical nanoparticle life

  16. aggregate health care: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aggregate health care First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Health care CiteSeer Summary: n...

  17. AN AGGREGATION-BASED DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION PRECONDITIONER FOR GROUNDWATER FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Our analysis uses the standard finite element framework from [18,24]. The preconditioner also works well in the context of finite differences, however, as some of the examples in £ 3 illustrateAN AGGREGATION-BASED DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION PRECONDITIONER FOR GROUNDWATER FLOW E. W. JENKINS ¡, C

  18. Probabilistic Data Aggregation In Distributed Anthony D. Joseph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Anthony D.

    . Kubiatowicz Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California at Berkeley Technical Report- tivity of large-scale data aggregation networks to the loss of data. Our approach leverages multi involuntary data loss while minimizing overall impact on accuracy. Further, this technique permits nodes

  19. A Distributed Throttling Approach for Handling High Bandwidth Aggregates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lui, John C.S.

    bandwidth aggregates that may occur during times of flooding- based DDoS attacks or flash crowds. The often attention are distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks and flash crowds[12]. In a DDoS attack, attackers of the congestion points) from overload. Consider a network server, say , experiencing a DDoS attack. To protect

  20. A Distributed Throttling Approach for Handling High Bandwidth Aggregates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yau, David K Y

    by high bandwidth aggregates that may occur during times of flooding-based DDoS attacks or flash crowds) are stable under given delay bounds. Index Terms--Resource management, DDoS attacks, network security. Ç 1 attention are distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks and flash crowds [7]. In a DDoS attack, attackers

  1. Tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (TPA) as a membrane-permeable chelator for interception of biological mobile zinc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Zhen

    We report the characterization of tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (TPA) as a membrane-permeable zinc chelator for intercepting biological mobile zinc. Compared to N,N,N?,N?-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN), TPA ...

  2. Investigating the Aggregation of the Basic Leucine Zipper (bZIP) Domain of Activating Transcription Factor 5 (ATF5)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciaccio, Natalie Anne

    2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Protein aggregation is a major problem for biopharmaceuticals. Aggregate formation in a drug formulation can have serious health implications for the patient. While the control of protein aggregation is critically important ...

  3. Commercial Building Tenant Energy Usage Data Aggregation and Privacy: Technical Appendix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, Olga V.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Anderson, David M.

    2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical appendix accompanies report PNNL–23786 “Commercial Building Tenant Energy Usage Data Aggregation and Privacy”. The objective is to provide background information on the methods utilized in the statistical analysis of the aggregation thresholds.

  4. Efficient Föster energy transfer : from phosphorescent organic molecules to J-aggregate thin film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirasaki, Yasuhiro

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis demonstrates the first ever use of Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to increase the quantum efficiency of a electrically pumped J-aggregate light emitting device (JLED). J-aggregate thin films are highly ...

  5. The development of correlations between HMA pavement performance and aggregate shape properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGahan, Jeremy

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical characteristics of aggregates (form, angularity, and texture) are known to affect the performance of hot mix asphalt (HMA) pavements. Efforts to develop relationships between these aggregate characteristics ...

  6. Narrow-Band Absorption-Enhanced Quantum Dot/J-Aggregate Conjugates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Brian J.

    We report narrow-band absorption enhancement of semiconductor nanocrystals via Förster resonance energy transfer from cyanine J-aggregates. These J-aggregated dyes associate electrostatically with short quantum-dot (QD) ...

  7. Amino-terminal domain stability mediates apolipoprotein E aggregation into neurotoxic fibrils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatters, Danny M; Zhong, Ning; Rutenber, Earl; Weisgraber, Karl H

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of self-association of apoE tetramer into aggregates. (a).presence of 100 µg/ml apoE4 tetramer incubated at 37 o C forstructure between apoE4 tetramer and aggregate. (a). CD

  8. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1995 was about $700 million. Essentially all came from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use were used principally by the agricultural, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts--United States: 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995e Production: Mine, recoverable 518 523 488 570 600 Primary slab zinc 253

  9. Regular Article Effects of erythrocyte deformability and aggregation on the cell free layer and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popel, Aleksander S.

    , and sickle cell anemia (Popel and Johnson, 2005).The underlying mechanism of RBC aggregation is still under

  10. Investigation of the bond and tensile capacity of synthetic lightweight aggregates embedded in a cement matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nichols, Gisela Wagner

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aggregates. A disoussion of the design and oonstruotion of the equipmsnt of the testing method is presented~ iv ABSTRACT CONTINUED Eight batohes of differently shaped pieces of seven types of lightweight aggregates were tested and are evaluated.... . Almost all of the aggregate pieces failed in tension. The approximate tensile strengths are caloulated and compared to the dry unit weights and bulk specific gravities of the various aggregates. Three conolusions are presented and six recommendations...

  11. Cathodic hydrogen embrittlement of a 22% chromium 5% nickel duplex stainless steel in sulfide containing 3.5 wt% NaCl solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, S.Y. [Industrial Technology Research Inst., Hsinchu (Taiwan, Province of China). Materials Research Labs.; Shih, H.C. [National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Yen, K.P. [National Chung Hsing Univ., Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China). Inst. of Materials Engineering

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of a 2,205 duplex stainless steel has been studied by slow straining of tensile specimens in sulfide containing 3.5 wt% NaCl solution. A more complex sulfide-concentration-dependent loss in ductility was discovered at controlled potentials in {minus}1,100 mV (SCE). It is believed that HE was controlled by the critical concentration of S as a promoter at lower sulfide levels and recovery of ductility at higher sulfide concentrations was attributed to the role of the sulfide as a cathodic inhibitor. No stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was observed at anodic polarization in this system. The electrochemical results indicate that the corrosion potentials of 2,205 duplex stainless steel in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution move to the less noble direction with increasing the sulfide concentration or with decreasing the solution acidity. This trend was not influenced by the presence of dissolved oxygen. Under severe HE environments transgranular cleavage is the favored path for cracking.

  12. New technology for sulfide reduction and increased oil recovery. Second quarter progress report, September 7, 1997--December 8, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Project work was initiated by Geo-Microbial Technologies, Inc. (GMT), Ochelata, Oklahoma for Contract Number DE-FG01-97EE15659 on June 18, 1997. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate reduction of sulfide contamination, as well as possible improvement of production in oil and gas production systems. This will be accomplished by application of the BioCompetitive Exclusion (BCX) process developed by GMT. A broad spectrum of well types and geographical locations is anticipated. The BCX process is designed to manipulate indigenous reservoir bacteria with the addition of synergistic inorganic chemical formulae. These treatments will stimulate growth of beneficial microbes, while suppressing metabolic activity of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), the primary source of harmful sulfide production.

  13. Influence of technological factors on statics of hydrogen sulfide absorption from coke-oven gas by the ammonia process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazarov, V.G.; Kamennykh, B.M.; Rus'yanov, N.D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The basic technological factors that determine the effectiveness of hydrogen sulfide absorption from coke-oven gas by the cyclic ammonia process are the initial H/sub 2/S content of the gas, the degree of purification, the absorption temperature and the NH/sub 3/ and CO/sub 2/ contents of the absorbent solution. The effects of these factors on the statics of hydrogen sulfide absorption are studied. The investigation is based on the phase-equilibrium distributions of components in the absorption-desorption gas-cleaning cycle. The mathematical model is presented which includes the solution of a system of chemical equilibrium equations for reactions in the solution, material balances, and electrical neutrality. 4 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  14. Examinations of Oxidation and Sulfidation of Grain Boundaries in Alloy 600 Exposed to Simulated Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Saxey, David W.; Kruska, Karen; Moore, K. L.; Lozano-Perez, Sergio; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution characterizations of intergranular attack in alloy 600 (Ni-17Cr-9Fe) exposed to 325 °C simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water have been conducted using a combination of scanning electron microscopy, NanoSIMS, analytical transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. The intergranular attack exhibited a two-stage microstructure that consisted of continuous corrosion/oxidation to a depth of ~200 nm from the surface followed by discrete Cr-rich sulfides to a further depth of ~500 nm. The continuous oxidation region contained primarily nanocrystalline MO-structure oxide particles and ended at Ni-rich, Cr-depleted grain boundaries with spaced CrS precipitates. Three-dimensional characterization of the sulfidized region using site-specific atom probe tomography revealed extraordinary grain boundary composition changes, including total depletion of Cr across a several nm wide dealloyed zone as a result of grain boundary migration.

  15. Dual battery sets including zinc MnO{sub 2} rechargeable cells on constant power tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumm, B. Jr.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric vehicle power requirements typically are much greater than what would be recommended for rechargeable zinc manganese dioxide alkaline batteries. In order to use the zinc manganese dioxide system as an economical power source for heavy load or pulse systems it is necessary to augment the pulse load carrying capability. Eagle-Cliffs is testing commercially available rechargeable zinc manganese dioxide cells in sets. These sets consist one configuration of the zinc manganese dioxide cells accompanied by a much lower capacity device ( which may be another configuration of zinc manganese dioxide cells) supporting any heavy pulse current requirements. Thus the zinc manganese dioxide cells provide at least a low cost, environmentally desirable main power battery and perhaps the pulse power yet the system still meets the intermittent high power needs of many uses. In this test program, small zinc manganese dioxide rechargeable cells are supported by a nickel cadmium battery or a different set of zinc manganese dioxide cells simulating any of a number of devices such as power batteries, large capacitors, flywheels, etc. Discharge performance demonstrating forty-five to fifty watt-hours per kilogram and 80 watts per kilogram is achieved by the system.

  16. Calculation of critical dimensions for wurtzite and cubic zinc blende coaxial nanowire heterostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Edward T.

    Calculation of critical dimensions for wurtzite and cubic zinc blende coaxial nanowire-shell heterostructures in 111 zinc blende and 0001 wurtzite geometries. These calculations reveal that critical wurtzite nanowire systems. In this article we extend this methodology to explore and contrast coherency

  17. Phase controlled synthesis of ZnS nanobelts: zinc blende vs wurtzite Yong Ding a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Phase controlled synthesis of ZnS nanobelts: zinc blende vs wurtzite Yong Ding a , Xu Dong WangS nanostructures normally take the metastable wurtzite structure. This Letter investigates the conditions under which the formed phase can be con- trolled between zinc blende and wurtzite in nanomaterials synthesis

  18. Structural and Room-Temperature Transport Properties of Zinc Blende and Wurtzite InAs Nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    Structural and Room-Temperature Transport Properties of Zinc Blende and Wurtzite InAs Nanowires between pure zinc blende (ZB) NWs and wurtzite (WZ) NWs containing stacking faults and small ZB segments their growth-direction axis while wurtzite (WZ) InAs NWs grown on InAs (111)B substrates have numerous stacking

  19. Theoretical study of nonpolar surfaces of aluminum nitride: Zinc blende ,,110... and wurtzite ,,1010...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandey, Ravi

    Theoretical study of nonpolar surfaces of aluminum nitride: Zinc blende ,,110... and wurtzite ,,101 structure and electronic properties of the nonpolar surfaces, namely zinc blende 110 and wurtzite (10 1 and small ther- mal expansion coefficient. At ambient conditions, AlN crys- tallizes in the wurtzite phase

  20. SYNTHESIS OF ZINC FERRITE NANOPOWDERS IN AN RF THERMAL PLASMA , J. Szpvlgyi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gubicza, Jenõ

    SYNTHESIS OF ZINC FERRITE NANOPOWDERS IN AN RF THERMAL PLASMA I. Mohai1 , J. Szépvölgyi1 , J University, P.O.B. 32, Budapest, H-1518, Hungary Abstract Nanosized zinc ferrite spinel powders of various. Ferrites synthetized in the RF plasma reactor were compared to that produced by the conventional ceramic

  1. Attrition resistant, zinc titanate-containing, reduced sulfur sorbents and methods of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vierheilig, Albert A.; Gupta, Raghubir P.; Turk, Brian S.

    2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduced sulfur gas species (e.g., H.sub.2S, COS and CS.sub.2) are removed from a gas stream by compositions wherein a zinc titanate ingredient is associated with a metal oxide-aluminate phase material in the same particle species. Nonlimiting examples of metal oxides comprising the compositions include magnesium oxide, zinc oxide, calcium oxide, nickel oxide, etc.

  2. Size effects on varistor properties made from zinc oxide nanoparticles by low temperature spark plasma sintering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of nanostructured varistors by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) are investigated, using 8 nm zinc oxide nanoparticles to 600°C. Keywords: Organometallic, Zinc oxide, Nanoparticles, Spark plasma sintering, Varistor hal plasma sintering By Léna Saint Macary, § Myrtil L. Kahn, * Claude Estournčs; Pierre Fau , David

  3. Low-Loss, Tunable Microwave Capacitors Using Bismuth Zinc Niobate Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, Robert A.

    Low-Loss, Tunable Microwave Capacitors Using Bismuth Zinc Niobate Thin Films Jaehoon Park, Jiwei in the measured frequency range. The results show that BZN thin films have great potential for low loss, tunable microwave devices. Keyword: low loss, thin film, capacitors, dielectric properties, bismuth zinc niobate I

  4. SPECIATION AND RELEASE KINETICS OF CADMIUM AND ZINC IN PADDY SOILS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    SPECIATION AND RELEASE KINETICS OF CADMIUM AND ZINC IN PADDY SOILS by Saengdao Khaokaew Rights Reserved #12;SPECIATION AND RELEASE KINETICS OF CADMIUM AND ZINC IN PADDY SOILS by Saengdao interest in soil science has been also fueled by the unfortunate Cd contamination that occurred

  5. Use of underpotential deposition of zinc to mitigate hydrogen absorption into Monel K500

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, G.; Popov, B.N.; White, R.E. (Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polarization experiments and a potentiostatic pulse technique have been used to show that a monolayer coverage of zinc effectively inhibits the absorption of hydrogen into Monel K500. By depositing a monolayer of zinc on Monel K500 the hydrogen, evolution reaction and hydrogen ingress flux rate were reduced by 60%.

  6. Kinetics of Zinc/ Arsenate Co-Sorption at the Goethite-Water Interface. (5827)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Kinetics of Zinc/ Arsenate Co-Sorption at the Goethite-Water Interface. (5827) Authors: D.L. Sparks, and 1000 mg goethite L-1 solutions at pH 7, collected complimentary As and Zn K-edge EXAFS data after of aging time. Arsenate and zinc formed adamite-like and koettigite-like surface precipitates on goethite

  7. Effects of zinc on Salmonella in the layer house environments and laying hens, and the ability of zinc to induce molt in laying hens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Shinyoung

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    environments, and its ability to induce a molt in single comb white leghorn hens. In part, the antibacterial properties of zinc may reduce environmental contamination in a poultry house by interrupting airborne routes. The first phase involved detecting...

  8. ccsd-00000932(version1):10Dec2003 Electronic structure of wurtzite and zinc-blende AlN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ccsd-00000932(version1):10Dec2003 Electronic structure of wurtzite and zinc-blende AlN P. Jonnard) Abstract The electronic structure of AlN in wurtzite and zinc-blende phases is studied experimentally. Differences 1 #12;between the wurtzite and zinc-blende phases are small and reflect the slight variations

  9. Optical properties of wurtzite and zinc-blende GaNAlN quantum dots Vladimir A. Fonoberova)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fonoberov, Vladimir

    Optical properties of wurtzite and zinc-blende GaNŐAlN quantum dots Vladimir A. Fonoberova; published 20 August 2004 We investigate theoretically and compare optical properties of wurtzite and zincN/AlN interface governs optical properties of wurtzite quantum dots while having a small effect on zinc

  10. ZINC/AIR BATTERY R & D RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF BIFUNCTIONAL OXYGEN ELECTRODE TASKS I AND II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ED SCI ENCE DIVISION ZINC/AIR BATTERY R&D C-.J(~ur.1":! rfSAC03-76SF00098 LBL-22661 ZINC/AIR BATTERY R&D RESEARCH ANDanalysis of the zinc-air battery system at one of the

  11. Lifting Rationality Assumptions in Binary Aggregation Umberto Grandi and Ulle Endriss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endriss, Ulle

    Lifting Rationality Assumptions in Binary Aggregation Umberto Grandi and Ulle Endriss Institute aggregation procedure will lift the rationality assumptions from the in- dividual to the collective level, i an axiomatic characterisation of the class of aggregation proce- dures that will lift all rationality

  12. SelectCast: Scalable Data Aggregation Scheme in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiang-Yang

    Aggregation, Percolation theory, aggregation capacity. I. INTRODUCTION Data aggregation is a key energy environment. In our protocol, for the neighborhood of every node, we will approximately select portion-coverage, connectivity, etc the node density (number of nodes per unit area) can be treated as a varible within a large

  13. Preferential Solvent Partitioning within Asphaltenic Aggregates Dissolved in Binary Solvent Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilpatrick, Peter K.

    Preferential Solvent Partitioning within Asphaltenic Aggregates Dissolved in Binary SolventVised Manuscript ReceiVed December 9, 2006 The heaviest fraction of crude oils, asphaltenes, has been shown to play-assembled interfacially active asphaltenic aggregates. Thus, careful characterization of these aggregates is of great

  14. Assessing the Role of Iron Sulfides in the Long Term Sequestration of U by Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rittman, Bruce; Zhou, Chen; Vannela, Raveender

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This four-year project’s overarching aim was to identify the role of biogenic and synthetic iron-sulfide minerals in the long-term sequestration of reduced U(IV) formed under sulfate-reducing conditions when subjected to re-oxidizing conditions. As stated in this final report, significant progress was achieved through the collaborative research effort conducted at Arizona State University (ASU) and the University of Michigan (UM).

  15. Durable Zinc Oxide-Based Regenerable Sorbents for Desulfurization

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR57451 CleanFOR IMMEDIATEDurable Zinc Oxide-Based

  16. Assessing the Role of Iron Sulfides in the Long Term Sequestration of Uranium by Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, Kim F.; Bi, Yuqiang; Carpenter, Julian; Hyng, Sung Pil; Rittmann, Bruce E.; Zhou, Chen; Vannela, Raveender; Davis, James A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This overarching aim of this project was to identify the role of biogenic and synthetic iron-sulfide minerals in the long-term sequestration of reduced U(IV) formed under sulfate-reducing conditions when subjected to re-oxidizing conditions. The work reported herein was achieved through the collaborative research effort conducted at Arizona State University (ASU) and the University of Michigan (UM). Research at ASU, focused on the biogenesis aspects, examined the biogeochemical bases for iron-sulfide production by Desulfovibrio vulgaris, a Gram-negative bacterium that is one of the most-studied strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A series of experimental studies were performed to investigate comprehensively important metabolic and environmental factors that affect the rates of sulfate reduction and iron-sulfide precipitation, the mineralogical characteristics of the iron sulfides, and how uranium is reduced or co-reduced by D. vulagaris. FeS production studies revealed that controlling the pH affected the growth of D. vulgaris and strongly influenced the formation and growth of FeS solids. In particular, lower pH produced larger-sized mackinawite (Fe1+xS). Greater accumulation of free sulfide, from more sulfate reduction by D. vulgaris, also led to larger-sized mackinawite and stimulated mackinawite transformation to greigite (Fe3S4) when the free sulfide concentration was 29.3 mM. On the other hand, using solid Fe(III) (hydr)oxides as the iron source led to less productivity of FeS due to their slow and incomplete dissolution and scavenging of sulfide. Furthermore, sufficient free Fe2+, particularly during Fe(III) (hydr)oxide reductions, led to the additional formation of vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2•8(H2O)]. The U(VI) reduction studies revealed that D. vulgaris reduced U(VI) fastest when accumulating sulfide from concomitant sulfate reduction, since direct enzymatic and sulfide-based reductions of U(VI) occurred in parallel. The UO2 produced in presence of ferrous iron was poorly crystalline. At UM, laboratory-scale reactor studies were performed to assess the potential for the predominant abiotic reductants formed under sulfate reducing conditions (SRCs) to: (1) reduce U(VI) in contaminated groundwater sediments), and (2) inhibit the re-oxidation of U(IV) species, and in particular, uraninite (UO2(s)). Under SRCs, mackinawite and aqueous sulfide are the key reductants expected to form. To assess their potential for abiotic reduction of U(VI) species, a series of experiments were performed in which either FeS or S(-II) was added to solutions of U(VI), with the rates of conversion to U(IV) solids monitored as a function of pH, and carbonate and calcium concentration. In the presence of FeS and absence of oxygen or carbonate, U(IV) was completely reduced uraninite. S(-II) was also found to be an effective reductant of aqueous phase U(VI) species and produced uraninite, with the kinetics and extent of reduction depending on geochemical conditions. U(VI) reduction to uraninite was faster under higher S(-II) concentrations but was slowed by an increase in the dissolved Ca or carbonate concentration. Rapid reduction of U(VI) occurred at circumneutral pH but virtually no reduction occurred at pH 10.7. In general, dissolved Ca and carbonate slowed abiotic U(VI) reduction by forming stable Ca-U(VI)-carbonate soluble complexes that are resistant to reaction with aqueous sulfide. To investigate the stability of U(IV) against re-oxidation in the presence of iron sulfides by oxidants in simulated groundwater environments, and to develop a mechanistic understanding the controlling redox processes, continuously-mixed batch reactor (CMBR) and flow-through reactor (CMFR) studies were performed at UM. In these studies a series of experiments were conducted under various oxic groundwater conditions to examine the effectiveness of FeS as an oxygen scavenger to retard UO2 dissolution. The results indicate that FeS is an effective oxygen scavenger, and can lower the rate of oxidative dissolution of UO2 by over an order of magnitude compared to

  17. Mitigation of Hydrogen Sulfide Emissions in the Geysers KGRA (Staff Draft)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buell, Richard

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Violations of the ambient air quality standard (AAQS) for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are currently being experienced in The Geysers KGRA and could significantly increase in the future. Attainment and maintenance of the H2S AAQS is a potential constraint to optimum development of this resource. The availability of reliable H2S controls and the development of a validated air dispersion model are critical to alleviating this constraint. The purpose of this report is to assess the performance capabilities for state-of-the-art controls, to identify potential cost-effective alternative controls, and to identify the California Energy Commission (CEC) staffs efforts to develop a validated air dispersion model. Currently available controls (Stretford, Hydrogen Peroxide, and EIC) are capable of abating H2S emissions from a proposed facility to five lbs/hr. Alternative controls, such as condensate stripping and condensate pH control, appear to promising, cost-effective control option. The CEC staff is currently developing a validated air dispersion model for The Geysers KGRA. The CEC staff recommends investigation of retrofit control options for existing units, investigation of alternative control technologies, and dispersion analysis for optimum plant location in order to maximize the development potential of The Geysers KGRA. Energy cost studies suggest that the EIC process would be the most cost-effective for retrofits at The Geysers. (DJE-2005)

  18. Transition-metal doped sulfide, selenide, and telluride laser crystal and lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA); Page, Ralph H. (San Ramon, CA); DeLoach, Laura D. (Manteca, CA); Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of solid state laser crystals and lasers are formed of transition metal doped sulfide, selenide, and telluride host crystals which have four fold coordinated substitutional sites. The host crystals include II-VI compounds. The host crystal is doped with a transition metal laser ion, e.g., chromium, cobalt or iron. In particular, Cr.sup.2+ -doped ZnS and ZnSe generate laser action near 2.3 .mu.m. Oxide, chloride, fluoride, bromide and iodide crystals with similar structures can also be used. Important aspects of these laser materials are the tetrahedral site symmetry of the host crystal, low excited state absorption losses and high luminescence efficiency, and the d.sup.4 and d.sup.6 electronic configurations of the transition metal ions. The same materials are also useful as saturable absorbers for passive Q-switching applications. The laser materials can be used as gain media in amplifiers and oscillators; these gain media can be incorporated into waveguides and semiconductor lasers.

  19. Transition-metal doped sulfide, selenide, and telluride laser crystal and lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krupke, W.F.; Page, R.H.; DeLoach, L.D.; Payne, S.A.

    1996-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of solid state laser crystals and lasers are formed of transition metal doped sulfide, selenide, and telluride host crystals which have four fold coordinated substitutional sites. The host crystals include II-VI compounds. The host crystal is doped with a transition metal laser ion, e.g., chromium, cobalt or iron. In particular, Cr{sup 2+}-doped ZnS and ZnSe generate laser action near 2.3 {micro}m. Oxide, chloride, fluoride, bromide and iodide crystals with similar structures can also be used. Important aspects of these laser materials are the tetrahedral site symmetry of the host crystal, low excited state absorption losses and high luminescence efficiency, and the d{sup 4} and d{sup 6} electronic configurations of the transition metal ions. The same materials are also useful as saturable absorbers for passive Q-switching applications. The laser materials can be used as gain media in amplifiers and oscillators; these gain media can be incorporated into waveguides and semiconductor lasers. 18 figs.

  20. CHEMICAL STABILITY OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE IN THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT FOR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. For simplicity, this solvent is referred to as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The initial deployment target envisioned for the technology was within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), the polymer used in the coalescers within MCU. This report provides the data from exposing PPS polymer to NGS. The test was conducted over a three month period. PPS is remarkably stable in the presence of the next generation solvent. Testing showed no indication of swelling or significant leaching. Preferential sorption of the Modifier on PPS was observed but the same behavior occurs with the baseline solvent. Therefore, PPS coalescers exposed to the NGS are expected to perform comparably to those in contact with the baseline solvent.

  1. Conditions under which cracks occur in modified 13% chromium steel in wet hydrogen sulfide environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hara, T.; Asahi, H.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occurrence of cracks in an API 13% Cr steel, modified 13% Cr steel, and duplex stainless steel were compared in various wet, mild hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) environments. The conditions under which cracks occurred in the modified 13% Cr steel in oil and gas production environments were made clear. No cracks occurred if pH > depassivation pH (pH{sub d}) and redox potential of sulfur (E{sub S(red/ax)}) < pitting potential (V{sub c}). Hydrogen embrittlement-type cracks occurred in pH > Ph{sub d} and E{sub S(red/ax)} > V{sub c}. The pH inside the pit decreased drastically and hydrogen embrittlement occurred. Cracks of the hydrogen embrittlement type occurred if pH < pH{sub d} and threshold hydrogen concentration under which cracks occur (H{sub th}) < hydrogen concentration in steel (H{sub 0}). No cracks occurred if pH < pH{sub d} and H{sub th} > H{sub 0}.

  2. Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. C. Kwon

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced power plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppmv and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation power plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S In the Single-Step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP), the direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The H{sub 2} and CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash or carbon coats, and catalytic metals, to develop a catalytic regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. Experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 130-156 seconds at 120-140 C to formulate catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS from coal gases, evaluate removal capabilities of hydrogen sulfide and COS from coal gases with formulated catalysts, and develop an economic regeneration method of deactivated catalysts. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,300-3,800-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-1,900 ppmv sulfur dioxide, 18-21 v% hydrogen, 29-34 v% CO, 8-10 v% CO{sub 2}, 5-18 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 114-132 SCCM. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-140 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 116-129 psia. The molar ratio of H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} in the monolithic catalyst reactor is

  3. Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.C. Kwon

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced power plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppmv and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation power plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S In the Single-Step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP), the direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The H{sub 2} and CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash coat, and catalytic metals, to develop a regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor. The task of developing kinetic rate equations and modeling the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants will be abandoned since formulation of catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS is being in progress. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. Experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 46-570 seconds under reaction conditions to formulate catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS from coal gases and evaluate their capabilities in reducing hydrogen sulfide and COS in coal gases. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,200-4,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-20,000-ppmv sulfur dioxide, 18-27 v% hydrogen, 29-41 v% CO, 8-12 v% CO{sub 2}, 0-10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of simulated coal gas mixtures to the reactor are 30 - 180 cm{sup 3}/min at 1 atm and 25 C (SCCM). The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-155 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 40-210 psia. The molar ratio

  4. Synthesis and optical properties of quantum-size metal sulfide particles in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nedeljkovic, J.M.; Patel, R.C.; Kaufman, P.; Joyce-Pruden, C.; O'Leary, N. (Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States))

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past decade, small-particle' research has become quite popular in various fields of chemistry and physics. The recognition of quantum-size effects in very small colloidal particles has led to renewed interest in this area. Small particles' are clusters of atoms or molecules ranging in size from 1 nm to almost 10 nm or having agglomeration numbers from 10 up to a few hundred. In other words, small particles fall in size between single atoms or molecules and bulk materials. The agglomeration number specifies the number of individual atoms or molecules in a given cluster. The research in this area is interdisciplinary, and it links colloidal science and molecular chemistry. The symbiosis of these two areas of research has revealed some intriguing characteristics of small particles. This experiment illustrates the following: simple colloidal techniques for the preparation of two different types of quantum-size metal sulfide particles; the blue shift of the measured optical absorption spectra when the particle size is decreased in the quantum-size regime; and use of a simple quantum mechanical model to calculate the particle size from the absorption onset measured for CdS.

  5. EFFECT OF PORE SIZE ON TRAPPING ZINC VAPORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.

    2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments were conducted to determine the effect of pore size on pumping efficiency and zinc vapor trapping efficiency. A simple pumping efficiency test was conducted for all five pore diameters where it was observed that evacuation times were adversely affected by reducing the pore size below 5 {micro}m. Common test conditions for the zinc trapping efficiency experiments were used. These conditions resulted in some variability, to ascribe different efficiencies to the filter media. However, the data suggest that there is no significant difference in trapping efficiency for filter media with pores from 0.2 to 20 {micro}m with a thickness of 0.065-inch. Consequently, the 20 {micro}m pore filter media that is currently used at SRS is a suitable filter material for to utilize for future extractions. There is evidence that smaller pore filter will adversely affect the pumping times for the TEF and little evidence to suggest that a smaller pore diameters have significant impact on the trapping efficiency.

  6. Third order nonlinear optical properties of bismuth zinc borate glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanmugavelu, B.; Ravi Kanth Kumar, V. V., E-mail: ravi.phy@pondiuni.edu.in [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, Puducherry 605 014 (India); Kuladeep, R.; Narayana Rao, D. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046, Andhra Pradesh (India)

    2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Third order nonlinear optical characterization of bismuth zinc borate glasses are reported here using different laser pulse durations. Bismuth zinc borate glasses with compositions xBi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-30ZnO-(70-x) B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (where x?=?30, 35, 40, and 45?mol. %) have been prepared by melt quenching method. These glasses were characterized by Raman, UV-Vis absorption, and Z scan measurements. Raman and UV-Vis spectroscopic results indicate that non-bridging oxygens increase with increase of bismuth content in the glass. Nonlinear absorption and refraction behavior in the nanosecond (ns), picosecond (ps), and femtosecond (fs) time domains were studied in detail. Strong reverse saturable absorption due to dominant two-photon absorption (TPA) was observed with both ps and fs excitations. In the case of ns pulse excitations, TPA and free-carrier absorption processes contribute for the nonlinear absorption. Two-photon absorption coefficient (?) and the absorption cross section due to free carriers (?{sub e}) are estimated by theoretical fit of the open aperture Z-scan measurements and found to be dependent on the amount of bismuth oxide in the glass composition. In both ns and fs regimes the sign and magnitude of the third order nonlinearity are evaluated, and the optical limiting characteristics are also reported.

  7. Hastings-Levitov aggregation in the small-particle limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Norris; Amanda Turner

    2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We establish some scaling limits for a model of planar aggregation. The model is described by the composition of a sequence of independent and identically distributed random conformal maps, each corresponding to the addition of one particle. We study the limit of small particle size and rapid aggregation. The process of growing clusters converges, in the sense of Caratheodory, to an inflating disc. A more refined analysis reveals, within the cluster, a tree structure of branching fingers, whose radial component increases deterministically with time. The arguments of any finite sample of fingers, tracked inwards, perform coalescing Brownian motions. The arguments of any finite sample of gaps between the fingers, tracked outwards, also perform coalescing Brownian motions. These properties are closely related to the evolution of harmonic measure on the boundary of the cluster, which is shown to converge to the Brownian web.

  8. Sticky Bacteria: Adhesion-Detachment Based Microbial Aggregation Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sircar, Sarthok

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a mechanistic model for the adherence of two spherical flocs in quiescent flow conditions. Adhesion forces arise via the binding ligands as well as the attractive/repulsive surface potential in an ionic medium via the DLVO theory. The reversible binding kinetics are assumed to follow the standard model for linear springs \\cite{Dembo1988}. The collision factor and the floc aggregate number density is studied as a function of various surface/fluid parameters. It is seen that large floc aggregates are possible with more tensile ligands due to efficient inter-floc collisions (measured via the collision factor). Our results quantify how fluid drag and strong electrolytic composition of the surrounding fluid favor floc formation as well.

  9. Model for Aggregated Water Heater Load Using Dynamic Bayesian Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlachopoulou, Maria; Chin, George; Fuller, Jason C.; Lu, Shuai; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The transition to the new generation power grid, or “smart grid”, requires novel ways of using and analyzing data collected from the grid infrastructure. Fundamental functionalities like demand response (DR), that the smart grid needs, rely heavily on the ability of the energy providers and distributors to forecast the load behavior of appliances under different DR strategies. This paper presents a new model of aggregated water heater load, based on dynamic Bayesian networks (DBNs). The model has been validated against simulated data from an open source distribution simulation software (GridLAB-D). The results presented in this paper demonstrate that the DBN model accurately tracks the load profile curves of aggregated water heaters under different testing scenarios.

  10. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission. Eddy current sensing of cadmium zinc telluride crystal growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    permission. Eddy current sensing of cadmium zinc telluride crystal growth Choi, Byoung-Woo William Pro

  11. On the fractal morphology of combustion-generated soot aggregates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koylu, U.O. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The fractal properties of soot aggregates were investigated using ex-situ and in-situ experimental methods as well as computer simulations. Ex-situ experiments involved thermophoretic sampling and analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), while in-situ measurements employed angular static light scattering and data inversion based on Rayleigh-Debye-Gans (RDG) approximation. Computer simulations used a sequential algorithm which mimics mass fractal-like structures. So from a variety of hydrocarbon-fueled laminar and turbulent nonpremixed flame environments were considered in the present study. The TEM analysis of projected soot images sampled from fuel-rich conditions of buoyant and weakly-buoyant laminar flames indicated that the fractal dimension of soot was relatively independent of position in flames, fuel type and flame condition. These measurements yielded an average fractal dimension of 1.8, although other structure parameters such as the primary particle diameters and number of primary particles in aggregates had wide range of values. Fractal prefactor (lacunarity) was also measured for soot sampled from the fuel-lean conditions of turbulent flames, considering the actual morphology by tilting the samples during TEM analysis. These measurements yielded a fractal dimension of 1.65 and a lacunarity of 8.5, with experimental uncertainties (95% confidence) of 0.08 and 0.5, respectively. Relationships between the actual and projected structure properties of soot were also developed by combining TEM observations with numerical simulations. Practical approximate formulae were suggested to find radius of gyration of an aggregate from its maximum dimension, and number of primary particles in an aggregate from projected area. Finally, the fractal dimension and lacunarity of soot were obtained using light scattering for the same conditions of the above TEM measurements.

  12. Effect of Aggregation on Thermal Conduction in Colloidal Nanofluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R Prasher; W Evans; J Fish; P Meakin; P Phelan; Pawel Keblinski

    2006-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Using effective medium theory we demonstrate that the thermal conductivity of nanofluids can be significantly enhanced by the aggregation of nanoparticles into clusters. The enhancement is based purely on conduction and does not require a novel mechanism. Predictions of the effective medium theory are in excellent agreement with detailed numerical calculations on model nanofluids involving fractal clusters and show the importance of cluster morphology on thermal conductivity enhancements.

  13. Investigation for determining the curing characteristics of lightweight aggregate concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlton, Thomas Arlis

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    desired gradatiani This burning produces an inert ~ highly porous material that will no longer soften in water gntil after World Mar II ~ the principal use of lightweight aggre- gates was in the manufacture of lightweight aoncrete building bloaks... or not the method of curing is of equal, lesser, or greater inportance for concrete made with lightweight aggregates ~ The prime need for curing concrete is to prevent the loss of water neoessary ta complete the hydratfen process in the os?cent The general...

  14. Synthesis of Black and Red Mercury Sulfide Nano-Powder by Traditional Indian Method for Biomedical Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padhi, Payodhar [Orissa Engineering College, Bhubaneswar (India); Sahoo, G. [Tapaswini Ayurvedic clinic and Research center, Balasore (India); Das, K. [Gopobandhu Ayurvedic Medical College, Puri (India); Ghosh, Sudipto; Panigrahi, S. C. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, IIT, Kharagpur (India)

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of metals and minerals in the traditional Indian system of medicine known as aired is very common and is practiced since seventh century B.C. Metals were reduced to calcined powder form for medicinal purpose. For detoxification, a further step of purification of the metals and minerals with different vegetable extracts was practiced. The people of East India were using mercury and its sulfide as medicine. Gradually this secret was leaked to Arabic physicians who used mercury in skin ointment. Subsequently Italian Physicians adopted Arabic prescriptions of mercurial ointments for skin diseases. In the olden days, metals and minerals were impregnated with decoction and juice of vegetables and animal products like milk and fat for purification. These were then reduced to fine particles by milling with a pestle and mortar. It was known by then that the fineness of the powder had a significant influence on the color, texture, and medicinal properties as is cited by Charak. Nagarjun studied in detail the processing of metals and minerals, particularly mercury and the influence of the processing parameters on the medicinal values. Mercury is unique in many aspects. Indian alchemy developed a wide variety a chemical processes for the ostensible transmutation of metals and preparation of elixir of life, in which mercury occupied a prime position .The present investigation attempts to use the traditional methods as prescribed in the ancient texts to prepare mercury sulfide in both red and black form for medicinal use. XRD, SEM and HRTEM investigations of the sulfides obtained shows that the ancient Indians were able to produce nano-sized powders. Possibly this may be taken as the earliest application of the production and use of nano powder. The study proves that even in ancient time the knowledge of nano particle synthesis was prevalent and used to enhance effectiveness of medicines. Further mercury in the free form is not acceptable in medicines. The ancient physicians could get rid of free mercury by milling and proper choice of the ratio of ingredients as is shown in the investigation by X-ray diffraction studies. In the traditional method for synthesis of mercury sulfide, mercury and pure sulfur were taken and milled in a mortar and pastel. During milling process, the white mercury and yellow sulfur yielded to a gray black colored sulfide. Synthesis of red sulfide of mercury required additional steps of heating and subsequent milling. For therapeutically application, the sulfide thus obtained needed detoxification, which was done using organic extracts. In the present investigation, the same method was followed to synthesize the sapphires and the product was characterized using modern methods like XRD, SEM and HRTEM. With increase in milling time the fineness of the powder increases, which increases the efficacy of the medicine, and free mercury, which is not desirable for medicinal application is found to decrease. The powder obtained at the end of 48 hours of milling is found to be of a size finer than l0nm.

  15. Laboratory-scale sodium-carbonate aggregate concrete interactions. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westrich, H.R.; Stockman, H.W.; Suo-Anttila, A.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of laboratory-scale experiments was made at 600/sup 0/C to identify the important heat-producing chemical reactions between sodium and carbonate aggregate concretes. Reactions between sodium and carbonate aggregate were found to be responsible for the bulk of heat production in sodium-concrete tests. Exothermic reactions were initiated at 580+-30/sup 0/C for limestone and dolostone aggregates as well as for hydrated limestone concrete, and at 540+-10/sup 0/C for dehydrated limestone concrete, but were ill-defined for dolostone concrete. Major reaction products included CaO, MgO, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/O, NaOH, and elemental carbon. Sodium hydroxide, which forms when water is released from cement phases, causes slow erosion of the concrete with little heat production. The time-temperature profiles of these experiments have been modeled with a simplified version of the SLAM computer code, which has allowed derivation of chemical reaction rate coefficients.

  16. Zinc recovery by ultrasound acid leaching of double kiln treated electric arc furnace dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrera Godinez, J.A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need to convert 70,000 tons a year of electric arc furnace (EAF) dust into an environmentally safe or recyclable product has encouraged studies to reclaim zinc from this waste material. Successful characterization of a double-kiln calcine, produced from EAF dust, has shown that the calcine pellets consisted mainly of zinc oxide plates with some iron oxide particles. Preliminary leaching tests using hydrochloric and sulfuric acids indicated that this calcine is suitable for selective ultrasound leaching of zinc. A factorially designed screening test using hydrochloric acid showed that ultrasound significantly lowered iron dissolution and increased zinc dissolution, thus enhancing the selective leaching of zinc. Ultrasound, temperature, air bubbling rate and acidity increased the sulfuric acid selectivity, while fluorosilicic acid was not selective. Reactor characterization through ultrasonic field measurements led to the selection of reactor and ultrasound bath, which were utilized to enhance the selectivity of a laboratory scale sulfuric acid leaching of a double-kiln treated electric arc furnace dust. Results indicated that ultrasonic leaching of this calcine is a satisfactory technique to selectively separate zinc from iron. After further iron removal by precipitation and cementation of nickel, it was possible to electrowin zinc from the leach liquor under common industrial conditions, with current efficiencies from 86% through 92% being observed. Calcine washing showed that a substantial chloride removal is possible, but fluoride ion in the electrolyte caused deposit sticking during electrowinning.

  17. Effect of morphology and solvent on two-photon absorption of nano zinc oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kavitha, M.K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Valiamala, Thiruvananthapuram 695547, Kerala (India); Haripadmam, P.C.; Gopinath, Pramod; Krishnan, Bindu [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Valiamala, Thiruvananthapuram 695547, Kerala (India); John, Honey, E-mail: honey@iist.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Valiamala, Thiruvananthapuram 695547, Kerala (India)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? ZnO nanospheres and triangular structures synthesis by novel precipitation technique. ? The effect of precursor concentration on the size and shape of nano ZnO. ? Open aperture Z-scan measurements of the ZnO nanoparticle dispersions. ? Nanospheres exhibit higher two photon absorption coefficient than triangular nanostructures. ? Nanospheres dispersed in water exhibit higher two photon absorption coefficient than its dispersion in 2-propanol. - Abstract: In this paper, we report the effect of morphology and solvent on the two-photon absorption of nano zinc oxide. Zinc oxide nanoparticles in two different morphologies like nanospheres and triangular nanostructures are synthesized by novel precipitation technique and their two-photon absorption coefficient is measured using open aperture Z-scan technique. Experimental results show that the zinc oxide nanospheres exhibit higher two-photon absorption coefficient than the zinc oxide triangular nanostructures. The zinc oxide nanospheres dispersed in water exhibit higher two-photon absorption coefficient than that of its dispersion in 2-propanol. The zinc oxide nanospheres dispersed in water shows a decrease in two-photon absorption coefficient with an increase in on-axis irradiance. The result confirms the dependence of shape and solvent on the two-photon absorption of nano zinc oxide.

  18. CENT Center for Energy Nanoscience and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    -zinc-tin-sulfide (CZTS) system. Finally, I will describe some results of our work on silicon nanowire photovoltaics

  19. 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim5742 www.advmat.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -generation photo- voltaics, such as copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS)[5,6] and copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS

  20. Energy-Efficient Data Aggregation Hierarchy for Wireless Sensor Networks Yuanzhu Peter Chen Arthur L. Liestman Jiangchuan Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yuanzhu Peter

    Energy-Efficient Data Aggregation Hierarchy for Wireless Sensor Networks Yuanzhu Peter Chen Arthur study single-level aggregation and propose an Energy-Efficient Protocol for Aggregator Selec- tion (EPAS). Then, we generalize it to an aggregation hier- archy and extend EPAS to a Hierarchical Energy-Efficient

  1. Performance optimization of solar cells based on colloidal lead sulfide nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulfa, Maria, E-mail: mu.ulfa@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), Jalan Ganesha 10 Bandung 40132, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Colloidal semiconducting quantum dot nanocrystals (NCs) have attracted extensive interest as active building-block for low-cost solution-processed photovoltaic due to their size tunable absorption from the visible to near IR. Among various nanocrystal composition, lead sulfide (PbS), having a bulk bandgap of 0.41 eV, are particularly attractive for photovoltaic applications due to their excellent photosensitivity in the near IR. Starting from colloidal synthesis, in this project functional solar cells are fabricated and characterized based on the nearly monodispersed colloidal PbS nanocrystals that we synthesized. These NC-solar cells are fabricated under a “depleted heterojunction” device architecture containing a planar “tipe II” heretojunction formed by a layer of electron-transporting TiO{sub 2} and a layer of PbS NCs. Relevant structural, optical, and electrical characterizations are performed on NCs and their devices. To understand the operational mechanism of these NC-based solar cells, various material and device aspects are investigated in this work aiming for optimized photovoltaic performance. These aspects include the effect of: (1) NC dimensions (and thus their band gaps); (2) passivation of surface traps through post-synthesis treatments; (3) NC surface ligand-exchange; and (4) interfacial modifications at the heterojunction. The most optimized photovoltaic performance is found after combining the surface trap passivation strategy by halides, ligand-exchange by 3-mercaptopropionic acids, and interfacial TiCl4 treatment, leading to a peak open-circuit voltage of 0.53 V, a short-circuit current density of 14.03 mAcm{sup ?2}, and a power conversion efficiency of 3.25%.

  2. Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide to Elemental Sulfur from Coal-Derived Fuel Gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, Todd H.; Berry, David A.; Lyons, K. David; Beer, Stephen K.; Monahan, Michael J.

    2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of low cost, highly efficient, desulfurization technology with integrated sulfur recovery remains a principle barrier issue for Vision 21 integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation plants. In this plan, the U. S. Department of Energy will construct ultra-clean, modular, co-production IGCC power plants each with chemical products tailored to meet the demands of specific regional markets. The catalysts employed in these co-production modules, for example water-gas-shift and Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, are readily poisoned by hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a sulfur contaminant, present in the coal-derived fuel gases. To prevent poisoning of these catalysts, the removal of H{sub 2}S down to the parts-per-billion level is necessary. Historically, research into the purification of coal-derived fuel gases has focused on dry technologies that offer the prospect of higher combined cycle efficiencies as well as improved thermal integration with co-production modules. Primarily, these concepts rely on a highly selective process separation step to remove low concentrations of H{sub 2}S present in the fuel gases and produce a concentrated stream of sulfur bearing effluent. This effluent must then undergo further processing to be converted to its final form, usually elemental sulfur. Ultimately, desulfurization of coal-derived fuel gases may cost as much as 15% of the total fixed capital investment (Chen et al., 1992). It is, therefore, desirable to develop new technology that can accomplish H{sub 2}S separation and direct conversion to elemental sulfur more efficiently and with a lower initial fixed capital investment.

  3. Sulfide stress cracking resistance of superduplex stainless steels in oil and gas field simulated environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scoppio, L.; Barteri, M.; Leali, C. [Centro Sviluppo Materiali S.p.A., Rome (Italy); [Dalmine S.p.A., Bergamo (Italy)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The need to improve stress corrosion cracking resistance in H{sub 2}S/CO{sub 2}/Cl{sup {minus}}, at reasonably low prices and good mechanical properties, has led in the last decade to develop a plethora of superduplex stainless steels for sour oilfield environments application. The outstanding performance of superduplex stainless steels to SSC corrosion is diminished with the increase of chloride concentration and H{sub 2}S partial pressure. In this work the performance of superduplex steel in very harsh oilfield simulated environments (H{sub 2}S up to 20 psi (155 kPa), NaCl 25% and 80 C) were verified, Experimental work was carried out on two grades of superduplex steel seamless tubes, UNS S32760 (80ksi, 560 MPa), as the most commonly used, and UNS S39277, characterized by high strength in the annealed state (90 ksi, 630 MPa). The resistance to sulfide stress cracking (SSC) of duplex and superduplex stainless steels was evaluated in H{sub 2}S/CO{sub 2}/Cl{sup {minus}} bottom hole simulated environments. SSC threshold was determined by means of C-ring (constant strain) testing method. The results were utilized to draw engineering diagrams of superduplex UNS S39277 and UNS S32760. Duplex 22%Cr steel was considered as reference material. SSC resistance of duplex steel was strictly correlated to the acidity of the solution. Critical H{sub 2}S partial pressure in high chloride environments with addition of a buffering agent such as NaHCO{sub 3} is shifted towards higher values. Superduplex steel represents a suitable candidate for the use in the deep high pressure wells with H{sub 2}S partial pressure up to 5 psi (35kPa) and 20% NaCl.

  4. Development of Thin Section Zinc Die Casting Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, Frank [International Lead Zinc Research Org., Inc.] [International Lead Zinc Research Org., Inc.

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A new high fluidity zinc high pressure die casting alloy, termed the HF alloy, was developed during laboratory trials and proven in industrial production. The HF alloy permits castings to be achieved with section thicknesses of 0.3 mm or less. Technology transfer activities were conducted to develop usage of the HF high fluidity alloy. These included production of a brochure and a one-hour webinar on the HF alloy. The brochure was then sent to 1,184 product designers in the Interzinc database. There was excellent reception to this mailing, and from this initial contact 5 technology transfer seminars were conducted for 81 participants from 30 companies across a wide range of business sectors. Many of the successful applications to date involve high quality surface finishes. Design and manufacturing assistance was given for development of selected applications.

  5. Structural and Functional Studies of the Protamine 2-Zinc Complex from Syrian Gold Hamster (Mesocricetus Auratus) Spermatids and Sperm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, C E

    2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The research described in this dissertation consists of four major areas: (1) sequence analysis of protamine 2 from Muroid rodents to identify potential zinc-binding domain(s) of protamine 2; (2) structural studies of the protamine 2-zinc complex from Syrian Gold hamster sperm and spermatids to elucidate the role of zinc during spermiogenesis; (3) structural studies of an unique protamine 2-zinc complex from chinchilla sperm; and (4) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies of soluble complexes of hairpin oligonucleotides with synthetic arginine-rich peptides or protamine 1 isolated from bull sperm. First, zinc was quantitated in spermatids and sperm by Proton-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) to determine whether zinc is present in the early stages of spermiogenesis. The PIXE results revealed the zinc content varies proportionately with the amount of protamine 2 in both spermatid and sperm nuclei. An exception was chinchilla sperm containing twice the amount of protamine 2 than zinc. Further analyses by PIXE and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) of zinc bound to protamines isolated from hamster sperm confirmed the majority of the zinc is bound to protamine and identified the zinc ligands of protamine 2 in hamster spermatids and sperm in vivo. These studies established that zinc is bound to the protamine 2 precursor in hamster spermatids and the coordination of zinc by protamine 2 changes during spermiogenesis. Finally, the sequence analysis combined with the XAS results suggest that the zinc-binding domain in protamine 2 resides in the amino-terminus. Similar analyses of chinchilla sperm by XAS were performed to clarify the unusual PIXE results and revealed that chinchilla has an atypical protamine 2-zinc structure. Two protamine 2 molecules coordinate one zinc atom, forming homodimers that facilitate the binding of protamine 2 to DNA and provide an organizational scheme that would accommodate the observed species-specific protamine stoichiometry in mammalian sperm. Based on these results, we propose the binding of zinc to protamine 2 molecules stabilizes a dimerization domain in other mammalian sperm. Future experiments will use the knowledge we gained of the interactions between protamine 1 and DNA from the NMR studies to obtain structural data for the DNA-protamine 2-zinc complex.

  6. Relating the biogeochemistries of zinc, cobalt, and phosphorus to phytoplankton activities in the sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisniewski, Rachel J. (Rachel Jane), 1978-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the potential of zinc, cobalt, and phosphorus to influence primary production in the subarctic North Pacific, the Bering Sea, and the North Atlantic Ocean. In the North Pacific and Bering Sea, total ...

  7. A Novel Imaging Approach for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer Based on Endogenous Zinc Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Subrata K.

    The early detection of prostate cancer is a life-saving event in patients harboring potentially aggressive disease. With the development of malignancy, there is a dramatic reduction in the zinc content of prostate tissue ...

  8. Exciton localization mechanisms in wurtzite/zinc-blende GaAs nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Alexandra; Corfdir, Pierre; Heiss, Martin; Conesa-Boj, Sonia; Uccelli, Emanuele; Fontcuberta i Morral, Anna; Phillips, Richard

    We investigate the emission properties of excitons in GaAs nanowires containing quantum disks formed by structural alternation between the zinc-blende and wurtzite phases, by means of temperature-dependent photoluminescence. At 10 K the emission...

  9. Distributed Phase Shifter with PyrochloreBismuth Zinc Niobate Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jaehoon; Lu, Jiwei; Boesch, Damien; Stemmer, Susanne; York, Robert A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bandpass Filter Using Thin-Film Barium-Strontium-Titanate (using Ba x Sr 1 - x TiO 3 thin films," IEEE Microwave GuidedBismuth Zinc Niobate Thin Films," J. Appl. Phys. 97,

  10. Overexpression of copper zinc superoxide dismutase impairs human trophoblast cell fusion and differentiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    investigated the role of the key antioxidant enzyme copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD-1), encoded and the synthesis of steroid and peptide hormones required for fetal growth and development (5, 6). Some

  11. Beam-induced graphitic carbon cage transformation from sumanene aggregates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, Jun-ichi, E-mail: fujita@bk.tsukuba.ac.jp; Tachi, Masashi; Murakami, Katsuhisa [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan); Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science (TIMS), Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan); Sakurai, Hidehiro; Morita, Yuki; Higashibayashi, Shuhei [Research Center of Integrative Molecular Systems, Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8787 (Japan); Takeguchi, Masaki [Transmission Electron Microscopy Station, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We found that electron-beam irradiation of sumanene aggregates strongly enhanced their transformation into a graphitic carbon cage, having a diameter of about 20?nm. The threshold electron dose was about 32 mC/cm{sup 2} at 200?keV, but the transformation is still induced at 20?keV. The transformation sequence suggested that the cage was constructed accompanied by the dynamical movement of the transiently linked sumanene molecules in order to pile up inside the shell. Thus, bond excitation in the sumanene molecules rather than a knock-on of carbon atoms seems to be the main cause of the cage transformation.

  12. Extraction of pores from microtomographic reconstructions of intact soil aggregates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albee, P. B.; Stockman, G. C.; Smucker, A. J. M.

    2000-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Segmentation of features is often a necessary step in the analysis of volumetric data. The authors have developed a simple technique for extracting voids from irregular volumetric data sets. In this work they look at extracting pores from soil aggregates. First, they identify a threshold that gives good separability of the object from the background. They then segment the object, and perform connected components analysis on the pores within the object. Using their technique pores that break the surface can be segmented along with pores completely contained in the initially segmented object.

  13. Data Aggregation Strategies for Evaluation and Reporting | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197 This work was performedEnergy Data Aggregation

  14. EFFECT OF THERMAL PROCESSES ON COPPER-TIN ALLOYS FOR ZINC GETTERING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.; Golyski, M.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A contamination mitigation plan was initiated to address the discovery of radioactive zinc‐65 in a glovebox. A near term solution was developed, installation of heated filters in the glovebox piping. This solution is effective at retaining the zinc in the currently contaminated area, but the gamma emitting contaminant is still present in a system designed for tritium beta. A project was initiated to develop a solution to contain the {sup 65}Zn in the furnace module. Copper and bronze (a Cu/Sn alloy) were found to be candidate materials to combine with zinc‐65 vapor, using thermodynamic calculations. A series of binary Cu/Sn alloys were developed (after determining that commercial alloys were unacceptable), that were found to be effective traps of zinc vapor. The task described in this report was undertaken to determine if the bronze substrates would retain their zinc gettering capability after being exposed to simulated extraction conditions with oxidizing and reducing gases. Pure copper and three bronze alloys were prepared, exposed to varying oxidation conditions from 250 to 450{degree}C, then exposed to varying reduction conditions in He-H{sub 2} from 250-450{degree}C, and finally exposed to zinc vapor at 350{degree}C for four hours. The samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, mass change, and visual observation. It was observed that the as fabricated samples and the reduced samples all retained their zinc gettering capacity while samples in the "as-oxidized" condition exhibited losses in zinc gettering capacity. Over the range of conditions tested, i.e., composition, oxidation temperature, and reduction temperature, no particular sample composition appeared better. Samples reduced at 350{degree}C exhibited the greatest zinc capacity, although there were some testing anomalies associated with these samples. This work clearly demonstrated that the zinc gettering was not adversely affected by exposure to simulated process conditions and a full scale lithium and zinc trap should be fabricated for testing in the Tritium Extraction Facility.

  15. The magnetic properties of the iron-rich, iron-nickel-zinc alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupton, Paul Stephen

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE MAGNETIC PROPERTIES OF THE IRON-RICH, IRON-NICKEL-ZINC ALLOYS A Thesis By Paul Stephen Gupton Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1961 Major Subject Nuclear Engineering THE MAGNETIC PROPERTIES OF THE IRON-RICH, IRON-NICKEL-ZINC ALLOYS A Thesis By Paul Stephen Gupton Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Ittee) Head of Oepartment...

  16. Levels of dissolved zinc and cadmium in some surface waters of western Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fatoki, O.S. [Obafemi Awolowo Univ., Ile-Ife (Nigeria)] [Obafemi Awolowo Univ., Ile-Ife (Nigeria)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dissolved zinc and cadmium in some surface waters of Western Nigeria were separated and quantified using anion exchange of their chloro-complexes and detected by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Concentrations of zinc and cadmium found in tested water samples ranged from 0.99 to 2.97 mg L{sup {minus}1} and 0.13 to 0.17 mg L{sup {minus}1}, respectively. 35 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. The synthesis and characterization of zinc(II) and copper(II) diphosphonatoalkanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Deirdre I.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ZINC(II) AND COPPER(II) DIPHOSPHONATOALKANES A Thesis by DEIRDRE I. ARNOLD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2000 Major Subject: Chemistry THE SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ZINC(II) AND COPPER(II) DIPHOSPHONATOALKANES A Thesis by DEIRDRE I. ARNOLD Submitted to Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  18. Mechanical Flow Response and Anisotropy of Ultra-Fine Grained Magnesium and Zinc Alloys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Maharbi, Majid H.

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    MECHANICAL FLOW RESPONSE AND ANISOTROPY IN ULTRA-FINE GRAINED MAGNESIUM AND ZINC ALLOYS A Dissertation by MAJID AL MAHARBI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2009 Major Subject: Materials Science and Engineering MECHANICAL FLOW RESPONSE AND ANISOTROPY IN ULTRA-FINE GRAINED MAGNESIUM AND ZINC ALLOYS A Dissertation by MAJID AL...

  19. Fixed bed testing of durable, steam resistant zinc oxide containing sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siriwardane, R.V.; Grimm, U.; Poston, J. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Monaco, S.J. [EG& G dTechnical Services of West Virginia, Inc., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy is currently developing Integrated Gasification combined Cycle (IGCC) systems for electrical power generation. It has been predicted that IGCC plants with hot gas cleanup will be superior to conventional pulverized coal-fired power plants in overall plant efficiency and environmental performance. Development of a suitable regenerable sorbent is a major barrier issue in the hot gas cleanup program for IGCC systems. This has been a challenging problem during the last 20 years, since many of the sorbents developed in the program could not retain their reactivity and physical integrity during repeated cycles of sulfidation and regeneration reactions. Two promising sorbents and (METC6), which were capable of sustaining their reactivity and physical integrity during repeated sulfidation/regeneration cycles, have been developed at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) during the past year. These sorbents were tested (sulfided) both in low-pressure (260 kPa/37.7 psia) and high-pressure (1034 kPa/150 psia) fixed-bed reactors at 538{degrees}C (1000{degrees}F) with simulated KRW coal gas. High-pressure testing was continued for 20 cycles with steam regeneration. There were no appreciable changes in sulfidation capacity of the sorbents during the 20-cycle testing. The crush strength of the sorbent actually improved after 20 cycles and there were no indications of spalling or any other physical deterioration of the sorbents. In testing to date, these sorbents exhibit better overall sulfur capture performance than the conventional sorbents.

  20. THE REBOUND CONDITION OF DUST AGGREGATES REVEALED BY NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF THEIR COLLISIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wada, Koji [Planetary Exploration Research Center, Chiba Institute of Technology, 2-17-1 Tsudanuma, Narashino, Chiba 275-0016 (Japan); Tanaka, Hidekazu; Yamamoto, Tetsuo [Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan); Suyama, Toru [Nagano City Museum, Hachimanpara Historic Park, Oshimada, Nagano 381-2212 (Japan); Kimura, Hiroshi, E-mail: wada@perc.it-chiba.ac.jp [Center for Planetary Science (CPS), Chuo-ku Minatojima Minamimachi 7-1-48, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan)

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Collisional growth of dust aggregates is a plausible root of planetesimals forming in protoplanetary disks. However, a rebound of colliding dust aggregates prevents dust from growing into planetesimals. In fact, rebounding aggregates are observed in laboratory experiments but not in previous numerical simulations. Therefore, the condition of rebound between dust aggregates should be clarified to better understand the processes of dust growth and planetesimal formation. We have carried out numerical simulations of aggregate collisions for various types of aggregates and succeeded in reproducing a rebound of colliding aggregates under specific conditions. Our finding is that in the rebound process, the key factor of the aggregate structure is the coordination number, namely, the number of particles in contact with a particle. A rebound is governed by the energy dissipation along with restructuring of the aggregates and a large coordination number inhibits the restructuring at collisions. Results of our numerical simulation for various aggregates indicate that they stick to each other when the mean coordination number is less than 6, regardless of their materials and structures, as long as their collision velocity is less than the critical velocity for fragmentation. This criterion of the coordination number would correspond to a filling factor of {approx}0.3, which is somewhat larger than that reported in laboratory experiments. In protoplanetary disks, dust aggregates are expected to have low bulk densities (<0.1 g cm{sup -3}) during their growth, which would prevent dust aggregates from rebounding. This result supports the formation of planetesimals with direct dust growth in protoplanetary disks.

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - aggregation prone regions Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Collection: Biology and Medicine 7 Protein folding in the cell: reshaping the folding funnel Summary: , as a second aggregation'...

  2. SIZE AND SURFACE AREA OF ICY DUST AGGREGATES AFTER A HEATING EVENT AT A PROTOPLANETARY NEBULA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirono, Sin-iti [Earth and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)] [Earth and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The activity of a young star rises abruptly during an FU Orionis outburst. This event causes a temporary temperature increase in the protoplanetary nebula. H{sub 2}O icy grains are sublimated by this event, and silicate cores embedded inside the ice are ejected. During the high-temperature phase, the silicate grains coagulate to form silicate core aggregates. After the heating event, the temperature drops, and the ice recondenses onto the aggregates. I determined numerically the size distribution of the ice-covered aggregates. The size of the aggregates exceeds 10 {mu}m around the snow line. Because of the migration of the ice to large aggregates, only a small fraction of the silicate core aggregate is covered with H{sub 2}O ice. After the heating event, the surface of an ice-covered aggregate is totally covered by silicate core aggregates. This might reduce the fragmentation velocity of aggregates when they collide. It is possible that the covering silicate cores shield the UV radiation field which induces photodissociation of H{sub 2}O ice. This effect may cause the shortage of cold H{sub 2}O vapor observed by Herschel.

  3. A new mineralogical approach to predict coefficient of thermal expansion of aggregate and concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neekhra, Siddharth

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    constituent mineral phase are considered as input for the aggregate CoTE model, whereas the same properties for coarse aggregate and mortar are considered for the concrete CoTE model. Methods have been formulated to calculate the mineral volume percentage... on the determined CoTE of pure minerals and their respective calculated volume percentages, shows a good resemblance with the measured aggregate CoTE by dilatometer. Similarly, predicted concrete CoTE, based on the calculated CoTE of aggregate and mortar...

  4. Energy landscapes for protein folding, binding, and aggregation : simple funnels and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Samuel Sung-Il

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coordinates capture protein folding on smooth landscapes.in the Prediction of Protein Folding Kinetics. Proc. Natl.Landscapes for Protein Folding, Binding, and Aggregation:

  5. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2012, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Net import reliance 4 as a percentage of apparent consumption (refined zinc) 72 77 73 74 72 Recycling secondary materials--mainly electric arc furnace dust, as well as galvanizing residues. Import Sources (2008­11): Ore and concentrate: Peru, 81%; Canada, 7%; Ireland, 6%; Mexico, 6%. Metal: Canada, 74%; Mexico, 12

  6. Fireproof impact limiter aggregate packaging inside shipping containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Byington, Gerald A. (Knoxville, TN); Oakes, Jr., Raymon Edgar (Kingston, TN); Feldman, Matthew Rookes (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a product and a process for making a fireproof, impact limiter, homogeneous aggregate material for casting inside a hazardous material shipping container, or a double-contained Type-B nuclear shipping container. The homogeneous aggregate material is prepared by mixing inorganic compounds with water, pouring the mixture into the void spaces between an inner storage containment vessel and an outer shipping container, vibrating the mixture inside the shipping container, with subsequent curing, baking, and cooling of the mixture to form a solidified material which encapsulates an inner storage containment vessel inside an outer shipping container. The solidified material forms a protective enclosure around an inner storage containment vessel which may store hazardous, toxic, or radioactive material. The solidified material forms a homogeneous fire-resistant material that does not readily transfer heat, and provides general shock and specific point-impact protection, providing protection to the interior storage containment vessel. The material is low cost, may contain neutron absorbing compounds, and is easily formed into a variety of shapes to fill the interior void spaces of shipping containers.

  7. Mine-to-Mill Optimization of Aggregate Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Adel; Toni Kojovic; Darren Thornton

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Mine-to-Mill optimization is a total systems approach to the reduction of energy and cost in mining and processing. Developed at the Julius Krutschnitt Mineral Research Center in Queensland, Australia, the Mine-to-Mill approach attempts to minimize energy consumption through optimization of all steps in the size reduction process. The approach involves sampling and modeling of blasting and processing, followed by computer simulation to optimize the operation and develop alternatives. The most promising alternatives are implemented, and sampling is conducted to quantify benefits. In the current project, the primary objective was to adapt Mine-to-Mill technology to the aggregates industry. The first phase of this work was carried out at the Bealeton Quarry near Fredericksburg, Virginia. The second phase was carried out at the Pittsboro Quarry south of Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Both quarries are operated by Luck Stone Corporation of Richmond, Virginia. As a result of the work, several conclusions can be drawn from the project which should assist DOE in assessing the applicability of the Mine-to-Mill approach to the aggregates industry. 1. Implementation of MTM guidelines at Pittsboro has resulted in tangible improvements in productivity. It is clear that MTM guidelines represent an energy savings of around 5% (primary and secondary) and an overall energy savings of 1%. This 1-5% energy savings is also consistent with simulated results for Bealeton had side-by-side shots used to evaluate the technology been carried out in the same rockmass. 2. Luck Stone clearly runs their operations at a high standard. Hence the percentage improvement realized in this project may represent the lower end of what might be expected overall in the aggregates industry. 3. Variability in ore types across both Bealeton and Pittsboro suggests a 2:1 difference in hardness which contradicts the misconception that quarry rock is homogenous. Therefore, the idea of comparing side-by-side blasts is not viable and long term comparisons stand the best chance of confirming the benefits of optimized blasting. 4. There are clear limitations on how much improvement can be made in the aggregate industry due to the fixed feed size that reports to the tertiary section of a typical aggregate plant. These limitations restrict the MTM approach from exercising significant increases in blasting which would only serve to increase fines and reduce product yield. 5. The key to success at Pittsboro was the development of MTM guidelines for the modified blasting practice in consultation with the drill & blast crew. Their full buy-in was necessary to implement optimized blasting in a sustained manner. 6. The JKSimBlast and JKSimMet models have proven to be effective tools for examining blasting and processing at Bealeton and Pittsboro. These models should enable Luck Stone to transfer the MTM approach to other sites.

  8. Oxidative stress suppresses the cellular bioenergetic effect of the 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase/hydrogen sulfide pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Módis, Katalin [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States)] [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States); Asimakopoulou, Antonia [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Patras (Greece)] [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Coletta, Ciro [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States)] [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States); Papapetropoulos, Andreas [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States) [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States); Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Szabo, Csaba, E-mail: szabocsaba@aol.com [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States)] [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •Oxidative stress impairs 3-MST-derived H{sub 2}S production in isolated enzyme and in isolated mitochondria. •This impairs the stimulatory bioenergetic effects of H{sub 2}S in hepatocytes. •This has implications for the pathophysiology of diseases with oxidative stress. -- Abstract: Recent data show that lower concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), as well as endogenous, intramitochondrial production of H{sub 2}S by the 3-mercaptopyruvate (3-MP)/3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST) pathway serves as an electron donor and inorganic source of energy to support mitochondrial electron transport and ATP generation in mammalian cells by donating electrons to Complex II. The aim of our study was to investigate the role of oxidative stress on the activity of the 3-MP/3-MST/H{sub 2}S pathway in vitro. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, 100–500 ?M) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in the activity of recombinant mouse 3-MST enzyme. In mitochondria isolated from murine hepatoma cells, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (50–500 ?M) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in production of H{sub 2}S from 3-MP. In cultured murine hepatoma cells H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, (3–100 ?M), did not result in overall cytotoxicity, but caused a partial decrease in basal oxygen consumption and respiratory reserve rapacity. The positive bioenergetic effect of 3-MP (100–300 nM) was completely abolished by pre-treatment of the cells with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (50 ?M). The current findings demonstrate that oxidative stress inhibits 3-MST activity and interferes with the positive bioenergetic role of the 3-MP/3-MST/H{sub 2}S pathway. These findings may have implications for the pathophysiology of various conditions associated with increased oxidative stress, such as various forms of critical illness, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes or physiological aging.

  9. Secure Hop-by-Hop Aggregation of End-to-End Concealed Data in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mlaih, Esam

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-network data aggregation is an essential technique in mission critical wireless sensor networks (WSNs) for achieving effective transmission and hence better power conservation. Common security protocols for aggregated WSNs are either hop-by-hop or end-to-end, each of which has its own encryption schemes considering different security primitives. End-to-end encrypted data aggregation protocols introduce maximum data secrecy with in-efficient data aggregation and more vulnerability to active attacks, while hop-by-hop data aggregation protocols introduce maximum data integrity with efficient data aggregation and more vulnerability to passive attacks. In this paper, we propose a secure aggregation protocol for aggregated WSNs deployed in hostile environments in which dual attack modes are present. Our proposed protocol is a blend of flexible data aggregation as in hop-by-hop protocols and optimal data confidentiality as in end-to-end protocols. Our protocol introduces an efficient $O(1)$ heuristic for checking...

  10. Ordered Nucleation Sites for the Growth of Zinc Oxide Nanofibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.; Ginley, D.S.; Shaheen, S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) offer a promising route to low cost photovoltaic (PV) technology that can be inexpensively manufactured on a large scale for use in power generation and commercial products. Solar power conversion efficiencies of laboratory scale OPV devices have recently reached ~5%; however, projected efficiencies of at least 10% will be required for commercialization. An analogous approach that has arisen recently that can potentially increase efficiencies employs metal oxide semiconductors as the electron acceptor, creating a hybrid organic-inorganic device. This approach offers the advantage that the conduction band of the oxide can be tuned in a systematic way through doping, thus potentially achieving higher photovoltages in the device. Additionally, nanostructures of these materials can be easily grown from precursor solutions, providing a technique to precisely control the nanoscale geometry. This work focuses on using ZnO, which is known to have high electron mobility (>100 cm2/Vs), as the electron acceptor. Nanofibers of ZnO can be grown from precursors such as zinc acetate or zinc nitrate to form arrays of nanofibers into which a conjugated polymer can be intercalated to form a composite PV device. The morphology of the nanofiber array is critical to the performance of the device, but current methods of nanofiber growth from a flat, polycrystalline nucleation layer allow for little morphological control. To overcome this limitation, we have created ordered arrays of ZnO nucleation sites with controllable size and spacing. Toluene solutions of diblock copolymer micelles with ZnCl2 incorporated into the micellar cores were spin-coated onto glass substrates and etched with an O2 plasma to yield hexagonally ordered arrays of ZnO nanoparticles that functioned as nucleation sites. Changing the concentration of ZnCl2 and the molecular weight and ratio of the diblock copolymer resulted in systematic variation in the size and spacing of the nucleation sites. Thermal anneal treatment provided further modification of the nucleation layer, from which ZnO nanofibers were successfully grown from solution, although at present it is not known if the geometry of the as-grown ZnO nanofibers precisely reflects that of the underlying nucleation layer. This work provides a simple and useful method for potentially controlling the nucleation of ZnO nanofibers to be used in hybrid ZnO/organic nanocomposite PV devices.

  11. COMMERCIAL DEMONSTRATION OF THE MANUFACTURED AGGREGATE PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY UTILIZING SPRAY DRYER ASH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy Scandrol

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Universal Aggregates, LLC proposes to design, construct and operate a lightweight aggregate manufacturing plant at the Birchwood Power Facility in King George, Virginia. The installation and start-up expenses for the Birchwood Aggregate Facility are $19.5 million. The DOE share is $7.2 million (37%) and the Universal Aggregates share is $12.3 (63%). The project team consists of CONSOL Energy Inc., P.J. Dick, Inc., SynAggs, LLC, and Universal Aggregates, LLC. The Birchwood Facility will transform 115,000 tons per year of spray dryer by-products that are currently being disposed of in an offsite landfill into 167,000 tons of a useful product, lightweight aggregates that can be used to manufacture lightweight aggregates that can be used to manufacture lightweight and medium weight masonry blocks. In addition to the environmental benefits, the Birchwood Facility will create nine (9) manufacturing jobs plus additional employment in the local trucking industry to deliver the aggregate to customers or reagents to the facility. A successful demonstration would lead to additional lightweight aggregate manufacturing facilities in the United States. There are currently twenty-one (21) spray dryer facilities operating in the United States that produce an adequate amount of spray dryer by-product to economically justify the installation of a lightweight aggregate manufacturing facility. Industry sources believe that as additional scrubbing is required, dry FGD technologies will be the technology of choice. Letters from potential lightweight aggregate customers indicate that there is a market for the product once the commercialization barriers are eliminated by this demonstration project.

  12. COMMERCIAL DEMONSTRATION OF THE MANUFACTURED AGGREGATE PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY UTILIZING SPRAY DRYER ASH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy Scandrol

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Universal Aggregates, LLC proposes to design, construct and operate a lightweight aggregate manufacturing plant at the Birchwood Power Facility in King George, Virginia. The installation and start-up expenses for the Birchwood Aggregate Facility are $19.5 million. The DOE share is $7.2 million (37%) and the Universal Aggregates share is $12.3 (63%). The project team consists of CONSOL Energy Inc., P.J. Dick, Inc., SynAggs, LLC, and Universal Aggregates, LLC. The Birchwood Facility will transform 115,000 tons per year of spray dryer by-products that are currently being disposed of in an offsite landfill into 167,000 tons of a useful product, lightweight aggregates that can be used to manufacture lightweight aggregates that can be used to manufacture lightweight and medium weight masonry blocks. In addition to the environmental benefits, the Birchwood Facility will create eight (8) manufacturing jobs plus additional employment in the local trucking industry to deliver the aggregate to customers or reagents to the facility. A successful demonstration would lead to additional lightweight aggregate manufacturing facilities in the United States. There are currently twenty-one (21) spray dryer facilities operating in the United States that produce an adequate amount of spray dryer by-product to economically justify the installation of a lightweight aggregate manufacturing facility. Industry sources believe that as additional scrubbing is required, dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies will be the technology of choice. Letters from potential lightweight aggregate customers indicate that there is a market for the product once the commercialization barriers are eliminated by this demonstration project.

  13. Power-law of Aggregate-size Spectra in Natural Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo Convertino; Filippo Simini; Filippo Catani; Igor Linkov; Gregory A. Kiker

    2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Patterns of animate and inanimate systems show remarkable similarities in their aggregation. One similarity is the double-Pareto distribution of the aggregate-size of system components. Different models have been developed to predict aggregates of system components. However, not many models have been developed to describe probabilistically the aggregate-size distribution of any system regardless of the intrinsic and extrinsic drivers of the aggregation process. Here we consider natural animate systems, from one of the greatest mammals - the African elephant (\\textit{Loxodonta africana}) - to the \\textit{Escherichia coli} bacteria, and natural inanimate systems in river basins. Considering aggregates as islands and their perimeter as a curve mirroring the sculpting network of the system, the probability of exceedence of the drainage area, and the Hack's law are shown to be the the Kor\\v{c}ak's law and the perimeter-area relationship for river basins. The perimeter-area relationship, and the probability of exceedence of the aggregate-size provide a meaningful estimate of the same fractal dimension. Systems aggregate because of the influence exerted by a physical or processes network within the system domain. The aggregate-size distribution is accurately derived using the null-method of box-counting on the occurrences of system components. The importance of the aggregate-size spectrum relies on its ability to reveal system form, function, and dynamics also as a function of other coupled systems. Variations of the fractal dimension and of the aggregate-size distribution are related to changes of systems that are meaningful to monitor because potentially critical for these systems.

  14. The preparation of zinc silicate/ZnO particles and their use as an efficient UV absorber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Podbrscek, Peter [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)] [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Drazic, Goran [Department for Nanostructured Materials, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)] [Department for Nanostructured Materials, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Anzlovar, Alojz [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia) [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Center of Excellence for Polymer Materials and Technologies, Tehnoloski Park 24, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Orel, Zorica Crnjak, E-mail: zorica.crnjak.orel@ki.si [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Center of Excellence for Polymer Materials and Technologies, Tehnoloski Park 24, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: {yields} We used innovative gel-route in order to prepare zinc silicate/ZnO nano-particles. {yields} Continuous reactor was efficient for synthesizing ZnO and zinc silicate/ZnO precursors. {yields} Introduction of Si into reaction mixture influenced on particle size and their photoactivity. {yields} Prepared particles are appropriate for UV absorbers in polymers. -- Abstract: The formation of zinc silicate/ZnO particles synthesized by a two-step method and their incorporation into PMMA is presented. In the first step a segmented-flow tubular reactor was used for the continuous room-temperature preparation of a zinc silicate/Zn(OH){sub 2} gel that was thermally treated after rinsing and drying in the second step. The same preparation procedure was also employed for the synthesis of pure ZnO and pure zinc silicate particles. It was found that the presence of the zinc silicate phase significantly influenced the final particle size, decreased the degree of crystallization and reduced the particles' UV absorption capabilities. The reduced photocatalytic activity of the zinc silicate/ZnO particles indicated that the majority of ZnO crystallites were formed inside the zinc silicate matrix. The nanocomposite prepared from zinc silicate/ZnO particles (0.04 wt.%) and PMMA showed high UV shielding and at the same time sufficient transmittance in the visible-light region.

  15. Zinc Fertilization Plus Liming to Reduce Cadmium Uptake by Romaine Lettuce on Cd-Mineralized Lockwood Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaney, Rufus L; Green, Carrie E.; Ajwa, Husein A; Smith, Richard F

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by emissions from zinc smelters. Trace Subst. Environ.1999) who studied Zn-smelter or mine waste contaminated orgrowing Romaine lettuce on Zn-smelter contaminated soils in

  16. The Zinc Metalloregulatory Protein Synechococcus PCC7942 SmtB Binds a Single Zinc Ion per Monomer with High Affinity in a Tetrahedral Coordination Geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Robert A.

    . Scott,§ and David P. Giedroc*, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Center for AdVanced metallothionein that functions in the sequestra- tion and metabolism of zinc in Synechococcus (7). Smt-2-12 inverted repeat. Each half-site is characterized by a consensus 5-TGAA sequence to which SmtB binds (9

  17. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McQuaid, James H. (Livermore, CA); Lavietes, Anthony D. (Hayward, CA)

    1998-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radio nuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components.

  18. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McQuaid, J.H.; Lavietes, A.D.

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector is disclosed. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radionuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components. 9 figs.

  19. PROMOTED ZINC CHROMITE CATALYSTS FOR HIGHER ALCOHOL SYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ms. Xiaolei Sun; Professor George W. Roberts

    2000-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    During this reporting period, a ''zinc chromite'' catalyst promoted with 6 wt.% cesium (Cs) was evaluated at the following conditions: Temperature--375 C; Total Pressure--6.8 MPa (1000 psig); Gas Hourly Space Velocity (GHSV) - 5000 standard liters/kg(cat)-hr, and; H{sub 2}/CO feed ratio--1.0 mole/mole. Decahydronaphthalene (DHN) was used as the slurry liquid. The experiment lasted for eight days of continuous operation. Although the experimental data once again did not exhibit the desired degree of consistency, the data did show that methanol was the primary reaction product. The slurry liquid did not decompose or alkylate to a measurable extent during the continuous 8-day experiment. There was a relatively significant loss of catalyst surface area during the experiment. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of various fractions of ''spent'' THQ was carried out. The fractions were prepared by silica gel liquid chromatography (LC). Chemical formuli and probable structures for each major compound were obtained. However, a higher degree of purification will be necessary to allow nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis to be used for definitive compound identification. A new Maxpro gas booster (DLE 15-75) was purchased because the existing Haskel gas booster once again developed a severe leak of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, and was judged to be unworthy of repair.

  20. Zinc-chlorine battery plant system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whittlesey, Curtis C. (Birmingham, MI); Mashikian, Matthew S. (Huntington Woods, MI)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A zinc-chlorine battery plant system and method of redirecting the electrical current around a failed battery module. The battery plant includes a power conditioning unit, a plurality of battery modules connected electrically in series to form battery strings, a plurality of battery strings electrically connected in parallel to the power conditioning unit, and a bypass switch for each battery module in the battery plant. The bypass switch includes a normally open main contact across the power terminals of the battery module, and a set of normally closed auxiliary contacts for controlling the supply of reactants electrochemically transformed in the cells of the battery module. Upon the determination of a failure condition, the bypass switch for the failed battery module is energized to close the main contact and open the auxiliary contacts. Within a short time, the electrical current through the battery module will substantially decrease due to the cutoff of the supply of reactants, and the electrical current flow through the battery string will be redirected through the main contact of the bypass switch.