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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm samples rich in zinc sulfide and dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were collected from lead-zinc mine waters. The researchers were curious about the relationship of the organic material and metals, particularly how organics affect mobility, and its potential for bioremediation. It is known that some organics promote aggregation. Amine-bearing molecules, for example, can organize sulfide nanoparticles into semiconductor nanowires. The research team used a series of imaging techniques and detectors to analyze aggregates of biogenic zinc sulfide nanocrystals in the biofilms. Their examination yielded excellent results and some surprises. They were able to prove that natural organic matter promotes dense aggregation of the zinc sulfide nanocrystals into much larger spheroids and that the organic matter is preserved in nanometer-scale pores in the spheroids. What was not expected was the presence of proteins in the spheroids, making them a key component in aggregation and an example of extracellular biomineralization.

2

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extracellular Proteins Promote Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Wednesday, 26 September 2007 00:00 Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm samples rich in zinc sulfide and dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were collected from lead-zinc mine waters. The researchers were curious about the relationship of the organic material and metals, particularly how organics affect mobility, and its potential for bioremediation. It is known that some organics promote aggregation. Amine-bearing molecules, for example, can organize sulfide nanoparticles into semiconductor nanowires. The research team used a series of imaging techniques and detectors to analyze aggregates of biogenic zinc sulfide nanocrystals in the biofilms. Their examination yielded excellent results and some surprises. They were able to prove that natural organic matter promotes dense aggregation of the zinc sulfide nanocrystals into much larger spheroids and that the organic matter is preserved in nanometer-scale pores in the spheroids. What was not expected was the presence of proteins in the spheroids, making them a key component in aggregation and an example of extracellular biomineralization.

3

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm samples rich in zinc sulfide and dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were collected from lead-zinc mine waters. The researchers were curious about the relationship of the organic material and metals, particularly how organics affect mobility, and its potential for bioremediation. It is known that some organics promote aggregation. Amine-bearing molecules, for example, can organize sulfide nanoparticles into semiconductor nanowires. The research team used a series of imaging techniques and detectors to analyze aggregates of biogenic zinc sulfide nanocrystals in the biofilms. Their examination yielded excellent results and some surprises. They were able to prove that natural organic matter promotes dense aggregation of the zinc sulfide nanocrystals into much larger spheroids and that the organic matter is preserved in nanometer-scale pores in the spheroids. What was not expected was the presence of proteins in the spheroids, making them a key component in aggregation and an example of extracellular biomineralization.

4

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sulfide Aggregation Print Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm...

5

Zinc sulfide liquefaction catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the liquefaction of carbonaceous material, such as coal, is set forth wherein coal is liquefied in a catalytic solvent refining reaction wherein an activated zinc sulfide catalyst is utilized which is activated by hydrogenation in a coal derived process solvent in the absence of coal.

Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Acid treatment removes zinc sulfide scale restriction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that removal of zinc sulfide (ZnS) scale with acid restored an offshore Louisiana well's production to original rates. The zinc sulfide scale was determined to be in the near well bore area. The selected acid had been proven to control iron sulfide (FeS) scales in sour wells without causing harm to surface production equipment, tubing, and other downhole hardware. The successful removal of the blockage re-established previous production rates with a 105% increase in flowing tubing pressure. On production for a number of months, a high rate, high-pressure offshore well was experiencing unusually rapid pressure and rate declines. A small sample of the restrictive material was obtained during the wire line operations. The well was subsequently shut in while a laboratory analysis determined that zinc sulfide was the major component of the obstruction.

Biggs, K. (Kerr McGee Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Allison, D. (Otis Engineering Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Ford, W.G.F. (Halliburton Co., Duncan, OK (United States))

1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

Cadmium zinc sulfide by solution growth  

SciTech Connect

A process for depositing thin layers of a II-VI compound cadmium zinc sulfide (CdZnS) by an aqueous solution growth technique with quality suitable for high efficiency photovoltaic or other devices which can benefit from the band edge shift resulting from the inclusion of Zn in the sulfide. A first solution comprising CdCl.sub.2 2.5H.sub.2 O, NH.sub.4 Cl, NH.sub.4 OH and ZnCl.sub.2, and a second solution comprising thiourea ((NH.sub.2).sub.2 CS) are combined and placed in a deposition cell, along with a substrate to form a thin i.e. 10 nm film of CdZnS on the substrate. This process can be sequentially repeated with to achieve deposition of independent multiple layers having different Zn concentrations.

Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA)

1992-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

8

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

26 September 2007 00:00 Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm...

9

Sulfidation and reduction of zinc titanate and zinc oxide sorbents for injection in gasifier exit ducts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sulfidation reaction kinetics of fine particles of zinc titanate and zinc oxide with H{sub 2}S were studied in order to test the potential of the sorbent injection hot-gas desulfurization process. Fine sorbent particles with diameter between 0.3 and 60 {mu}m were sulfided with H{sub 2}S and/or reduced with H{sub 2} in a laminar flow reactor over the temperature range of 500-900{degrees}C. Sulfidation/reduction conversion was compared for different particle sizes and sorbents with various porosities and atomic ratios of Zn and Ti. In reduction of ZnO with H{sub 2} and without H{sub 2}S, significant amount of Zn was formed and vaporized, while the presence of H{sub 2}S suppressed elemental Zn formation. This suggests that H{sub 2}S may suppress the surface reduction of ZnO and/or gaseous Zn may react with H{sub 2}S homogeneously and form fine particles of ZnS. Formation and vaporization of elemental Zn from zinc titanate sorbents was slower than from zinc oxide with and without H{sub 2}S.

Ishikawa, K. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering]|[Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd., Akashi, Hyogo (Japan). Technical Inst.; Krueger, C.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Jl, W.; Higgins, R.J.; Bishop, B.A.; Goldsmith, R.L. [CeraMem Corp., Waltham, MA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Triboluminescent properties of zinc sulfide phosphors due to hypervelocity impact  

SciTech Connect

The emission of light due to crystal fracture, or triboluminescence (TL), is a phenomenon that has been known for centuries. One of the most common examples of TL is the flash created from chewing Wint-O-Green Lifesavers . From 2004 to 2006, research was completed using the two-stage light gas gun located at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama to measure the TL properties for zinc sulfide doped with both manganese (ZnS:Mn) and copper (ZnS:Cu). Results clearly show that hypervelocity impact-induced TL has been observed for both ZnS:Mn and ZnS:Cu. For ZnS:Mn, TL produced during 4.7 and 5.7km/s impacts was statistically more luminous than was observed from similar data collected at 3.3km/s. The TL decay time for ZnS:Mn was found to be 292 58 s, which is totally consistent with earlier measurements that did not use impact as an excitation source. Further, the emission of TL from ZnS:Mn undergoing hypervelocity impact has been demonstrated to have a significant component at the known peak emission wavelength of ZnS:Mn of 585nm. Small TL emission generated as a result of hypervelocity impact was also observed from ZnS:Cu. The most intriguing conclusion from this research is that it may be possible to discriminate impact velocity by measuring the time-integrated luminosity of TL phosphors. An ability to measure the velocity of a hypervelocity impact is a significant indicator of the potential usefulness for this concept for use as an impact sensor in future spacecraft.

Bergeron, Mr. Noah P. [Louisiana Tech University; HollermanPh.D., Dr. William A. [University of Louisiana, Lafayette; Goedeke, Shawn [ORNL; Moore, R. J. [University of Louisiana, Lafayette

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Impact of hydrogen and oxygen defects on the lattice parameter of chemical vapor deposited zinc sulfide  

SciTech Connect

The lattice parameter of cubic chemical vapor deposited (CVD) ZnS with measured oxygen concentrations < 0.6 at.% and hydrogen impurities of < 0.015 at.% have been measured and found to vary between -0.10% and +0.09% relative to the reference lattice parameter (5.4093 Å) of oxygen-free cubic ZnS as reported in the literature. Defects other than substitutional O must be invoked to explain these observed volume changes. The structure and thermodynamic stability of a wide range of native and impurity induced defects in ZnS have been determined by Ab initio calculations. Lattice contraction is caused by S-vacancies, substitutional O on S sites, Zn vacancies, H in S vacancies, peroxy defects, and dissociated water in S-vacancies. The lattice is expanded by interstitial H, H in Zn vacancies, dihydroxy defects, interstitial oxygen, Zn and [ZnHn] complexes (n=1,…,4), interstitial Zn, and S2 dumbbells. Oxygen, though present, likely forms substitutional defects for sulfur resulting in lattice contraction rather than as interstitial oxygen resulting in lattice expansion. It is concluded based on measurement and calculations that excess zinc atoms either at anti-sites (i.e. Zn atoms on S-sites) or possibly as interstitial Zn are responsible for the relative increase of the lattice parameter of commercially produced CVD ZnS.

McCloy, John S.; Wolf, Walter; Wimmer, Erich; Zelinski, Brian

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

12

Iron Control in Zinc Pressure Leach Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consequently, the disposal of iron residues is an integral part of the design and operation of zinc refineries. Zinc has been recovered from sulfide concentrates ...

13

ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry: Chapter 6: Lead and Zinc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Lead and Zinc Lead and zinc ores are usually found together with gold and silver. A lead-zinc ore may also contain lead sulfide, zinc sulfide, iron sulfide, iron carbonate, and quartz. When zinc and lead sulfides are present in profitable amounts they are regarded as ore minerals. The remaining rock and minerals are called gangue. Forms of Lead and Zinc Ore The two principal minerals containing lead and zinc are galena and sphalerite. These two minerals are frequently found together along with other sulfide minerals, but one or the other may be predominant. Galena may contain small amounts of impurities including the precious metal silver, usually in the form of a sulfide. When silver is present in sufficient quantities, galena is regarded as a silver ore and called argentiferous galena. Sphalerite is zinc sulfide, but

14

Sulfide chemiluminescence detection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method of chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction.

Spurlin, Stanford R. (Ames, IA); Yeung, Edward S. (Ames, IA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Sulfide chemiluminescence detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction. 4 figs.

Spurlin, S.R.; Yeung, E.S.

1985-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

16

Cadmium sulfide membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

Spanhel, Lubomir (Madison, WI); Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

1992-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

17

Cadmium sulfide membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

Spanhel, Lubomir (Madison, WI); Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

1991-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

18

SRD 134 Hydrogen Sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

> Return to SRD 134, Index of Semiconductor Process Gases. HYDROGEN SULFIDE. MW [1]. 34.082. NBP [1]. 212.88 K. TP [1]. 187.7 K. H 2 S. Pc [1 ...

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

19

Zinc Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 7   Typical applications of wrought zinc and zinc alloys...deep-drawn hardware; address plates; solar collectors Zn-Pb-Cd-Fe Building construction materials, dry-cell battery

20

Wrought Zinc and Zinc Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 12   Typical applications of wrought zinc and zinc alloys...deep-drawn hardware; address plates; solar collectors Zn-Pb-Cd-Fe Building construction materials, dry-cell battery

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Wrought Zinc and Zinc Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 12 Typical applications of wrought zinc and zinc alloys...materials; deep-drawn hardware; address plates; solar collectors Zn-Pb-Cd-Fe Building construction materials, dry-cell battery cans, deep-drawn hardware, address plates, electrical components Zn-Al (superplastic zinc) Shaped components such as typewriter casings, computer panels, and covers...

22

Information Markets and Aggregation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information Markets and Aggregation by Narahari Mohan PhatakSpring 2012 Information Markets and Aggregation CopyrightMohan Phatak Abstract Information Markets and Aggregation by

Phatak, Narahari Mohan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Coordinated Aggregation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coordinated Coordinated Aggregation of Distributed Energy Resources Alejandro Dominguez-Garcia Univ of Illinois Pravin Varaiya & Kameshwar Poolla UC Berkeley August 6, 2013 Dominguez-Garcia, Poolla, Varaiya CERTS Review 2013 August 6, 2013 0 / 45 Our Research Group Students Anand Subramanian, Justin Hughes Jared Porter, Zach Lerner Post-docs Ashutosh Nayyar He Hao, Borhan Sanandaji Faculty Alejandro Dominguez-Garcia Kameshwar Poolla, Pravin Varaiya Dominguez-Garcia, Poolla, Varaiya CERTS Review 2013 August 6, 2013 0 / 45 CERTS Research Activities Network case of Risk-Limiting Dispatch Improved Load Forecasting with fine-grain measurements Coordinated Aggregation of Distributed Resources Dominguez-Garcia, Poolla, Varaiya CERTS Review 2013 August 6, 2013 1 / 45 Risk Limiting Dispatch Dominguez-Garcia, Poolla, Varaiya CERTS Review 2013 August

24

Geothermal hydrogen sulfide removal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

UOP Sulfox technology successfully removed 500 ppM hydrogen sulfide from simulated mixed phase geothermal waters. The Sulfox process involves air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide using a fixed catalyst bed. The catalyst activity remained stable throughout the life of the program. The product stream composition was selected by controlling pH; low pH favored elemental sulfur, while high pH favored water soluble sulfate and thiosulfate. Operation with liquid water present assured full catalytic activity. Dissolved salts reduced catalyst activity somewhat. Application of Sulfox technology to geothermal waters resulted in a straightforward process. There were no requirements for auxiliary processes such as a chemical plant. Application of the process to various types of geothermal waters is discussed and plans for a field test pilot plant and a schedule for commercialization are outlined.

Urban, P.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Apparatus for use in sulfide chemiluminescence detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction. 4 figs.

Spurlin, S.R.; Yeung, E.S.

1987-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

26

Apparatus for use in sulfide chemiluminescence detection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method of chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction.

Spurlin, Stanford R. (Ames, IA); Yeung, Edward S. (Ames, IA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Lithium and Zinc Sulfide Coated Plastic Neutron Detector Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. In addition, a few other companies have detector technologies that might be competitive in the near term as an alternative technology. Reported here are the results of tests of 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated scintillator paddles. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Symetrica.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

28

Durable zinc oxide-containing sorbents for coal gas desulfurization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Durable zinc-oxide containing sorbent pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a gas stream at an elevated temperature are made up to contain titania as a diluent, high-surface-area silica gel as a matrix material, and a binder. These materials are mixed, moistened, and formed into pellets, which are then dried and calcined. The resulting pellets undergo repeated cycles of sulfidation and regeneration without loss of reactivity and without mechanical degradation. Regeneration of the pellets is carried out by contacting the bed with an oxidizing gas mixture.

Siriwardane, R.V.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

Zinc electrode with cement additive  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A zinc electrode having a cement additive, preferably, Portland Cement, distributed in the zinc active material.

Charkey, Allen (Brookfield, CT)

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Removing hydrogen sulfide from a gas  

SciTech Connect

The hydrogen sulfide concentration of a gas of relatively higher hydrogen sulfide concentration is reduced by introducing the gas to a fragmented permeable mass of oil shale for contacting the oil shale in the substantial absence of free oxygen. This yields a gas with relatively lower hydrogen sulfide concentration which is withdrawn from the fragmented permeable mass of oil shale.

Compton, L.E.

1978-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

31

Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

1989-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

32

Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A zeolite-based catalyst is described for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C[sub 2]+ hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

Maroni, V.A.; Iton, L.E.; Pasterczyk, J.W.; Winterer, M.; Krause, T.R.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

33

Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A zeolite based catalyst for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C.sub.2 + hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

Maroni, Victor A. (Naperville, IL); Iton, Lennox E. (Downers Grove, IL); Pasterczyk, James W. (Westmont, IL); Winterer, Markus (Westmont, IL); Krause, Theodore R. (Lisle, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Production of zinc pellets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries. 6 figs.

Cooper, J.F.

1996-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

35

Production of zinc pellets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Arnold Schwarzenegger COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT APPENDIX G Aggregation Guide is the interim report for the Community Choice Aggregation Pilot Program project (Contract Community Choice Aggregation Guide. California Energy Commission, PIER Renewable Energy Technologies

37

Arnold Schwarzenegger COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT PIERFINALPROJECTREPORT Rosenfeld. Please cite this report as follows: Stoner, G. Patrick. 2008. Community Choice Aggregation Pilot Aggregation Pilot Project Final Report is the final report for the Community Choice Aggregation Pilot Project

38

Sulfide Stress Cracking in Steels - A Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Corrosion and Corrosion Protection of Materials in the Oil and Gas Industry. Presentation Title, Sulfide Stress Cracking in Steels - A Review.

39

Nickel/zinc batteries  

SciTech Connect

A review of the design, components, electrochemistry, operation and performance of nickel-zinc batteries is presented. 173 references. (WHK)

McBreen, J.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Hydrogen Sulfide, Oil and Gas, and People’s Health By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. Hydrogen Sulfide in the Environment.................................................................................... 4 3. Hydrogen Sulfide and Oil and Gas......................................................................................... 5

Lana Skrtic

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

Alonso, Gabriel (Chihuahua, MX); Chianelli, Russell R. (El Paso, TX); Fuentes, Sergio (Ensenada, MX); Torres, Brenda (El Paso, TX)

2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

42

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT APPENDIX B: Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor Project Reports on California Public Utilities Commission Decisions on Community Choice Aggregation Prepared For Participants FROM: John Dalessi, NCI SUBJECT: CPUC COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PHASE 1 DECISION On December 16

43

Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are presented in durable form, usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (Drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.

Siriwardane, R.V.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are prepared in durable form usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V. (Morgantown, WV)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide coal gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are prepared in durable form, usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V. (Morgantown, WV)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Business models of information aggregators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis identifies the specific characteristics of information aggregators, and proposes nine business models appropriate for information aggregators. These nine models are: advertising, brokerage, subscription, ...

Hu, Jiangxia, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT APPENDIX H: Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor Berkeley have been investigating and analyzing a program for the implementation of Community Choice Aggregation

48

Sulfidation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Coal gasification is an important process, providing material challenges. Reference 81 describes the evaluation of alloys

49

Improved zinc electrode and rechargeable zinc-air battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention comprises an improved rechargeable zinc-air cell/battery having recirculating alkaline electrolyte and a zinc electrode comprising a porous foam support material which carries the active zinc electrode material. 5 figs.

Ross, P.N. Jr.

1988-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

50

Copper and Zinc Metallation Status of Copper Zinc Superoxide Dismutase form Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Transgenic Mice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mutations in the metalloenzyme copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause one form of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and metals are suspected to play a pivotal role in ALS pathology. To learn more about metals in ALS, we determined the metallation states of human wild-type or mutant (G37R, G93A, and H46R/H48Q) SOD1 proteins from SOD1-ALS transgenic mice spinal cords. SOD1 was gently extracted from spinal cord and separated into insoluble (aggregated) and soluble (supernatant) fractions, and then metallation states were determined by HPLC inductively coupled plasma MS. Insoluble SOD1-rich fractions were not enriched in copper and zinc. However, the soluble mutant and WT SOD1s were highly metallated except for the metal-binding-region mutant H46R/H48Q, which did not bind any copper. Due to the stability conferred by high metallation of G37R and G93A, it is unlikely that these soluble SOD1s are prone to aggregation in vivo, supporting the hypothesis that immature nascent SOD1 is the substrate for aggregation. We also investigated the effect of SOD1 overexpression and disease on metal homeostasis in spinal cord cross-sections of SOD1-ALS mice using synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence microscopy. In each mouse genotype, except for the H46R/H48Q mouse, we found a redistribution of copper between gray and white matters correlated to areas of high SOD1. Interestingly, a disease-specific increase of zinc was observed in the white matter for all mutant SOD1 mice. Together these data provide a picture of copper and zinc in the cell as well as highlight the importance of these metals in understanding SOD1-ALS pathology.

Lelie, H.L.; Miller, L.; Liba, A.; Bourassa, M.W.; Chattopadhyay, M.; Chan, P.K.; Gralla, E.B.; Borchelt, D.R.; et al

2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

51

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT APPENDIX A: Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor Community in this report. #12;1 COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT APPENDIX A Community Choice Aggregation in the Community Choice Aggregation Demonstration project and assesses the costs and availability of renewable

52

Applications of Zinc  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Typical applications of zinc-coated steel products...galvanized Various alloys Structural steel for power generating plants, petrochemical

53

Zinc-Nickel Battery  

The short lifetime of the conventional zinc-nickel oxide battery has been the primary factor limiting its commercial use, ... Higher voltage, lower co ...

54

Regional Comparisons, Spatial Aggregation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Regional Comparisons, Spatial Aggregation, and Asymmetry of Price Pass-Through in U.S. Gasoline Markets MICHAEL YE*, JOHN ZYREN**, JOANNE SHORE**, AND MICHAEL BURDETTE** Abstract Spot to retail price pass-through behavior of the U.S. gasoline market was investigated at the national and regional levels, using weekly wholesale and retail motor gasoline prices from January 2000 to the present. Asymmetric pass-through was found across all regions, with faster pass-through when prices are rising. Pass-through patterns, in terms of speed and time for completion, were found to vary from region to region. Spatial aggregation was investigated at the national level and the East Coast with the aggregated cumulative pass-through being greater than the volume-weighted regional pass-through when spot prices increase. These results are useful to the petroleum industry, consumers,

55

Molecular Cell Hydrogen Sulfide-Linked Sulfhydration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Cell Article Hydrogen Sulfide-Linked Sulfhydration of NF-kB Mediates Its Antiapoptotic@jhmi.edu DOI 10.1016/j.molcel.2011.10.021 SUMMARY Nuclear factor kB (NF-kB) is an antiapoptotic tran- scription factor. We show that the antiapoptotic actions of NF-kB are mediated by hydrogen sulfide (H2S

Dong, Xinzhong

56

Technology meets aggregate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New technology carried out at Tufts University and the University of Massachusetts on synthetic lightweight aggregate has created material from various qualities of fly ash from coal-fired power plants for use in different engineered applications. In pilot scale manufacturing tests an 'SLA' containing 80% fly ash and 20% mixed plastic waste from packaging was produced by 'dry blending' mixed plastic with high carbon fly ash. A trial run was completed to produce concrete masonry unit (CMU) blocks at a full-scale facility. It has been shown that SLA can be used as a partial substitution of a traditional stone aggregate in hot asphalt mix. 1 fig., 2 photos.

Wilson, C.; Swan, C. [INNERT Co. (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Uncertain generalized aggregation operators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to extend the generalized ordered weighted averaging operator and provide a new class of operators called the uncertain generalized ordered weighted averaging (UGOWA) operator. It provides a very general formulation that includes ... Keywords: Aggregation, Decision making, Generalized mean, OWA operator, Operator weights

Li-Gang Zhou; Hua-You Chen; José M. Merigó; Anna M. Gil-Lafuente

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Thermal decomposition of mercuric sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rate of thermal decomposition of mercuric sulfide (HgS) has been measured at temperatures from 265 to 345 C. These data have been analyzed using a first-order chemical reaction model for the time dependence of the reaction and the Arrhenius equation for the temperature dependence of the rate constant. Using this information, the activation energy for the reaction was found to be 55 kcal/mol. Significant reaction vessel surface effects obscured the functional form of the time dependence of the initial portion of the reaction. The data and the resulting time-temperature reaction-rate model were used to predict the decomposition rate of HgS as a function of time and temperature in thermal treatment systems. Data from large-scale thermal treatment studies already completed were interpreted in terms of the results of this study. While the data from the large-scale thermal treatment studies were consistent with the data from this report, mass transport effects may have contributed to the residual amount of mercury which remained in the soil after most of the large-scale runs.

Leckey, J.H.; Nulf, L.E.

1994-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

59

Sealed nickel-zinc battery  

SciTech Connect

A sealed, rechargeable nickel-zinc cell includes a zinc electrode active mass essentially free of zinc metal when at full discharge, a carboxylated styrene-butadiene binder retaining the zinc electrode mixture in a coherent structure, a predetermined amount of cadmium being included in the zinc electrode mixture, a separator preferably comprising at least two layers of material free of any adhesive binding the layers together and a wicking layer positioned between the nickel positive electrode and the separator.

Gibbard, H. F.; Menard, C. J.; Murray Jr., R. C.; Putt, R. A.; Valentine, T. W.

1985-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

60

Zinc phosphate conversion coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT APPENDIX E: Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor Community in this report. #12;«CCA_Name» - DRAFT - COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION IMPLEMENTATION PLAN «Date Choice Aggregation Implementation Plan Template Prepared For: California Energy Commission Prepared By

62

Zinc electrode and rechargeable zinc-air battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved zinc electrode is disclosed for a rechargeable zinc-air battery comprising an outer frame and a porous foam electrode support within the frame which is treated prior to the deposition of zinc thereon to inhibit the formation of zinc dendrites on the external surface thereof. The outer frame is provided with passageways for circulating an alkaline electrolyte through the treated zinc-coated porous foam. A novel rechargeable zinc-air battery system is also disclosed which utilizes the improved zinc electrode and further includes an alkaline electrolyte within said battery circulating through the passageways in the zinc electrode and an external electrolyte circulation means which has an electrolyte reservoir external to the battery case including filter means to filter solids out of the electrolyte as it circulates to the external reservoir and pump means for recirculating electrolyte from the external reservoir to the zinc electrode.

Ross, Jr., Philip N. (Kensington, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Method of washing hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas by the ammonium sulfide method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved coke oven gas washing process for removing hydrogen sulfide is proposed wherein the coke oven gas is treated in a hydrogen sulfide scrubber by counterflow with an aqueous ammonia wash water. A stream of aqueous weak ammonia liquor is cooled and sprayed through nozzles in the mid-region of the hydrogen sulfide scrubber. A quantity of aqueous ammonia liquor, corresponding to the quantity which is sprayed through the said nozzles, is withdrawn from the hydrogen sulfide scrubber at a level below the nozzles and is introduced into the top of the said hydrogen sulfide scrubber. Ammonia vapor released at the nozzles has a higher partial pressure than the ammonia partial pressure of the coke oven gas in the region of the nozzle. The aqueous ammonia liquor from the deacidifier is the source of the cooled aqueous ammonia liquor which is introduced through the nozzles. A portion of the aqueous ammonia liquor from the deacidifier is introduced directly into the top of the hydrogen sulfide scrubber as a portion of the required aqueous ammonia wash water.

Ritter, H.

1985-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

64

Teichert Aggregates | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teichert Aggregates Teichert Aggregates Jump to: navigation, search Name Teichert Aggregates Facility Teichert Aggregates Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Teichert Aggregates Developer Foundation Windpower Energy Purchaser Teichert Aggregates Location South of Tracy CA Coordinates 37.616169°, -121.356236° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.616169,"lon":-121.356236,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

65

Zinc electrode in alkaline electrolyte  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The zinc electrode in alkaline electrolyte is unusual in that supersaturated zincate solutions can form during discharge and spongy or mossy zinc deposits can form on charge at low overvoltages. The effect of additives on regular pasted ZnO electrodes and calcium zincate electrodes is discussed. The paper also reports on in situ x-ray absorption (XAS) results on mossy zinc deposits.

McBreen, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

66

Photovoltaic cells employing zinc phosphide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic cell having a zinc phosphide absorber. The zinc phosphide can be a single or multiple crystal slice or a thin polycrystalline film. The cell can be a Schottky barrier, heterojunction or homojunction device. Methods for synthesizing and crystallizing zinc phosphide are disclosed as well as a method for forming thin films.

Barnett, Allen M. (Newark, DE); Catalano, Anthony W. (Wilmington, DE); Dalal, Vikram L. (Newark, DE); Masi, James V. (Wilbraham, MA); Meakin, John D. (Newark, DE); Hall, Robert B. (Newark, DE)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Aggregation in Charged Nano Suspensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to control aggregation phenomena in suspensions of nanoparticles, one often charges the particles electrically, e.g. by triboelectric charging. Stabilization of suspensions against aggregation of particles is an important issue, which may be realized by monopolar charging, where particles repel each other. Contrarily, bipolar charging may be used in coating processes, where smaller particles of one material coat larger particles of another material. When the two particle fractions are charged oppositely, aggregation between equally charged particles is hindered whereas aggregation between oppositely charged particles is preferred, thereby improving the coating process. We study various aspects of these two situations by theoretical investigations and computer simulations.

J. H. Werth; S. M. Dammer; H. A. Knudsen; H. Hinrichsen; D. E. Wolf

2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

68

Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Volume 1, Bench-scale testing and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AMAX Research & Development Center (AMAX R&D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

1989-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

69

Corrosion Resistance of Zinc  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 15 Compatibility of untreated zinc with various media...free Excellent Gas (a) Towns, natural, propane, butane Excellent Glycerine . . . Excellent Inks Printing Excellent Aqueous writing Not recommended Insecticides Dry Excellent In solution Not recommended Lubricants Mineral, acid free Excellent Organic Not recommended Paraffin . . . Excellent...

70

Doped zinc oxide microspheres  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new composition and method of making same for a doped zinc oxide microsphere and articles made therefrom for use in an electrical surge arrestor which has increased solid content, uniform grain size and is in the form of a gel. 4 figures.

Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Bond, W.D.; Lauf, R.J.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

71

Sources of Zinc Scrap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...and up to 1% Cu. Zinc die castings are generally small, from less than one ounce up to several pounds in weight. They are frequently found as components in complex assemblies such as in automobiles, appliances, and electronics. Separation of castings from these larger assemblies is difficult, as is the...

72

Zinc alkaline secondary battery  

SciTech Connect

A zinc alkaline secondary battery with improved service life in which a multi-layer separator is interposed between the negative and positive electrodes and the quantity of the alkaline electrolyte in the layer of the separator adjacent to the negative electrode is less than that of the electrolyte in the layer of the separator adjacent to the positive electrode.

Furukawa, N.; Nishizawa, N.

1983-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

73

Corrosion Resistance of Zinc  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 15   Compatibility of untreated zinc with various media...Sulfur free Excellent Gas (a) Towns, natural, propane, butane Excellent Glycerine � Excellent Inks Printing Excellent Aqueous writing Not recommended Insecticides Dry Excellent In solution Not recommended Lubricants Mineral, acid free Excellent Organic Not recommended Paraffin � Excellent...

74

Enhancing the efficiency of SnS solar cells via band-offset engineering with a zinc oxysulfide buffer layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S absorber layers without breaking vacuum. Indium tin oxide (ITO) (200 nm) was deposited at room temperature at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), exhibiting an improved cell performance of Jsc ¼ 19.4mA/cm2 by vapor deposition of p-type tin(II) sulfide, SnS, and n-type zinc oxysulfide, Zn(O,S), using a device

Gordon, Roy

75

Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

76

Single-layer transition metal sulfide catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Transition Metal Sulfides (TMS), such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2), are the petroleum industry's "workhorse" catalysts for upgrading heavy petroleum feedstocks and removing sulfur, nitrogen and other pollutants from fuels. We have developed an improved synthesis technique to produce SLTMS catalysts, such as molybdenum disulfide, with potentially greater activity and specificity than those currently available. Applications for this technology include heavy feed upgrading, in-situ catalysis, bio-fuel conversion and coal liquefaction.

Thoma, Steven G. (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Subsurface heaters with low sulfidation rates  

SciTech Connect

A system for heating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a heater having an elongated ferromagnetic metal heater section. The heater is located in an opening in a formation. The heater section is configured to heat the hydrocarbon containing formation. The exposed ferromagnetic metal has a sulfidation rate that goes down with increasing temperature of the heater, when the heater is in a selected temperature range.

John, Randy Carl; Vinegar, Harold J

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

78

Single-layer transition metal sulfide catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Transition Metal Sulfides (TMS), such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2), are the petroleum industry's "workhorse" catalysts for upgrading heavy petroleum feedstocks and removing sulfur, nitrogen and other pollutants from fuels. We have developed an improved synthesis technique to produce SLTMS catalysts, such as molybdenum disulfide, with potentially greater activity and specificity than those currently available. Applications for this technology include heavy feed upgrading, in-situ catalysis, bio-fuel conversion and coal liquefaction.

Thoma, Steven G. (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

State of zincate in supersaturated solutions obtained during the discharging of a nickel-zinc electrochemical system  

SciTech Connect

This article examines the ultraviolet (UV) spectra of supersaturated zincate solutions obtained as a result of the discharging of the nickel-zinc system during their aging. A disadvantage of the nickel-zinc storage battery is its relatively short service life due to the instability of the zinc electrode. This instability is caused by the tendency of the zincate solution to become supersaturated. The UV spectra of the supersaturated zincate solutions obtained in the silver-zinc and nickel-zinc systems show significant absorption at 240 nm and strong absorption at 280 nm. The strong absorption at 280 nm in the supersaturated zincate solutions corresponds to the weak absorption in the solution obtained by ordinary dissolution. It is suggested that the stability of supersaturated zincate solutions may be increased by the formation of additional bridging bonds, which link the individual molecules of their aggregates to form a three-dimensional structure.

Smitrenko, V.E.; Baulov, V.I.; Kotov, A.V.; Zubov, M.S.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Control of hydrogen sulfide...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Control of hydrogen sulfide emission from geothermal power plants. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Control of hydrogen sulfide...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Control of hydrogen sulfide emission from geothermal power plants. Volume II. Laboratory results and process...

82

MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF THE LITHIUM-ALUMINUM, IRON SULFIDE BATTERY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and J. Newman, Proc. Syrup. Battery Design and Optimization,123, 1364 (1976). Symp, Battery Design and Optimization, S.~ALUMINUM, IRON SULFIDE BATTERY Contents ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Pollard, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Micro-aeration for hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The presence of sulfur compounds (e.g. protein, sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, etc.) in the feed stream generates highly corrosive and odorous hydrogen sulfide during anaerobic digestion.… (more)

Duangmanee, Thanapong

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

A New Method to Evaluate Hydrogen Sulfide Removal from Biogas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydrogen sulfide in biogas fuel increases the speed at which the system utilizing the biogas corrodes. This corrosion may be prevented by separating and removing… (more)

Martin, Jerry H II

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Bioleaching and electrobioleaching of low grade copper sulfide ore ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Low grade Copper sulfide ore of Sarcheshmeh copper mine of Iran was leached using bioleaching mode and electrobioleaching mode.

86

On the Mechanism of Castastropic Atmospheric Sulfidation of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, On the Mechanism of Castastropic Atmospheric Sulfidation of Electronic Components in Data Centers. Author(s), Linn W. Hobbs. On-Site ...

87

Active Zinc Oxide Production From Waste Zinc Powder  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, various quality of active zinc oxides containing up to 98 wt. ... Comparison of Microstructural Evolution of Nickel During Conventional and Spark ...

88

Social network effects on information aggregation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we investigated how sociometric information can be used to improve different methods of aggregating dispersed information. We specifically compared four different approaches of information aggregation: ...

Mulanda, Chilongo D

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Boiling Water Reactor Zinc Addition Sourcebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiling water reactors (BWRs) have been injecting zinc into the primary coolant via the feedwater system for over 25 years to control primary system radiation fields. The zinc injection process has evolved since the initial application at the Hope Creek Nuclear Station in 1986. This evolution included transition from natural zinc oxide to depleted zinc oxide and from active zinc injection skids (pumped systems) to passive injection systems (zinc pellet beds).  Also occurring were various ...

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Tests for Hydrogen Cyanide and Hydrogen Sulfide  

SciTech Connect

A potential source of dangerous concentrations of hydrogen cyanide exists in the plating room of the Machine Shop where open plating baths containing cyanide salts are maintained and where solid cyanide salts are stored. Also the use of hydrogen sulfide in certain steps of the waste disposal process has lead to noticeable and sometimes objectionable concentrations of this gas in the air of the "WD" Building. In view of the toxic properties of these two gases, it was desirable to set up suitable tests to determine the actual concentrations present in the air of the respective working areas.

Joy, E. F.

1949-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

91

Zinc Matrix Power Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zinc Matrix Power Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Zinc Matrix Power Inc Place Santa Barbara, California Zip 93101 Product Develops high-performance rechargeable alkaline...

92

J7, Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide Solar Cell Development by RF ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

L6, PECVD-SiN, Si or Si/Al2O3-Capped ED-Mode AlN/GaN Inverters · Hide details for [

93

Incremental computation and maintenance of temporal aggregates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract.We consider the problems of computing aggregation queries in temporal databases and of maintaining materialized temporal aggregate views efficiently. The latter problem is particularly challenging since a single data update can cause aggregate ... Keywords: Access methods, Aggregation, B-tree, Segment tree, Temporal database, View maintenance

Jun Yang; Jennifer Widom

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

It's Elemental - The Element Zinc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Copper Copper Previous Element (Copper) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Gallium) Gallium The Element Zinc [Click for Isotope Data] 30 Zn Zinc 65.38 Atomic Number: 30 Atomic Weight: 65.38 Melting Point: 692.68 K (419.53°C or 787.15°F) Boiling Point: 1180 K (907°C or 1665°F) Density: 7.134 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 12 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the German word zink. Say what? Zinc is pronounced as ZINK. History and Uses: Although zinc compounds have been used for at least 2,500 years in the production of brass, zinc wasn't recognized as a distinct element until much later. Metallic zinc was first produced in India sometime in the 1400s by heating the mineral calamine (ZnCO3) with wool. Zinc was rediscovered by

95

Use of sulfide-containing liquors for removing mercury from flue gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for reducing and removing mercury in industrial gases, such as a flue gas, produced by the combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal, adds sulfide ions to the flue gas as it passes through a scrubber. Ideally, the source of these sulfide ions may include at least one of: sulfidic waste water, kraft caustic liquor, kraft carbonate liquor, potassium sulfide, sodium sulfide, and thioacetamide. The sulfide ion source is introduced into the scrubbing liquor as an aqueous sulfide species. The scrubber may be either a wet or dry scrubber for flue gas desulfurization systems.

Nolan, Paul S. (North Canton, OH); Downs, William (Alliance, OH); Bailey, Ralph T. (Uniontown, OH); Vecci, Stanley J. (Alliance, OH)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Hydrogen and sulfur recovery from hydrogen sulfide wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for generating hydrogen and elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide waste in which the hydrogen sulfide is [dis]associated under plasma conditions and a portion of the hydrogen output is used in a catalytic reduction unit to convert sulfur-containing impurities to hydrogen sulfide for recycle, the process also including the addition of an ionizing gas such as argon to initiate the plasma reaction at lower energy, a preheater for the input to the reactor and an internal adjustable choke in the reactor for enhanced coupling with the microwave energy input.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Gorski, A.J.; Daniels, E.J.

1993-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

97

Hydrogen and sulfur recovery from hydrogen sulfide wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for generating hydrogen and elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide waste in which the hydrogen sulfide is associated under plasma conditions and a portion of the hydrogen output is used in a catalytic reduction unit to convert sulfur-containing impurities to hydrogen sulfide for recycle, the process also including the addition of an ionizing gas such as argon to initiate the plasma reaction at lower energy, a preheater for the input to the reactor and an internal adjustable choke in the reactor for enhanced coupling with the microwave energy input.

Harkness, John B. L. (Naperville, IL); Gorski, Anthony J. (Woodridge, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Aggregation operators for fuzzy ontologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuzzy ontologies extend classical ontologies to allow the representation of imprecise and vague knowledge. Although a relatively important amount of work has been carried out in the field during the last years and they have been successfully used in ... Keywords: Aggregation operators, Fuzzy Description Logics, Fuzzy integrals, Fuzzy ontologies, Logic for the Semantic Web

Fernando Bobillo, Umberto Straccia

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Experience with Zinc Injection in European PWRs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zinc injection is an effective technique for lowering shutdown dose rates in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This report compiles information about zinc injection experience at Siemens PWRs and compares the results with the use of zinc injection at U.S. PWRs. The plant data confirm that even low concentrations of zinc in the reactor water can indeed lower shutdown dose rates, but plants should make a concerted effort to inject zinc on a continuous basis to achieve the best results.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) investigated methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbents. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For this program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such as size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation. Two base case sorbents, a spherical pellet and a cylindrical extrude used in related METC-sponsored projects, were used to provide a basis for the aimed enhancement in durability and reactivity. Sorbent performance was judged on the basis of physical properties, single particle kinetic studies based on thermogravimetric (TGA) techniques, and multicycle bench-scale testing of sorbents. A sorbent grading system was utilized to quantify the characteristics of the new sorbents prepared during the program. Significant enhancements in both reactivity and durability were achieved for the spherical pellet shape over the base case formulation. Overall improvements to reactivity and durability were also made to the cylindrical extrude shape. The primary variables which were investigated during the program included iron oxide type, zinc oxide:iron oxide ratio, inorganic binder concentration, organic binder concentration, and induration conditions. The effects of some variables were small or inconclusive. Based on TGA studies and bench-scale tests, induration conditions were found to be very significant.

Berggren, M.H.; Jha, M.C.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Stabilized nickel-zinc battery  

SciTech Connect

An alkaline nickel-zinc cell which has (1) a nickel-nickel hydroxide cathode; (2) a zinc-zinc oxide anode containing (A) a corrosion inhibitor such as PBO, SNO2, Tl2O3, in(OH)3 or mixtures thereof; (B) a slight corrosion accelerator such as cdo, bi2o3, ga2o3, or mixtures thereof; and (C) a zinc active material; (3) a mass-transport separator; (4) an alkaline electrolyte; and (5) means for charging the cell with an interrupted current having a frequency of from more than zero to 16 hertz with a rest period of not less than 60 milliseconds. Another desirable feature is the use of a pressure-cutoff switch to terminate charging when the internal pressure of the cell reaches a selected value in the range of from 5 to 8 psig.

Himy, A.; Wagner, O.C.

1982-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

102

Transition Metal Sulfide Electrocatalysts for PEM Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transition Metal Sulfide Transition Metal Sulfide Electrocatalysts for PEM Fuel Cells Hua Zhang 1 , Ysmael Verde-Gómez 1 and Allan J. Jacobson 1 Alejandra Ramirez 2 and Russell R. Chianelli 2 1 Department of Chemistry, University of Houston Houston, TX 77204 2 Materials Research and Technology Institute, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 Transition Metal Sulfide Electrocatalysts for PEM Fuel Cells Hua Zhang 1 , Ysmael Verde-Gómez 1 and Allan J. Jacobson 1 Alejandra Ramirez 2 and Russell R. Chianelli 2 1 Department of Chemistry, University of Houston Houston, TX 77204 2 Materials Research and Technology Institute, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 March 21, 2003 Objectives ¾ Investigate non-platinum electro-catalysts with CO tolerance ¾ Focus on transition metal sulfides as electro-catalysts

103

Distribution Category UC-66e CONTROL OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE EMISSION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 ) Distribution Category UC-66e CONTROL OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE EMISSION FROM GEOTHERMAL POWER PLANTS Final Report Volume I Summary of Results F.C. Brown W.W. Harvey - . - ...

104

Stability and Reactivity of Iron Sulfide Films in Sour Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Iron sulfide scales form on steels in the presence of H2S, notably in the extreme environments that exist in the oil and gas fields. Our research ...

105

Looping Sulfide Oxidation Process for Anode Copper Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical Enrichment of Precious Metals in Iron Sulfides Using Microwave Energy · Chloridizing ... Co-Gasification Behavior of Metallurgical Coke with High and Low Reactivity .... Thermal Plasma Torches for Metallurgical Applications.

106

Multiple-sulfur isotope effects during photolysis of carbonyl sulfide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were carried out to determine sulfur isotope effects during ultraviolet photolysis of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) to carbon monoxide (CO) and elemental sulfur (S[superscript 0]). The OCS gas at 3.7 to 501 ...

Lin, Ying

107

Design and fabrication of a tin-sulfide annealing furnace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A furnace was designed and its heat transfer properties were analyzed for use in annealing thin-film tins-ulfide solar cells. Tin sulfide has been explored as an earth abundant solar cell material, and the furnace was ...

Lewis, Raymond, S.M. (Raymond A.) Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Citizen engagement with information aggregation markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Participatory governance entails converting citizens from passive users of administrative decisions into active participants of political procedures. Public institutions and organizations can benefit from methods and tools able to aggregate and interpret ... Keywords: citizen engagement, information aggregation markets, public participation

Efthimios Bothos; Dimitris Apostolou; Gregoris Mentzas

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Representing aggregate works in the digital library  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the challenge of representing aggregate works such as encyclopedias, collected poems and journals in heterogenous digital library collections. Reflecting on the materials used by humanities academics, we demonstrate the varied range ... Keywords: aggregate documents, architecture, digital libraries

George Buchanan; Jeremy Gow; Ann Blandford; Jon Rimmer; Claire Warwick

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Process for thin film deposition of cadmium sulfide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention teaches a process for depositing layers of cadmium sulfide. The process includes depositing a layer of cadmium oxide by spray pyrolysis of a cadmium salt in an aqueous or organic solvent. The oxide film is then converted into cadmium sulfide by thermal ion exchange of the O.sup.-2 for S.sup.-2 by annealing the oxide layer in gaseous sulfur at elevated temperatures.

Muruska, H. Paul (East Windsor, NJ); Sansregret, Joseph L. (Scotch Plains, NJ); Young, Archie R. (Montclair, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Optimal aggregation of linear time series models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aggregation is a central and mainly unsolved problem in econometrics. When considering linear time series models, a widely used method is to replace the disaggregate model by an aggregative one in which the variables are grouped and replaced by sums ... Keywords: Aggregation, Industrial classification, Threshold accepting

J. Chipman; P. Winker

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Evaluation of Aggregate Materials in Florida's Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Aggregates consultant Joe Besharat Districts Three Materials Office, FDOT Aggregates Roland Boney Florida operations Don Conner Rail Management, Inc. Rail logistics John Paul Crews District Two Materials Office Materials Office, FDOT Aggregates Rob Duke Rinker Materials Mine sales and marketing Robert (Bobbi G

113

Atmospheric measurements of carbonyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide using the electron capture sulfur detector  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of atmospheric dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were conducted over the Atlantic Ocean on board the NASA Electra aircraft during the Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation (CITE 3) project using the electron capture sulfur detector (ECD-S). The system employed cryogenic preconcentration of air samples, gas chromatographic separation, catalytic fluorination, and electron capture detection. Samples collected for DMS analysis were scrubbed of oxidants with NaOH impregnated glass fiber filters to preconcentration. The detection limits (DL) of the system for COS, DMS, and CS2 were 5, 5, and 2 ppt, respectively. COS concentrations ranged from 404 to 603 ppt with a mean of 489 ppt for measurements over the North Atlantic Ocean (31 deg N to 41 deg N), and from 395 to 437 ppt with a mean of 419 ppt for measurements over the Tropical Atlantic Ocean (11 deg S to 2 deg N). DMS concentrations in the lower marine boundary layer, below 600-m altitude, ranged from below DL to 150 ppt from flights over the North Atlantic, and from 9 to 104 ppt over the Tropical Atlantic. CS2 concentrations ranged from below DL to 29 ppt over the North Atlantic. Almost all CS2 measurements over the Tropical Atlantic were below DL.

Johnson, J.E.; Bates, T.S. [NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Aggregation in Large Dynamic Panels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;, and as = E (w0#8;s#28; ) = E(#21;s). Hence, for su¢ ciently large N and T , the distributed lag coe¢ cients can be consistently estimated by bas = 1N PN i=1 b#21;si , where b#21;i is the least square estimator of #21;i in the autoregressions (30... ). The distribution F#21; is not the same as the distribution of b#21;i when T is ?nite, but bas is consistent at least when T ! 1 followed by N ! 1. Both the aggregate and the disaggregate estimators are biased when T is small. Initially, we also report the estimates...

Pesaran, M. Hashem; Chudik, Alexander

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

115

Hydrogen and Sulfur Production from Hydrogen Sulfide Wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new hydrogen sulfide waste-treatment process that uses microwave plasma-chemical technology is currently under development in the Soviet Union and in the United States. Whereas the present waste treatment process only recovers sulfur at best, this novel process recovers both hydrogen and sulfur. The plasma process involves dissociating hydrogen sulfide in a "nonequilibrium" plasma in a microwave or radio-frequency reactor. After the dissociation process, sulfur is condensed and sold just as is currently done. The remaining gases are purified and separated into streams containing the product hydrogen, the hydrogen sulfide to be recycled to the plasma reactor, and the process purge containing carbon dioxide and water. This process has particular implications for petroleum refining industry, in which hydrogen is a widely used reagent and must be produced from increasingly scarce hydrocarbon resources. The modular nature of the new process may also offer economic advantages over small-scale waste treatment technologies widely used in the natural-gas industry. Laboratory-scale experiments with pure hydrogen sulfide indicate that conversions exceeding 90% are possible with appropriate reactor design and that the energy required to dissociate hydrogen sulfide is low enough for the plasma process to be economically competitive. In addition, the experiments show-that typical refinery acid-gas streams are compatible with the plasma process and that all by-products can be treated with existing technology.

Harkness, J.; Doctor, R. D.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Hydrogen and sulfur production from hydrogen sulfide wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new hydrogen sulfide waste-treatment process that uses microwave plasma-chemical technology is currently under development in the Soviet Union and in the United States. Whereas the present waste treatment process only recovers sulfur at best, this novel process recovers both hydrogen and sulfur. The plasma process involves dissociating hydrogen sulfide in a nonequilibrium'' plasma in a microwave or radio-frequency reactor. After the dissociation process, sulfur is condensed and sold just as is currently done. The remaining gases are purified and separated into streams containing the product hydrogen, the hydrogen sulfide to be recycled to the plasma reactor, and the process purge containing carbon dioxide and water. This process has particular implications for the petroleum refining industry, in which hydrogen is a widely used reagent and must be produced from increasingly scarce hydrocarbon resources. The modular nature of the new process may also offer economic advantages over small-scale waste treatment technologies widely used in the natural-gas industry. Laboratory-scale experiments with pure hydrogen sulfide indicate that conversions exceeding 90% are possible with appropriate reactor design and that the energy required to dissociate hydrogen sulfide is low enough for the plasma process to be economically competitive. In addition, the experiments show that typical refinery acid-gas streams are compatible with the plasma process and that all by-products can be treated with existing technology.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Hydrogen and sulfur production from hydrogen sulfide wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new hydrogen sulfide waste-treatment process that uses microwave plasma-chemical technology is currently under development in the Soviet Union and in the United States. Whereas the present waste treatment process only recovers sulfur at best, this novel process recovers both hydrogen and sulfur. The plasma process involves dissociating hydrogen sulfide in a ``nonequilibrium`` plasma in a microwave or radio-frequency reactor. After the dissociation process, sulfur is condensed and sold just as is currently done. The remaining gases are purified and separated into streams containing the product hydrogen, the hydrogen sulfide to be recycled to the plasma reactor, and the process purge containing carbon dioxide and water. This process has particular implications for the petroleum refining industry, in which hydrogen is a widely used reagent and must be produced from increasingly scarce hydrocarbon resources. The modular nature of the new process may also offer economic advantages over small-scale waste treatment technologies widely used in the natural-gas industry. Laboratory-scale experiments with pure hydrogen sulfide indicate that conversions exceeding 90% are possible with appropriate reactor design and that the energy required to dissociate hydrogen sulfide is low enough for the plasma process to be economically competitive. In addition, the experiments show that typical refinery acid-gas streams are compatible with the plasma process and that all by-products can be treated with existing technology.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Zinc and Health: Current Status and Future Directions Zinc Transport in the Brain: Routes of Zinc Influx and Efflux in Neurons1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zinc and Health: Current Status and Future Directions Zinc Transport in the Brain: Routes of Zinc and that mediate extracellular zinc toxicity and (3) a plasma membrane transporter potentially present in all of mechanism, is the transporter pathway. The kinetics of zinc uptake in cultured neurons under resting

119

Method for removing hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved sulfur-ammonia process is disclosed for removing hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gases. In the improved process, a concentrator formerly used for standby operation is used at all normal times as an ammonia scrubber to improve the efficiency of gas separation during normal operation and is used as a concentrator for its intended standby functions during the alternative operations. In its normal function, the concentrator/scrubber functions as a scrubber to strip ammonia gas from recirculating liquid streams and to permit introduction of an ammonia-rich gas into a hydrogen sulfide scrubber to increase the separation efficiency of that unit. In the standby operation, the same concentrator/scrubber serves as a concentrator to concentrate hydrogen sulfide in a ''strong liquor'' stream for separate recovery as a strong liquor.

Ritter, H.

1982-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

120

Froth flotation of oil-bearing metal sulfide wastes  

SciTech Connect

An industrial wastewater, including plating wastes, is treated with sodium sulfide and ferrous sulfate to form a sulfide-oxide precipitate containing chromium and other toxic metals. Hydrocarbons, in the water, coat the sulfide-oxide particles, impeding metal recovery. Froth flotation, without reagent addition, was found to recover 93.9% of the solids from the sludge with simultaneous rejection of 89% of the water. Methyl isobutyl carbinol (MIBC) improved recovery and potassium amyl xanthate improved both recovery and grade. The process design has wastewater feed (without MIBC) to the rougher circuit. The rougher concentrate is conditioned with MIBC and fed to a cleaner circuit to achieve a high grade concentrate. About 95% of the water is recirculated to the waste treatment plant. 3 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Miller, R.L. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Atwood, R.L.; Ye, Yi [Advanced Processing Technologies, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Froth flotation of oil-bearing metal sulfide wastes  

SciTech Connect

An industrial wastewater, including plating wastes, is treated with sodium sulfide and ferrous sulfate to form a sulfide-oxide precipitate containing chromium and other toxic metals. Hydrocarbons, in the water, coat the sulfide-oxide particles, impeding metal recovery. Froth flotation, without reagent addition, was found to recover 93.9% of the solids from the sludge with simultaneous rejection of 89% of the water. Methyl isobutyl carbinol (MIBC) improved recovery and potassium amyl xanthate improved both recovery and grade. The process design has wastewater feed (without MIBC) to the rougher circuit. The rougher concentrate is conditioned with MIBC and fed to a cleaner circuit to achieve a high grade concentrate. About 95% of the water is recirculated to the waste treatment plant. 3 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Miller, R.L. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Atwood, R.L.; Ye, Yi (Advanced Processing Technologies, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Method for direct production of carbon disulfide and hydrogen from hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide feedstock  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for converting hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide to carbon disulfide and hydrogen is provided comprising contacting the hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide to a bi-functional catalyst residing in a controlled atmosphere for a time and at a temperature sufficient to produce carbon disulfide and hydrogen. Also provided is a catalyst for converting carbon sulfides and hydrogen sulfides to gasoline range hydrocarbons comprising a mixture containing a zeolite catalyst and a hydrogenating catalyst.

Miao, Frank Q.; Erekson, Erek James

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Hydrogen sulfide stress corrosion cracking in materials for geothermal power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies to evaluate the performance of alloys used in geothermal power systems are reported. Alloys which are commercially available and those which have modified metallurgical structures and/or composition modifications were tested to determine the corrosive effects of the H/sub 2/S and thermal environments in geothermal fluids. Hydrogen embrittlement and sulfide stress corrosion cracking were tested. Test results showing the effects of alloy composition, tempering temperatures, fluid temperature and salt content, and ageing on sulfide stress cracking are tabulated. (LCL)

Hehemann, R.F.; Troiano, A.R.; Abu-Khater, B.; Ferrigno, S.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Aggregate Absorption - A Methodology for Mixture ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Figure 2 provides representative desorption isotherms for an expanded shale lightweight aggregate, measured at a temperature of 20 ºC at NIST. ...

2005-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

125

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY UNIVERSAL AGGREGATES,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash." The purpose of the cooperative agreement is to design, construct and operate a...

126

Hydrogen Sulfide Dispersion Consequences Analysis in Different Wind Speeds: A CFD Based Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen sulfide (h2s) leakage and dispersion from a sulfide recycle installation in different wind speeds are simulated by implementing a 3D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. H2s concentrations of monitor points which represent dispersion contours ... Keywords: CFD, hydrogen Sulfide, dispersion, concenquences analysis, different wind speeds

Bo Zhang; Guo-ming Chen

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Method for the regeneration of spent molten zinc chloride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process for regenerating spent molten zinc chloride which has been used in the hydrocracking of coal or ash-containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbonaceous materials derived therefrom and which contains zinc chloride, zinc oxide, zinc oxide complexes and ash-containing carbonaceous residue, by incinerating the spent molten zinc chloride to vaporize the zinc chloride for subsequent condensation to produce a purified molten zinc chloride: an improvement comprising the use of clay in the incineration zone to suppress the vaporization of metals other than zinc. Optionally water is used in conjunction with the clay to further suppress the vaporization of metals other than zinc.

Zielke, Clyde W. (McMurray, PA); Rosenhoover, William A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Topology Aggregation for E-science Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose several algorithms for topology aggregation (TA) to effectively summarize large-scale networks. These TA techniques are shown to significantly better for path requests in e-Science that may consist of simultaneous reservation of multiple paths ... Keywords: Topology aggregation, Multi-domain routing, EScience

Eun-Sung Jung; Sanjay Ranka; Sartaj Sahni

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Distribution Category UC-66e CONTROL OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE EMISSION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2) Distribution Category UC-66e CONTROL OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE EMISSION FROM GEOTHERMAL POWER PLANTS F i n a l Report - Volume I I L a b o r a t o r y R e s u l t s and P...

130

Reaction Behavior of Sulfides Associated with Stibnite in Low ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this research, we aim at the behavior of sulfides involved PbS, Cu2S, Bi2S3 and FeS2 in Na2CO3-NaCl molten salt, using XRD and TG-DTA methods based

131

Trust network-based filtering of aggregated claims  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On the semantic web, assertions may be aggregated from many sources, those aggregations filtered, reasoned over, aggregated with other aggregators, displayed, scraped, extracted, recombined, and otherwise processed without significant human oversight. ... Keywords: aggregated claims, assertions, information filtering, knowledge bases, ontologies, semantic web, social networks, source reputation, trust networks, trust rating, trustworthiness

Jennifer Golbeck; Bijan Parsia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Methods for producing hydrogen (BI) sulfide and/or removing metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a process wherein sulfide production by bacteria is efficiently turned on and off, using pH adjustment. The adjustment of pH impacts sulfide production by bacteria by altering the relative amounts of H.sub.2 S and HS-- in solution and thereby control the inhibition of the bacterial metabolism that produces sulfide. This process can be used to make a bioreactor produce sulfide "on-demand" so that the production of sulfide can be matched to its use as a metal precipitation reagent. The present invention is of significance because it enables the use of a biological reactor, a cost effective sulfide production system, by making the biological reactor produce hydrogen sulfide "on demand", and therefore responsive to production schedules, waste stream generation rate, and health and safety requirements/goals.

Truex, Michael J [Richland, WA; Peyton, Brent M [Pullman, WA; Toth, James J [Kennewick, WA

2002-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

133

Removal of mercury from gas streams using hydrogen sulfide and amines  

SciTech Connect

Phillips Petroleum Co. has developed an integrated process for treating a natural-gas stream with a precipitating agent to remove mercury and introducing an absorption agent to control the amount of precipitating agent left in the gas stream. In the process, a gas (particularly a sulfur-free natural gas) that contains mercury is contacted with an amount of hydrogen sulfide in excess of the stoichiometric amount of hydrogen sulfide necessary to precipitate sulfides of mercury, with further contact with an amine that is an absorption agent for hydrogen sulfide. The hydrogen sulfide precipitates sulfides of mercury from the gas stream while the amine absorbs the excess hydrogen sulfide to produce a gas stream of minimal sulfur content with a reduced mercury content that can be below the range of detection.

Miller, A.J.; Tuckett, W.F.

1977-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

134

MTF-1-Mediated Repression of the Zinc Transporter Zip10 Is Alleviated by Zinc Restriction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The regulation of cellular zinc uptake is a key process in the overall mechanism governing mammalian zinc homeostasis and how zinc participates in cellular functions. We analyzed the zinc transporters of the Zip family in both the brain and liver of zinc-deficient animals and found a large, significant increase in Zip10 expression. Additionally, Zip10 expression decreased in response to zinc repletion. Moreover, isolated mouse hepatocytes, AML12 hepatocytes, and Neuro 2A cells also respond differentially to zinc availability in vitro. Measurement of Zip10 hnRNA and actinomycin D inhibition studies indicate that Zip10 was transcriptionally regulated by zinc deficiency. Through luciferase promoter constructs and ChIP analysis, binding of MTF-1 to a metal response element located 17 bp downstream of the transcription start site was shown to be necessary for zinc-induced repression of Zip10. Furthermore, zinc-activated MTF-1 causes down-regulation of Zip10 transcription by physically blocking Pol II movement through the gene. Lastly, ZIP10 is localized to the plasma membrane of hepatocytes and neuro 2A cells. Collectively, these results reveal a novel repressive role for MTF-1 in the regulation of the Zip10 zinc transporter expression by pausing Pol II transcription. ZIP10 may have roles in control of zinc homeostasis in specific sites particularly those of the brain and liver. Within that context ZIP10 may act as an important survival mechanism during

Louis A. Lichten; Moon-suhn Ryu; Liang Guo; Jennifer Embury; Robert J. Cousins

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Direct Leaching Alternatives for Zinc Concentrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biosorption Characteristics of Pb(II) from Aqueous Solution onto Poplar Cotton · Characterization of Aluminum Cathode Sheets Used for Zinc Electrowinning.

136

Zinc air battery development for electric vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of research conducted during the sixteen month continuation of a program to develop rechargeable zinc-air batteries for electric vehicles. The zinc-air technology under development incorporates a metal foam substrate for the zinc electrode, with flow of electrolyte through the foam during battery operation. In this soluble'' zinc electrode the zincate discharge product dissolves completely in the electrolyte stream. Cycle testing at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, where the electrode was invented, and at MATSI showed that this approach avoids the zinc electrode shape change phenomenon. Further, electrolyte flow has been shown to be necessary to achieve significant cycle life (> 25 cycles) in this open system. Without it, water loss through the oxygen electrode results in high-resistance failure of the cell. The Phase I program, which focused entirely on the zinc electrode, elucidated the conditions necessary to increase electrode capacity from 75 to as much as 300 mAh/cm{sup 2}. By the end of the Phase I program over 500 cycles had accrued on one of the zinc-zinc half cells undergoing continuous cycle testing. The Phase II program continued the half cell cycle testing and separator development, further refined the foam preplate process, and launched into performance and cycle life testing of zinc-air cells.

Putt, R.A.; Merry, G.W. (MATSI, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The marine biogeochemistry of zinc isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zinc (Zn) stable isotopes can record information about important oceanographic processes. This thesis presents data on Zn isotopes in anthropogenic materials, hydrothermal fluids and minerals, cultured marine phytoplankton, ...

John, Seth G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Small Generator Aggregation (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generator Aggregation (Maine) Generator Aggregation (Maine) Small Generator Aggregation (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Green Power Purchasing Provider Public Utilities Commission This section establishes requirements for electricity providers to purchase

139

NETL: PPII - Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash - Project Brief PDF-72KB Universal Aggregates, LLC, King George County, VA...

140

Laboratory-scale evaluation of secondary alkaline zinc batteries...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory-scale evaluation of secondary alkaline zinc batteries for electric vehicles Title Laboratory-scale evaluation of secondary alkaline zinc batteries for electric vehicles...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Green Power Network: Community Choice Aggregation (CCA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) Community choice aggregation (CCA) is a state policy that enables local governments to aggregate electricity demand within their jurisdictions in order to procure alternative energy supplies while maintaining the existing electricity provider for transmission and distribution services. Many states passed CCA laws as part of electric restructuring legislation in the late 1990s and early 2000s. States that have passed CCA laws include California (2002), Illinois (2009), Massachusetts (1997), New Jersey (2003), Ohio (1999), and Rhode Island (1997). There are many reasons that a community may choose to develop a CCA, including the option to purchase more green power, reduce electricity cost, and provide power from more local sources.

142

Aggregation of Ice Crystals in Cirrus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are given from analysis of the aggregation of thick plate, columnar, and bullet rosette ice crystals in cirrus. Data were obtained from PMS 2D-C images, oil coated slides, and aircraft meteorological measurements. Crystal size ranged from ...

Masahiro Kajikawa; Andrew J. Heymsfield

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Costs of aggregate hydrocarbon reserve additions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In what follows, we highlight problems created by aggregation using fixed conversion coefficients (Section 1). We then offer an economic index approach as an alternative, one that recognizes changing relative values of oil ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Brasil: basic resource aggregation system infrastructure layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brasil is a self-contained service which can be deployed across a cluster to provide a dataflow workload distribution and communication aggregation mechanism. Together with our dataflow shell, named PUSH, it is intended to be used for the management ...

Eric Van Hensbergen; Pravin Shinde; Noah Evans

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Wet oxidation of oil-bearing sulfide wastes  

SciTech Connect

Oil-bearing metal sulfide sludges produced in treatment of an industrial wastewater, which includes plating wastes, have yielded to treatment by electrooxidation and hydrogen peroxide processes. The oxidation can be controlled to be mild enough to avoid decomposition of the organic phase while oxidizing the sulfides to sulfates. The pH is controlled to near neutral conditions where iron, aluminum and chromium(III) precipitate as hydrous oxides. Other metals, such as lead and barium, may be present as sulfate precipitates with limited solubility, while metals such as nickel and cadmium would be present as complexed ions in a sulfate solution. The oxidations were found to proceed smoothly, without vigorous reaction; heat liberation was minimal. 2 refs., 12 figs.

Miller, R.L.; Hotz, N.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Control of hydrogen sulfide emission from geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process for controlling H/sub 2/S emissions at geothermal power plants was evaluated in laboratory scale equipment and by process engineering analysis. The process is based on scrubbing geothermal steam with a metal salt solution to selectively remove and precipitate the contained H/sub 2/S. The metal sulfide is roasted or oxygen/acid leached to regenerate the metal salt, and sulfur is rejected from the system as elemental sulfur or as sulfate. Up to 95 percent removal of H/sub 2/S from simulated geothermal steams was obtained in a 2'' diameter scrubbing column packed with 3 feet of 5/8'' Flexirings by use of a recirculating slurry of copper sulfate/copper sulfide. Information is included on the chemistry, thermodynamics, kinetics and process control aspects of the process, scrubber system design, operation, and corrosion, and design proposals and cost estimates for a H/sub 2/S removal system. (LCL)

Harvey, W.W.; Brown, F.C.; Turchan, M.J.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Aggregation in the USA Electricity Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines current and likely future activity in the electricity aggregation market. Using a combination of quantitative and qualitative techniques, the study was designed to provide an understanding of the types of organizations that are currently involved in marketing or aggregating electricity, motives underlying current levels of activity, and preferred types of participation for those choosing to involve themselves. In addition the study examined why other organizations had decided not to ...

1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

148

Aggregation in the USA Electricity Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examined current and likely future activity in the electricity aggregation market. Using a combination of quantitative and qualitative techniques, the study was designed to provide an understanding of the types of organizations that are currently involved in marketing for aggregating electricity, motives underlying current levels of activity, and preferred types of participation for those choosing to involve themselves. In addition the study examined why other organizations had decided not to...

1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

149

Sulfide ceramics in molten-salt electrolyte batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sulfide ceramics are finding application in the manufacture of advanced batteries with molten salt electrolyte. Use of these ceramics as a peripheral seal component has permitted development of bipolar Li/FeS{sub 2} batteries. This bipolar battery has a molten lithium halide electrolyte and operates at 400 to 450C. Initial development and physical properties evaluations indicate the ability to form metal/ceramic bonded seal (13-cm ID) components for use in high-temperature corrosive environments. These sealants are generally CaAl{sub 2}S{sub 4}-based ceramics. Structural ceramics (composites with oxide or nitride fillers), highly wetting sealant formulations, and protective coatings are also being developed. Sulfide ceramics show great promise because of their relatively low melting point, high-temperature viscous flow, chemical stability, high-strength bonding, and tailored coefficients of thermal expansion. Our methodology of generating laminated metal/ceramic pellets (e.g., molybdenum/sulfide ceramic/molybdenum) with which to optimize materials formulation and seal processing is described.

Kaun, T.D.; Hash, M.C.; Simon, D.R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

The zinc electrode: Reactions and mechanisms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The zinc electrode in alkaline electrolyte is unusual in that supersaturated zincate solutions can form during discharge and spongy or mossy zinc deposits can form on charge at low overvoltages. This paper reports on in situ x-ray absorption (XAS) results on supersaturated zincate and on mossy deposits.

McBreen, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Cadmium sulfide-copper sulfide heterojunction cell research. Annual report, September 1, 1979-August 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary goal of this program, increasing the conversion efficiency of a thin-film cell based on CdS/Cu/sub 2/S, has been achieved. A number of (CdZn)S/Cu/sub 2/S cells have been made with conversion efficiencies in excess of 10% when tested in collimated sunlight. The highest efficiency achieved was 10.2% for a cell with 16% Zinc which had the following parameters; V/sub oc/ = 0.60V, J/sub sc/ = 22.8 mA/cm/sup 2/ (pro-rated to 100 mW/cm/sup 2/) FF = 74.9%. Further improvement in the performance of CdS/Cu/sub 2/S cells beyond the previously reported 9.2%, was found to be limited by deficiencies in the fundamental knowledge and control of the Cu/sub 2/S layer. A number of process changes in the production of CdS/Cu/sub 2/S cells have been explored and are reported on. Transient capacitance measurements on CdS/Cu/sub 2/S cells and further development of an integral encapsulation are also reported.

None

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Lossy Data Aggregation in Multihop Wireless Sensor Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In wireless sensor networks, in-network data aggregation is an efficient way to reduce energy consumption in network. However, most of the existing data aggregation scheduling methods try to aggregate the data from all the nodes at all time-instances. ... Keywords: Data Loss, Data Sampling, Energy Efficiency, Lossy Data Aggregation

Guojun Dai; Jianhui Zhang; Shaojie Tang; Xingfa Shen; Changping Lv

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Massive sulfide deposits and hydrothermal solutions: incremental reaction modeling of mineral precipitation and sulfur isotopic evolution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Incremental reaction path modeling of chemical and sulfur isotopic reactions occurring in active hydrothermal vents on the seafloor, in combination with chemical and petrographic data from sulfide samples from the seafloor and massive sulfide ore deposits, allows a detailed examination of the processes involved. This paper presents theoretical models of reactions of two types: (1) adiabatic mixing between hydrothermal solution and seawater, and (2) reaction of hydrothermal solution with sulfide deposit materials. In addition, reaction of hydrothermal solution with sulfide deposit minerals and basalt in feeder zones is discussed.

Janecky, D.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Lithium Super-Ionic Sulfide Carbon (LiSISC) Composite for Li-S ...  

Lithium Super-Ionic Sulfide Carbon (LiSISC) Composite for Li-S Batteries Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing ...

155

A novel and cost-effective hydrogen sulfide removal technology using tire derived rubber particles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is corrosive, toxic, and produced during the anaerobic digestion process at wastewater treatment plants. Tire derived rubber particles (TDRPTM) and other rubber… (more)

Siefers, Andrea Mary

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

EXTRACTION OF HEXAVALENT PLUTONIUM FROM AQUEOUS ACIDIC SOLUTIONS WITH ETHYL SULFIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for extracting Pu>s6/sup > /om an aqueous ammonium nitrate-containing nitric acid solution with ethyl sulfide.

Seaborg, G.T.

1961-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

157

Spectral induced polarization and electrodic potential monitoring of microbially mediated iron sulfide transformations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stimulated sulfate-reduction is a bioremediation technique utilized for the sequestration of heavy metals in the subsurface.We performed laboratory column experiments to investigate the geoelectrical response of iron sulfide transformations by Desulfo vibriovulgaris. Two geoelectrical methods, (1) spectral induced polarization (SIP), and (2) electrodic potential measurements, were investigated. Aqueous geochemistry (sulfate, lactate, sulfide, and acetate), observations of precipitates (identified from electron microscopy as iron sulfide), and electrodic potentials on bisulfide ion (HS) sensitive silver-silver chloride (Ag-AgCl) electrodes (630 mV) were diagnostic of induced transitions between an aerobic iron sulfide forming conditions and aerobic conditions promoting iron sulfide dissolution. The SIP data showed 10m rad anomalies during iron sulfide mineralization accompanying microbial activity under an anaerobic transition. These anomalies disappeared during iron sulfide dissolution under the subsequent aerobic transition. SIP model parameters based on a Cole-Cole relaxation model of the polarization at the mineral-fluid interface were converted to (1) estimated biomineral surface area to pore volume (Sp), and (2) an equivalent polarizable sphere diameter (d) controlling the relaxation time. The temporal variation in these model parameters is consistent with filling and emptying of pores by iron sulfide biofilms, as the system transitions between anaerobic (pore filling) and aerobic (pore emptying) conditions. The results suggest that combined SIP and electrodic potential measurements might be used to monitor spatiotemporal variability in microbial iron sulfide transformations in the field.

Hubbard, Susan; Personna, Y.R.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L.; Yee, N.; O'Brien, M.; Hubbard, S.

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen Sulfide Emission Factors Applicable to Wastewater Wet Wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Transport of wastewater in sewer networks causes potential problems associated with gases which include ammonia, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide and methane, in regard… (more)

Mudragaddam, Madhuri

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Answering ad hoc aggregate queries from data streams using prefix aggregate trees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In some business applications such as trading management in financial institutions, it is required to accurately answer ad hoc aggregate queries over data streams. Materializing and incrementally maintaining a full data cube or even its compression or ... Keywords: Aggregate query, Data cube, Data stream, Data warehousing, Online analytic processing (OLAP)

Moonjung Cho; Jian Pei; Ke Wang

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Evaluation of superpave fine aggregate specification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superpave[] was the final product of the Strategic Highway Research Program's (SHRP) asphalt pavement research effort during 1987-93. Some aspects of the Superpave aggregate specifications are not universally accepted. The validity of the fine aggregate angularity (FAA) requirement is questioned by both the owner agencies and the paving and aggregate industries. The FAA test is based on the assumption that more fractured faces will result in higher void content in the loosely compacted sample; however, this is not always true. The aggregate industry has found that cubical shaped particles, even with 100% fractured faces, may not meet the FAA requirement for high-volume traffic. State agencies are concerned that local materials previously considered acceptable and which have provided good field performance, now cannot meet the Superpave requirements. Twenty three-fine aggregates from different part of the USA were tested using major angularity tests: FAA test, direct shear test, compacted aggregate resistance (CAR) test, image analysis Hough transform, and visual inspection. The results from those tests were compared with the available performance history. The FAA test method does not consistently identify angular, cubical aggregates as high quality materials. There is a fair correlation between the CAR stability value and angle of internal friction (AIF) from direct shear test. No correlation was found between FAA and CAR stability or between FAA and AIF. A good correlation was found between FAA and K-index from Hough transform method. Some cubical crushed aggregates whose FAA values were less than 45 gave very high values of CAR stability, AIF and K-index. The statistical analysis of the SHRP LTPP database reveals that there is no evidence of any good linear relationship between FAA and rutting. Of the methods evaluated, image analysis using Hough transform appears most promising for measuring fine aggregate angularity. Until a replacement method for FAA can be identified, the author recommends that the FAA criteria be lowered from 45. The FAA vs. rutting data analysis should be continued with a larger amount of data as the LTPP SHRP database is expanded.

Chowdhury, Md. Tahjib-Ul-Arif

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Development of copper sulfide/cadmium sulfide thin-film solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this work has been to identify aspects of cell fabrication and treatment which are critical for achieving high efficiency Cu/sub 2/S/CdS solar cells. In approaching the problem several comparisons were made of the effects of specific steps in two methods of cell fabrication. These methods had previously given cells of about 6% and a maximum of 9% efficiency. Three areas requiring special attention and specific means to achieve acceptable results were identified. (1) The Cu/sub 2/S/CdS heterojunction area must be minimized. If single source evaporations of CdS are made on substrates whose temperatures (approx. 220/sup 0/C) are monitored and controlled using welded thermocouples, the CdS films will have adequately large grains (grain diameter greater than or equal to 2 ..mu..m) and will not develop significant etch pits during texturing in a mild etchant solution. (2) The termination of the wet barrier processing steps must be done carefully. An acceptable termination involves minimizing the amount of cuprous chloride retained on the cell surface during transfer to a rinsing stage while providing adequate exclusion of air from the space above the surface of the cuprous chloride solution. (3) Once formed, the Cu/sub 2/S layer should not be exposed to high temperatures (>100/sup 0/C) for long periods of time (> 5 min) if surface adsorbed moisture or oxygen are present. Heat treatments in ampoules under flowing hydrogen atmospheres should be preceded and followed by periods of at least 30 minutes at room temperature in the reducing ambient. If all these precautions are taken, wet chemical barrier processing of thermally evaporated CdS films on zinc-plated copper foil substrates yields cells of nearly 8% conversion efficiency without AR coating.

Szedon, J.R.; Biter, W.J.; Abel, J.A.; Dickey, H.C.; Shirland, F.A.

1981-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

162

ZINC MITIGATION INTERIM REPORT - THERMODYNAMIC STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental program was initiated in order to develop and validate conditions that will effectively trap Zn vapors that are released during extraction. The proposed work is broken down into three tasks. The first task is to determine the effectiveness of various pore sizes of filter elements. The second task is to determine the effect of filter temperature on zinc vapor deposition. The final task is to determine whether the zinc vapors can be chemically bound. The approach for chemically binding the zinc vapors has two subtasks, the first is a review of literature and thermodynamic calculations and the second is an experimental approach using the best candidates. This report details the results of the thermodynamic calculations to determine feasibility of chemically binding the zinc vapors within the furnace module, specifically the lithium trap (1). A review of phase diagrams, literature, and thermodynamic calculations was conducted to determine if there are suitable materials to capture zinc vapor within the lithium trap of the extraction basket. While numerous elements exist that form compounds with zinc, many of these also form compounds with hydrogen or the water that is present in the TPBARs. This relatively comprehensive review of available data indicates that elemental cobalt and copper and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) may have the requisite properties to capture zinc and yet not be adversely affected by the extraction gases and should be considered for testing.

Korinko, P.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

163

Challenges in Flexible Aggregation of Pervasive Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The vision of billions of users connected to millions of services using trillions of devices is fast becoming a reality. The result will be a vast network of mobile communication devices and data sources, including sensors, newsfeeds, web services, and databases. Potential uses of this data span a wide range of application domains, including medical monitoring, traffic routing, proximity detection, electricity management, and service-fleet dispatching. Applications require flexible mechanisms for constructing condensed and refined views of the raw data, possibly in ways unanticipated by the data providers. Aggregation comprises collection of high volumes of raw data from data sources, composition of the raw data into less voluminous refined data, and timely delivery of the refined data to applications. There are difficult challenges inherent in creating an aggregation system that is sufficiently flexible, scalable, and reliable to address the needs of applications. 1 The aggregation...

Norman H. Cohen; Norman H. Cohen; Apratim Purakayastha; Apratim Purakayastha; John Turek; John Turek; Luke Wong; Luke Wong; Danny Yeh; Danny Yeh

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Microeconomic Inventory Adjustment and Aggregate Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine microeconomic and aggregate inventory dynamics in the business sector of the U.S. economy. We employ high-frequency ...rm-level data and use an empirically tractable model, in which the aggregate dynamics are derived explicitly from the underlying microeconomic data. Our results show that the microeconomic adjustment function in both the manufacturing and trade sectors is nonlinear and asymmetric, results consistent with ...rms using (S; s)-type inventory policies. There are dierences in the estimated adjustment functions between the two sectors as well as the durable and nondurable goods ...rms within each sector. The estimated adjustment function is remarkably stable across subperiods, indicating little change in the inventory adjustment process over time. As predicted by our model, higher moments of the cross-sectional distribution of inventory deviations aect aggregate inventory dynamics. Both authors are aliated with the Research Department, Federal Reserve...

Jonathan Mccarthy; Egon Zakrajsek; We Thank Palle Andersen; Andy Caplin; Mark Gertler; John Haltiwanger; Jim Harrigan; Brad Humphreys; Spence Krane; Trish Mosser; Simon Potter; Tom Sargent

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Sulfide-Driven Arsenic Mobilization from Arsenopyrite and Black Shale Pyrite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examined the hypothesis that sulfide drives arsenic mobilization from pyritic black shale by a sulfide-arsenide exchange and oxidation reaction in which sulfide replaces arsenic in arsenopyrite forming pyrite, and arsenide (As-1) is concurrently oxidized to soluble arsenite (As+3). This hypothesis was tested in a series of sulfide-arsenide exchange experiments with arsenopyrite (FeAsS), homogenized black shale from the Newark Basin (Lockatong formation), and pyrite isolated from Newark Basin black shale incubated under oxic (21% O2), hypoxic (2% O2, 98% N2), and anoxic (5% H2, 95% N2) conditions. The oxidation state of arsenic in Newark Basin black shale pyrite was determined using X-ray absorption-near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES). Incubation results show that sulfide (1 mM initial concentration) increases arsenic mobilization to the dissolved phase from all three solids under oxic and hypoxic, but not anoxic conditions. Indeed under oxic and hypoxic conditions, the presence of sulfide resulted in the mobilization in 48 h of 13-16 times more arsenic from arsenopyrite and 6-11 times more arsenic from isolated black shale pyrite than in sulfide-free controls. XANES results show that arsenic in Newark Basin black shale pyrite has the same oxidation state as that in FeAsS (-1) and thus extend the sulfide-arsenide exchange mechanism of arsenic mobilization to sedimentary rock, black shale pyrite. Biologically active incubations of whole black shale and its resident microorganisms under sulfate reducing conditions resulted in sevenfold higher mobilization of soluble arsenic than sterile controls. Taken together, our results indicate that sulfide-driven arsenic mobilization would be most important under conditions of redox disequilibrium, such as when sulfate-reducing bacteria release sulfide into oxic groundwater, and that microbial sulfide production is expected to enhance arsenic mobilization in sedimentary rock aquifers with major pyrite-bearing, black shale formations.

Zhu, W.; Young, L; Yee, N; Serfes, M; Rhine, E; Reinfelder, J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Improved oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1 to 8 wt % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500 to 1000/sup 0/C.

Natesan, K.; Baxter, D.J.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

167

Rechargeable zinc cell with alkaline electrolyte which inhibits shape change in zinc electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved rechargeable zinc cell is described comprising a zinc electrode and another electrode such as, for example, a nickel-containing electrode, and having an electrolyte containing KOH and a combination of KF and K[sub 2]CO[sub 3] salts which inhibits shape change in the zinc electrode, i.e., the zinc electrode exhibits low shape change, resulting in an improved capacity retention of the cell over an number of charge-discharge cycles, while still maintaining high discharge rate characteristics. 8 figures.

Adler, T.C.; McLarnon, F.R.; Cairns, E.J.

1994-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

168

Rechargeable zinc cell with alkaline electrolyte which inhibits shape change in zinc electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved rechargeable zinc cell is described comprising a zinc electrode and another electrode such as, for example, a nickel-containing electrode, and having an electrolyte containing KOH and a combination of KF and K.sub.2 CO.sub.3 salts which inhibits shape change in the zinc electrode, i.e., the zinc electrode exhibits low shape change, resulting in an improved capacity retention of the cell over an number of charge-discharge cycles, while still maintaining high discharge rate characteristics.

Adler, Thomas C. (Berkeley, CA); McLarnon, Frank R. (Orinda, CA); Cairns, Elton J. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Spontaneous discharge in nickel-zinc accumulations  

SciTech Connect

The authors have examined discharge in nickel-zinc accumulators and monitored the gas. The measurements were made at room temperature with types having two layers of hydrated cellulose separators on the zinc electrodes and capron separators on the nickel oxide ones. There was a ratio of 2.5 between the active masses of the negative and positive electrodes. After three controlled cycles the accumulators were tested for spontaneous discharge. Then they determined the spontaneous discharge after use. The hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen in the gas were determined by a gasometric method in combination with gas chromatography. The zinc and the nickel oxide electrodes contribute to the self-discharge, which considerably exceeds the capacity loss determined from the hydrogen production. The zinc electrode corrosion indicated by the hydrogen production increases when the accumulator is operated. When a charged battery is stored, nitrogen is produced as well as hydrogen and oxygen. The nitrate accelerates the spontaneous discharge.

Dmitrenko, V.E.; Zubov, M.S.; Kuznetsova, L.N.; Okhlobystin, N.I.; Toguzov, B.M.; Tikhomirov, Yu.V.

1988-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

170

Propagating and aggregating trust with uncertainty measure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trust networks have been recognized as a valuable component of many modern systems, such as e-commerce or recommender systems, as they provide a way of quality assessment. In addition to adequate modeling of trust in such network, two fundamental issues ... Keywords: IFS, global trust, intuitionistic fuzzy sets, local trust, relative scalar cardinality of IFS, trust aggregation, trust propagation

Anna Stachowiak

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Programming with partially specified aggregates in Java  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various forms of data aggregates, e.g., arrays, lists, sets, etc., are usually provided by programming languages, either as primitive entities or as additional features made available by standard libraries. In conventional programming languages these ... Keywords: Constraints, Declarative programming, Finite sets, Logical variables

F. Bergenti; L. Chiarabini; G. Rossi

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Aggregate Terminal Velocity/Temperature Relations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terminal velocities of snow aggregates in storms along the Front Range in eastern Colorado are examined with a ground-based two-dimensional video disdrometer. Power-law relationships for particles having equivalent volume diameters of 0.5–20 mm ...

Edward A. Brandes; Kyoko Ikeda; Gregory Thompson; Michael Schönhuber

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Bipolar queries: An aggregation operator focused perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of a bipolar query, meant as a database query that involves both negative and positive conditions, is discussed from the point of view of flexible database querying and modeling of more sophisticated intentions and preferences of the user. ... Keywords: Aggregation operators, Bipolar queries, Flexible queries, Fuzzy logic, Logical connectives modeling

S?awomir Zadro?ny; Janusz Kacprzyk

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Investigation on Durability and Reactivity of Promising Metal Oxide Sorbents During Sulfidation and Regeneration  

SciTech Connect

Research activities and efforts of this research project were concentrated on formulating various metal oxide sorbents with various additives under various formulation conditions, conducting experiments on initial reactivity of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide, and testing hardness of formulated sorbents. Experiments on reactivity of formulated metal oxide sorbents with wet hydrogen sulfide contained in a simulated coal gas mixture were carried out for 120 seconds at 550 o C (see Table 1) to evaluate reactivity of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide. Hardness of formulated sorbents was evaluated in addition to testing their reactivity with hydrogen sulfide. A typical simulated coal gas mixture consists of 9107-ppm hydrogen sulfide (0.005 g; 1 wt %), 0.085-g water (15.84 wt %), 0.0029-g hydrogen (0.58 wt %), and 0.4046-g nitrogen (81.34 wt%).

K. C. Kwon

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

MODELING OF SYNGAS REACTIONS AND HYDROGEN GENERATION OVER SULFIDES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the research is to analyze pathways of reactions of hydrogen with oxides of carbon over sulfides, and to predict which characteristics of the sulfide catalyst (nature of metal, defect structure) give rise to the lowest barriers toward oxygenated hydrocarbon product. Reversal of these pathways entails the generation of hydrogen, which is also proposed for study. During this study, adsorption reactions of H atoms and H{sub 2} molecules with MoS{sub 2}, both in molecular and solid form, have been modeled using high-level density functional theory. The relative stabilities of pure MoS{sub 2} edges were calculated and small clusters exhibiting properties of the edges were modeled. The results were finalized and published in the journal ''Surface Science''. Hydrogen adsorption energies on both the edges and the clusters were calculated, and the thermodynamics of hydrogen adsorption on both systems were evaluated. The adsorption locations and vibrational frequencies were also determined. These additional results were published in a second paper in ''Surface Science''. Most recently, the bonding and effect of alkali and transition metal ions was investigated on the MoS{sub 2} clusters. Potassium atoms bind to the clusters and increase the binding of hydrogen to the clusters while reducing the activation barriers for hydrogen adsorption. Silver attaches to the Mo7S14 cluster and donates its odd electron to the nearby Mo atoms and should have a similar effect to hydrogen as potassium does.

Kamil Klier; Jeffery A. Spirko; Michael L. Neiman

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Electrochemical polishing of hydrogen sulfide from coal synthesis gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An advanced process has been developed for the separation of H{sub 2}S from coal gasification product streams through an electrochemical membrane. This technology is developed for use in coal gasification facilities providing fuel for cogeneration coal fired electrical power facilities and Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell electrical power facilities. H{sub 2}S is removed from the syn-gas by reduction to the sulfide ion and H at the cathode. The sulfide ion migrates to the anode through a molten salt electrolyte suspended in an inert ceramic matrix. Once at the anode it is oxidized to elemental sulfur and swept away for condensation in an inert gas stream. The syn-gas is enriched with the H{sub 2}. Order-of-magnitude reductions in H{sub 2}S have been repeatably recorded (100 ppm to 10 ppm H{sub 2}S) on a single pass through the cell. This process allows removal of H{sub 2}S without cooling the gas stream and with negligible pressure loss through the separator. Since there are no absorbents used, there is no absorption/regeneration step as with conventional technology. Elemental sulfur is produced as a by-product directly, so there is no need for a Claus process for sulfur recovery. This makes the process economically attractive since it is much less equipment intensive than conventional technology.

Gleason, E.F.; Winnick, J.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Formation of zinc oxide films using submicron zinc particle dispersions  

SciTech Connect

The thermal oxidation of submicron metallic Zn particles was studied as a method to form nanostructured ZnO films. The particles used for this work were characterized by electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and thermal analysis to evaluate the Zn-ZnO core shell structure, surface morphology, and oxidation characteristics. Significant nanostructural changes were observed for films annealed to 400 °C or higher, where nanoflakes, nanoribbons, nanoneedles and nanorods were formed as a result of stress induced fractures arising in the ZnO outer shell due to differential thermal expansion between the metallic Zn core and the ZnO shell. Mass transport occurs through these defects due to the high vapor pressure for metallic Zn at temperatures above 230 °C, whereupon the Zn vapor rapidly oxidizes in air to form the ZnO nanostructures. The Zn particles were also incorporated into zinc indium oxide precursor solutions to form thin film transistor test structures to evaluate the potential of forming nanostructured field effect sensors using simple solution processing.

Rajachidambaram, Meena Suhanya; Varga, Tamas; Kovarik, Libor; Sanghavi, Rahul P.; Shutthanandan, V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Han, Seungyeol; Chang, Chih-hung; Herman, Gregory S.

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

178

STUDIES OF MICROMORPHOLOGY AND CURRENT EFFICIENCY OF ZINC ELECTRODEPOSITED FROM FLOWING CHLORIDE ELECTROLYTES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the rechargeable zinc/chlorine and zinc/bromine batteriesthis section. The zinc/chlorine and zinc/bromine batteriesare high: 2.32 V for the chlorine (12) and tions are 1.85 V

Mc Vay, L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Zinc halogen battery electrolyte composition with lead additive  

SciTech Connect

This disclosure relates to a zinc halogen battery electrolyte composition containing an additive providing improved zinc-on-zinc recyclability. The improved electrolyte composition involves the use of a lead additive to inhibit undesirable irregular plating and reduce nodular or dendritic growth on the electrode surface. The lead-containing electrolyte composition of the present invention appears to influence not only the morphology of the base plate zinc, but also the morphology of the zinc-on-zinc replate. In addition, such lead-containing electrolyte compositions appear to reduce hydrogen formation.

Henriksen, Gary L. (Troy, MI)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Zinc air refuelable battery: alternative zinc fuel morphologies and cell behavior  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multicell zinc/air batteries have been tested previously in the laboratory and as part of the propulsion system of an electric bus; cut zinc wire was used as the anode material. This battery is refueled by a hydraulic transport of 0.5-1 mm zinc particles into hoppers above each cell. We report an investigation concerning alternative zinc fuel morphologies, and energy losses associated with refueling and with overnight or prolonged standby. Three types of fuel pellets were fabricated, tested and compared with results for cut wire: spheres produced in a fluidized bed electrolysis cell; elongated particles produced by gas-atomization; and pellets produced by chopping 1 mm porous plates made of compacted zinc fines. Relative sizes of the particles and cell gap dimensions are critical. All three types transported within the cell 1553 and showed acceptable discharge characteristics, but a fluidized bed approach appears especially attractive for owner/user recovery operations.

Cooper, J.F.; Krueger, R.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

New aggregation programs drive consumer participation in Illinois ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

New aggregation programs drive consumer participation ... Ameren Energy Marketing, Direct Energy ... (buying their electricity from renewable generators) ...

182

Theoretical Studies on Heavy Metal Sulfides in Solution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

'Calculating the stabilities, Raman and UV spectra and acidities of As sulfides in aqueous solution', J. A. Tossell, M. D. Zimmermann and G. R. Helz. Some of the Raman spectra obtained by reacting aqueous As(OH)3 with aqueous bisulfide are shown, taken from Wood, et al. (2002). To interpret these spectra we have carried out an extensive series of calculations, detailed for the case of AsS(SH){sub 2}{sup -} in Table 1 below. By employing state of the art quantum chemical techniques to determine gas-phase harmonic and anharmonic frequencies and solution phase corrections we can accurately match features in the experimental spectrum shown in the top figure. The AsS(SH){sub 2}{sup -}...22 H{sub 2}O nanocluster employed is shown in the lower figure. For this species we have calculated the equilibrium structure and the harmonic vibrational spectrum at the CBSB7 B3LYP level. For the free solute species AsS(SH){sub 2}{sup -} we have carried out a whole series of calculations, evaluating harmonic and anharmonic vibrational frequencies at a number of different quantum mechanical levels. In the spectra below, Fig. 3 and Fig. 5 from Wood, et al. (2002), the features around 700-800 cm{sup -1} are attributed to As-O stretches and those around 350-450 cm{sup -1} to As-S stretches. In the nanocluster an isolated vibrational feature is observed at 425 cm{sup -1}, an As=S stretch, close to the value (415 cm{sup -1}) determined by Wood, et al. (2002). Analysis of the calculated frequencies for AsS(SH){sub 2}{sup -} within a polarizable continuum model yields a similar result. Taking the highest level harmonic results, obtained from a CCSD calculation, and adding anharmonic and PCM corrections at the B3LYP level (designated (3) + (5) - (1) in Table 1) gives a frequency for the intense high frequency As=S stretch within 15 cm{sup -1} of experiment. Although there is still interesting work to be done on the stabilities and the Raman and UV spectra of As sulfides, most of the basic concepts have been worked out and we are therefore proposing to move to a new area, that of humic acids (while continuing our studies complexes formed by As oxides and sulfides, now applied to functional groups present in humic acids).

Tossell, John A.

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

Data aggregation in wireless sensor networks using ant colony algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data aggregation is important in energy constraint wireless sensor networks which exploits correlated sensing data and aggregates at the intermediate nodes to reduce the number of messages exchanged network. This paper considers the problem of constructing ... Keywords: Ant colony, Data aggregation, Wireless sensor networks

Wen-Hwa Liao; Yucheng Kao; Chien-Ming Fan

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Reducing false positives in anomaly detectors through fuzzy alert aggregation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we focus on the aggregation of IDS alerts, an important component of the alert fusion process. We exploit fuzzy measures and fuzzy sets to design simple and robust alert aggregation algorithms. Exploiting fuzzy sets, we are able to robustly ... Keywords: Aggregation, Anomaly detection, Fuzzy measures, Fuzzy sets, Intrusion detection, Multisensor fusion

Federico Maggi; Matteo Matteucci; Stefano Zanero

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Community Choice Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) enables California cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Community Choice Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) enables California cities and counties, and are looking at Community Choice Aggregation as a mechanism for doing so. When California deregulated the same utilities that provided it before deregulation. Community Choice Aggregation offers an opportunity

186

An Aggregation Tree Constructing Algorithm Based on Energy Consumption Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper first gives an analysis of Data Aggregation and Data Compression based on the energy consumption of sensor nodes, after which an approach is proposed to construct an aggregation tree in the case of non-perfect aggregation since GIT considers ...

Dayang Sun; Yanheng Liu; Aimin Wang

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Aggregated Purchasing - A Clean Energy Strategy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A number of organizations, including municipalities, state and federal agencies, businesses and even religious organizations are leading the way to a renewable energy future by using their collective buying power to purchase green power. The city of Chicago has formed an alliance with 47 other local government agencies to increase their reliance on clean energy sources. As part of this effort, Chicago has installed solar electric systems on a number of the city's buildings, including the Chicago Center for Green Technology shown here. City of Chicago Aggregated Purchasing-A Clean Energy Strategy SOLAR TODAY Aggregated Purchasing-A Clean Energy Strategy by Lori A. Bird and Edward A. Holt November/December 2002 35 Power generated from renewable resources, also known as "green" power, is

188

Changes in dimethyl sulfide oceanic distribution due to climate change  

SciTech Connect

Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is one of the major precursors for aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer over much of the remote ocean. Here we report on coupled climate simulations with a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemical model for DMS distribution and fluxes using present-day and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. We find changes in zonal averaged DMS flux to the atmosphere of over 150% in the Southern Ocean. This is due to concurrent sea ice changes and ocean ecosystem composition shifts caused by changes in temperature, mixing, nutrient, and light regimes. The largest changes occur in a region already sensitive to climate change, so any resultant local CLAW/Gaia feedback of DMS on clouds, and thus radiative forcing, will be particularly important. A comparison of these results to prior studies shows that increasing model complexity is associated with reduced DMS emissions at the equator and increased emissions at high latitudes.

Elliott, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Erickson III, David J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Lithium sulfide compositions for battery electrolyte and battery electrode coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods of forming lithium-containing electrolytes are provided using wet chemical synthesis. In some examples, the lithium containing electroytes are composed of .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7. The solid electrolyte may be a core shell material. In one embodiment, the core shell material includes a core of lithium sulfide (Li.sub.2S), a first shell of .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7, and a second shell including one or .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7 and carbon. The lithium containing electrolytes may be incorporated into wet cell batteries or solid state batteries.

Liang, Chengdu; Liu, Zengcai; Fu, Wunjun; Lin, Zhan; Dudney, Nancy J; Howe, Jane Y; Rondinone, Adam J

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

190

A Lithium Superionic Sulfide Cathode for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries  

SciTech Connect

This work presents a facile synthesis approach for core-shell structured Li2S nanoparticles, which have Li2S as the core and Li3PS4 as the shell. This material functions as lithium superionic sulfide (LSS) cathode for long-lasting, energy-efficient lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. The LSS has an ionic conductivity of 10-7 S cm-1 at 25 oC, which is 6 orders of magnitude higher than that of bulk Li2S (~10-13 S cm-1). The high lithium-ion conductivity of LSS imparts an excellent cycling performance to all-solid Li-S batteries, which also promises safe cycling of high-energy batteries with metallic lithium anodes.

Lin, Zhan [ORNL; Liu, Zengcai [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Liang, Chengdu [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Hydrogen Production from Hydrogen Sulfide in IGCC Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

IGCC power plants are the cleanest coal-based power generation facilities in the world. Technical improvements are needed to help make them cost competitive. Sulfur recovery is one procedure in which improvement is possible. This project has developed and demonstrated an electrochemical process that could provide such an improvement. IGCC power plants now in operation extract the sulfur from the synthesis gas as hydrogen sulfide. In this project H{sub 2}S has been electrolyzed to yield sulfur and hydrogen (instead of sulfur and water as is the present practice). The value of the byproduct hydrogen makes this process more cost effective. The electrolysis has exploited some recent developments in solid state electrolytes. The proof of principal for the project concept has been accomplished.

Elias Stefanakos; Burton Krakow; Jonathan Mbah

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Changes in Dimethyl Sulfide Oceanic Distribution due to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is one of the major precursors for aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer over much of the remote ocean. Here they report on coupled climate simulations with a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemical model for DMS distribution and fluxes using present-day and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. They find changes in zonal averaged DMS flux to the atmosphere of over 150% in the Southern Ocean. This is due to concurrent sea ice changes and ocean ecosystem composition shifts caused by changes in temperature, mixing, nutrient, and light regimes. The largest changes occur in a region already sensitive to climate change, so any resultant local CLAW/Gaia feedback of DMS on clouds, and thus radiative forcing, will be particularly important. A comparison of these results to prior studies shows that increasing model complexity is associted with reduced DMS emissions at the equator and increased emissions at high latitudes.

Cameron-Smith, P; Elliott, S; Maltrud, M; Erickson, D; Wingenter, O

2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

193

Sythesis of metal sulfide nanomaerials via thermal decomposition of single-source percursors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report, we present a synthetic method for the formation of cuprous sulfide (Cu2S) and lead sulfide (PbS) nanomaterials directly on substrates from the thermolysis of single-source precursors. We find that the final morphology and arrangement of the nanomaterials may be controlled through the concentration of the dissolved precursors and choice of solvent. One-dimensional (1-D) morphologies may also be grown onto substrates with the addition of a metal catalyst layer through solution-liquid-solid (SLS) growth. These synthetic techniques may be expanded to other metal sulfide materials.

Jen-La Plante, Ilan; Zeid, Tahani W.; Yang, Peidong; Mokari, Taleb

2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

194

Conversion of ammonia into hydrogen and nitrogen by reaction with a sulfided catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for removing ammonia from the sour water stream of a coal gasification process. The basic steps comprise stripping the ammonia from the sour water; heating the stripped ammonia to a temperature from between 400.degree. to 1,000.degree. F; passing the gaseous ammonia through a reactor containing a sulfided catalyst to produce elemental hydrogen and nitrogen; and scrubbing the reaction product to obtain an ammonia-free gas. The residual equilibrium ammonia produced by the reactor is recycled into the stripper. The ammonia-free gas may be advantageously treated in a Claus process to recover elemental sulfur. Iron sulfide or cobalt molybdenum sulfide catalysts are used.

Matthews, Charles W. (Denver, CO)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Metal?organic frameworks for the storage and delivery of biologically active hydrogen sulfide  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen sulfide is an extremely toxic gas that is also of great interest for biological applications when delivered in the correct amount and at the desired rate. Here we show that the highly porous metal-organic frameworks with the CPO-27 structure can bind the hydrogen sulfide relatively strongly, allowing the storage of the gas for at least several months. Delivered gas is biologically active in preliminary vasodilation studies of porcine arteries, and the structure of the hydrogen sulfide molecules inside the framework has been elucidated using a combination of powder X-ray diffraction and pair distribution function analysis.

Allan, Phoebe K.; Wheatley, Paul S.; Aldous, David; Mohideen, M. Infas; Tang, Chiu; Hriljac, Joseph A.; Megson, Ian L.; Chapman, Karena W.; De Weireld, Guy; Vaesen, Sebastian; Morris, Russell E. (St Andrews)

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

196

NETL: PPII - Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration Project Documents - Industrial Applications Demonstration Project Documents - Industrial Applications Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash - Project Brief [PDF-72KB] Universal Aggregates, LLC, King George County, VA PROJECT FACT SHEET Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash [PDF-412KB] (Feb 2008) PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Report Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Absorber Ash [PDF-4.5MB] (Nov 2007) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash: A DOE Assessment [PDF-170KB] (Mar 2008)

197

Measurement and quantification of aggregate thermal coefficient of expansion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coefficient of thermal expansion of concrete affects thermal related distresses in pavements. Factors affecting expansion of concrete and aggregates along with existing models are reviewed. A test method to measure the coefficient of thermal expansion of aggregates is proposed. Existing methods used to analyze oxide contents are evaluated. A relation between the oxide content of various elements in aggregates and the CTE of aggregate is presented. Results obtained from the proposed method are presented. A model is also presented for the CTE of concrete based on aggregate properties.

Chande, Gautam U

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Electrically and Hydraulically Rechargeable Zinc-air Battery  

A secondary zinc air battery, which can be either eletrically or hydraulically recharged, is provided with an inventive metal ...

199

Chemists Measure Copper Levels in Zinc Oxide Nanowires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nikoobakht. Analysis of copper incorporation into zinc oxide nanowires. ACS Nano Articles ASAP, published online Jan. 12, 2008.

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

200

Processing of Lead, Zinc, Copper and Nickel Concentrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Processing of copper, zinc, lead and nickel concentrates is becoming more challenging due increasingly complex mineralogy. Smelters are  ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Cadmium zinc telluride substrate growth, characterization, and evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), chemical analysis, infrared focal plane arrays (INFRAs), single crystal growth, subsstrate defects, substrates

M. Kestigian; A. B. Bollong; J. J. Derby; H. L. Glass; K. Harris; H. L. Hettich; P. K. Liao; P. Mitra; P. W. Norton; H. Wadley

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Cadmium sulfide-copper sulfide: heterojunction cell research. Quarterly progress report-3, March 1, 1979-June 1, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress has been made on improving the photon efficiency of the planar CdS/Cu/sub 2/S solar cell. Current in excess of 20 mA/cm/sup 2/ have been achieved. Mixed sulfide solar cells responsive to heat treatment are now being produced. The morphology of the Cu/sub 2/S/CdZnS junction has been examined and found to be significantly different than the morphology on CdS/Su/sub 2/S cells. Efficiencies measured under ELH simulation approaching 8% have been achieved. Work in the analytical task has focused on establishing the experimental techniques to study the trap levels in the CdS and to provide a working model for the voltage instabilities in some (CdZn)S/Cu/sub 2/S cells. Cells under roof top exposure continue to be monitored.

Not Available

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Regenerative zinc/air and zinc/ferricyanide batteries for stationary power applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors report a novel configuration for a zinc-particle, packed-bed anode in which an open structure of high hydraulic permeability is maintained indefinitely in a cell with closely spaced walls by the formation of particle bridges and associated gaps. The configuration minimizes electrolyte pumping costs, allows rapid refueling and partial recharge, and provides for 100% zinc consumption. This approach benefits zinc/air fuel batteries by allowing nearly continuous operation and fuel recycle without commercial infrastructure; it benefits Zn/[Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup {minus}3} batteries by eliminating shape-change and polarization problems found with planar anodes.

Cooper, J.F.; Keene, L.E.; Noring, J.; Maimoni, A.; Peterman, K.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Process for sodium sulfide/ferrous sulfate treatment of hexavalent chromium and other heavy metals  

SciTech Connect

433 of 9384 ) United States Patent 5,000,859 Suciu ,   et al. March 19, 1991 Process for sodium sulfide/ferrous sulfate treatment of hexavalent chromium and other heavy metals

Suciu, Dan F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wikoff, Penny M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Beller, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Carpenter, Charles J. (Lynn Haven, FL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Ecodynamic and Eddy-Admitting Dimethyl Sulfide Simulations in a Global Ocean Biogeochemistry/Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe planetary-scale modeling of mixed-layer dimethyl sulfide (DMS) processing and distributions, conducted at a resolution of 0.28° using the Parallel Ocean Program (POP). Ecodynamic routines embedded within POP track the ...

Shaoping Chu; Scott Elliott; Mathew Maltrud; Jose Hernandez; David Erickson

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Rechargeable zinc cell with alkaline electrolyte which inhibits shape change in zinc electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved rechargeable zinc cell is described comprising a zinc electrode and another electrode such as, for example, a nickel-containing electrode, and having an electrolyte containing one or more hydroxides having the formula M(OH), one or more fluorides having the formula MF, and one or more carbonates having the formula M.sub.2 CO.sub.3, where M is a metal selected from the group consisting of alkali metals. The electrolyte inhibits shape change in the zinc electrode, i.e., the zinc electrode exhibits low shape change, resulting in an improved capacity retention of the cell over an number of charge-discharge cycles, while still maintaining high discharge rate characteristics.

Adler, Thomas C. (Berkeley, CA); McLarnon, Frank R. (Orinda, CA); Cairns, Elton J. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Changes in Zinc Speciation with Mine Tailings Acidification in a Semiarid Weathering Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High concentrations of residual metal contaminants in mine tailings can be transported easily by wind and water, particularly when tailings remain unvegetated for decades following mining cessation, as is the case in semiarid landscapes. Understanding the speciation and mobility of contaminant metal(loid)s, particularly in surficial tailings, is essential to controlling their phytotoxicities and to revegetating impacted sites. In prior work, we showed that surficial tailings samples from the Klondyke State Superfund Site (AZ, USA), ranging in pH from 5.4 to 2.6, represent a weathering series, with acidification resulting from sulfide mineral oxidation, long-term Fe hydrolysis, and a concurrent decrease in total (6000 to 450 mg kg{sup -1}) and plant-available (590 to 75 mg kg{sup -1}) Zn due to leaching losses and changes in Zn speciation. Here, we used bulk and microfocused Zn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data and a six-step sequential extraction procedure to determine tailings solid phase Zn speciation. Bulk sample spectra were fit by linear combination using three references: Zn-rich phyllosilicate (Zn{sub 0.8}talc), Zn sorbed to ferrihydrite (Zn{sub adsFeOx}), and zinc sulfate (ZnSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 7H{sub 2}O). Analyses indicate that Zn sorbed in tetrahedral coordination to poorly crystalline Fe and Mn (oxyhydr)oxides decreases with acidification in the weathering sequence, whereas octahedral zinc in sulfate minerals and crystalline Fe oxides undergoes a relative accumulation. Microscale analyses identified hetaerolite (ZnMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}), hemimorphite (Zn{sub 4}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O) and sphalerite (ZnS) as minor phases. Bulk and microfocused spectroscopy complement the chemical extraction results and highlight the importance of using a multimethod approach to interrogate complex tailings systems.

Hayes, Sarah M.; O’ Day, Peggy A.; Webb, Sam M.; Maier, Raina M.; Chorover, Jon (UCM); (SLAC); (Ariz)

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

208

Reduced ternary molybdenum and tungsten sulfides and hydroprocessing catalysis therewith  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New amorphous molybdenum/tungsten sulfides with the general formula M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n (L.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x, where L is molybdenum or tungsten and M is a ternary metal, has been developed. Characterization of these amorphous materials by chemical and spectroscopic methods (IR, Raman, PES) shows that the (M.sub.6 S.sub.8).sup.0 cluster units are present. Vacuum thermolysis of the amorphous Na.sub.2x (Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x .multidot.yMeOH first produces poorly crystalline NaMo.sub.6 S.sub.8 by disproportionation at 800.degree. C. and well-crystallized NaMo.sub.6 S.sub.8 at .gtoreq. 900.degree. C. Ion-exchange of the sodium material in methanol with soluble M.sup.2+ and M.sup.3+ salts (M=Sn, Co, Ni, Pb, La, Ho) produces the M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n (Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x .multidot.yMeOH compounds. Additionally, the new reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides with the general formula M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8+x (MeOH).sub.y ›MMOS! (M=Sn, Co, Ni) is an effective hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst both as-prepared and after a variety of pretreatment conditions. Under specified pretreatment conditions with flowing hydrogen gas, the SnMoS type catalyst can be stabilized, and while still amorphous, can be considered as "Chevrel phase-like" in that both contain Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8 cluster units. Furthermore, the small cation NiMoS and CoMoS type pretreated catalyst showed to be very active HDS catalysts with rates that exceeded the model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS.sub.2 catalysts.

Hilsenbeck, Shane J. (Ames, IA); McCarley, Robert E. (Ames, IA); Schrader, Glenn L. (Ames, IA); Xie, Xiaobing (College Station, TX)

1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

209

Modeling aggregate investment: A fundamentalist approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Revised version Abstract: This paper applies some lessons from recent estimation of investment models with firm-level data to the aggregate data with an eye to rehabilitating convex costs of adjusting the capital stock. In recent firm-level work, the response of investment to output and other “fundamental ” variables is interpreted in terms of the traditional convex-adjustment-cost model, implying annual capital-stock adjustment speeds on the order of 15 to 35 percent. In aggregate data, I find that this “fundamentalist ” model can account for the reduced-form effect of output on investment and the estimated capital-stock adjustment speed is similar to those from firm-level studies – around 25 percent per year. To account for the slower adjustment to changes in the cost of capital, I consider a model in which the capital-intensity of production is also costly to adjust. I find that this model can account for the reduced-form effects of both output and the cost of capital on investment.

John M. Roberts

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Removal of hydrogen sulfide from simulated geothermal brines by reaction with oxygen. Final report, October 6, 1975-February 4, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process for controlling hydrogen sulfide emissions and corrosivity in geothermal systems has been evaluated on a small laboratory pilot plant scale and shown to be technically feasible. The hydrogen sulfide was oxidized by oxygen injected directly into a 11.4-liter-(3-gallon)-per-minute flowing stream of simulated geothermal brine. The oxidation of the sulfide was complete at oxygen:sulfide mole ratios of 1.25:1 to 1.5:1, depending on temperature and total dissolved solids in the brine. The reaction products were free sulfur, sulfite and sulfate. The ratio of these was dependent upon the oxygen:sulfide mole ratios; but, generally, more than 80% of the sulfide was converted to sulfate, approximately 10% to free sulfur and less than 10% to sulfite.

Wilson, J.S.; King, J.E.; Bullard, G.R.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Methanol tolerant oxygen reduction catalysts based on transition metal sulfides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxygen reduction activity and methanol tolerance of a range of transition metal sulfide electrocatalysts have been evaluated in half-cell experiments and in a liquid-feed solid polymer electrolyte direct methanol fuel cell. These catalysts were prepared in high surface area form by direct synthesis onto various surface-functionalized carbon blacks. Of the materials tested, mixed-metal catalysts based on ReRuS and MoRuS were observed to give the best oxygen reduction activities. In addition, significant increases in performance were observed when employing sulfur-functionalized carbon black, which were attributed to the preferential deposition of active Ru sites in the catalyst-preparation process. Although the intrinsic activity of the best material tested, namely, Mo{sub 2}Ru{sub 5}S{sub 5} on sulfur-treated XC-72, was lower than Pt (by ca. 1545 mV throughout the entire polarization curve), its activity relative to Pt increased significantly in methanol-contaminated electrolytes. This was due to methanol oxidation side reactions reducing the net activity of the Pt, especially at low overpotentials.

Reeve, R.W.; Christensen, P.A.; Hamnett, A.; Haydock, S.A.; Roy, S.C. [Univ. of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Synthesis of actinide nitrides, phosphides, sulfides and oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a process of preparing an actinide compound of the formula An{sub x}Z{sub y} wherein An is an actinide metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, x is selected from the group consisting of one, two or three, Z is a main group element atom selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen and sulfur and y is selected from the group consisting of one, two, three or four, by admixing an actinide organometallic precursor wherein said actinide is selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, a suitable solvent and a protic Lewis base selected from the group consisting of ammonia, phosphine, hydrogen sulfide and water, at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an intermediate actinide complex, heating said intermediate actinide complex at temperatures and for time sufficient to form the actinide compound, and a process of depositing a thin film of such an actinide compound, e.g., uranium mononitride, by subliming an actinide organometallic precursor, e.g., a uranium amide precursor, in the presence of an effective amount of a protic Lewis base, e.g., ammonia, within a reactor at temperatures and for time sufficient to form a thin film of the actinide compound, are disclosed.

Van Der Sluys, W.G.; Burns, C.J.; Smith, D.C.

1991-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

213

Improved cell design for lithium alloy/metal sulfide battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosed lithium alloy/iron sulfide cell design provides loop-like positive and negative sheet metal current collectors electrically insulated from one another by separator means, the positive collector being located outwardly of the negative collector. The collectors are initially secured within an open-ended cell housing, which allows for collector pretesting for electrical shorts prior to adding any electrode materials and/or electrolyte to the cell. Separate chambers are defined outwardly of the positive collector and inwardly of the negative collector open respectively in opposite directions toward the open ends of the cell housing; and positive and negative electrode materials can be extruded into these respective chambers via the opposite open housing ends. The chambers and cell housing ends can then be sealed closed. A cross wall structurally reinforces the cell housing and also thereby defines two cavities, and paired positive and negative collectors are disposed in each cavity and electrically connected in parallel. The cell design provides for a high specific energy output and improved operating life in that any charge-discharge cycle swelling of the positive electrode material will be inwardly against only the positive collector to minimize shorts caused by the collectors shifting relative to one another.

Kaun, T.D.

1984-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

214

Cell design for lithium alloy/metal sulfide battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosed lithium alloy/iron sulfide cell design provides loop-like positive and negative sheet metal current collectors electrically insulated from one another by separator means, the positive collector being located outwardly of the negative collector. The collectors are initially secured within an open-ended cell housing, which allows for collector pretesting for electrical shorts prior to adding any electrode materials and/or electrolyte to the cell. Separate chambers are defined outwardly of the positive collector and inwardly of the negative collector open respectively in opposite directions toward the open ends of the cell housing; and positive and negative electrode materials can be extruded into these respective chambers via the opposite open housing ends. The chambers and cell housing ends can then be sealed closed. A cross wall structurally reinforces the cell housing and also thereby defines two cavities, and paired positive and negative collectors are disposed in each cavity and electrically connected in parallel. The cell design provides for a high specific energy output and improved operating life in that any charge-discharge cycle swelling of the positive electrode material will be inwardly against only the positive collector to minimize shorts caused by the collectors shifting relative to one another.

Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lennox, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Updated cost estimates of meeting geothermal hydrogen sulfide emission regulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A means of estimating the cost of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emission control was investigated. This study was designed to derive H/sub 2/S emission abatement cost functions and illustrate the cost of H/sub 2/S emission abatement at a hydrothermal site. Four tasks were undertaken: document the release of H/sub 2/S associated with geothermal development; review H/sub 2/S environmental standards; develop functional relationships that may be used to estimate the most cose-effective available H/sub 2/S abatement process; and use the cost functions to generate abatement cost estimates for a specific site. The conclusions and recommendations derived from the research are presented. The definition of the term impacts as used in this research is discussed and current estimates of the highest expected H/sub 2/S concentrations of in geothermal reservoirs are provided. Regulations governing H/sub 2/S emissions are reviewed and a review of H/sub 2/S control technology and a summary of the control cost functions are included. A case study is presented to illustrate H/sub 2/S abatement costs at the Baca KGRA in New Mexico.

Wells, K.D.; Currie, J.W.; Weakley, S.A.; Ballinger, M.Y.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Synthesis of actinide nitrides, phosphides, sulfides and oxides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process of preparing an actinide compound of the formula An.sub.x Z.sub.y wherein An is an actinide metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, x is selected from the group consisting of one, two or three, Z is a main group element atom selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen and sulfur and y is selected from the group consisting of one, two, three or four, by admixing an actinide organometallic precursor wherein said actinide is selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, a suitable solvent and a protic Lewis base selected from the group consisting of ammonia, phosphine, hydrogen sulfide and water, at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an intermediate actinide complex, heating said intermediate actinide complex at temperatures and for time sufficient to form the actinide compound, and a process of depositing a thin film of such an actinide compound, e.g., uranium mononitride, by subliming an actinide organometallic precursor, e.g., a uranium amide precursor, in the presence of an effectgive amount of a protic Lewis base, e.g., ammonia, within a reactor at temperatures and for time sufficient to form a thin film of the actinide compound, are disclosed.

Van Der Sluys, William G. (Missoula, MT); Burns, Carol J. (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, David C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

The oceanic cycle and global atmospheric budget of carbonyl sulfide  

SciTech Connect

A significant portion of stratospheric air chemistry is influenced by the existence of carbonyl sulfide (COS). This ubiquitous sulfur gas represents a major source of sulfur to the stratosphere where it is converted to sulfuric acid aerosol particles. Stratospheric aerosols are climatically important because they scatter incoming solar radiation back to space and are able to increase the catalytic destruction of ozone through gas phase reactions on particle surfaces. COS is primarily formed at the surface of the earth, in both marine and terrestrial environments, and is strongly linked to natural biological processes. However, many gaps in the understanding of the global COS cycle still exist, which has led to a global atmospheric budget that is out of balance by a factor of two or more, and a lack of understanding of how human activity has affected the cycling of this gas. The goal of this study was to focus on COS in the marine environment by investigating production/destruction mechanisms and recalculating the ocean-atmosphere flux.

Weiss, P.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Commercialization planning for the lithium/metal sulfide battery  

SciTech Connect

A federally supported battery development program has been underway at Argonne National laboratory since 1973 that is directed to the development and commercialization of high-energy batteries that meet national needs. This program has received a high national priority from the Energy Research Development Administration (and previously the Atomic Energy Commission) with appropriate R and D funding because achievement of the program goals is perceived as having a potentially important impact upon the energy resources in the U.S. The commercial production of high-energy-density batteries, if produced at costs that are attractive, can result in the reduction of petroleum consumption in applications such as utility peak-shaving or personal transportation. This would be accomplished by shifting these applications away from petroleum-fueled combustion turbines and internal combustion engines to battery peaking plants for utilities and battery-powered automobiles which can use electricity produced from energy sources such as coal or nuclear fuel. The energy storage that is projected for mature lithium/metal sulfide (Li/Ms) batteries is about 4 to 5 times that of today's lead--acid battery per unit weight and about 3 to 4 times per unit volume. Achievement of these performance goals and the cost goals for the cells of $20 to $35/kWh would make this system very attractive for many applications of commercial interest. 4 figures, 5 tables.

Chilenskas, A.A.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Mitigation of hydrogen sulfide emissions in The Geysers KGRA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Violations of the ambient air quality standard (AAQS) for hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) are currently being experienced in The Geysers KGRA and could significantly increase in the future. Attainment and maintenance of the H/sub 2/S AAQS is a potential constraint to optimum development of this resource. The availability of reliable H/sub 2/S controls and the development of a validated air dispersion model are critical to alleviating this constraint. The purpose of this report is to assess the performance capabilities for state-of-the-art controls, to identify potential cost-effective alternative controls, and to identify the California Energy Commission (CEC) staff's efforts to develop a validated air dispersion model. Currently available controls (Stretford, Hydrogen Peroxide, and EIC) are capable of abating H/sub 2/S emissions from a proposed facility to five lbs/hr. Alternative controls, such as condensate stripping and condensate pH control, appear to be promising, cost-effective control options.

Buell, R.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Econometric Estimation of the Aggregate Impacts of Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) recently funded a study in which local area aggregated electricity and natural gas consumption in California from 2006 through 2010 were analyzed...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A General Relationship between Disorder, Aggregation, and Charge...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aggregation, and Charge Transport in Conjugated Polymers Monday, September 23, 2013 The potential for combining low-cost manufacturing and mechanical robustness with engineering...

222

Aggregate Production Planning for Process Industries under Competition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Linear Programming Approach to Production and EmploymentA.C. 1978. “Aggregate Production Planning. ” Handbook ofH.A. Simon. 1960. Planning Production, Inventories and Work

Karmarkar, U. S.; Rajaram, K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Characterization of Dry Aggregates in Carbon Anodes by Image ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anodes are mainly composed of dry aggregates such as calcined petroleum coke and recycled materials with pitch as the binder. Granulometry of the dry ...

224

Kinetic and hydrodynamic models of chemotactic aggregation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive general kinetic and hydrodynamic models of chemotactic aggregation that describe certain features of the morphogenesis of biological colonies (like bacteria, amoebae, endothelial cells or social insects). Starting from a stochastic model defined in terms of N coupled Langevin equations, we derive a nonlinear mean field Fokker-Planck equation governing the evolution of the distribution function of the system in phase space. By taking the successive moments of this kinetic equation and using a local thermodynamic equilibrium condition, we derive a set of hydrodynamic equations involving a damping term. In the limit of small frictions, we obtain a hyperbolic model describing the formation of network patterns (filaments) and in the limit of strong frictions we obtain a parabolic model which is a generalization of the standard Keller-Segel model describing the formation of clusters (clumps). Our approach connects and generalizes several models introduced in the chemotactic literature. We discuss the anal...

Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Defect aggregation kinetics in calcium fluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Defects in solid materials are responsible for many of their most interesting and critical properties. The authors have developed a site-selective laser technique that allows us to monitor the aggregation of rare earth ion defects in solids on the microscopic scale. This excitation absorption laser method enables us to derive kinetic rate information and thermodynamic parameters for the distribution of defects in solids. For doped materials, various types of defects arise when the dopant ions have ionic charges that differ from the charges of host crystal ions. In model systems such as alkaline earth fluorides doped with trivalent rare earth ions, some defect sites consist of a single dopant ion, while others consist of clusters of dopant cations and interstitial anions. Heat treatment of doped samples leads to a distribution of the various types of defect sites that is characteristic of the temperature and length of heat treatment and the total dopant ion concentration. The results from a study of the formation of trivalent europium ion defect aggregates in calcium fluoride indicate that our method successfully monitors changes in individual site concentrations resulting from heat treatment. The results of this study are consistent with the formation of negatively charged dimer and trimer defects in Eu{sup 3+}:CaF{sub 2} crystals from isolated europium ion and (Eu:F{sub i}) single pair defects. In addition, he presents evidence for rapid equilibrium between the isolated ion and the single pair. Other work presented in this thesis includes the development of a high-temperature fluorine oxidation apparatus that was used to convert divalent europium ions to the trivalent state in calcium fluoride single crystals. This apparatus was also used to increase the superconducting {Tc}'s of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} through modification of copper-oxygen oxidation states.

Cirillo, K.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Thermal treatment for recovery of manganese and zinc from zinc-carbon and alkaline spent batteries  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We separated Zn from Mn in zinc-carbon and alkaline batteries after removal of Hg. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Almost total removal of Hg is achieved at low temperature in air. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen atmosphere is needed to reduce zinc and to permit its volatilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high grade Zn concentrate was obtained with a high recovery at 1000-1200 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The grade of Mn in the residue was enhanced with complete recovery. - Abstract: The aim of this paper is the recovery of manganese and zinc from a mixture of zinc-carbon and alkaline spent batteries, containing 40.9% of Mn and 30.1% of Zn, after preliminary physical treatment followed by removal of mercury. Separation of the metals has been carried out on the basis of their different boiling points, being 357 Degree-Sign C and 906 Degree-Sign C the boiling point of mercury and zinc and 1564 Degree-Sign C the melting point of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Characterization by chemical analysis, TGA/DTA and X-ray powder diffraction of the mixture has been carried out after comminution sieving and shaking table treatment to remove the anodic collectors and most of chlorides contained in the mixture. The mixture has been roasted at various temperatures and resident times in a flow of air to set the best conditions to remove mercury that were 400 Degree-Sign C and 10 min. After that, the flow of air has been turned into a nitrogen one (inert atmosphere) and the temperatures raised, thus permitting the zinc oxide to be reduced to metallic zinc by the carbon present in the original mixture and recovered after volatilization as a high grade concentrate, while manganese was left in the residue. The recovery and the grade of the two metals, at 1000 Degree-Sign C and 30 min residence time, were 84% and 100% for zinc and 85% and 63% for manganese, respectively. The recovery of zinc increased to 99% with a grade of 97% at 1200 Degree-Sign C and 30 min residence time, while the recovery and grade of manganese were 86% and 87%, respectively, at that temperature. Moreover, the chlorinated compounds that could form by the combustion of the plastics contained in the spent batteries, are destroyed at the temperature required by the process.

Belardi, G. [Institute for Environmental Engineering and Geosciences (CNR) Area della Ricerca CNR, via Salaria km 29,300, Monterotondo, 00016 Rome (Italy); Lavecchia, R.; Medici, F. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Environment, Sapienza University of Rome, via Eudossiana 84, 00184 Rome (Italy); Piga, L., E-mail: luigi.piga@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Environment, Sapienza University of Rome, via Eudossiana 84, 00184 Rome (Italy)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Analysis of hypochlorite process for removal of hydrogen sulfide from geothermal gases  

SciTech Connect

Sodium hypochlorite reacts readily with hydrogen sulfide to convert the sulfide ion into free sulfur in a neutral or acid solution and to the sulfate ion in an alkaline solution. Sodium hypochlorite can be generated on site by processing geothermal brine in electrolytic cells. An investigation to determine if this reaction could be economically used to remove hydrogen sulfide from geothermal noncondensible gases is reported. Two processes, the LO-CAT Process and the Stretford Process, were selected for comparison with the hypochlorite process. Three geothermal reservoirs were considered for evaluation: Niland KGRA, Baca KGRA, and The Geysers KGRA. Because of the wide variation in the amount of hydrogen sulfide present at The Geysers, two different gas analyses were considered for treatment. Plants were designed to process the effluent noncondensible gases from a 10 MW/sub e/ geothermal power plant. The effluent gas from each plant was to contain a maximum hydrogen sulfide concentration of 35 ppb. Capital costs were estimated for each of the processes at each of the four sites selected. Operating costs were also calculated for each of the processes at each of the sites. The results of these studies are shown.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Aluminum doped zinc oxide for organic photovoltaics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) was grown via magnetron sputtering as a low-cost alternative to indium tin oxide (ITO) for organic photovoltaics (OPVs). Postdeposition ozone treatment resulted in devices with lower series resistance, increased open-circuit voltage, and power conversion efficiency double that of devices fabricated on untreated AZO. Furthermore, cells fabricated using ozone treated AZO and standard ITO displayed comparable performance.

Murdoch, G. B.; Hinds, S.; Sargent, E. H.; Tsang, S. W.; Mordoukhovski, L.; Lu, Z. H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada)

2009-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

229

Annual and Aggregate Loan Limits 2011-12 Stafford Loans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual and Aggregate Loan Limits 2011-12 Stafford Loans Medical students 1st year 2nd year 3rd year 4th year Aggregate Subsidized Stafford (maximum amount shown; amount is lower if student has less need) $8,500 $8,500 $8,500 $8,500 $65,500 Unsubsidized Stafford (maximum amount shown; amount is lower

Tufts University

230

Aggregations of tuna can be found in association with seamounts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

392 Aggregations of tuna can be found in association with seamounts throughout all the tropical oceans and these aggregations are often exploited by tuna fishing fleets (Fonteneau, 1991). In Hawaii subadult tuna found in association with the Cross Seamount located approximately 160 nmi south of Honolulu

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

231

A Note on Rotor-Router Aggregation on the Comb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove a shape theorem for rotor-router aggregation on the comb, for a specific initial rotor configuration and clockwise rotor sequence for all vertices. Furthermore, as an application of rotor-router walks, we describe the harmonic measure for the limiting shape of rotor-router aggregation, which is useful in the study of other growth models on the comb.

Huss, Wilfried

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Grading of construction aggregate through machine vision: Results and prospects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, crushed aggregate to be used in construction is graded using sieves. We describe an innovative machine vision approach to such grading. Our operational scenario is one where a camera takes images from directly overhead of a layer of aggregate ... Keywords: Construction industry, Image database, Machine vision, Supervised and unsupervised classification, Wavelet transform

Fionn Murtagh; Xiaoyu Qiao; Paul Walsh; P. A. M. Basheer; Danny Crookes; Adrian Long

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Municipal Aggregation and Retail Competition in the Ohio Energy Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ohio allows communities to vote to aggregate the loads of individual consumers (unless they opt out) in order to seek a competitive energy supplier. Over 200 communities have voted to do this for electricity. By 2004 residential switching reached 69 % in Cleveland territory (95 % from municipal aggregation) but by 2006 had fallen to 8%. Savings are now small, but customer acquisition costs are low and the cost to consumers is negligible. Aggregation and retail competition have been thwarted by Rate Stabilization Plans holding incumbent utility prices below cost since 2006. In the Ohio gas sector, rate regulation has not discouraged aggregation and competition, but market prices falling below municipally negotiated rates can be politically embarrassing. How municipal aggregation would fare against individual choice in a market conducive to retail competition is an open question, but the policy deserves consideration elsewhere.

Stephen Littlechild; Stephen Littlechild

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Study for Technology of Asphalt Pavement Aggregate Washed by Cycle Limewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technology of asphalt pavement aggregate washed by cycle limewater was put forward for the first time in this paper. Before and after the aggregate was washed by cycle limewater, aggregate mud content, aggregate asphalt adhesion and asphalt mixture water ... Keywords: energy conservation, emissions reduction, cycle limewater, wash, asphalt pavement aggregate

Jiang Tao; Sun Bin

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Fluorescent chemosensors for exploring zinc metalloneurochemistry and detecting mercury in aqueous solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1. An Introduction to Zinc Metalloneurochemistry and Zinc Detection in Biology. This chapter presents an overview of zinc neurophysiology and pathology, which provides motivation for the design of new tools and ...

Nolan, Elizabeth M. (Elizabeth Marie), 1978-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Role of Standard Demand Response Signals for Advanced Automated Aggregation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emerging standards such as OpenADR enable Demand Response (DR) Resources to interact directly with Utilities and Independent System Operators to allow their facility automation equipment to respond to a variety of DR signals ranging from day ahead to real time ancillary services. In addition, there are Aggregators in today’s markets who are capable of bringing together collections of aggregated DR assets and selling them to the grid as a single resource. However, in most cases these aggregated resources are not automated and when they are, they typically use proprietary technologies. There is a need for a framework for dealing with aggregated resources that supports the following requirements: • Allows demand-side resources to participate in multiple DR markets ranging from wholesale ancillary services to retail tariffs without being completely committed to a single entity like an Aggregator; • Allow aggregated groups of demand-side resources to be formed in an ad hoc fashion to address specific grid-side issues and support the optimization of the collective response of an aggregated group along a number of different dimensions. This is important in order to taylor the aggregated performance envelope to the needs to of the grid; • Allow aggregated groups to be formed in a hierarchical fashion so that each group can participate in variety of markets from wholesale ancillary services to distribution level retail tariffs. This paper explores the issues of aggregated groups of DR resources as described above especially within the context of emerging smart grid standards and the role they will play in both the management and interaction of various grid-side entities with those resources.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Kiliccote, Sila

2011-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

237

Mechanical Pretreatment of Lead Based Alloy Anode for Zinc ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biosorption Characteristics of Pb(II) from Aqueous Solution onto Poplar Cotton · Characterization of Aluminum Cathode Sheets Used for Zinc Electrowinning.

238

Zinc-catalyzed copolymerization of carbon dioxide and propylene oxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The zinc-catalyzed copolymerization of carbon dioxide and propylene oxide, which is one of the promising reactions for the utilization of carbon dioxide, has been investigated from various aspects. Above all, considering that supercritical carbon dioxide has recently been paid attention in the field of extraction, separation, and reaction medium, its aptitude for both a reaction solvent and a reactant was examined in zinc glutarate-catalyzed reactions. As a result, it was proved that supercritical carbon dioxide was a suitable substitute for organic solvents in the copolymerization reactions. Great diffusivity of supercritical carbon dioxide into polymer segments was thought to promote carbon dioxide supply to the active sites of the zinc species and to afford alternating polycarbonate production. Low reaction temperature appeared to be advantageous to polycarbonate and cyclic carbonate formation. Apart from zinc glutarate catalyst whose detailed mechanistic studies were hard to perform due to its insolubility, some other zinc compounds were studied. A homogeneous catalyst, bis(ethyl fumarato)zinc, showed similar polycarbonate yield to zinc glutarate, and the method of the catalyst preparation affected its catalytic activity. Only a small amount of the catalyst was considered to be active in the copolymerization process even in the homogeneous systems. In the zinc dicarboxylate complexes, the carbon number between two carboxyl groups and the steric nature in the vicinity of the zinc atom might be important factors for the copolymerization catalysis.

Katsurao, Takumi

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Reduction Process Of Zinc From Concentrates With CO2 Reduced ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recoveries of >90% of Zinc, and reduced CO2 gas emission product are expected after evaluation. Proceedings Inclusion? Planned: A print-only volume ...

240

Aluminum-doped Zinc Oxide Nanoink - Energy Innovation Portal  

Scientists at Berkeley Lab have developed a method for fabricating conductive aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) nanocrystals that provide a lower cost, less toxic ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Zinc air battery development for electric vehicles. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of research conducted during the sixteen month continuation of a program to develop rechargeable zinc-air batteries for electric vehicles. The zinc-air technology under development incorporates a metal foam substrate for the zinc electrode, with flow of electrolyte through the foam during battery operation. In this ``soluble`` zinc electrode the zincate discharge product dissolves completely in the electrolyte stream. Cycle testing at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, where the electrode was invented, and at MATSI showed that this approach avoids the zinc electrode shape change phenomenon. Further, electrolyte flow has been shown to be necessary to achieve significant cycle life (> 25 cycles) in this open system. Without it, water loss through the oxygen electrode results in high-resistance failure of the cell. The Phase I program, which focused entirely on the zinc electrode, elucidated the conditions necessary to increase electrode capacity from 75 to as much as 300 mAh/cm{sup 2}. By the end of the Phase I program over 500 cycles had accrued on one of the zinc-zinc half cells undergoing continuous cycle testing. The Phase II program continued the half cell cycle testing and separator development, further refined the foam preplate process, and launched into performance and cycle life testing of zinc-air cells.

Putt, R.A.; Merry, G.W. [MATSI, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Zinc Electrowinning Using Novel Rolled Pb-Ag-Ca Anodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 2003 ... Since May 2001, industrial-scale tests have been carried out at two zinc refineries in North America in industrial electrowinning cells.

243

Dechlorination Thermodynamics of CuCl Residue from Zinc ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commissioning of a Second Cobalt Recovery Furnace at Nchanga Smelter .... Study of Dielectric Properties and Drying Characteristics on Zinc Alloy Power from ...

244

Synthesis and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Nickel Zinc Oxide ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stochiometric amount of nickel nitrate and zinc nitrate were used to prepare the corresponding solution. Particles were synthesized by hydrogen reduction of the  ...

245

On the Effects of Zinc and AlB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, On the Effects of Zinc and AlB2 Particles on Absorbed Impact ... on Mechanical Properties of Spark Plasma Sintered Nickel-CNT Composites.

246

Chromium-free Conversion Coating for Electroplated Zinc-nickel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Chromium-free Conversion Coating for Electroplated Zinc- nickel. Author(s), Melissa L. Klingenberg, Clayton Drees, Elizabeth Berman, ...

247

Novel electrolyte additives to enhance zinc electrode cycle life  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrochemical power sources that utilize zinc electrodes possess many advantages. Zinc is abundantly available, benign, inexpensive, stable over a wide operating temperature range, and has a high oxidation potential. In spite of these advantageous characteristics, rechargeable electrochemical systems based on zinc chemistry have not found widespread use. The major disadvantages of zinc electrodes are that they have limited cycle life due to zinc slumping and zinc electrode shape changes in alkaline solutions resulting from the solubility of zincate (Zn(OH){sub 4}{sup 2-}) in these solutions. As a result, premature cell failure often results due to cell shorting caused by dendritic growth as well as zinc slumping. In this paper we describe the chemical and physical characteristics of electrolyte solutions employing additives, particularly for zinc based electrochemical systems. These electrolytes are prepared using the alkali metal salts of 1,3,5-phenyltrisulfonic acid in combination with potassium hydroxide. The alkali metal salts of the acid possess good thermal stability, good ionic conductivity, and have a wide electrochemical voltage window in aqueous systems. With these electrolyte solutions improved cycle life was achieved in Zn/NiOOH and Zn/AgO. Improved cycle life with this additive is attributed to decreased zincate solubility, resulting in reduced zinc slumping and electrode shape changes. In addition, increased shelf-life and reduced self-discharge were also observed in many alkaline power sources.

Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction stage. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. Because of the higher cost of chemicals and the restricted markets in Hawaii, the economic viability of this process in Hawaii is questionable.

Sims, A.V.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction state. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process. Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination Process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure.

Sims, A.V.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Sulfidation of mixed metal oxides in a fluidized-bed reactor  

SciTech Connect

Mixed metal oxides were used for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a hot gas stream. Sorbents were prepared according to the dry and wet impregnation techniques. The desulfurization performance of the metal oxide sorbents was experimentally tested in a fluidized-bed reactor system. Sulfidation experiments performed under reaction conditions similar to those at the exit of a coal gasifier showed that the preparation procedure and technique, the type and the amount of the impregnated metal oxide, the type of the solid carrier, and the size of the solid reactant affect the H[sub 2]S removal capacity of the sorbents. The pore structure of fresh and sulfided sorbents was analyzed using mercury porosimetry, nitrogen adsorption, and scanning electron microscopy.

Christoforou, S.C.; Efthimiadis, E.A.; Vasalos, I.A. (Aristotelian Univ. of Thessaloniki (Greece))

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Plasma-chemical conversion of hydrogen sulfide into hydrogen and sulfur  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A waste-treatment process that recovers both hydrogen and sulfur from hydrogen-sulfide-contaminated industrial wastes is being developed to replace the Claus technology, which recovers only sulfur. The proposed process is based on research reported in the Soviet technical literature and uses microwave (or radio-frequency) energy to initiate plasma-chemical reactions that dissociate hydrogen sulfide into elemental hydrogen and sulfur. In the plasma-chemical process, the gaseous stream would be purified and separated into streams containing the product hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide for recycle to the plasma reactor, and the process purge containing carbon dioxide and water. Since unconverted hydrogen sulfide is recycled to the plasma reactor, the plasma-chemical process has the potential for sulfur recoveries in excess of 99% without the additional tail-gas clean-up processes associated with the Claus technology. Laboratory experiments with pure hydrogen sulfide have confirmed that conversions of over 90% per pass are possible. Experiments with impurities typical of petroleum refinery and natural gas production acid gases have demonstrated that these impurities are compatible with the plasma dissociation process and do not appear to create new waste-treatment problems. Other experiments show that the cyclonic-flow pattern hypothesized by the Russian theoretical analysis of the plasma-chemical process can substantially decrease energy requirements for hydrogen sulfide dissociation while increasing conversion. This process has several advantages over the current Claus-plus-tail-gas-cleanup technology. The primary advantage is the potential for recovering hydrogen more cheaply than the direct production of hydrogen. The difference could amount to an energy savings of 40 {times} 10{sup 15} to 70 {times} 10{sup 15} J/yr in the refining industry, for an annual savings of $500 million to $1,000 million.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.; Daniels, E.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Materials and mechanisms of high temperature lithium sulfide batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New materials have encouraged development of bipolar Li-Al/FeS{sub 2} batteries for electric vehicle (EV) applications. Current technology employs a two-phase Li-alloy negative electrode low-melting, LiCl-rich LiCl-LiBr-KBr molten salt electrolyte, and either an FeS or an upper-plateau (UP) FeS{sub 2} positive electrode. These components are assembled in a sealed bipolar battery configuration. Use of the two-phase Li-alloy ({alpha} + {beta} Li-Al and Li{sub 5}Al{sub 5}Fe{sub 2}) negative electrode provides in situ overcharge tolerance that renders the bipolar design viable. Employing LiCl-rich LiCl-LiBr-KBr electrolyte in ``electrolyte-starved`` calls achieves low-burdened cells, that possess low area-specific impedance; comparable to that of flooded cells using LiCl-LiBr-KBr eutectic electrolyte. The combination of dense UP FeS{sub 2} electrodes and low-melting electrolyte produces a stable and reversible couple, achieving over 1000 cycle life in flooded cells, with high power capabilities. In addition, a family of stable sulfide ceramic/sealant materials was developed that produce high-strength bonds between a variety of metals and ceramics, which renders lithium/iron suffide bipolar stacks practical. Bipolar Li-Al/FeS{sub 2} cells and four-cell stacks using these seals are being built and tested in the 13 cm diameter size for EV applications. To date, Li-Al/FeS{sub 2} cells have attained 400 W/kg power at 80% DOD and 180 Wh/kg energy at the 30 W/kg rate. When cell performance characteristics are used to model full-scale EV and hybrid vehicle (HV) batteries, they are projected to meet or exceed the performance requirements for a large variety of EV and HV applications. Efficient production and application of Li-alloys and Li-salt electrolyte are critical to approaching battery cost objectives.

Kaun, T.D.; Hash, M.C.; Henriksen, G.L.; Jansen, A.N.; Vissers, D.R.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Prediction and correlation of accessible area of large multiparticle aggregates  

SciTech Connect

Aggregates (composed of large numbers of primary particles) are produced in many engineering environments. One convenient characterization is the fractal dimension, the exponent describing how the number of primary particles in each aggregate scales with radial distance from its center of mass. The authors describe a finite-analytic pseudo-continuum prediction of the normalized accessible surface area of an isothermal quasi-spherical fractal aggregate containing N ([much gt]1) primary particles, on the surfaces of which a first-order chemical process occurs. Results are displayed for specific fractal dimensions (2.5, 2.18, and 1.8) frequently observed in aggregating systems. An effective Thiele modulus is used to develop an efficient and accurate scheme for predicting/correlating the effectiveness factor for an aggregate containing N primary particles in terms of aggregate fractal dimension, reaction probability, and Knudsen number. The methods now allow calculations of the accessible surface area of populations of aggregates, provided pdf--(N, D[sub f], ...)--is known for the populations of interest.

Rosner, D.E.; Tandon, P. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Zinc ion and neutral emission from single crystal zinc oxide during 193-nm excimer laser exposure  

SciTech Connect

Mass resolved time-of-flight measurements on neutral zinc atoms and zinc ions show energetic ions and neutrals during 193-nm irradiation of single crystals of semiconducting zinc oxide. Typical Zn+ kinetic energies are 3-5 eV. At fluences (energy per unit area per pulse) below 200 mJ/cm2, the ion intensities (per laser pulse) decrease monotonically to low values with laser pulse number. The depletion kinetics change from exponential to second order near 50 mJ/cm2. We attribute this change to the annihilation of defects yielding Zn+ emission when Zn+ or other surface defects become mobile. At fluences between 200 and 300 mJ/cm2, Zn+ emission becomes more sustained due to defects created by the laser. In this same fluence range, we observe the onset of detectable neutral atomic zinc emission. These neutral atoms display Maxwell-Boltzmann kinetic energy distributions w th effective surface temperatures that approach 5000 K as the fluence is raised to 350 mJ/cm2. These high surface temperatures are remarkable given the low etch rates observed at these fluences, suggesting that heated layer is extremely thin. We propose emission mechanisms and experiments to resolve outstanding questions.

Kahn, E. H. [Washington State University; Langford, S. C. [Washington State University; Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Dickinson, J. T. [Washington State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Illinois Solar Energy Association - Renewable Energy Credit Aggregation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Illinois Solar Energy Association - Renewable Energy Credit Illinois Solar Energy Association - Renewable Energy Credit Aggregation Program Illinois Solar Energy Association - Renewable Energy Credit Aggregation Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate $105/MWh) Program Info Start Date 01/01/2010 State Illinois Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount $105/MWh '''''RECAP is not currently accepting applications. The most recent solicitation closed April 30th, 2013. Check the program web site for information regarding future solicitations. ''''' The Illinois Solar Energy Association offers the Renewable Energy Credit Aggregation Program (RECAP) to Illinois solar photovoltaic (PV) system

256

Research on separators for alkaline zinc batteries. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is concerned with the research and development of a hybrid separator as an improved battery separator in alkaline zinc secondary batteries. Particular emphasis has been directed toward increasing the cycle life of zinc electrodes by controlling the permselectivity of the separator.

Yeo, R.S.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Zinc electrode shape change. 1; In situ monitoring  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on zinc electrode shape change, the redistribution of zinc material over the electrode during repeated cycling, identified as one of the main life-limiting factors for alkaline nickel oxide/zinc secondary batteries. To investigate this phenomenon in situ, a radiotracer, {sup 65}Zn, is incorporated in the battery and its movement monitored during repeated cycling of the battery. The changes in the distribution of {sup 65}Zn over the electrode during battery operation are attributed to the displacement of radioactive zincate ions via the battery electrolyte. It is shown that the spatial distribution of {sup 65}Zn offers a reliable indication for the zinc material distribution over the electrode, provided an electrode with uniformly specific radioactivity is used in the measurements. Radiotracer experiments using zinc electrodes containing 2 weight percent HgO as an additive and uniformly labeled with {sup 203}Hg, have revealed that during battery cycling no substantial net transport of mercury species occurs.

Visschev, W.; Barendrecht, E.; Einerhand, R.E.F.; deGoeij, J.J.M. (Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (NL))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

EFFECTIVENESS OF COPPER AND BRONZE FOR ZINC CAPTURE  

SciTech Connect

A series of experiments was conducted to determine the efficacy of using copper and bronze sheet and screen under high vacuum conditions to capture zinc vapor. The experiments were conducted in a parametric manner using a fixed zinc vaporization temperature (350°C) but varying the filter temperature from ambient to 550°C. Consistent with previous work, metallic zinc was deposited at low temperatures, but the deposit was non?adherent. At an intermediate temperature range (350?450°C), the deposit formed an alloy with both copper and bronze materials. At higher temperatures (> 500°C) the zinc did not deposit on the surfaces likely due to its high vapor pressure. Additional testing to optimize the zinc 'getter' chemistry and surface condition is warranted.

Korinko, P. S.

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

259

Stable cycling of lithium sulfide cathodes through strong affinity with a bifunctional binder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stable cycling of lithium sulfide cathodes through strong affinity with a bifunctional binder Zhi lithium­sulfur batteries have attracted great interest in recent years because of their high theoretical specific energy, which is several times that of current lithium-ion batteries. Compared to sulfur, fully

Cui, Yi

260

Removal of Hydrogen Sulfide in a Biotrickling Filter under Extremely Acidic Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), an extremely corrosive and toxic gas, was commonly generated by urban treatment plants, gas and oil refineries, paper and pulp industries and so on. Biofiltration, which was considered as cost-effective and environment-friendly, ... Keywords: H2S, biotrickling filter, biodegradation, removal efficiency, elimination capacity

Jing Chen

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen in the presence of sulfite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Commonly, abatement of hydrogen sulfide emission from a geothermal powerplant requires that hydrogen sulfide dissolved in the cooling water be eliminated by chemical reaction. Oxidation by atmospheric oxygen is the preferred reaction, but requires a suitable catalyst. Nickel is the most potent and thereby cheapest catalyst for this purpose. One mg/L nickel in the cooling water would allow 99% removal of hydrogen sulfide to be attained. A major drawback of catalytic air oxidation is that colloidal sulfur is a major reaction product; this causes rapid sludge accumulation and deposition of sulfur scale. We studied the kinetics and product distribution of the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen, catalyzed by nickel. Adding sodium sulfite to the solution completely suppresses formation of colloidal sulfur by converting it to thiosulfate. The oxidation reaction is an autocatalytic, free radical chain reaction. A rate expression for this reaction and a detailed reaction mechanism were developed. Nickel catalyzes the chain initiation step, and polysulfidoradical ions propagate the chains. Several complexes of iron and cobalt were also studied. Iron citrate and iron N-hydroxyEDTA are the most effective iron based catalysts. Uncomplexed cobalt is as effective as nickel, but forms a precipitate of cobalt oxysulfide and is too expensive for practical use. 33 figures, 9 tables.

Weres, O.; Tsao, L.

1983-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

262

Reaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Oxygen in the Presence ofSulfite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Commonly, abatement of hydrogen sulfide emissions from a geothermal powerplant requires that hydrogen sulfide dissolved in the cooling water be eliminated by chemical reaction. Oxidation by atmospheric oxygen is the preferred reaction, but requires a suitable catalyst. Nickel is the most potent and thereby cheapest catalyst for this purpose. One Mg/L nickel in the cooling water would allow 99% removal of hydrogen sulfide to be attained. A major drawback of catalytic air oxidation is that colloidal sulfur is a major reaction product; this causes rapid sludge accumulation and deposition of sulfur scale. The authors studied the kinetics and product distribution of the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen, catalyzed by nickel. Adding sodium sulfite to the solution completely suppresses formation of colloidal sulfur by converting it to thiosulfate. The oxidation reaction is an autocatalytic, free radical chain reaction. A rate expression for this reaction and a detailed reaction mechanism were developed. Nickel catalyzes the chain initiation step, and polysulfidoradical ions propagate the chains. Several complexes of iron and cobalt were also studied. Iron citrate and iron N-hydroxyEDT are the most effective iron based catalysts. Uncomplexed cobalt is as effective as nickel, but forms a precipitate of cobalt oxysulfide and is too expensive for practical use.

Weres, Oleh; Tsao, Leon

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Addressing the Challenges of Aggregational and Temporal Ontological Heterogeneity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we first identify semantic heterogeneities that, when not resolved, often cause serious data quality problems. We discuss the especially challenging problems of temporal and aggregational ontological ...

Zhu, Hongwei

264

Public Sector Energy Efficiency Aggregation Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Sector Energy Efficiency Aggregation Program Public Sector Energy Efficiency Aggregation Program Public Sector Energy Efficiency Aggregation Program < Back Eligibility Fed. Government Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Other Maximum Rebate $4,000,000 Program Info Expiration Date 3/22/2013 State Illinois Program Type State Grant Program Rebate Amount $500,000-$4,000,000 Provider Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity The Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) administers the Illinois Energy Now programs, including the Public Sector Energy Efficiency Aggregation Program. The program will allow public sector participants to combine energy efficiency projects in order to simplify the application process and implement projects that might otherwise be

265

Influence of grain size, morphology and aggregation on galena dissolution.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The acidic, non-oxidative dissolution of galena nanocrystals has been studied using both microscopic and wet-chemical methods. The effects of particle size, shape, aggregation state, and… (more)

Liu, Juan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Nanocrystal/J-aggregate constructs : chemistry, energy transfer, and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interaction of light with matter is one of the most central subjects to modern chemistry. Two types of materials, semiconductor nanocrystals and J-aggregates of cyanine dyes, have been developed chiefly due to their ...

Walker, Brian J. (Brian Jacob)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Tangible interfaces for manipulating aggregates of digital information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops new approaches for people to physically represent and interact with aggregates of digital information. These support the concept of Tangible User Interfaces (TUIs), a genre of human-computer interaction ...

Ullmer, Brygg Anders

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Automating data aggregation for collaborative filtering in Ruby on Rails  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collaborative filtering and information filtering are tried and proven methods of utilizing aggregated data about a website's users to provide catered content. Passive filters are one subset of such algorithms that utilize ...

Malconian, Daniel R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Contextual def-use associations for object aggregation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel formulation of definitions, uses, and def-use associations for objects in object-oriented programs by exploiting the relations that occur between classes and their instantiated objects due to aggregation. Contextual def-use ...

Amie L. Souter; Lori L. Pollock

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The impact of bidding aggregation levels on truckload rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis was to determine if line-haul rates are impacted by bid type, and if aggregation of bidding lanes can reduce costs for both shippers and carriers. Using regression analysis, we developed a model ...

Collins, Julia M. (Julia Marie)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Infrared Extinction by Aggregates of SiC Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Particle shape and aggregation have a strong influence on the spectral profiles of infrared phonon bands of solid dust grains. In this paper, we use a discrete dipole approximation, a cluster-of-spheres code following the Gerardy-Ausloos approach and a T-matrix method for calculating IR extinction spectra of aggregates of spherical silicon carbide (SiC) particles. We compare the results obtained with the three different methods and discuss differences in the band profiles.

Anja C. Andersen; Harald Mutschke; Thomas Posch

2005-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

272

Zeolite with trimodal porosity by desilication of zeolite nanocrystals aggregate  

SciTech Connect

Zeolite with trimodal porosity can be synthesized by desilication of zeolite nanocrystal aggregate. In the desilication process, the originally existed intercrystalline mesopores of zeolite nanocrystal aggregate were enlarged into large mesopore, and the new small intracrystalline mesopore channel was created, thus the Zeolite with trimodal porosity was formed. The structure of resulted zeolite, both on aggregate and mesopore level can be fine tuned by the desilication degree. - Graphical abstract: The Si from the edges and boundary of nanocrystals was first removed resulted the surface roughness and enlarges of the originally existed intercrystalline mesopores. As the degree of alkali-treatment increasing, the Si species inside zeolite nanocrystals was also removed, leading to further enlarges the intercrystalline mesopores and the formation of small intracrystalline mesopores. In case the alkali-treatment is serve enough to completely dissolve the bridges between zeolite nanocrystals, zeolite nanocrystals were exfoliated from the aggregate. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zeolite with trimodal porosity by desilication of zeolite nanocrystals aggregate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The original intercrystalline mesopores were enlarged into large mesopore. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The new intracrystalline mesopores were created as the inside Si extracted out. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The aggregate structure, crystallinity and acidity of parent zeolite remained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Desilication is start on the edges then in the inner part of zeolite.

Wang Yuxin; Liu Kaituo [Key Laboratory of Biofuels, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese academy of Sciences, 189 Songling road, Qingdao 266101 (China) [Key Laboratory of Biofuels, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese academy of Sciences, 189 Songling road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); He Tao; Wu Jinhu [Key Laboratory of Biofuels, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese academy of Sciences, 189 Songling road, Qingdao 266101 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Biofuels, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese academy of Sciences, 189 Songling road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Fang Yunming, E-mail: fangym@qibebt.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Biofuels, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese academy of Sciences, 189 Songling road, Qingdao 266101 (China)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Fabrication and characterization of flower-like zinc oxide for dye-sensitized solar cell photoanode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zinc oxide porous film consists of nanoparticles which assemble forming flake-like particle is synthesised through pyrolitic of chemical bath deposition product. Zinc oxide film consists of nanoparticle around 20 nm with surface area of 58.6 m2/gram ... Keywords: chemical bath depostition, dye sensitized soalr cell, nanoparticle, porous film, zinc carbonate hydroxide, zinc oxide

H. Abdullah; N. P. Ariyanto; B. Yuliarto; S. Junaidi; Yap Chi Chin; Muhamad Yahaya; S. Shaari

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Regenerable Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent and Regenerable Multifunctional Hydrogen Sulfide and Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent for High Temperature Gas Streams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Chloride and Hydrogen Sulfide Hydrogen Chloride and Hydrogen Sulfide Removal Sorbents for High Temperature Gas Streams Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,767,000 entitled "Regenerable Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent and Regenerable Multifunctional Hydrogen Sulfide and Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent for High Temperature Gas Streams." Disclosed in this patent is the invention of a unique regenerable sorbent process that can remove contaminants from gas produced by the gasification of fossil fuels. Specifically, the process removes hydrogen chloride by using the regenerable sorbent and simultaneously extracts hydrogen chloride compounds and hydrogen

275

Effect of Aggregate Specification in Heavy Concrete for Fusion Reactor Shield on Neutron Dose Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of Aggregate Specification in Heavy Concrete for Fusion Reactor Shield on Neutron Dose Evaluation

Murata, I; Takahashi, A

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Regeneration of zinc halide catalyst used in the hydrocracking of polynuclear hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved recovery of spent molten zinc halide hydro-cracking catalyst is achieved in the oxidative vapor phase regeneration thereof by selective treatment of the zinc oxide carried over by the effluent vapors from the regeneration zone with hydrogen halide gas under conditions favoring the reaction of the zinc oxide with the hydrogen halide, whereby regenerated zinc halide is recovered in a solids-free state with little loss of zinc values.

Gorin, Everett (San Rafael, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Pressurized Water Reactor Zinc Application: Data Analysis and Evaluation of Primary Chemistry Responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Pressurized Water Reactor Zinc Application Users Group (PWR ZUG) facilitates and improves the use of zinc injection in PWR primary coolant systems by assisting in the evaluation of zinc injection performance; documentation of lessons learned; communication of information on zinc injection qualification, monitoring, and operating experience; and review of zinc application effectiveness regarding primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) and radiation fiel...

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Testing of a refuelable zinc/air bus battery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report tests of a refuelable zinc/air battery of modular, bipolar-cell design, intended for fleet electric busses and vans. The stack consists of twelve 250-cm{sup 2} cells built of two units: (1) a copper-clad glass-reinforced epoxy board supporting anode and cathode current collectors, and (2) polymer frame providing for air- and electrolyte distribution and zinc fuel storage. The stack was refueled in 4 min. by a hydraulic transfer of zinc particles entrained in solution flow.

Cooper, J.F.; Fleming, D.; Koopman, R.; Hargrove, D.; Maimoni, A.; Peterman, K.

1995-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

279

Phosphogypsum slag aggregate-based asphaltic concrete mixes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phosphogypsum is a by-product from the production of phosphoric acid used in the fertilizer and chemical industries. Large production rates and problems associated with its stockpiling have led researchers to seek alternative uses for phosphogypsum, primarily as a construction material. One such use is the extraction of sulfur dioxide for the production of sulfuric acid, a process that also generates a by-product slag aggregate. This study investigated the feasibility of using this slag aggregate in asphaltic concrete binder course mixes. The physical properties of the slag aggregate, such as gradation, specific gravity, absorption, unit weight, and void content, were determined, as well as its durability and environmental characteristics. The Marshall mix design method was used to obtain the optimum asphalt content for this aggregate, while moisture susceptibility was examined using the boiling and modified Lottman tests. Indirect tensile, resilient modulus, and dynamic creep tests were performed on the mix to evaluate its performance potential. The results of the study indicate that phosphogypsum-based slag aggregate can be successfully employed in asphaltic concrete binder course mixtures.

Foxworthy, P.T. [Terracon Consultants, Inc., Lenexa, KS (United States); Nadimpalli, R.S.; Seals, R.K. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Biological Properties of Zinc Oxide-Coated Anodized Aluminum Oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We used agar diffusion assays to evaluate the activity of zinc oxide-coated ... Zirconia Stabilisation Nano-Confined by Using Electroless Nickel Cladding .... Metal Oxide Nanofibers Produced by a ForceSpinning Method for Battery Electrodes.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

AN INVENTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHS OF ZINC ELECTRODEPOSITED FROM ACID ELECTROLYTES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for publication AN INVENTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHS OF ZINCemployer. LBL-16601 AN INVENTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHS OF ZINCNo. DE-AC03-76SF00098 AN INVENTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHS OF ZINC

Faltemier, J.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Spouted Bed Electrowinning of Zinc from Chloride Electrolytes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 2000 ... Current efficiencies, for the cell with the SBE, have been as high as 90% and DC energy consumption as Iow as 2.8 kWh/kg zinc deposited.

283

Incorporating Aggregated PV Systems into the Power Grid | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incorporating Aggregated PV Systems into the Power Grid Incorporating Aggregated PV Systems into the Power Grid Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Spain Installed Wind Capacity Website Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.gwec.net/index.php?id=131 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/spain-installed-wind-capacity-website Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Feed-in Tariffs This website presents an overview of total installed wind energy capacity in Spain per year from 2000 to 2010. The page also presents the main market developments from 2010; a policy summary; a discussion of the revision in feed-in tariffs in 2010; and a future market outlook. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Incorporating_Aggregated_PV_Systems_into_the_Power_Grid&oldid=514463

284

Econometric Estimation of the Aggregate Impacts of Energy Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Econometric Estimation of the Aggregate Impacts of Energy Efficiency Econometric Estimation of the Aggregate Impacts of Energy Efficiency Programs: Report on a California Pilot Study Speaker(s): Marvin J. Horowitz Date: February 26, 2013 - 2:00pm Location: 90-3075 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Alan Sanstad The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) recently funded a study in which local area aggregated electricity and natural gas consumption in California from 2006 through 2010 were analyzed econometrically. Data were available to estimate electricity energy efficiency program impacts for two of the three large California investor-owned utilities. The findings indicate that net savings from these programs for the 2006-2010 period amounted to 11,391 GWh, or 7.3 percent of annual electricity consumption. This point estimate is 50 percent higher than the CPUC

285

NACP Site-Model and Aggregated Flux Data Published  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site-Model and Aggregated Flux Data Published Site-Model and Aggregated Flux Data Published The ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce the release of a data set from the North American Carbon Program (NACP): NACP Site: Terrestrial Biosphere Model and Aggregated Flux Data in Standard Format . Data set prepared by D.M. Ricciuto, K. Schaefer, P.E. Thornton, K. Davis, R.B. Cook, Shishi Liu, R. Anderson, M.A. Arain, I. Baker, J.M. Chen, M. Dietze, R. Grant, C. Izaurralde, A.K. Jain, A.W. King, C. Kucharik, Shuguang Liu, E. Lokupitiya, Y. Luo, C. Peng, B. Poulter, D. Price, W. Riley, A. Sahoo, H. Tian, C. Tonitto, and H. Verbeeck. This data set provides standardized output variables for gross primary productivity (GPP), net ecosystem exchange (NEE), leaf area index (LAI), ecosystem respiration (Re), latent heat flux (LE), and sensible heat flux (H) from 24

286

PRODUCTION OF CONSTRUCTION AGGREGATES FROM FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SLUDGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three main conclusions of this report are: (1) The pilot plant successfully demonstrated the continuous, fully-integrated, long-term process operation, including the mixing, pelletizing, and curing steps for aggregate production. The curing vessel, which was designed for the pilot plant test, was operated in a mass flow mode and performed well during pilot plant operation. (2) The pilot plant test demonstrated process flexibility. The same equipment was used to produce lightweight, medium-weight, and road aggregates. The only change was the mix formulation. Aggregates were produced from a variety of mix designs and from FGD sludge with solids concentrations between 45.0% and 56.7% and moisture contents between 55.0% and 43.3%. (3) The pilot plant provided operating data and experience to design and cost a commercial plant, which was not part of the cooperative agreement.

M.M. Wu; D.C. McCoy; R.O. Scandrol; M.L. Fenger; J.A. Withum; R.M. Statnick

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Overcoming Solubility Limitations to Zinc Addition in Pressurized Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zinc addition to the reactor coolant system (RCS) of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is being used for dose rate reduction and primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) mitigation. This report summarizes results of aqueous zinc oxide solubility experiments from 150 to 350 degrees Celsius (302 to 662 degrees Fahrenheit). These experiments were performed to develop quantitative models of solubility and aqueous-phase solute speciation behavior as functions of temperature, pH, and solution compositio...

2001-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

288

Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Zinc Application Sourcebook, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities continually strive to optimize core design, address primary system material issues, and minimize dose impact on plant personnel. To meet these challenges, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Westinghouse, and Southern Nuclear-Plant Farley began zinc injection in 1994 for mitigation of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) and radiation field reductions. Additional information from industry research continues to show the beneficial impact of zinc injection on radiation fields...

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

289

High-Temperature Nano-Derived Micro-Hydrogen Sulfide Sensors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperature Nano-Derived Micro- Temperature Nano-Derived Micro- Hydrogen and -Hydrogen Sulfide Sensors Background The Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) seeks applications for the University Coal Research (UCR) Program to further develop the understanding of coal utilization. Since the program's inception in 1979, its primary objectives have been to (1) improve our understanding of the chemical and physical processes involved in the conversion and utilization of coal in an environmentally

290

Effects of internal mixing and aggregate morphology on optical properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effects of internal mixing and aggregate morphology on optical properties Effects of internal mixing and aggregate morphology on optical properties of black carbon using a discrete dipole approximation model Title Effects of internal mixing and aggregate morphology on optical properties of black carbon using a discrete dipole approximation model Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Scarnato, B., S. Vahidinia, D. T. Richard, and Thomas W. Kirchstetter Journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Volume 12 Pagination 26401-26434 Abstract According to recent studies, internal mixing of black carbon (BC) with other aerosol materials in the atmosphere alters its aggregate shape, absorption of solar radiation, and radiative forcing. These mixing state effects are not yet fully understood. In this study, we characterize the morphology and mixing state of bare BC and BC internally mixed with sodium chloride (NaCl) using electron microscopy and examine the sensitivity of optical properties to BC mixing state and aggregate morphology using a discrete dipole approximation model (DDSCAT). DDSCAT predicts a higher mass absorption coefficient, lower single scattering albedo (SSA), and higher absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) for bare BC aggregates that are lacy rather than compact. Predicted values of SSA at 550 nm range between 0.18 and 0.27 for lacy and compact aggregates, respectively, in agreement with reported experimental values of 0.25 ± 0.05. The variation in absorption with wavelength does not adhere precisely to a power law relationship over the 200 to 1000 nm range. Consequently, AAE values depend on the wavelength region over which they are computed. In the 300 to 550 nm range, AAE values ranged in this study from 0.70 for compact to 0.95 for lacy aggregates. The SSA of BC internally mixed with NaCl (100-300 nm in radius) is higher than for bare BC and increases with the embedding in the NaCl. Internally mixed BC SSA values decrease in the 200-400 nm wavelength range, a feature also common to the optical properties of dust and organics. Linear polarization features are also predicted in DDSCAT and are dependent on particle morphology. The bare BC (with a radius of 80 nm) presents in the linear polarization a bell shape feature, which is a characteristic of the Rayleigh regime (for particles smaller than the wavelength of incident radiation). When BC is internally mixed with NaCl (100-300 nm in radius), strong depolarization features for near-VIS incident radiation are evident, such as a decrease in the intensity and multiple modes at different angles corresponding to different mixing states.

291

The effects of alcohol use on zinc status  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alcohol consumption has been shown to have adverse affects on bone growth and maintenance, although the mechanism has not been elucidated. The objective of this research was to look at the relationship between zinc and alcohol as a possible mechanism for the negative effects of ethanol consumption on bone health. Five studies were performed in order to analyze the effects of different types of alcohol consumption on female Sprague-Dawley rats of various ages. The animals were fed one of three diets (alcohol, pair-fed or chow). The rats were sacrificed at varying time intervals according to the specific study. Zinc analysis of the serum, femur and tibia was performed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The alcohol eventually affected the serum zinc status of the rats in the adolescent project. The zinc status of the animals in the moderate alcohol, 2-day binge, 5-day binge and short-term adult alcohol projects was not significantly altered due to the alcohol. A longer duration and/or a higher amount of ethanol was needed to consistently detect changes in the serum and bone zinc concentrations of all the animals. Although zinc status is altered by ethanol consumption, this relationship is not likely to be the sole mechanism behind the effects of alcohol on bone health.

Chapman, Lisa Louise

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Direct Chlorination Process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5% hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction stage. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90% excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure. Because of the higher cost of chemicals and the restricted markets in Hawaii, the economic viability of this process in Hawaii is questionable.

Sims, A.V.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

State-of-the-art hydrogen sulfide control for geothermal energy systems: 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Existing state-of-the-art technologies for removal of hydrogen sulfide are discussed along with a comparative assessment of their efficiencies, reliabilities and costs. Other related topics include the characteristics of vapor-dominated and liquid-dominated resources, energy conversion systems, and the sources of hydrogen sulfide emissions. It is indicated that upstream control technologies are preferred over downsteam technologies primarily because upstream removal of hydrogen sulfide inherently controls all downstream emissions including steam-stacking. Two upstream processes for vapor-dominated resources appear promising; the copper sulfate (EIC) process, and the steam converter (Coury) process combined with an off-gas abatement system such as a Stretford unit. For liquid-dominated systems that produce steam, the process where the non-condensible gases are scrubbed with spent geothermal fluid appears to be promising. An efficient downstream technology is the Stretford process for non-condensible gas removal. In this case, partitioning in the surface condenser will determine the overall abatement efficiency. Recommendations for future environmental control technology programs are included.

Stephens, F.B.; Hill, J.H.; Phelps, P.L. Jr.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Kinetic and morphological development of oxide-sulfide scales on manganese at 1,073 K  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The corrosion behavior of manganese in controlled gas atmospheres of SO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-CO-N{sub 2} at 1073 K was studied. Under all conditions, the gas phase was slow to equilibrate, and catalysis of the gas affected the corrosion mechanism and resulting scale morphologies. Product scales invariably became detached from the metal during reaction, but the high manganese vapor pressure meant that no slowing of reaction resulted. Corrosion under conditions where MnS was the equilibrium reaction product led to the formation of a sulfide scale. At low p{sub s{sub 2}} values, this scale grew by reaction with either COS or SO{sub 2} according to parabolic kinetics. Gases with equilibrium compositions calculated to produce MnO, in fact corroded manganese to produce an inner layer of oxide plus sulfide, and an outer layer of MnO. The tendency to form sulfide was more marked at lower SO{sub 2} partial pressure and higher sulfur activities, the latter resulting from gas catalysis. These effects are due to the fact that SO{sub 2} is the principal reactant species.

McAdam, G.; Yound, D.J. (Univ. of New South Wales, Kensington (Australia))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Morphological development of oxide-sulfide scales on iron and iron-manganese alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pure iron and alloys containing 2, 15, 25, and 50 wt.% manganese have been reacted at 1073 K in controlled gas atmospheres of SO/sub 2/-CO/sub 2/-CO-N/sub 2/. Equilibrium gas compositions were such that (1) FeS was stable but not FeO, or (2) both FeS and FeO were stable, or (3) FeO was stable but not FeS; in all cases, both MnS and MnO were stable. Under all reaction conditions, pure iron corroded to produce both sulfide and oxide. The resultant scale morphologies were consistent with local solid-gas equilibrium for the case in which both oxide and sulfide were stable but in the other cases indicated that equilibrium was not achieved and that direct reaction with SO/sub 2/(g) was responsible for corrosion. Additions of manganese did not greatly alter the scale morphologies. Under reaction conditions that were oxidizing and sulfidizing, very high levels of manganese were required to reduce the corrosion rate. On the other hand, relatively low levels had a beneficial effect both when FeO but not FeS was thermodynamically stable and similarly when FeS but not FeO was stable.

McAdam, G.; Young, D.J.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Detecting Traffic Anomalies through aggregate analysis of packet header data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.Narasimha Reddy1 , and Marina Vannucci2 Department of 1 Electrical Engineering, 2 Statistics , Texas A a signal that can be analyzed through statistical techniques and compared to historical norms to detect (i.e., the rate of decrease) be- tween the flow numbers of neighboring specific bit-prefix aggregate

Reddy, Narasimha

297

Cultural consensus theory: aggregating continuous responses in a finite interval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cultural consensus theory (CCT) consists of cognitive models for aggregating responses of “informants” to test items about some domain of their shared cultural knowledge. This paper develops a CCT model for items requiring bounded numerical ... Keywords: cognitive models, cross-cultural study, cultural Consensus Theory

William H. Batchelder; Alex Strashny; A. Kimball Romney

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

SeDyA: secure dynamic aggregation in VANETs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In vehicular ad-hoc networks (VANETs), a use case for mobile ad-hoc networks (MANETs), the ultimate goal is to let vehicles communicate using wireless message exchange to provide safety, traffic efficiency, and entertainment applications. Especially ... Keywords: multi-hop communication, secure aggregation, vanets

Rens Wouter van der Heijden; Stefan Dietzel; Frank Kargl

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Automatic morphological categorisation of carbon black nano-aggregates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nano-technology is the study of matter behaviour on atomic and molecular scale (i.e. nano-scale). In particular, carbon black is a nano-material generally used for the reinforcement of rubber compounds. Nevertheless, the exact reason behind its success ... Keywords: aggregate morphology classifying, carbon black, image processing, machine-learning

Juan López-de-Uralde; Iraide Ruiz; Igor Santos; Agustín Zubillaga; Pablo G. Bringas; Ana Okariz; Teresa Guraya

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Effects of internal mixing and aggregate morphology on optical properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Authors Scarnato, Barbara V., Sanaz Vahidinia, D. T. Richard, and Thomas W. Kirchstetter Journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Volume 13 Start Page 5089 Issue 10 Pagination 5089 - 5101 Date Published 05/2013 Abstract According to recent studies, internal mixing of black carbon (BC) with other aerosol materials in the atmosphere alters its aggregate shape, absorption of solar radiation, and radiative forcing. These mixing state effects are not yet fully understood. In this study, we characterize the morphology and mixing state of bare BC and BC internally mixed with sodium chloride (NaCl) using electron microscopy and examine the sensitivity of optical properties to BC mixing state and aggregate morphology using a discrete dipole approximation model (DDSCAT). DDSCAT is flexible in simulating the geometry and refractive index of particle aggregates. DDSCAT predicts a higher mass absorption coefficient (MAC), lower single scattering albedo (SSA), and higher absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) for bare BC aggregates that are lacy rather than compact. Predicted values of SSA at 550 nm range between 0.16 and 0.27 for lacy and compact aggregates, respectively, in agreement with reported experimental values of 0.25 ± 0.05. The variation in absorption with wavelength does not adhere precisely to a power law relationship over the 200 to 1000 nm range. Consequently, AAE values depend on the wavelength region over which they are computed. The MAC of BC (averaged over the 200-1000 nm range) is amplified when internally mixed with NaCl (100-300 nm in radius) by factors ranging from 1.0 for lacy BC aggregates partially immersed in NaCl to 2.2 for compact BC aggregates fully immersed in NaCl. The SSA of BC internally mixed with NaCl is higher than for bare BC and increases with the embedding in the NaCl. Internally mixed BC SSA values decrease in the 200-400 nm wavelength range, a feature also common to the optical properties of dust and organics. Linear polarization features are also predicted in DDSCAT and are dependent on particle size and morphology.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

and electrical properties of zinc oxide films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Undoped and indium-doped ZnO films have been deposited onto glass substrates by the spray pyrolysis method. The effect of indium incorporation on structural and electrical properties of ZnO films has been investigated. Zinc acetate dihydrate, indium chloride were used as a starting material and a dopant source, respectively. X-ray diffraction pattern of the films showed hexagonal wurtzite type polycrystalline structure. The results show that indium incorporation leads to substantial changes in the structural characteristics of ZnO films. The grain size was found to be in the range 15-50 nm, depending on indium content. In addition, the surface morphology features of the films, as a function of the indium content, are shown. For all the films, a linear dependence typical of ohmic behavior was observed. The electrical conductivity of ZnO films was improved by indium incorporation. The most important changes were observed for 1 at. % In-doped ZnO film which exhibit a resistivity of 3.2x10-1 ?cm. At certain constant voltage, from Arrhenius plots of In-doped ZnO films, activation energy values have been calculated from 17 meV to 89 meV.

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Preparation, characterization, and stability of calcium zinc hydrophosphate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calcium zinc hydrophosphate phases with different Zn/(Zn + Ca) molar ratios (x{sub Zn}, from 0 to 1) were synthesized using co-precipitation method at pH 10, 25 deg. C. X-ray diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) were used to characterize the synthesized products. Thermal behavior of the products was examined by thermal analytical instruments (TG-DSC-MS), while the chemical stability of the products was tested by toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP). The results showed that the phase constituents of formed calcium zinc hydrophosphate phases were related to the molar contents of Zn{sup 2+}. With the increase of x{sub Zn}, it formed calcium-deficient hydorxyapatite (CaHap), calcium zinc hydorxyapatite (CaZnHap), CaZn{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O, and Zn{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O, respectively. All the calcium zinc hydrophosphates were thermally stable up to 600 deg. C, and less Zn{sup 2+} leached in a wide pH range of 2-11, which indicated that calcium zinc hydrophosphate could effectively hold Zn{sup 2+} in their crystal phases with stabilization ratios of over 99.99%.

Qian Guangren [School of Environmental Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)], E-mail: grqian@shu.edu.cn; Xu Xia; Sun Weimin; Xu Yunfeng; Liu Qiang [School of Environmental Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Plasma-chemical treatment of hydrogen sulfide in natural gas processing. Final report, May 1991--December 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new process for the treatment of hydrogen sulfide waste that uses microwave plasma-chemical technology has been under development in Russia and the United States. Whereas the present waste-treatment technology, at best, only recovers sulfur, this novel process recovers both hydrogen and sulfur by dissociating hydrogen sulfide in a plasma by means of a microwave or radio-frequency reactor. A research project has been undertaken to determine the suitability of the plasma process in natural gas processing applications. The experiments tested acid-gas compositions with 30--65% carbon dioxide, 0--7% water, and 0--0.2% of a standard mixture of pipeline gas. The balance gas in all cases was hydrogen sulfide. The reactor pressure for the experiments was 50 torr, and the microwave power was 1.0 kW. Conversions of hydrogen sulfide ranged from 80 to 100%, while 35--50% of the carbon dioxide was converted to carbon monoxide. This conversion of carbon dioxide resulted in a loss of hydrogen production and an energy loss from a hydrogen sulfide waste-treatment perspective. Tests of a direct natural gas treatment concept showed that hydrocarbon losses were unacceptably high; consequently, the concept would not be economically viable.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Efficient Föster energy transfer : from phosphorescent organic molecules to J-aggregate thin film  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis demonstrates the first ever use of Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to increase the quantum efficiency of a electrically pumped J-aggregate light emitting device (JLED). J-aggregate thin films are highly ...

Shirasaki, Yasuhiro

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Biochemical, Cell Biological, and Genetic Assays to Analyze Amyloid and Prion Aggregation in Yeast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protein aggregates are associated with a variety of debilitating human diseases, but they can have functional roles as well. Both pathological and nonpathological protein aggregates display tremendous diversity, with ...

Alberti, Simon

306

Automation of Capacity Bidding with an Aggregator Using Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Site Controls 21  Aggregated Load Profile of the  Test on 24  Retail C3 Load Profile with Its C6 Figure 5. Aggregated Load Profile of the Test on October

Kiliccote, Sila

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Impact of tillage and crop rotation on aggregate-associated carbon in two oxisols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oades. 1980. The effect of crop rotation on aggregation in aand J.H. Long. 1990. Crop rotation and tillage effects onImpact of Tillage and Crop Rotation on Aggregate-Associated

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

A NEW CONCEPT IN AN ELECTRICALLY RECHARGEABLE ZINC-AIR ALKALINE BATTERY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of a New Zinc-Air Battery Concept Using Flowingdiagram of the zinc-air battery single cell prototype usedDivision . Presented at the Battery and Electrochemical

Ross, P.N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

A new concept in an electrically rechargeable zinc-air alkaline battery. [Porous electrodes  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a new idea for zinc-air battery design. The novel idea is a porous zinc electrode surrounded with a supersaturated zincate solution. 3 figs. (JDH)

Ross, P.N.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

No pane, no gain: efficient evaluation of sliding-window aggregates over data streams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Window queries are proving essential to data-stream processing. In this paper, we present an approach for evaluating sliding-window aggregate queries that reduces both space and computation time for query execution. Our approach divides overlapping windows into disjoint panes, computes sub-aggregates over each pane, and “rolls up ” the pane-aggregates to compute window-aggregates. Our experimental study shows that using panes has significant performance benefits. 1.

Jin Li; David Maier; Kristin Tufte; Vassilis Papadimos; Peter A. Tucker

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Evaluation of Zinc Addition During Cycle 9 at Diablo Canyon Unit 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory studies have shown that zinc addition to primary coolant can mitigate primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 and reduce radiation fields in PWRs. This report documents experience with zinc addition during Cycle 9 at Diablo Canyon Power Plant Unit 1 (DCPP-1), operated by Pacific Gas & Electric. This project evaluated the effect of zinc addition on PWSCC initiation and propagation. It also examined the impact of zinc addition on radiation fields and fuel cladding deposition...

1999-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

312

High-sensitive sensor of dopamine based on photoluminescence quenching of hierarchical CdS spherical aggregates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hierarchical CdS spherical aggregates have been fabricated by an assembling strategy starting from nanoparticles, which opens a general way to obtain hierarchical spherical aggregates of different types of materials. The hierarchical CdS spherical aggregates ...

Binjie Sun, Changzheng Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Manganese sulfide formation via concomitant microbial manganese oxide and thiosulfate reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 produced {gamma}-MnS (rambergite) nanoparticles during the concurrent reduction of MnO{sub 2} and thiosulfate coupled to H{sub 2} oxidation. To investigate effect of direct microbial reduction of MnO{sub 2} on MnS formation, two MR-1 mutants defective in outer membrane c-type cytochromes ({Delta}mtrC/{Delta}omcA and {Delta}mtrC/{Delta}omcA/{Delta}mtrF) were also used and it was determined that direct reduction of MnO{sub 2} was dominant relative to chemical reduction by biogenic sulfide generated from thiosulfate reduction. Although bicarbonate was excluded from the medium, incubations of strain MR-1 with lactate as the electron donor produced MnCO{sub 3} (rhodochrosite) as well as MnS in nearly equivalent amounts as estimated by micro X-ray diffraction (micro-XRD) analysis. It was concluded that carbonate released from lactate metabolism promoted MnCO{sub 3} formation and that Mn(II) mineralogy was strongly affected by carbonate ions even in the presence of abundant sulfide and weakly alkaline conditions expected to favor the precipitation of MnS. Formation of MnS, as determined by a combination of micro-XRD, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction analyses was consistent with equilibrium speciation modeling predictions. Biogenic manganese sulfide may be a manganese sink in the Mn biogeochemical cycle in select environments such as deep anoxic marine basins within the Baltic Sea.

Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kennedy, David W.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Moore, Dean A.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Reed, Samantha B.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

314

Biomolecule-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of silver bismuth sulfide with nanostructures  

SciTech Connect

Silver bismuth sulfide (AgBiS{sub 2}) nanostructures were successfully prepared via a simple biomolecule-assisted hydrothermal synthesis at 200 Degree-Sign C for 12-72 h. Silver nitrate, bismuth nitrate and L-cysteine were used as starting materials. Here, the biomolecule, L-cysteine, was served as the sulfide source and a complexing agent. The products, characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), were cubic AgBiS{sub 2} nanoparticles with a diameter range of about 20-75 nm. It was found that their crystallinity and particle size increased with increasing reaction time. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrophotometry (ICP-OES) analyses were used to confirm the stoichiometry of AgBiS{sub 2}. The optical band gap of the AgBiS{sub 2} nanoparticles, calculated from UV-vis spectra, was 3.0 eV which indicated a strong blue shift because of the quantum confinement effect. A possible formation mechanism of the AgBiS{sub 2} nanoparticles was also discussed. - Graphical abstract: The optical band gap of the as-prepared AgBiS{sub 2} nanoparticles displays a strong blue shift comparing to the 2.46 eV of bulk AgBiS{sub 2} caused by the quantum confinement effects. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A simple biomolecule-assisted hydrothermal method is developed to prepare AgBiS{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer L-Cysteine is served as the sulfide source and a complexing agent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increase in band gap of the AgBiS{sub 2} nanoparticles attributes to the quantum confinement effects.

Kaowphong, Sulawan, E-mail: sulawank@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

PRELIMINARY STUDY OF METHODS TO CHEMICALLY BIND ZINC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To address the {sup 65}Zn contamination issue in the TEF, a multi-task experimental program was initiated. The first two experimental tasks were completed. The results of the third experimental task are reported here. This task was conducted to determine if the zinc vapors could be chemically bound on two non hydrogen active substrates. Based on a thermodynamic study copper and cobalt were the most favorable for capturing zinc without forming hydrides. Within the experimental parameters tested, which include temperatures of 350, 400, and 450 C at pressures of nominally 20-40 millitorr, the zinc deposited on the both copper screen and cobalt rods but did not react to form a compound. The conditions that were tested are not prototypic and additional testing under higher vacuum conditions, i.e., .01 millitorr, may enhance the reactivity of the surfaces and is recommended.

Korinko, P.

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

316

Analyzing the techniques that improve fault tolerance of aggregation trees in sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sensor networks are finding significant applications in large scale distributed systems. One of the basic operations in sensor networks is in-network aggregation. Among the various approaches to in-network aggregation, such as gossip and tree, including ... Keywords: Aggregation, Fault tolerance, Modeling faults, Reliability, Sensor network

Laukik Chitnis; Alin Dobra; Sanjay Ranka

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Institutional Logics from the Aggregation of Organizational Networks: Operational Procedures for the Analysis of Counted Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We address some problems of network aggregation that are central to organizational studies. We show that concepts of network equivalence (including generalizations and special cases of structural equivalence) are relevant to the modeling of the aggregation ... Keywords: aggregation, co-constitution of organizational identities and practices, loglinear models, organizational fields, structural equivalence

Ronald L. Breiger; John W. Mohr

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Beyond size and search: building contextual mass in digital aggregations for scholarly use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At present there are no established collection development methods for building large-scale digital aggregations. However, to realize the potential of the collective base of digital content and advance scholarship, aggregations must do more than provide ... Keywords: collection evaluation, collection policy, collection-level metadata, digital aggregations, scholarly information use, subject access, subject analysis, thematic research collections

Carole L. Palmer; Oksana L. Zavalina; Katrina Fenlon

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Environmental Impact Assessment of Artificial Aggregate Systems Based on Fuzzy Comprehensive Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aggregates are food for construction industry and hydraulic and hydropower engineering, account for 80% of concrete. Now the number of artificial aggregate systems of being used and preparing to put into use is considerable, which calls for an efficient ... Keywords: Artificial Aggregate System, Environment Impact Assessment, Fuzzy Comprehensive evaluation

Qin Hongling; Meng Suimin; Zhou Xincong

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Prevention of iron-sulfide deposition in petroleum processing. Final CRADA report.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this CRADA extension which effectively ended in 2003 was to quantify the effect of iron-sulfide formation on the fouling propensity of crude oil. The specific objectives are focused on fouling of the Crude Distillation Unit (CDU-1) at the Shell Refinery in Mobile, Alabama. The technical approach consists of analyzing the plant data, chemical analysis of crude oil to detect key precursors, performing refinery tests using the Argonne Field Fouling Unit, and verifying the effectiveness of a physical device of tube insert and enhanced tubes to change threshold conditions and thereby reducing fouling.

Doctor, R. D.; Panchal, C. B.; Energy Systems

2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The use of ethylenediamine to remove hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The investigations of the equilibrium absorption of H/sub 2/S by an EDA solution showed the solubility of hydrogen sulfide in ethylenediamine solutions is almost twice that in monoethanolamine solutions. Ethylenediamine may be used as an absorber for thorough removal of H/sub 2/S from coke oven gas in the presence of CO/sub 2/ and HCN. The hydrogen cyanide of coke oven gas, having practically no effect on the equilibrium absorption of H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/, may in this case be used in the form of ethylenethiourea - a marketable byproduct.

Marakhovskii, L.F.; Rezunenko, Y.I.; Popov, A.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Use of ethylenediamine to remove hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas  

SciTech Connect

The investigations of the equilibrium absorption of H/sub 2/S by an EDA solution which show that the solubility of hydrogen sulfide in ethylenediamine solutions is almost twice that in monoethanolamine solutions. Ethylenediamine may be used as an absorber for thorough removal of H/sub 2/S from coke oven gas in the presence of CO/sub 2/ and HCN. The hydrogen cyanide of coke oven gas, having practically no effect on the equilibrium absorption of H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/, may in this case be recovered in the form of ethylenethiourea - a marketable byproduct.

Marakhovskii, L.F.; Popov, A.A.; Rezunenko, Yu.I.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Separation and Purification Technology 40 (2004) 251257 Copper and zinc sorption by treated oil shale ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jordanian oil shale ash was used as an adsorbent for the removal of copper and zinc from aqueous solution.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Oil shale; Ash; Adsorption; Copper and zinc removal 1. IntroductionSeparation and Purification Technology 40 (2004) 251­257 Copper and zinc sorption by treated oil

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

324

Organic thin film prehistory: looking towards solution phase aggregation |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organic thin film prehistory: looking towards solution phase aggregation Organic thin film prehistory: looking towards solution phase aggregation Wednesday, November 6, 2013 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Christopher Tassone, SSRL Polymer bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells have attracted significant attention in industry and academia because of their potential for achieving large-area, light-weight, and flexible photovoltaic devices through cost-effective solution deposition techniques. These devices consist of a blend of an absorbing polymer and an electron accepting fullerene, the molecular packing and phase segregation of which heavily influence power conversion efficiency by effecting important processes such as exciton splitting, charge transport, and recombination. Understanding and utilization of molecular interactions to predicatively control the

325

A General Relationship between Disorder, Aggregation, and Charge Transport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A General Relationship between Disorder, Aggregation, and Charge Transport A General Relationship between Disorder, Aggregation, and Charge Transport in Conjugated Polymers Monday, September 23, 2013 The potential for combining low-cost manufacturing and mechanical robustness with engineering of specific opto-electronic properties has recently spurred great interest in semiconducting polymers. Consequently, devices based on organic semiconductors have reached significant milestones such as ~10% solar power conversion efficiencies as well as electron and hole mobilities exceeding 1 cm2/Vs. Conjugated polymer chains have many degrees of conformational freedom and interact weakly with each other, resulting in complex microstructures in the solid state. Understanding charge transport in such systems, which have both amorphous and ordered

326

Model for Aggregated Water Heater Load Using Dynamic Bayesian Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transition to the new generation power grid, or “smart grid”, requires novel ways of using and analyzing data collected from the grid infrastructure. Fundamental functionalities like demand response (DR), that the smart grid needs, rely heavily on the ability of the energy providers and distributors to forecast the load behavior of appliances under different DR strategies. This paper presents a new model of aggregated water heater load, based on dynamic Bayesian networks (DBNs). The model has been validated against simulated data from an open source distribution simulation software (GridLAB-D). The results presented in this paper demonstrate that the DBN model accurately tracks the load profile curves of aggregated water heaters under different testing scenarios.

Vlachopoulou, Maria; Chin, George; Fuller, Jason C.; Lu, Shuai; Kalsi, Karanjit

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

327

Aggregates: Waste and recycled materials; new rapid evaluation technology. Soils, geology, and foundations; materials and construction. Transportation research record  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

;Contents: Engineering Properties of Shredded Tires in Lightweight Fill Applications; Using Recovered Glass as Construction Aggregate Feedstock; Utilization of Phosphogypsum-Based Slag Aggregate in Portland Cement Concrete Mixtures; Waste Foundry Sand in Asphalt Concrete; Toward Automating Size-Gradation Analysis of Mineral Aggregate; Evaluation of Fine Aggregate Angularity Using National Aggregate Association Flow Test; Siliceous Content Determination of Sands Using Automatic Image Analysis; and Methodology for Improvement of Oxide Residue Models for Estimation of Aggregate Performance Using Stoichiometric Analysis.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Effects of sulfide ions on the integrity of the protective film of benzotriazole on alpha brass in salt water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The addition of sulfide ions to a solution of 0.58 M NaCl containing benzotriazole (BTAH) results in a decrease of the inhibiting efficiency of BTAH and a momentary increase of the dissolution rate of alpha brass at potentials above the corrosion potential. The effect depends on the sulfide ion concentration and the potential selected for the tests. The results are explained by decomposition of the protective Cu(I)BTA film, caused by the extraction of Cu(I) ions from the film and formation of Cu{sub 2}S: nS{sup 2{minus}} + 2[Cu(I)BTA]{sub n} {yields} nCu{sub 2}S + 2nBTA{sup {minus}}. The breakdown of the film allows metal dissolution from the bare surface and further promotes the effects of sulfide ions.

Ashour, E.A.; Hegazy, H.S.; Ateya, B.G.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

PRODUCTION OF CONSTRUCTION AGGREGATES FROM FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SLUDGE  

SciTech Connect

Through a cooperative agreement with DOE, the Research and Development Department of CONSOL Inc. (CONSOL R and D) is teaming with SynAggs, Inc. and Duquesne Light to design, construct, and operate a 500 lb/h continuous pilot plant to produce road construction aggregate from a mixture of wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sludge, fly ash, and other components. The proposed project is divided into six tasks: (1) Project Management; (2) Mix Design Evaluation; (3) Process Design; (4) Construction; (5) Start-Up and Operation; and (6) Reporting. In this quarter, Tasks 1 and 2 were completed. A project management plan (Task 1) was issued to DOE on October 22, 1998 . The mix design evaluation (Task 2) with Duquesne Light Elrama Station FGD sludge and Allegheny Power Hatfields Ferry Station fly ash was completed. Eight semi-continuous bench-scale tests were conducted to examine the effects of mix formulation on aggregate properties. A suitable mix formulation was identified to produce aggregates that meet specifications of the American Association of State High Transport Officials (AASHTO) as Class A aggregate for use in highway construction. The mix formulation was used in designing the flow sheet of the pilot plant. The process design (Task 3) is approximately 80% completed. Equipment was evaluated to comply with design requirements. The design for the curing vessel was completed by an outside engineering firm. All major equipment items for the pilot plant, except the curing vessel, were ordered. Pilot plant construction (Task 4) was begun in October. The Hazardous Substance Plan was issued to DOE. The Allegheny County (PA) Heat Department determined that an air emission permit is not required for operation of the pilot plant.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Secondary battery containing zinc electrode with modified separator and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A battery containing a zinc electrode with a porous separator between the anode and cathode. The separator is a microporous substrate carrying therewith an organic solvent of benzene, toluene or xylene with a tertiary organic amine therein, wherein the tertiary amine has three carbon chains each containing from six to eight carbon atoms. The separator reduces the rate of zinc dentrite growth in the separator during battery operation prolonging battery life by preventing short circuits. A method of making the separator is also disclosed.

Poa, D.S.

1984-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

331

Secondary battery containing zinc electrode with modified separator and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A battery containing a zinc electrode with a porous separator between the anode and cathode. The separator is a microporous substrate carrying therewith an organic solvent of benzene, toluene or xylene with a tertiary organic amine therein, wherein the tertiary amine has three carbon chains each containing from six to eight carbon atoms. The separator reduces the rate of zinc dentrite growth in the separator during battery operation prolonging battery life by preventing short circuits. A method of making the separator is also disclosed.

Poa, David S. (Naperville, IL); Yao, Neng-Ping (Clarendon Hills, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Zinc Injection Strategy Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All U.S. boiling water reactors (BWRs) inject depleted zinc oxide (DZO) into the reactor feedwater for the purpose of suppressing drywell shutdown radiation dose rates. Current guidance in BWRVIP-190: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines2008 Revision (EPRI report 1016579) is to inject sufficient zinc to achieve a Co-60(s)/Zn(s) ratio of Utility-specific goals may encourage even lower Co-60(s)/Zn(s) levels. This may be in part because BWR e...

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

333

Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part 1: Load Availability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part 1: Load Availability Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part 1: Load Availability Profiles and Constraints for the Western Interconnection Title Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part 1: Load Availability Profiles and Constraints for the Western Interconnection Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6417E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Olsen, Daniel, Nance Matson, Michael D. Sohn, Cody Rose, Junqiao Han Dudley, Sasank Goli, Sila Kiliccote, Marissa Hummon, David Palchak, Paul Denholm, Jennie Jorgenson, and Ookie Ma Date Published 09/2013 Abstract Demand response (DR) has the potential to improve electric grid reliability and reduce system operation costs. However, including DR in grid modeling can be difficult due to its variable and non-traditional response characteristics, compared to traditional generation. Therefore, efforts to value the participation of DR in procurement of grid services have been limited. In this report, we present methods and tools for predicting demand response availability profiles, representing their capability to participate in capacity, energy, and ancillary services. With the addition of response characteristics mimicking those of generation, the resulting profiles will help in the valuation of the participation of demand response through production cost modeling, which informs infrastructure and investment planning.

334

Water adsorption on aggregates of spherical aerosol nano particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A three dimensional integral equation is developed in order to compute water adsorption onto aggregates of spherical aerosol nano particles. The integral equation is derived from molecular density functional theory, with a weighted density approximation and a direct correlation function interpolation rule. Only required inputs are the direct correlation functions of the uniform fluid or gas at both high-density and low-density limits. The equation has been tested on argon adsorption onto a graphite planer substrate; the result corresponds well with previous simulation work. Adsorption of both noble gas and water onto a single spherical nano particle and aggregates of spherical nano particles has been computed with the developed equation. For the adsorption of a single spherical substrate, layer structure has been found, the adsorption shows a transition property when substrate size increases and when the substrate size is over 100?? the adsorption is nearly the same as that of a planer substrate. For adsorption of aggregates of spherical nano particles, not only much strong adsorption appears but also adsorption property changes with different configurations of spherical nano particles.

Nie, Chu

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Semantics and evaluation techniques for window aggregates in data streams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A windowed query operator breaks a data stream into possibly overlapping subsets of data and computes results over each. Many stream systems can evaluate window aggregate queries. However, current stream systems suffer from a lack of an explicit definition of window semantics. As a result, their implementations unnecessarily confuse window definition with physical stream properties. This confusion complicates the stream system, and even worse, can hurt performance both in terms of memory usage and execution time. To address this problem, we propose a framework for defining window semantics, which can be used to express almost all types of windows of which we are aware, and which is easily extensible to other types of windows that may occur in the future. Based on this definition, we explore a one-pass query evaluation strategy, the Window-ID (WID) approach, for various types of window aggregate queries. WID significantly reduces both required memory space and execution time for a large class of window definitions. In addition, WID can leverage punctuations to gracefully handle disorder. Our experimental study shows that WID has better execution-time performance than existing window aggregate query evaluation options that retain and reprocess tuples, and has better latency-accuracy tradeoff performance for disordered input streams compared to using a fixed delay for disorder handling. 1.

Jin Li; David Maier; Kristin Tufte; Vassilis Papadimos; Peter A. Tucker

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Thin film cadmium telluride, zinc telluride, and mercury zinc telluride solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes research to demonstrate (1) thin film cadmium telluride solar cells with a quantum efficiency of 75% or higher at 0. 44 {mu}m and a photovoltaic efficiency of 11.5% or greater, and (2) thin film zinc telluride and mercury zinc telluride solar cells with a transparency to sub-band-gap radiation of 65% and a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 5% and 8%, respectively. Work was directed at (1) depositing transparent conducting semiconductor films by solution growth and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, (2) depositing CdTe films by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) and MOCVD techniques, (3) preparing and evaluating thin film CdTe solar cells, and (4) preparing and characterizing thin film ZnTe, CD{sub 1-x}Zn{sub 1-x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te solar cells. The deposition of CdS films from aqueous solutions was investigated in detail, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. CdTe films were deposited from DMCd and DIPTe at 400{degrees}C using TEGa and AsH{sub 3} as dopants. CdTe films deposited by CSS had significantly better microstructures than those deposited by MOCVD. Deep energy states in CdTe films deposited by CSS and MOCVD were investigated. Thin films of ZnTe, Cd{sub 1- x}Zn{sub x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te were deposited by MOCVD, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. 67 refs.

Chu, T.L. (University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Investigation of Microbial Respirometry for Monitoring Natural Sulfide Abatement in Geothermal Cooling Tower Basins  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal plant operators are interested in investigating the ability of micro-organisms found in the cooling tower basin to metabolize and cycle sulfide to less toxic sulfur compounds. If the growth or activity of the organisms participating in sulfur-oxidation could be selectively enhanced, then hydrogen sulfide could be naturally abated in the cooling basin, substantially reducing the costs associated with the chemicals used for abatement. The use of respirometry has been proposed as a technique for monitoring the response of the microbial populations found in geothermal cooling towers to various conditions, including the addition of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. Respiro-metry is a manometric measurement of dissolved gases that are in equilibrium in a con-fined sample volume. Since microbes expire varying amounts of carbon dioxide or oxygen as they metabolize nutrients, this technique can be used to evaluate their activities in process streams. This report describes a series of experiments designed to determine the suitability of respirometry for tracking microbial activity for evaluating and enhancing natural abatement processes in geothermal cooling basins.

Peter A. Pryfogle

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Production of manufactured aggregates from flue gas desulfurization by-products  

SciTech Connect

CONSOL R and D has developed a disk pelletization process to produce manufactured aggregates from the by-products of various technologies designed to reduce sulfur emissions produced from coal utilization. Aggregates have been produced from the by-products of the Coolside and LIMB sorbent injection, the fluidized-bed combustion (FBC), spray dryer absorption (SDA), and lime and limestone wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. The aggregates produced meet the general specifications for use as road aggregate in road construction and for use as lightweight aggregate in concrete masonry units. Small field demonstrations with 1200 lb to 5000 lb of manufactured aggregates were conducted using aggregates produced from FBC ash and lime wet FGD sludge in road construction and using aggregates made from SDA ash and lime wet FGD sludge to manufacture concrete blocks. The aggregates for this work were produced with a bench-scale (200--400 lb batch) unit. In 1999, CONSOL R and D constructed and operated a 500 lb/hr integrated, continuous pilot plant. A variety of aggregate products were produced from lime wet FGD sludge. The pilot plant test successfully demonstrated the continuous, integrated operation of the process. The pilot plant demonstration was a major step toward commercialization of manufactured aggregate production from FGD by-products. In this paper, progress made in the production of aggregates from dry FGD (Coolside, LIMB, SDA) and FBC by-products, and lime wet FGD sludge is discussed. The discussion covers bench-scale and pilot plant aggregate production and aggregate field demonstrations.

Wu, M.M.; McCoy, D.C.; Fenger, M.L.; Scandrol, R.O.; Winschel, R.A.; Withum, J.A.; Statnick, R.M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Process for fabricating doped zinc oxide microsphere gel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are a new composition and method of making same for a doped zinc oxide microsphere and articles made therefrom for use in an electrical surge arrestor which has increased solid content, uniform grain size and is in the form of a gel. 4 figures.

Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Bond, W.D.; Lauf, R.J.

1991-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

340

V1, Alkanethiol Island Formation on Single Crystal Zinc Oxide ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... through the Renewable Energy Materials Research Science and Engineering Center is ... A2, Observation and Elimination of Indium Surface Segregation ... B5, The Universal Optimal Seebeck Coefficient for Maximum Power Factor ..... X9, Solution-Processed Zirconium Oxide and Integration with Zinc-Tin Oxide Thin-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

Interfacial electron transfer dynamics of photosensitized zinc oxide nanoclusters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors have prepared and characterized photosensitized zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoclusters, dispersed in methanol, using carboxylated coumarin dyes for surface adsorption. Femtosecond time-resolved emission spectroscopy allows the authors to measure the photo-induced charge carrier injection rate constant from the adsorbed photosensitizer to the n-type semiconductor nanocluster. These results are compared with other photosensitized semiconductors.

Murakoshi, Kei; Yanagida, Shozo [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering; Capel, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc oxide semiconductor thin film transistors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We reported on the performance and electrical properties of co-sputtering-processed amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc oxide (?-HfIZO) thin film transistors (TFTs). Co-sputtering-processed ?-HfIZO thin films have shown an amorphous phase in nature. ...

Sheng-Po Chang; San-Syong Shih

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

IN-VIVO EXPOSURE CHARACTERIZATION AND VISUALIZATION OF SWNH AGGREGATES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the manufacturing and use of nanomaterials and nanoparticle clusters/aggregates become prevalent in the future, it will be necessary to understand the biological interactions with this new class of materials introduced through various routes, intentionally or unintentionally. However, there currently exist a host of technical/methodological issues related to nanotoxicological study. For example, the ability to generate reproducible precision nanomaterial and nanoparticles is critically needed for both toxicological evaluation and pharmaceutical applications. Technology for tracing and visualization of nanomaterials in biological systems are also lacking. Single-walled carbon nanohorn (SWNH) is a unique carbon nanostructure belonging to the same family as the famous carbon nanotubes. SWNH aggregates can be produced through laser vaporization of carbon at room temperature; the aggregates are of particular interest to energy application such as hydrogen storage and new-generation of fuel cells. Unlike carbon nanotubes that are made using metal catalysts, SWNHs can be made without the use of a metal catalyst providing an opportunity for nanotoxicological study of purest carbon nanoparticles with no complication of trace metal toxicity that the nanotubes might have. We summarize results from our ongoing biological research on SWNHs. Our results were from in vivo animal aspiration experiments, in contrast to the results of a recent publication that were based on phenotypic observation of cell-line exposure experiments. The characterization results of ORNL-produced SWNHs are presented in Figure 1, which include low- (Figure 1a) and high-resolution (Figure 1b) structural images of SWNHs, the thermal gravimetric analysis (Figure 1c) and characteristic Raman (Figure 1d) results. We coated the SWNH powder with Pluronic F-127, which is a biocompatible polymer, to facilitate the dispersion of SWNHs in suspension during pressure-driven nebulization in mice aspiration and nose-only inhalation experiments. The phenotypic and genomic expression results are reported by. Twenty-two inflammatory measures from bronchoalveolar lavage were assayed. Only five showed significant changes from the control (e.g., G-CSF, GM-CSF, IP-10, and IL-5) in 24 hours after exposure indicating acute inflammatory responses; however, the responses subsided in 7 days and no significant difference could be found between the control and exposed groups. Whole lung microarray analysis also found few differences between SWNH-exposed and controls of several genes in 24 hours. The SWNH aggregates did penetrate cell membranes; the stained optical microscopy images show the presence of SWNH aggregates in mice red blood cell. The images results are consistent with visualization by using the Scanning Near Field Ultrasound Holography (SNFUH) available at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The SNFUH also provided transport information regarding the transport dynamics of the SWNH aggregates into the cells. The visualization showing consistent results with those obtained from the stained optical microscopy.

Lynch, Rachel M [ORNL; Voy, Brynn H [ORNL; Zhao, Bin [ORNL; Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Thundat, Thomas George [ORNL; Cheng, Mengdawn [ORNL; Passian, Ali [ORNL; Venmar, Katherine T [ORNL; Tetard, Laurene [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Journal of Power Sources 135 (2004) 184191 A solid oxide fuel cell system fed with hydrogen sulfide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, such as food processing, coke ovens, paper mills, tanneries, and petroleum refineries. Sometimes, a desulfurizer, and two recuperators. Natural gas is internally reformed, and the product, a hydrogen-rich gas sulfide and natural gas Yixin Lu, Laura Schaefer1 Department of Mechanical Engineering, University

345

A new aggregation method for determining composite load characteristics  

SciTech Connect

A new aggregation method for determining load characteristics for representation in computer simulations is proposed. In support of the new method, a mathematical derivation is presented. Also, results are compared with models obtained by using the EPRI/University of Texas at Arlington method and field tests. The application of the proposed method is simpler than existing methods in that it does not require field tests or the use of curve fitting techniques. The procedure should be of primary interest to transmission system planners involved in load flow and dynamic stability simulations of power systems.

Rideiro, J.R.; Lange, F.J.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Rotor-router aggregation on the layered square lattice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In rotor-router aggregation on the square lattice Z^2, particles starting at the origin perform deterministic analogues of random walks until reaching an unoccupied site. The limiting shape of the cluster of occupied sites is a disk. We consider a small change to the routing mechanism for sites on the x- and y-axes, resulting in a limiting shape which is a diamond instead of a disk. We show that for a certain choice of initial rotors, the occupied cluster grows as a perfect diamond.

Kager, Wouter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Effects of zinc on Salmonella in the layer house environments and laying hens, and the ability of zinc to induce molt in laying hens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is increasing interest in developing methods to detect and identify Salmonella, to eliminate or reduce the risk of contamination of shell eggs, and to retain the economic advantages of induced molting without increasing the risk of Salmonella enteritidis infection. S. enteritidis and S. typhimurium are the most common serotypes among 2449 known serotypes of the Salmonella, and are the causes of most egg- related foodborne salmonellosis in humans in the U. S. These two species are also responsible for environmental contamination and the incidence of infections. Therefore, this study was conducted in three phases consisting of ten in vivo and in vitro experiments. This study investigated the effects of zinc on Salmonella growth and survivability in poultry environments, and its ability to induce a molt in single comb white leghorn hens. In part, the antibacterial properties of zinc may reduce environmental contamination in a poultry house by interrupting airborne routes. The first phase involved detecting airborne bacteria by aerosol sampling methods, and then screening any Salmonella mutant (s) that survived desiccation by transposon footprinting. The second phase examined, in vitro, the addition of zinc on the growth kinetics of Salmonella under aerobic or anaerobic conditions, the effects of combinating zinc and acidic conditions on the growth kinetics of Salmonella in vitro under aerobic or anaerobic conditions, and the effects of zinc amended feed on the survival of a dry inoculum of Salmonella. The third phase investigated the ability of zinc propionate, as an alternative salt form of zinc, to induce molt in laying hens, the influence of zinc acetate and zinc propionate on gastrointestinal tract fermentation, and susceptibility of laying hens to S. enteritidis during an induced molt, and the comparison of digestive microbial crop and cecal communities among molted hens fed by either zinc acetate or zinc propionate amended molting diets with hens undergoing feed withdrawal or full fed nonmolted hens using molecular-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

Park, Shinyoung

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

THE WEATHERING OF A SULFIDE OREBODY: SPECIATION AND FATE OF SOME POTENTIAL CONTAMINANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various potentially toxic trace elements such as As, Cu, Pb and Zn have been remobilized by the weathering of a sulfide orebody that was only partially mined at Leona Heights, California. As a result, this body has both natural and anthropogenically modified weathering profiles only 500 m apart. The orebody is located in a heavily urbanized area in suburban Oakland, and directly affects water quality in at least one stream by producing acidic conditions and relatively high concentrations of dissolved elements (e.g., {approx}500 mg/L Cu, {approx}3700 mg/L Zn). Micrometric-scale mineralogical investigations were performed on the authigenic metal-bearing phases (less than 10 {mu}m in size) using electron-probe micro-analysis (EPMA), micro-Raman, micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy (mXAS), scanning X-ray diffraction (mSXRD) and scanning X-ray fluorescence (mSXRF) mapping techniques. Those measurements were coupled with classical mineralogical laboratory techniques, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Authigenic metal-bearing phases identified are mainly sulfates (jarosite, epsomite, schwertmannite), Fe (oxy-)hydroxides (goethite, hematite and poorly crystalline Fe products) and poorly crystalline Mn (hydr-)oxides. Sulfates and Fe (oxy-)hydroxides are the two main secondary products at both sites, whereas Mn (hydr-) oxides were only observed in the samples from the non-mining site. In these samples, the various trace elements show different affinities for Fe or Mn compounds. Lead is preferentially associated with Mn (hydr-)oxides and As with Fe (oxy-)hydroxides or sulfates. Copper association with Mn and Fe phases is questionable, and the results obtained rather indicate that Cu is present as individual Cu-rich grains (Cu hydroxides). Some ochreous precipitates were found at both sites and correspond to a mixture of schwertmannite, goethite and jarosite containing some potentially toxic trace elements such as Cu, Pb and Zn. According to the trace element distribution and relative abundance of the unweathered sulfides, this orebody still represents a significant reservoir of potential contaminants for the watershed, especially in the non-mining site, as a much greater proportion of sulfides is left to react and because of the lower porosity in this site.

Courtin-Nomade, Alexandra; Grosbois, Cecile; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Beny, Jean Michel; Foster, Andrea L.

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

349

Biogenic formation of photoactive arsenic-sulfide nanotubes by Shewanella sp. strain HN-41  

SciTech Connect

Microorganisms facilitate the formation of a wide range of minerals that have unique physical and chemical properties as well as morphologies that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here, we report the production of an extensive extracellular network of filamentous, arsenic-sulfide (As-S) nanotubes (20–100 nm in diameter by 30 µm in length) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella sp. HN-41. The As-S nanotubes, formed via the reduction of As(V) and S2O, were initially amorphous As2S3 but evolved with increasing incubation time toward polycrystalline phases of the chalcogenide minerals realgar (AsS) and duranusite (As4S). Upon maturation, the As-S nanotubes behaved as metals and semiconductors in terms of their electrical and photoconductive properties, respectively. The As-S nanotubes produced by Shewanella may provide useful materials for novel nano- and opto-electronic devices.

Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Min-Gyu; Yoo, Bongyoung; Myung, Nosang V.; Maeng, Jongsun; Lee, Takhe; Dohnalkova, Alice; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Hur, Hor-Gil

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

350

Method of recovering sulfur from the hydrogen sulfide contained in coke oven gases  

SciTech Connect

Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide are washed out of the coke oven gas and stripped from the wash liquor in the form of gases and fumes or vapors. The ammonia is decomposed in a nickel catalyzer and a small part of the decomposition gases is supplied directly to a combustion furnace, while the larger part of the combustion gases is first cooled and freed from condensate, and only then supplied to the combustion furnace. In the combustion furnace, the proportion of H/sub 2/S/SO/sub 2/ needed for the Claus process is adjusted by a partial combustion of the decomposition gases. The gases from the combustion furnace are then processed in the Claus plant to sulfur.

Laufhutte, D.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

351

Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide--Systems Analysis for IGCC Applications  

SciTech Connect

Selective catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (SCOHS) has been evaluated conceptually for IGCC applications, and the theoretical limits of reaction performance, process performance, and economic potential in IGCC have been estimated. Syngas conditions that have high partial pressures of total sulfur result in substantial liquid sulfur retention within the catalyst bed, with relatively complex processing being required. Applications that have much lower total sulfur partial pressure in the process gas might permit SCOHS operation under conditions where little liquid sulfur is retained in the catalyst, reducing the processing complexity and possibly improving the desulfurization performance. The results from our recent IGCC process evaluations using the SCOHS technology and conventional syngas cleaning are presented, and alternative SCOHS process configurations and applications that provide greater performance and cost potential are identified.

Newby, R.A.; Keairns, D.L.; Alvin, M.A.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

THE CHEMICAL AND RADIATION RESISTANCE OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE AS ENCOUNTERED IN THE NUCLEAR WASTE CLEANING PROCESSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) is extremely resistant to gamma irradiation, caustic solution, and dilute nitric acid. PPS is the material of construction for the coalescers used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). After applying the equivalent of 16 years of gamma irradiation and several months of exposures to caustic solution, no dimensional changes nor chemical changes were detected in PPS whether the PPS was in fiber form or in a composite with E-glass fibers. However, PPS acts as a media for heterogeneous nucleation. In particular, PPS appears to favor aluminosilicate formation in saturated solutions of aluminum and silicon in caustic environments. Parallel testing, in progress, is examining the stability of PPS when exposed to the new solvent formulation under development for MCU. Preliminary data, after two months of exposure, PPS is remarkably stable to the new solvent.

Fondeur, F.

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

353

Characterization of a transient +2 sulfur oxidation state intermediate from the oxidation of aqueous sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxidation H{sub 2}S to sulfate involves a net transfer of eight electrons and occurs through the formation of several partially oxidized intermediates with oxidation states ranging from {minus}1 to +5. Known intermediates include elemental sulfur (oxidation state 0), polysulfides (outer sulfur: {minus}1, inner sulfur: 0), sulfite (+4) and thiosulfate (outer sulfur: {minus}1, inner sulfur: +5). A noticeable gap in this series of intermediates is that of a +2 sulfur oxidation state oxoacid/oxoanion species, which was never detected experimentally. Here, we present evidence of the transient existence of +2 oxidation state intermediate in the Ni(II)-catalyzed oxidation of aqueous sulfide. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and Fourier-transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were used to characterize this species; they suggest that it has a sulfoxylate ion (SO{sub 2}{sup 2{minus}}) structure.

Vairavmurthy, M.A.; Zhou, Weiqing

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Ionization of oriented carbonyl sulfide molecules by intense circularly polarized laser pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present combined experimental and theoretical results on strong-field ionization of oriented carbonyl sulfide molecules by circularly polarized laser pulses. The obtained molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions show pronounced asymmetries perpendicular to the direction of the molecular electric dipole moment. These findings are explained by a tunneling model invoking the laser-induced Stark shifts associated with the dipoles and polarizabilities of the molecule and its unrelaxed cation. The focus of the present article is to understand the strong-field ionization of one-dimensionally-oriented polar molecules, in particular asymmetries in the emission direction of the photoelectrons. In the following article [Phys. Rev. A 83, 023406 (2011)] the focus is to understand strong-field ionization from three-dimensionally-oriented asymmetric top molecules, in particular the suppression of electron emission in nodal planes of molecular orbitals.

Dimitrovski, Darko; Abu-samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer; Filsinger, Frank; Meijer, Gerard; Kuepper, Jochen [Lundbeck Foundation Theoretical Center for Quantum System Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Holmegaard, Lotte; Kalhoej, Line [Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Nielsen, Jens H. [Department of Physics, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Stapelfeldt, Henrik [Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for Nonthermal Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this experimental project was to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a nonthermal plasma and to recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), but it was not achieved at the moderate pressure conditions used in this study. However, H{sub 2}S was successfully decomposed at energy efficiencies higher than any other reports for the high H{sub 2}S concentration and moderate pressures (corresponding to high reactor throughputs) used in this study.

Morris Argyle; John Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Gui-Bing Zhao; Sanil John; Ji-Jun Zhang; Linna Wang

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

Long-term Differences in Tillage and Land Use Affect Intra-aggregate Pore Heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in computed tomography provide measurement tools to study internal structures of soil aggregates at micrometer resolutions and to improve our understanding of specific mechanisms of various soil processes. Fractal analysis is one of the data analysis tools that can be helpful in evaluating heterogeneity of the intra-aggregate internal structures. The goal of this study was to examine how long-term tillage and land use differences affect intra-aggregate pore heterogeneity. The specific objectives were: (i) to develop an approach to enhance utility of box-counting fractal dimension in characterizing intra-aggregate pore heterogeneity; (ii) to examine intra-aggregate pores in macro-aggregates (4-6 mm in size) using the computed tomography scanning and fractal analysis, and (iii) to compare heterogeneity of intra-aggregate pore space in aggregates from loamy Alfisol soil subjected to 20 yr of contrasting management practices, namely, conventional tillage (chisel plow) (CT), no-till (NT), and native succession vegetation (NS). Three-dimensional images of the intact aggregates were obtained with a resolution of 14.6 {micro}m at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL. Proposed box-counting fractal dimension normalization was successfully implemented to estimate heterogeneity of pore voxel distributions without bias associated with different porosities in soil aggregates. The aggregates from all three studied treatments had higher porosity associated with large (>100 {micro}m) pores present in their centers than in their exteriors. Pores 15 to 60 {micro}m were equally abundant throughout entire aggregates but their distributions were more heterogeneous in aggregate interiors. The CT aggregates had greater numbers of pores 15 to 60 {micro}m than NT and NS. Distribution of pore voxels belonging to large pores was most heterogeneous in the aggregates from NS, followed by NT and by CT. This result was consistent with presence of very large pores associated with former root channels in NT and NS aggregates. Our findings indicate that mechanisms of macro-aggregate formation might differ in their importance in different land use and management practices.

Kravchenko, A.N.; Wang, A.N.W.; Smucker, A.J.M.; Rivers, M.L. (MSU); (UC)

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

357

Mine-to-Mill Optimization of Aggregate Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mine-to-Mill optimization is a total systems approach to the reduction of energy and cost in mining and processing. Developed at the Julius Krutschnitt Mineral Research Center in Queensland, Australia, the Mine-to-Mill approach attempts to minimize energy consumption through optimization of all steps in the size reduction process. The approach involves sampling and modeling of blasting and processing, followed by computer simulation to optimize the operation and develop alternatives. The most promising alternatives are implemented, and sampling is conducted to quantify benefits. In the current project, the primary objective was to adapt Mine-to-Mill technology to the aggregates industry. The first phase of this work was carried out at the Bealeton Quarry near Fredericksburg, Virginia. The second phase was carried out at the Pittsboro Quarry south of Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Both quarries are operated by Luck Stone Corporation of Richmond, Virginia. As a result of the work, several conclusions can be drawn from the project which should assist DOE in assessing the applicability of the Mine-to-Mill approach to the aggregates industry. 1. Implementation of MTM guidelines at Pittsboro has resulted in tangible improvements in productivity. It is clear that MTM guidelines represent an energy savings of around 5% (primary and secondary) and an overall energy savings of 1%. This 1-5% energy savings is also consistent with simulated results for Bealeton had side-by-side shots used to evaluate the technology been carried out in the same rockmass. 2. Luck Stone clearly runs their operations at a high standard. Hence the percentage improvement realized in this project may represent the lower end of what might be expected overall in the aggregates industry. 3. Variability in ore types across both Bealeton and Pittsboro suggests a 2:1 difference in hardness which contradicts the misconception that quarry rock is homogenous. Therefore, the idea of comparing side-by-side blasts is not viable and long term comparisons stand the best chance of confirming the benefits of optimized blasting. 4. There are clear limitations on how much improvement can be made in the aggregate industry due to the fixed feed size that reports to the tertiary section of a typical aggregate plant. These limitations restrict the MTM approach from exercising significant increases in blasting which would only serve to increase fines and reduce product yield. 5. The key to success at Pittsboro was the development of MTM guidelines for the modified blasting practice in consultation with the drill & blast crew. Their full buy-in was necessary to implement optimized blasting in a sustained manner. 6. The JKSimBlast and JKSimMet models have proven to be effective tools for examining blasting and processing at Bealeton and Pittsboro. These models should enable Luck Stone to transfer the MTM approach to other sites.

Greg Adel; Toni Kojovic; Darren Thornton

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

358

Cadmium sulfide/copper ternary heterojunction cell research. Final report, April 1, 1980-August 25, 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The properties of polycrystalline, thin-film CuInSe/sub 2//CdS and CuInSe/sub 2//Zn/sub x/Cd/sub 1-x/S solar cells prepared by vacuum-evaporation techniques onto metallized-alumina substrates are described. An efficiency of 10.6% for a 1 cm/sup 2/ area cell and 8.3% for an 8 cm/sup 2/ cell when tested under simulated AM1 illumination is reported. The mixed-sulfide cells are described as exhibiting increased open-circuit voltages, slightly higher short-circuit currents, and improved efficiencies. Mixed-sulfide film preparation by evaporation of CdS and ZnS powders from a single source and from two sources is discussed with preference given to the later technique. Selenide-film preparation in a planetary or rotating substrate vacuum-deposition apparatus is described. A 1 cm/sup 2/ area cell without AR-coating produced by the planetary approach is reported to demonstrate a 7.5% efficiency. The results of cell heat-treatment studies showing a strong environmental dependence are presented and indicate the desirability of an oxygen-containing atmosphere. An automatic, computer-controlled, cell-measurement system for I-V, C-V, and spectral-response analysis is described. The results of the cell-analysis and cell-modeling studies on both the plain CdS and mixed Zn/sub x/Cd/sub 1-x/S thin-film devices are presented. Finally, data obtained from constant illumination and elevated temperature life-tests on the thin-film cells showing little degradation after 9300 hours is reported.

Mickelsen, R. A.; Chen, W. S.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Petrography study on altered flint aggregate by alkali-silica reaction  

SciTech Connect

The aim of our study is to improve our understanding of an alkali-silica reaction (ASR) via petrography. We used a chemical concrete subsystem: flint aggregate, portlandite and KOH. The altered flint aggregate is followed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after acid treatment at different intervals. After acid treatment, the observations showed an increase in aggregate porosity and revealed internal degradation of the aggregate. This degradation created amorphous zones. Before acid treatment, the analyses on polished sections by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) enabled visualization of K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} penetration into the aggregate. The appearance of amorphous zones and penetration of positive ions into the aggregate are correlated with the increase in the molar fraction of silanol sites. This degradation is specific to the alkali-silica reaction.

Bulteel, D. [Departement Genie Civil de l'Ecole Nationale Superieure des Techniques Industrielles et des Mines de Douai, 941 rue Charles Bourseul, B.P. 838, F-59508, DOUAI Cedex (France)]. E-mail: bulteel@ensm-douai.fr; Rafai, N. [Laboratoire d'Etude et de Recherches des Materiaux a Arles, F-13631 ARLES (France); Degrugilliers, P. [Departement Genie Civil de l'Ecole Nationale Superieure des Techniques Industrielles et des Mines de Douai, 941 rue Charles Bourseul, B.P. 838, F-59508, DOUAI Cedex (France); Garcia-Diaz, E. [Departement Genie Civil de l'Ecole Nationale Superieure des Techniques Industrielles et des Mines de Douai, 941 rue Charles Bourseul, B.P. 838, F-59508, DOUAI Cedex (France)

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY UNIVERSAL AGGREGATES, LLC, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UNIVERSAL AGGREGATES, LLC, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF UNIVERSAL AGGREGATES, LLC, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC26-02NT41421; W(A)-02-049, CH-1108 The Petitioner, Universal Aggregates, LLC, was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash." The purpose of the cooperative agreement is to design, construct and operate a lightweight aggregate manufacturing plant at the Birchwood Power Facility in King George, Virginia. A successful demonstration would lead to additional lightweight aggregate manufacturing facilities in the United States. There are currently twenty-one spray dryer facilities operating in the United States that produce an adequate amount of spray

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Factor demand linkages and the business cycle: Interpreting aggregate fluctuations as sectoral fluctuations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stylized fact that need to be addressed by any theory of the business cycle. Whether the comovement between sectors and the aggregate business cycle originates from aggregate shocks or sectoral shocks ampli?ed by sectoral interactions, or a combination... Factor demand linkages and the business cycle: interpreting aggregate ?uctuations as sectoral ?uctuations. Sean Holly Ivan Petrella Faculty of Economics and Centre for International Macroeconomics and Finance (CIMF), University of Cambridge...

Petrella, I; Holly, Sean

362

Assessment of Wholesale Market Opportunities for Participation and Aggregation of Distributed Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an assessment of existing opportunities for participation and aggregation of distributed resources in organized wholesale electricity markets. The assessment provides an organized structure for identifying opportunities and requirements for distributed resources to participate in independent system operators (ISOs) and regional transmission organizations (RTOs) markets, either through direct participation or in aggregation. In the report, high-level aggregation, minimum size, and com...

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Amine templated zinc phosphates phases for membrane separations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research is focused on developing inorganic molecular sieve membranes for light gas separations such as hydrogen recovery and natural gas purification, and organic molecular separations, such as chiral enantiomers. The authors focus on zinc phosphates because of the ease in crystallization of new phases and the wide range of pore sizes and shapes obtained. With hybrid systems of zinc phosphate crystalline phases templated by amine molecules, the authors are interested in better understanding the association of the template molecules to the inorganic phase, and how the organic transfers its size, shape, and (in some cases) chirality to the bulk. Furthermore, the new porous phases can also be synthesized as thin films on metal oxide substrates. These films allow one to make membranes from organic/inorganic hybrid systems, suitable for diffusion experiments. Characterization techniques for both the bulk phases and the thin films include powder X-ray diffraction, TGA, Scanning Electron Micrograph (SEM) and Electron Dispersive Spectrometry (EDS).

Nenoff, T.M.; Chavez, A.V.; Thoma, S.G.; Provencio, P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harrison, W.T.A. [Univ. of Western Australia, Nedlands (Australia); Phillips, M.L.F. [Gemfire Corp., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

E-Aggregation: The Present and Future of Online Financial Services in Asia-Pacific  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many financial institutions have built websites to inform and attract customers. Financial aggregation present an opportunity by which they can build stronger ...

Fujii, Hiroshi

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

365

2012 CERTS R&M Peer Review - A Business Model for Retail Aggregation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Profile Or Aggregator's Wholesale Offers Profile Determining the Supply Probability r(v) Under Efficient Rationing r(v) Probability of supply assigned to a MW with...

366

SIZE AND SURFACE AREA OF ICY DUST AGGREGATES AFTER A HEATING EVENT AT A PROTOPLANETARY NEBULA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activity of a young star rises abruptly during an FU Orionis outburst. This event causes a temporary temperature increase in the protoplanetary nebula. H{sub 2}O icy grains are sublimated by this event, and silicate cores embedded inside the ice are ejected. During the high-temperature phase, the silicate grains coagulate to form silicate core aggregates. After the heating event, the temperature drops, and the ice recondenses onto the aggregates. I determined numerically the size distribution of the ice-covered aggregates. The size of the aggregates exceeds 10 {mu}m around the snow line. Because of the migration of the ice to large aggregates, only a small fraction of the silicate core aggregate is covered with H{sub 2}O ice. After the heating event, the surface of an ice-covered aggregate is totally covered by silicate core aggregates. This might reduce the fragmentation velocity of aggregates when they collide. It is possible that the covering silicate cores shield the UV radiation field which induces photodissociation of H{sub 2}O ice. This effect may cause the shortage of cold H{sub 2}O vapor observed by Herschel.

Sirono, Sin-iti [Earth and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)] [Earth and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Fluxes in ;Free; and Total Zinc Are Essential for Progression of Intraerythrocytic Stages of Plasmodium falciparum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic fluxes in the concentration of ions and small molecules are fundamental features of cell signaling, differentiation, and development. Similar roles for fluxes in transition metal concentrations are less well established. Here, we show that massive zinc fluxes are essential in the infection cycle of an intracellular eukaryotic parasite. Using single-cell quantitative imaging, we show that growth of the blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum parasite requires acquisition of 30 million zinc atoms per erythrocyte before host cell rupture, corresponding to a 400% increase in total zinc concentration. Zinc accumulates in a freely available form in parasitophorous compartments outside the food vacuole, including mitochondria. Restriction of zinc availability via small molecule treatment causes a drop in mitochondrial membrane potential and severely inhibits parasite growth. Thus, extraordinary zinc acquisition and trafficking are essential for parasite development.

Marvin, Rebecca G.; Wolford, Janet L.; Kidd, Matthew J.; Murphy, Sean; Ward, Jesse; Que, Emily L.; Mayer, Meghan L.; Penner-Hahn, James E.; Haldar, Kasturi; O; Halloran, Thomas V. (Michigan); (UWASH); (NWU); (Notre)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

368

Development of the Zinc-Chloride Battery for Utility Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews progress in Phase 2 (April 1978-March 1980) of a program to develop the zinc-chloride battery for utility load-leveling applications. Tasks in this phase included refurbishment of a 45-kWh module to increase capacity and efficiency, cycle testing of a 1.7-kWh battery, and development of a 50-kWh module to serve as the building block for the 4-MWh battery for the Battery Energy Test Facility.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

PROMOTED ZINC CHROMITE CATALYSTS FOR HIGHER ALCOHOL SYNTHESIS  

SciTech Connect

During this reporting period, a ''zinc chromite'' catalyst promoted with 6 wt.% cesium (Cs) was evaluated at the following operating conditions: Temperature - 375 C and 400 C; Total Pressure--13.6 MPa (2000 psig); Gas Hourly Space Velocity (GHSV) - 5000 standard liters/kg(cat)-hr; and H{sub 2}/CO feed ratio--0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mole/mole. Decahydronaphthalene (DHN) was used as the slurry liquid. The experiment lasted for twelve days of continuous operation. Unpromoted zinc chromite catalyst then was re-examined under the same operating conditions. Reproducible data was achieved with a continuous liquid make-up. Compared with unpromoted zinc chromite catalyst, 6 wt.% Cs-promoted catalyst shifted the product distribution from methanol to higher alcohols, even though methanol was still the major product. The effect of operating conditions was less important than the addition of promoter. However, it was observed that higher temperature favors higher alcohol synthesis, and that a higher H{sub 2}/CO ratio leads to lower oxygenates selectivity and higher hydrocarbons selectivity. These trends showed clearly with the Cs-promoted catalyst, but were not as prominent with the unpromoted catalyst. The slurry liquid did not decompose or alkylate to a measurable extent during either continuous, 12 - day experiment, even with the higher reactor temperature (400 C). There was a relatively significant loss of catalyst surface area during the experiment with the promoted catalyst, but not with the unpromoted catalyst.

Ms. Xiaolei Sun; Professor George W. Roberts

2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

370

Zinc Addition Fuel Study for Byron Unit 1 and Braidwood Unit 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study reports on an ongoing program to qualify zinc for use in higher duty cores. Braidwood Unit 1 and Byron Unit 1 represent two of the highest duty plants in the U.S. Therefore, prior to injecting zinc at these units, a thorough risk assessment was required to identify the optimum conditions to add zinc while maintaining margin for fuel cladding integrity and other fuel performance issues.

2008-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

371

Modeling and Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Primary Coolant Zinc Transients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of plant responses to transients in power production and zinc injection rates has the potential to reveal additional information about how, where, and at what rate zinc is deposited and incorporated into the films on primary system surfaces. Although the process of zinc transport and incorporation is complicated by the numerous mechanisms and surfaces available for incorporation, a control theory type analysis (linear systems analysis) could be useful for the analysis of transients, including in...

2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

372

PREPRINT QUASIPARTICLE AGGREGATION I N THE FRACTIONAL QUANTUM HALL EFFECT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

91618 91618 PREPRINT QUASIPARTICLE AGGREGATION I N THE FRACTIONAL QUANTUM HALL EFFECT R. B. Laughlin This paper was prepared for submittal to the Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on the Physics of Semi conductors San Francisco, California August 6-10, 1984 October 10, 1984 This is a preprint of a paper intended for publication in a journal or proceedings. Since changes may be made before publication, this preprint is made available with the un- derstanding that it will not be cited or reproduced without the permission of the author. DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees,

373

Municipal Aggregation and Retail Competition in the Ohio Energy Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Electric (CG&E), now Duke Energy (Ohio) 0.7m Dayton Power and Light (DP&L) 0.5m. There are also 25 rural electric companies (or co-ops), serving nearly 0.4m customers.15 Senate Bill 3, signed into law in 1999, provided for the market to open... communities Actual number of aggregating communities Ratio Actual to Proportionate Average low income electricity bill 2002 First Energy CEI 0.7 31 104 3.35 $77 OE 1.1 49 65 1.33 $67 TE 0.3 13 14 1.08 CGE/Duke 0.7 31 8 0.26 $52...

Littlechild, Stephen C

374

Fuel choice and aggregate energy demand in the commercial sector  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a fuel choice and aggregate-demand model of energy use in the commercial sector of the United States. The model structure is dynamic with short-run fuel-price responses estimated to be close to those of the residential sector. Of the three fuels analyzed, electricity consumption exhibits a greater response to its own price than either natural gas or fuel oil. In addition, electricity price increases have the largest effect on end-use energy conservation in the commercial sector. An improved commercial energy-use data base is developed which removes the residential portion of electricity and natural gas use that traditional energy-consumption data sources assign to the commercial sector. In addition, household and commercial petroleum use is differentiated on a state-by-state basis.

Cohn, S.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Isolation and characterization of a new zinc-binding protein from albacore tuna plasma  

SciTech Connect

The protein responsible for sequestering high levels of zinc in the plasma of the albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga) has been isolated by sequential chromatography. The glycoprotein has a molecular weight of 66,000. Approximately 8.2% of its amino acid residues are histidines. Equilibrium dialysis experiments show it to bind 3 mol of zinc/mol of protein. The stoichiometric constant for the association of zinc with a binding site containing three histidines was determined to be 10/sup 9.4/. This protein is different from albumin and represents a previously uncharacterized zinc transport protein.

Dyke, B.; Hegenauer, J.; Saltman, P.; Laurs, R.M.

1987-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

376

Investigation of the zinc electrode reaction. Annual report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect

The excellent performance characteristics of the nickel-zinc battery make it an attractive option for both all-battery and hydride electric vehicles. Commercialization of the battery has been delayed because of limited cycle life particularly under conditions of deep discharge. In nickel-zinc batteries, with pasted zinc electrodes, zinc electrode shape change or redistribution of the active material from the edge of the electrodes toward the center has been the major life-limiting factor. In batteries with soluble free electrolyte zinc electrodes, morphology changes, particularly under random cycling conditions, is a major operational problem. The present work was focussed on finding insights and possible solutions to these two problems. The areas covered in the work were (1) additive and substrate effects on zinc electrode morphology; (2) investigations of zinc electrodes of the second kind; (3) separator effects on zinc electrode shape change; and (4) investigation of the effect of modified charging methods on the morphology and behavior of both pasted and soluble free electrolyte zinc electrodes.

McBreen, J.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Selective electrodiffusion of zinc ions in a Zrt-, Irt-like protein, ZIPB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All living cells need zinc ions to support cell growth. Zrt-, Irt-like proteins (ZIPs) represent a major route for entry of zinc ions into cells, but how ZIPs promote zinc uptake has been unclear. Here we report the molecular characterization of ZIPB from Bordetella bronchiseptica, the first ZIP homolog to be purified and functionally reconstituted into proteoliposomes. Zinc flux through ZIPB was found to be nonsaturable and electrogenic, yielding membrane potentials as predicted by the Nernst equation. Conversely, membrane potentials drove zinc fluxes with a linear voltage-flux relationship. Direct measurements of metal uptake by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy demonstrated that ZIPB is selective for two group 12 transition metal ions, Zn{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+}, whereas rejecting transition metal ions in groups 7 through 11. Our results provide the molecular basis for cellular zinc acquisition by a zinc-selective channel that exploits in vivo zinc concentration gradients to move zinc ions into the cytoplasm.

Lin, W.; Fu, D.; Chai, J.; Love, J.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

378

Influence of technological factors on statics of hydrogen sulfide absorption from coke-oven gas by the ammonia process  

SciTech Connect

The basic technological factors that determine the effectiveness of hydrogen sulfide absorption from coke-oven gas by the cyclic ammonia process are the initial H/sub 2/S content of the gas, the degree of purification, the absorption temperature and the NH/sub 3/ and CO/sub 2/ contents of the absorbent solution. The effects of these factors on the statics of hydrogen sulfide absorption are studied. The investigation is based on the phase-equilibrium distributions of components in the absorption-desorption gas-cleaning cycle. The mathematical model is presented which includes the solution of a system of chemical equilibrium equations for reactions in the solution, material balances, and electrical neutrality. 4 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

Nazarov, V.G.; Kamennykh, B.M.; Rus'yanov, N.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Using Misbehavior to Analyze Strategic versus Aggregate Energy Minimization in Wireless  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their transmission powers to minimize the aggregate energy expenditure. Our analysis of these models yields insightsUsing Misbehavior to Analyze Strategic versus Aggregate Energy Minimization in Wireless Sensor of the prob- lem of energy misbehavior and develop an analytical frame- work for quantifying its impact

Wei, Shuangqing

380

Lithium Inhibits a Late Step in Agrin-Induced AChR Aggregation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Inhibits a Late Step in Agrin-Induced AChR Aggregation S. K. Sharma,* B. G. Wallace 1. Here we report that treating chick myotubes with lithium prevented any detectable agrin-induced change phosphorylation and detergent extractabil- ity. Lithium treatment also increased the rate at which AChR aggregates

Sharma, Shiv K.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Integrating Renewable Energy Contracts and Wholesale Dynamic Pricing to Serve Aggregate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Integrating Renewable Energy Contracts and Wholesale Dynamic Pricing to Serve Aggregate Flexible batteries, with renewable energy resources. We formulate a stochastic optimal control problem that describes and the degree to which the aggregator can respond to dynamic pricing. Index Terms--Dynamic pricing, renewable

Oren, Shmuel S.

382

Design and implementation of a socket-level bandwidth aggregation mechanism for wireless networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a mechanism to aggregate bandwidth of multiple network interfaces on a computer. Recently one single computer entails multiple different wireless network interfaces, such as IEEE 802.11a/b/g/n, Bluetooth, WiMAX, and so on. They can ... Keywords: bandwidth aggregation, heterogeneous wireless networks, multi-homed mobile host

Hiroshi Sakakibara; Masato Saito; Hideyuki Tokuda

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Fuzzy-genetic approach to aggregate production-distribution planning in supply chain management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aggregate production-distribution planning (APDP) is one of the most important activities in supply chain management (SCM). When solving the problem of APDP, we are usually faced with uncertain market demands and capacities in production environment, ... Keywords: Aggregate production-distribution planning, Fuzzy mathematical programming, Genetic algorithm, Supply chain management

R. A. Aliev; B. Fazlollahi; B. G. Guirimov; R. R. Aliev

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Weak aggregating algorithm for the distribution-free perishable inventory problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We formulate the multiperiod, distribution-free perishable inventory problem as a problem of prediction with expert advice and apply an online learning method (the Weak Aggregating Algorithm) to solve it. We show that the asymptotic average performance ... Keywords: Aggregating algorithm, Newsvendor problem, Online learning

Tatsiana Levina; Yuri Levin; Jeff Mcgill; Mikhail Nediak; Vladimir Vovk

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Optimizing lifetime for continuous data aggregation with precision guarantees in wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper exploits the tradeoff between data quality and energy consumption to extend the lifetime of wireless sensor networks. To obtain an aggregate form of sensor data with precision guarantees, the precision constraint is partitioned and allocated ... Keywords: data accuracy, data aggregation, energy efficiency, network lifetime, sensor network

Xueyan Tang; Jianliang Xu

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Load Scheduling and Dispatch for Aggregators of Plug-In Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and environmental problems worldwide [2], [3]. PEVs--either plug-in hybrid electric vehicles or pure electric1 Load Scheduling and Dispatch for Aggregators of Plug-In Electric Vehicles Di Wu, Student Member proposes an operating framework for aggregators of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs). First, a minimum- cost

Tesfatsion, Leigh

387

Integration of false data detection with data aggregation and confidential transmission in wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In wireless sensor networks, compromised sensor nodes can inject false data during both data aggregation and data forwarding. The existing false data detection techniques consider false data injections during data forwarding only and do not allow any ... Keywords: data aggregation, data integrity, network-level security, sensor networks

Suat Ozdemir; Hasan Çam

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Minimizing Aggregation Latency under the Physical Interference Model in Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of today's electric power systems, making them a vital component of the smart grid. Efficient aggregation of data collected by sensors is crucial for a successful WSN-based smart grid application. Existing works the network capacity. In this paper, we propose a distributed algorithm to minimize the data aggregation

Baras, John S.

389

Weld-overlay iron-aluminide coatings for use in high-temperature oxidizing/sulfidizing environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of iron-aluminide weld overlay coatings for high-temperature oxidation and sulfidation resistance critically depends on the determination of the aluminum concentration range for which good corrosion behavior and weldability coexist. This study demonstrated that a sound weld overlay composition with about 30 at.% Al has relatively low corrosion rates in a highly aggressive oxidizing/sulfidizing (H{sub 2}S-H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-Ar) environment at 800 C. Its corrosion resistance was superior to alloys with compositions like that of type 310 stainless steel and Fecralloy. The results with this overlay composition can be explained on the basis of what is known about the effects of variations in aluminum and chromium concentrations on high-temperature oxidation/sulfidation from studies with bulk iron aluminides. While higher aluminum concentrations are even better for long-term corrosion resistance, the ability to reliably produce weld overlays of such compositions without hydrogen cracking is problematical and is the subject of continuing development.

Tortorelli, P.F.; Goodwin, G.M.; Howell, M.; DeVan, J.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced power plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppmv and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation power plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S In the Single-Step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP), the direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The H{sub 2} and CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash or carbon coats, and catalytic metals, to develop a catalytic regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. Experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 130-156 seconds at 120-140 C to formulate catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS from coal gases, evaluate removal capabilities of hydrogen sulfide and COS from coal gases with formulated catalysts, and develop an economic regeneration method of deactivated catalysts. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,300-3,800-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-1,900 ppmv sulfur dioxide, 18-21 v% hydrogen, 29-34 v% CO, 8-10 v% CO{sub 2}, 5-18 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 114-132 SCCM. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-140 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 116-129 psia. The molar ratio of H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} in the monolithic catalyst reactor is

K. C. Kwon

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

391

Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced power plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppmv and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation power plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S In the Single-Step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP), the direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The H{sub 2} and CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash coat, and catalytic metals, to develop a regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor. The task of developing kinetic rate equations and modeling the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants will be abandoned since formulation of catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS is being in progress. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. Experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 46-570 seconds under reaction conditions to formulate catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS from coal gases and evaluate their capabilities in reducing hydrogen sulfide and COS in coal gases. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,200-4,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-20,000-ppmv sulfur dioxide, 18-27 v% hydrogen, 29-41 v% CO, 8-12 v% CO{sub 2}, 0-10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of simulated coal gas mixtures to the reactor are 30 - 180 cm{sup 3}/min at 1 atm and 25 C (SCCM). The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-155 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 40-210 psia. The molar ratio

K.C. Kwon

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

392

Control of hydrogen sulfide emission from geothermal power plants. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program of laboratory and pilot plant tests, detailed process and project engineering work, and process engineering and economic evaluation studies has been carried out in support of the design of a test facility for demonstration of the copper sulfate process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from geothermal steam at turbine upstream conditions. A demonstration plant has been designed which is capable of removing 99% of the H/sub 2/S, 90% of the NH/sub 3/, and significant amounts of H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ and particulates from 100,000 lb/hr of geothermal steam of The Geysers composition. Criteria for the mechanical and process design of the scrubber have been confirmed in field tests of fifty hours duration on an eight-inch diameter scrubber at PG and E's Unit No. 7, The Geysers. The background of the problem and the technical approach to its solution, the scope and results of the first-phase laboratory testing, the scope and results of the experimental and analytical studies carried out in the second phase, and a description of the configuration of the demonstration plant and the test plan for its operation are summarized. (MHR)

Brown, F.C.; Harvey, W.W.; Warren, R.B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

CHEMICAL STABILITY OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE IN THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT FOR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. For simplicity, this solvent is referred to as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The initial deployment target envisioned for the technology was within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), the polymer used in the coalescers within MCU. This report provides the data from exposing PPS polymer to NGS. The test was conducted over a three month period. PPS is remarkably stable in the presence of the next generation solvent. Testing showed no indication of swelling or significant leaching. Preferential sorption of the Modifier on PPS was observed but the same behavior occurs with the baseline solvent. Therefore, PPS coalescers exposed to the NGS are expected to perform comparably to those in contact with the baseline solvent.

Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

394

Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced power plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppmv and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation power plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2} in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S In the Single-Step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP), the direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The H{sub 2} and CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash or carbon coats, and catalytic metals, to develop a catalytic regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives using a monolithic catalyst reactor, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 40-560 seconds at 120-150 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperatures, total pressure, space time, and catalyst regeneration on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,600-4,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,800-2,000 ppmv sulfur dioxide, 23-27 v% hydrogen, 36-41 v% CO, 10-12 v% CO{sub 2}, 0-10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 30-180 SCCM. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-150 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 40-210 psia. The molar ratio of H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} in the monolithic catalyst reactor is mai

K. C. Kwon

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

395

Evaluation of Zinc Addition to Primary Coolant of Farley-2 PWR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A demonstration project at Southern Nuclear Operating Company's Farley Unit 2 showed that the addition of 35-45 ppb zinc to the primary coolant resulted in lower radiation dose rates and an apparent decrease in primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 steam generator tubing. The zinc had no significant effect on fuel cladding corrosion.

1996-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

The Sugar Creek zinc deposit, Jackson Co. TN -- Exploration history, geology and mineralization  

SciTech Connect

During the 60's and 70's zinc exploration of central TN and KY was active. The Sugar Creek Project was one of several investigated by Exxon. The discovery hole, Cu 15, was drilled in early 1973. The Sugar Creek Zinc Deposit was acquired by Independence Mining Co. in 1986 and I.M.C. has subsequently completed additional drilling, both stepout and confirmation holes. A total of 137 holes for 300,833 ft have been drilled. The Sugar Creek deposit is a typical Tennessee zinc deposit (Mississippi Valley Type) which occurs in solution collapse breccias in the Lower Ordovician, Knox Dolomite. The Knox consists of fine grained dolomite with interlayered limestones and crystalline dolomite. Only scattered residual limestone is found in the Sugar Creek area. Collapse breccias have formed which control zinc deposition and are similar to other TN Zn. deposits. At Sugar Creek the types of breccias include: a vertically exaggerated glory hole breakthrough breccia which extends to within 137 ft. of the Knox unconformity, has 500 ft. of zinc mineralization with 8 significant zinc intervals; holes with stacked zinc intervals interpreted to be sides of breakthrough breccia; and single zinc intervals in laterally positioned bedded mineral zones. A total of 99 holes were drilled in the more intense mineralized areas. The ratio of ore to non ore holes is nearly 1 to 1. The mineralization is typical M.V.T. with predominantly sphalerite and only minor occurrences of galena, fluorite, pyrite, etc.

Reinbold, G.; Moran, A.V.; Stevens, D.L. (Independence Mining Co. Inc., Reno, NV (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Research, development and demonstration of nickel-zinc batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work carried out under the Yardney Contract with ANL for R, D and D on nickel zinc batteries over the past year was directed in three major areas: (1) elucidating the failure modes of the nickel-zinc battery system; (2) improving performance of the system; and (3) effecting a cost reduction program. Progress on the three areas is reported. (TFD)

Not Available

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

PROMOTED ZINC CHROMITE CATALYSTS FOR HIGHER ALCOHOL SYNTHESIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work during the report period was concentrated on developing analytical techniques. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) was used in an attempt to define the best mobile phase to separate the components of ''spent'' tetrahydroquinoline by liquid chromatography in a silica gel column. Conditions have been defined for separating the light gases produced by the reaction of carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) over promoted ''zinc chromite'' catalysts. This will be done with a temperature-programmed Carboxen-1000 column, using a thermal conductivity detector for analysis. A Petrocol DM 150 capillary column will be purchased to separate the heavier products, which will be analyzed using a flame ionization detector.

Ms. Xiaolei Sun; Professor George W. Roberts

2000-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

399

ZINC/AIR BATTERY R & D RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF BIFUNCTIONAL OXYGEN ELECTRODE TASKS I AND II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENCE DIVISION ZINC/AIR BATTERY R&D C-.J(~ur.1":! rfS SECTIONLBL-22661 ZINC/AIR BATTERY R&D RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OFTask III - Zinc Air for EV Battery - an engineerin~~~~~¥! 3!

Klein, M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Criticality safety considerations for MSRE fuel drain tank uranium aggregation  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of a preliminary criticality safety study of some potential effects of uranium reduction and aggregation in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) fuel drain tanks (FDTs) during salt removal operations. Since the salt was transferred to the FDTs in 1969, radiological and chemical reactions have been converting the uranium and fluorine in the salt to UF{sub 6} and free fluorine. Significant amounts of uranium (at least 3 kg) and fluorine have migrated out of the FDTs and into the off-gas system (OGS) and the auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB). The loss of uranium and fluorine from the salt changes the chemical properties of the salt sufficiently to possibly allow the reduction of the UF{sub 4} in the salt to uranium metal as the salt is remelted prior to removal. It has been postulated that up to 9 kg of the maximum 19.4 kg of uranium in one FDT could be reduced to metal and concentrated. This study shows that criticality becomes a concern when more than 5 kg of uranium concentrates to over 8 wt% of the salt in a favorable geometry.

Hollenbach, D.F.; Hopper, C.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Computational Physics and Engineering Div.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Supervised Rank Aggregation for Predicting Influence in Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

focused on the identification of the most important actors in a social network. This has resulted in several measures of influence and authority. While most of such sociometrics (e.g., PageRank) are driven by intuitions based on an actors location in a network, asking for the “most influential ” actors in itself is an ill-posed question, unless it is put in context with a specific measurable task. Constructing a predictive task of interest in a given domain provides a mechanism to quantitatively compare different measures of influence. Furthermore, when we know what type of actionable insight to gather, we need not rely on a single network centrality measure. A combination of measures is more likely to capture various aspects of the social network that are predictive and beneficial for the task. Towards this end, we propose an approach to supervised rank aggregation, driven by techniques from Social Choice Theory. We illustrate the effectiveness of this method through experiments on Twitter and citation networks. I.

Karthik Subbian; Prem Melville

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Risk analysis of nuclear safeguards regulations. [Aggregated Systems Model (ASM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Aggregated Systems Model (ASM), a probabilisitic risk analysis tool for nuclear safeguards, was applied to determine benefits and costs of proposed amendments to NRC regulations governing nuclear material control and accounting systems. The objective of the amendments was to improve the ability to detect insiders attempting to steal large quantities of special nuclear material (SNM). Insider threats range from likely events with minor consequences to unlikely events with catastrophic consequences. Moreover, establishing safeguards regulations is complicated by uncertainties in threats, safeguards performance, and consequences, and by the subjective judgments and difficult trade-offs between risks and safeguards costs. The ASM systematically incorporates these factors in a comprehensive, analytical framework. The ASM was used to evaluate the effectiveness of current safeguards and to quantify the risk of SNM theft. Various modifications designed to meet the objectives of the proposed amendments to reduce that risk were analyzed. Safeguards effectiveness was judged in terms of the probability of detecting and preventing theft, the expected time to detection, and the expected quantity of SNM diverted in a year. Data were gathered in tours and interviews at NRC-licensed facilities. The assessment at each facility was begun by carefully selecting scenarios representing the range of potential insider threats. A team of analysts and facility managers assigned probabilities for detection and prevention events in each scenario. Using the ASM we computed the measures of system effectiveness and identified cost-effective safeguards modifications that met the objectives of the proposed amendments.

Al-Ayat, R.A.; Altman, W.D.; Judd, B.R.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

A preliminary report on zinc-induced resistance to nitrogen mustard toxicity in mice  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies with cultured human normal fibroblasts indicated that treatment of cells with zinc before exposure to alkylating agents enhanced cell survival by seven- to nine-fold. To establish whether a similar zinc-induced protective response could be elicited in vivo, a set of preliminary experiments was carried out in which Balb/cJ mice were treated with zinc chloride (2 mg/kg body weight) or saline by intraperitoneal (ip) injection at 48, 36, 24, and 12 h before ip administration of 4 mg/kg of the alkylating agent nitrogen mustard. Of the animals that received saline before nitrogen mustard, 57% were killed compared with only 20% in the group treated with zinc before administration of the alkylating agent. These results (which almost certainly were achieved with less than optimal induction conditions) provide evidence for the existence, in vivo, of a zinc-inducible process that reduces alkylating agent lethality. 12 refs., 4 figs.

Shackelford, M.E.; Tobey, R.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

The development of a micropatterned electrode for studies of zinc electrodeposition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A micropatterned electrode was prepared for the study of electrocrystallization. Using microphotolithography, in conjunction with evaporation and pulse electrodeposition of thin films, a set of artificially roughened electrodes with hemispherical surface features five microns in diameter was developed. Voltammetric studies were conducted to determine the best electrode material. Gold, platinum, and various carbon surfaces were evaluated for zinc nucleation density and hydrogen overpotential. Surface homogeneity was examined by both light and scanning electron microscopy. Gold was determined to possess the best combination of material properties: chemical inertness, low melting point, and a high work function allowing underpotential deposition of zinc which reduces the rate of hydrogen evolution. Stripping coulometry was employed to determine zinc limiting currents, and evaluate effective diffusion coefficients in concentrated zinc chloride solutions. Although the method worked well for dilute zinc chloride and copper sulfate solutions, it failed at higher current densities; the emergence of surface roughness obscured actual limiting current plateaus.

Sutija, D.P.; Muller, R.H.; Tobias, C.W.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Thermal Degradation of Single Crystal Zinc Oxide and the Growth of Nanostructures  

SciTech Connect

Heat treatment of (0001) single crystal zinc oxide (ZnO) seems to degrade the surface morphology at high temperature. The degradation, however, does not suppress the growth of ZnO nanostructures on selective regions of the single crystal ZnO that have been sputtered with metallic zinc (Zn) and annealed at 800 degree sign C. On the uncoated regions, no growth occurs but the presence of pits suggests material loss from the surface. The formation of ZnO nanostructures on the selective regions could be aided by the preferential loss of oxygen as well as zinc suboxides from the uncoated regions. Indirect evidence of the role of oxygen and zinc suboxides can be inferred from the formation of nickel zinc oxide Ni{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1}O and nickel oxide NiO{sub 2} when Zn is replaced by Ni and annealed under similar conditions.

Saw, K. G.; Tan, G. L. [Physics Section, School of Distance Education, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Hassan, Z.; Yam, F. K.; Ng, S. S. [Schools of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia)

2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

406

Zinc Uptake and Radial Transport in Roots of Arabidopsis thaliana: A Modelling Approach to Understand Accumulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zinc uptake in roots is believed to be mediated by ZIP (ZRT-, IRT- like Proteins) transporters. Once inside the symplast, zinc is transported to the pericycle, where it exits by means of HMA (Heavy Metal ATPase) transporters. The combination of symplastic transport and spatial separation of influx and efflux produces a pattern in which zinc accumulates in the pericycle. Here, mathematical modelling was employed to study the importance of ZIP regulation, HMA level and symplastic transport in creation of the radial pattern of zinc in primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. A comprehensive one-dimensional dynamical model of radial zinc transport in roots was developed and used to conduct simulations. The model accounts for the structure of the root consisting of symplast and apoplast and includes effects of water flow, diffusion, and cross-membrane transport via transporters. It also incorporates the radial geometry and varying porosity of root tissues, as well as regulation of ZIP transporters. Steady state patt...

Claus, Juliane; Chavarría-Krauser, Andrés

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

DURABILITY EVALUATION AND PRODUCTION OF MANUFACTURED AGGREGATES FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect

Under the cooperative agreement with DOE, the Research and Development Department of CONSOL Energy (CONSOL R&D), teamed with Universal Aggregates, LLC, to conduct a systematic study of the durability of aggregates manufactured using a variety of flue gas desulfurization (FGD), fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) and fly ash specimens with different chemical and physical properties and under different freeze/thaw, wet/dry and long-term natural weathering conditions. The objectives of the study are to establish the relationships among the durability and characteristics of FGD material, FBC ash and fly ash, and to identify the causes of durability problems, and, ultimately, to increase the utilization of FGD material, FBC ash and fly ash as a construction material. Manufactured aggregates made from FGD material, FBC ash and fly ash, and products made from those manufactured aggregates were used in the study. The project is divided into the following activities: sample collection and characterization; characterization and preparation of manufactured aggregates; determination of durability characteristics of manufactured aggregates; preparation and determination of durability characteristics of manufactured aggregate products; and data evaluation and reporting.

M. M. Wu

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Aggregate-associated carbon and nitrogen in reclaimed sandy loam soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Minimal research has been conducted on aggregate, C, and N in coarse-textured soils used to reclaim surface coal mine lands. Furthermore, little is known about the contribution different plant communities make to the recovery of aggregation in these soils. Two chronosequences of semiarid reclaimed sites with sandy loam soils were sampled under shrub- and grass-dominated communities. Aggregation, aggregate fractions, and associated C and N were measured. No definitive trends of increasing macroaggregates between sites were observed undershrubs; however, macro- and microaggregation was greater in the 16-yr-old (0.20 and 0.23 kg aggregate kg{sup -1} soil, respectively) than in the 5-yr-old soils (0.02 and 0.08 kg aggregate kg{sup -1} soil, respectively) under grasses. Although C and N concentrations were drastically reduced (50-75%) with mining activity between the <1-yr-old and native soils, aggregate C and N concentrations tinder shrubs and grasses were similar to each other and to the native soils in the 5-yr-old site. Sods under grass in the 16-yr-old site had lower available and aggregate-occluded C and N concentrations than the 5-yr-old site, while C and N concentrations did not change between 5- and 16-yr-old soils under shrubs. Conversely, aggregate C and N pool sizes under shrubs and grasses both increased with site age to conditions similar to those observed in the native soil. Reclaimed shrub site soils had consistently higher C concentrations in the older reclaimed sites (10 and 16 yr old) than the soils under grasses, indicating greater accumulation and retention of C and N in organic material under shrub than grass communities in semiarid reclaimed sites.

Wick, A.F.; Stahl, P.D.; Ingram, L.J. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Full counting statistics of laser excited Rydberg aggregates in a one-dimensional geometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We experimentally study the full counting statistics of few-body Rydberg aggregates excited from a quasi-one-dimensional Rydberg gas. We measure asymmetric excitation spectra and increased second and third order statistical moments of the Rydberg number distribution, from which we determine the average aggregate size. Direct comparisons with numerical simulations reveal the presence of liquid-like spatial correlations, and indicate sequential growth of the aggregates around an initial grain. These findings demonstrate the importance of dissipative effects in strongly correlated Rydberg gases and introduce a way to study spatio-temporal correlations in strongly-interacting many-body quantum systems without imaging.

H. Schempp; G. Günter; M. Robert-de-Saint-Vincent; C. S. Hofmann; D. Breyel; A. Komnik; D. W. Schönleber; M. Gärttner; J. Evers; S. Whitlock; M. Weidemüller

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Method for the production of cementitious compositions and aggregate derivatives from said compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method for the production of cementitious compositions and aggregate derivatives of said compositions, and cementitious compositions and aggregates produced by said method, wherein fluidized bed combustion residue and pozzolanic material, such as pulverized coal combustion system fly ash, are incorporated in a cementitious mix. The mix is cast into desired shape and cured. If desired, the shape may then be crushed so as to result in a fluidized bed combustion residue-fly ash aggregate material or the shape may be used by itself.

Minnick, L. John (Box 271, Plymouth Meeting, PA 19462)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Thermodynamics of Peptide Aggregation Processes. An Analysis from Perspectives of Three Statistical Ensembles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We employ a mesoscopic model for studying aggregation processes of protein-like hydrophobic-polar heteropolymers. By means of multicanonical Monte Carlo computer simulations, we find strong indications that peptide aggregation is a phase separation process, in which the microcanonical entropy exhibits a convex intruder due to nonnegligible surface effects of the small systems. We analyze thermodynamic properties of the conformational transitions accompanying the aggregation process from the multicanonical, canonical, and microcanonical perspective. It turns out that the microcanonical description is particularly advantageous as it allows for unraveling details of the phase-separation transition in the thermodynamic region, where the temperature is not a suitable external control parameter anymore.

Christoph Junghans; Michael Bachmann; Wolfhard Janke

2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

412

Research on separators for alkaline zinc batteries. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is concerned with the research and development of a hybrid separator as an improved battery separator in alkaline zinc secondary batteries. Particular emphasis has been directed toward mitigating the failure of zinc electrodes by controlling the permselectivity of the separator. Hybrid separators were synthesized and fabricated. These separators consist of a microporous film, radiation-grafted with a monomer containing ion-exchange groups. The new separator incorporates the favorable aspects of both ion-exchange membranes and microporous separators. Such a hybrid separator should ideally be highly specific for fast transport of electrolyte while inhibiting zincate diffusion. Hybrid separators with a wide range of percent graft (0 to 60%) were made by varying the monomer concentration and radiation time. The grafting of these ionic groups imparts the ion selectivity of the separators. The electrolyte uptake of hybrid separators is ca. 60 wt %. The higher the percent graft of the separator, the higher the water uptake and the lower the KOH uptake that are observed. The permeabilities of zincate ions were measured for a series of hybrid separators.

Yeo, R.S.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Induced Positron Annihiliation Investigation of Cadmium Zinc Telluride Crystal Microstructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) crystals are used in semiconductor radiation detectors for the detection of x-ray and gamma radiation. However, production of detector grade crystals is difficult as small variations in compositional uniformity and primarily the zinc content can significantly affect the ability of the CZT crystal to function as a radiation detector. Currently there are no known nondestructive methods that can be used to identify detector grade crystals. The current test method is to fabricate and test the detector to determine if the crystal is sufficiently uniform and of the correct composition to be considered a detector grade crystal. Consequently, nondestructive detection methods are needed to identify detector grade crystals prior to the fabrication process. The purpose of this feasibility study was to perform a preliminary assessment of the ability of several new, nondestructive technologies based on Induced Positron Annihilation (IPA) to determine if detector grade CZT crystals can be identified. Results of measurements performed on specimens from Fisk University and EV Products, Inc. indicate that both the near surface Distributed Source Positron Annihilation (up to 3 mm penetration) and the volumetric Photon Induced Positron Annihilation methods may be suitable for determining CZT crystal quality. Further work on CZT crystals with a broader range of compositions and detector characteristics is needed to provide a well defined, calibrated, method for assessing CZT crystal quality.

D. W. Akers

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Mine-to-Mill Optimization of Aggregate Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mine-to-Mill optimization is a total systems approach to the reduction of energy and cost in mining and mineral processing operations. Developed at the Julius Krutschnitt Mineral Research Centre (JKMRC) in Queensland, Australia, the Mine-to-Mill approach attempts to minimize energy consumption through the optimization of all steps in the size reduction process. The approach involves sampling and modeling of blasting and processing, followed by computer simulation to optimize the operation and develop alternatives. The most promising alternatives are implemented, and sampling is conducted to quantify energy savings. In the current project, the primary objective is to adapt the JKMRC Mine-to-Mill technology to the aggregates industry. The second phase of this project is being carried out at the Pittsboro Quarry located south of Chapel Hill, North Carolina. This quarry is owned by 3M Corporation and operated by Luck Stone. Based on lessons learned from the first phase work, long-term monitoring ({approx} three months) of all quarry operations is being carried out to minimize the impact of geological changes during the mining process. To date, the blasting and processing operations have been audited and modeled, the long-term monitoring of current Luck Stone practice has been completed, and a modified blasting approach has been implemented based on the results of simulations using JKSimBlast and JKSimPlant. The modified blasting approach is expected to increase the primary throughput by 15% and the secondary throughput by approximately 6%, with an overall specific energy reduction of around 1%. Long-term monitoring is currently underway to evaluate the impact the modified blasting approach. This report summarizes the current status of work at the Pittsboro Quarry.

Greg Adel; Toni Kojovic; Darren Thornton

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Monodispersed biocompatible silver sulfide nanoparticles: Facile extracellular biosynthesis using the gamma-proteobacterium, Shewanella oneidensis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interest in engineered metal and semiconductor nanocrystallites continues to grow due to their unique size- and shape-dependent optoelectronic, physicochemical and biological properties. Therefore identifying novel non-hazardous nanoparticle synthesis routes that address hydrophilicity, size and shape control and production costs has become a priority. In the present article we report for the first time on the efficient generation of extracellular silver sulfide (Ag{sub 2}S) nanoparticles by the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis. The particles are reasonably monodispersed and homogeneously shaped. They are produced under ambient temperatures and pressures at high yield, 85% theoretical maximum. UV-visible and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements confirmed the formation, optical and surface properties, purity and crystallinity of the synthesized particles. Further characterization revealed that the particles consist of spheres with a mean diameter of 9 {+-} 3.5 nm, and are capped by a detachable protein/peptide surface coat. Toxicity assessments of these biogenic Ag{sub 2}S nanoparticles on Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and S. oneidensis) and Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) bacterial systems, as well as eukaryotic cell lines including mouse lung epithelial (C 10) and macrophage (RAW-264.7) cells, showed that the particles were non-inhibitory and non-cytotoxic to any of these systems. Our results provide a facile, eco-friendly and economical route for the fabrication of technologically important semiconducting Ag{sub 2}S nanoparticles. These particles are dispersible and biocompatible, thus providing excellent potential for use in optical imaging, electronic devices and solar cell applications.

Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Moon, Ji Won [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Hensley, Dale K [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide to Elemental Sulfur from Coal-Derived Fuel Gases  

SciTech Connect

The development of low cost, highly efficient, desulfurization technology with integrated sulfur recovery remains a principle barrier issue for Vision 21 integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation plants. In this plan, the U. S. Department of Energy will construct ultra-clean, modular, co-production IGCC power plants each with chemical products tailored to meet the demands of specific regional markets. The catalysts employed in these co-production modules, for example water-gas-shift and Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, are readily poisoned by hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a sulfur contaminant, present in the coal-derived fuel gases. To prevent poisoning of these catalysts, the removal of H{sub 2}S down to the parts-per-billion level is necessary. Historically, research into the purification of coal-derived fuel gases has focused on dry technologies that offer the prospect of higher combined cycle efficiencies as well as improved thermal integration with co-production modules. Primarily, these concepts rely on a highly selective process separation step to remove low concentrations of H{sub 2}S present in the fuel gases and produce a concentrated stream of sulfur bearing effluent. This effluent must then undergo further processing to be converted to its final form, usually elemental sulfur. Ultimately, desulfurization of coal-derived fuel gases may cost as much as 15% of the total fixed capital investment (Chen et al., 1992). It is, therefore, desirable to develop new technology that can accomplish H{sub 2}S separation and direct conversion to elemental sulfur more efficiently and with a lower initial fixed capital investment.

Gardner, Todd H.; Berry, David A.; Lyons, K. David; Beer, Stephen K.; Monahan, Michael J.

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

417

Kinetic and morphological development of oxide-sulfide scales on iron at 1,073 K  

SciTech Connect

The corrosion behavior of pure iron has been investigated at 1,073 K in controlled gas atmospheres of SO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-CO-N{sub 2}. The equilibrium gas compositions were such that: (1) FeS was stable with respect to FeO, (2) FeO was stable with respect to FeS, and (3) only one of the solids was stable with respect to the gas sulfur and oxygen activities. The resultant scale morphologies are discussed along with the observed parabolic corrosion kinetics. It was shown that duplex (oxide plus sulfide) scales could be produced under all three reaction conditions. Careful adjustment of gas compositions permitted comparisons to be made among sets of experiments having (1) the same p{sub s{sub 2}} value but different p{sub so{sub 2}} and p{sub o{sub 2}}values, (2) the same p{sub o{sub 2}} value but different p{sub so{sub 2}} and p{sub s{sub 2}} values, and (3) the same p{sub so{sub 2}}value but different p{sub s{sub 2}} and p{sub o{sub 2}}values. In this way it was confirmed that the reactant species was SO{sub 2} over a wide range of gas compositions, and under conditions in which solid-state diffusion was rate-controlling. The exception was found at very high p{sub s{sub 2}} values, where elemental sulfur was the reactant. Catalysis of the reactant gas demonstrated that the results could be affected by the slow approach to equilibrium of the gas phase.

McAdam, G.; Young, D.J. (Univ. of New South Wales, Kensington (Australia))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Data aggregation architectures for single-chip SDH/SONET framers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single-chip SDH/SONET framer architectures are described that permit data aggregation from several line ports. After presenting an overview of the usual parallel approach and an extension thereof that exploits distributed algorithms, we introduce a novel ...

R. Clauberg

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

The Rhône-Aggregation Land Surface Scheme Intercomparison Project: An Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Rhône-Aggregation (Rhône-AGG) Land Surface Scheme (LSS) intercomparison project is an initiative within the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX)/Global Land–Atmosphere System Study (GLASS) panel of the World Climate Research ...

A. Boone; F. Habets; J. Noilhan; D. Clark; P. Dirmeyer; S. Fox; Y. Gusev; I. Haddeland; R. Koster; D. Lohmann; S. Mahanama; K. Mitchell; O. Nasonova; G.-Y. Niu; A. Pitman; J. Polcher; A. B. Shmakin; K. Tanaka; B. van den Hurk; S. Vérant; D. Verseghy; P. Viterbo; Z.-L. Yang

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

To reach consensus using uninorm aggregation operator: A gossip-based protocol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gossip-based protocols for group communication have attractive scalability and reliability properties. This paper presents a gossip-based protocol that enables agents to reach a consensus based on a specific uninorm aggregation operator. We theoretically ...

Zhixing Huang; Qiaoli Huang

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Arginine and the Hofmeister Series: The Role of Ion–Ion Interactions in Protein Aggregation Suppression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L-Arginine hydrochloride is a very important aggregation suppressor for which there has been much attention given regarding elucidating its mechanism of action. Little consideration, however, has been given toward other ...

Schneider, Curtiss P.

422

Aggregation of U.S. Population Centers Using Climate Parameters Related to Building Energy Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique for aggregating population centers into groups based on selected climate parameters is presented. Climate information on the 125 largest Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas (SMSAs) in the United States is used to assign each SMSA ...

Brandt Andersson; William L. Carroll; Marlo R. Martin

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Network Intrusion Detection and Visualization using Aggregations in a Cyber Security Data Warehouse  

SciTech Connect

The challenge of achieving situational understanding is a limiting factor in effective, timely, and adaptive cyber-security analysis. Anomaly detection fills a critical role in network assessment and trend analysis, both of which underlie the establishment of comprehensive situational understanding. To that end, we propose a cyber security data warehouse implemented as a hierarchical graph of aggregations that captures anomalies at multiple scales. Each node of our pro-posed graph is a summarization table of cyber event aggregations, and the edges are aggregation operators. The cyber security data warehouse enables domain experts to quickly traverse a multi-scale aggregation space systematically. We describe the architecture of a test bed system and a summary of results on the IEEE VAST 2012 Cyber Forensics data.

Czejdo, Bogdan [ORNL; Ferragut, Erik M [ORNL; Goodall, John R [ORNL; Laska, Jason A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Controlling the architectures and optical properties of conjugated polymer aggregates and films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The semiconducting properties of conjugated polymers are finding use in various optoelectronic applications, including chemical sensors and light-emitting diodes. In this thesis, we investigate aggregation in conjugated ...

Satrijo, Andrew

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

An Energy-Balance Analysis of Deep Convective Self-Aggregation above Uniform SST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-aggregation is sensitive to the ice microphysical parameterization, which affects the location and extent of cirrus clouds the dry to the moist regions. A simple mathematical model of the initial phase of self

Bretherton, Chris

426

Natural -sheet proteins use negative design to avoid edge-to-edge aggregation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of proteins almost all have severe problems of insol- ubility and aggregation (3­6); many designs originally surveys their properties in all classes of all- structure. Methods Coordinate files are from the Protein

Richardson, David

427

Absorption of zinc and iron by rats fed meals containing sorghum food products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zinc and iron absorption from freeze-dried traditionally-prepared sorghum food products was studied in rats. After a period of marginal zinc or iron depletion, rats were fed test meals containing 1 of 4 sorghum foods cooked maize gruel or an inorganic mineral each of which was extrinsically labeled with either /sup 65/Zn or /sup 59/Fe before being added to the diets. Absorption was determined by whole body percent retention of the initial radioisotope dose over a period of 19 days. Iron was highly available from all products tested (75-83%) with no significant differences in absorption among groups (p>0.05). Zinc from fermented Aceta (97%) was more available than that from the other sorghum products (69-78%) or maize gruel (76%). Zinc from acid To (78%) and Aceta (97%) was as available as that from zinc oxide in the control diet (93%) (p>0.05). There were no significant differences in zinc absorption among groups fed Acid To (78%), neutral To (76), alkali To (69%) or maize gruel (76%) (psorghum foods. Iron and zinc were highly available from all sorghum foods. Reduction phytate by fermentation increased Zn availability.

Stuart, S.M.A.; Johnson, P.E.; Hamaker, B.; Kirleis, A.

1986-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

428

Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash  

SciTech Connect

Universal Aggregates LLC (UA) was awarded a cost sharing Co-operative Agreement from the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Power Plant Improvement Initiative Program (PPII) to design, construct and operate a lightweight aggregate manufacturing plant at the Birchwood Power Facility in King George, Virginia in October 2001. The Agreement was signed in November 2002. The installation and start-up expenses for the Birchwood Aggregate Facility are $19.5 million. The DOE share is $7.2 million (37%) and the UA share is $12.3 million (63%). The original project team consists of UA, SynAggs, LLC, CONSOL Energy Inc. and P. J. Dick, Inc. Using 115,000 ton per year of spray dryer ash (SDA), a dry FGD by-product from the power station, UA will produce 167,000 tons of manufactured lightweight aggregate for use in production of concrete masonry units (CMU). Manufacturing aggregate from FGD by-products can provide an economical high-volume use and substantially expand market for FGD by-products. Most of the FGD by-products are currently disposed of in landfills. Construction of the Birchwood Aggregate Facility was completed in March 2004. Operation startup was begun in April 2004. Plant Integration was initiated in December 2004. Integration includes mixing, extrusion, curing, crushing and screening. Lightweight aggregates with proper size gradation and bulk density were produced from the manufacturing aggregate plant and loaded on a stockpile for shipment. The shipped aggregates were used in a commercial block plant for CMU production. However, most of the production was made at low capacity factors and for a relatively short time in 2005. Several areas were identified as important factors to improve plant capacity and availability. Equipment and process control modifications and curing vessel clean up were made to improve plant operation in the first half of 2006. About 3,000 tons of crushed aggregate was produced in August 2006. UA is continuing to work to improve plant availability and throughput capacity and to produce quality lightweight aggregate for use in commercial applications.

Milton Wu; Paul Yuran

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

Aggregation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets: Benefits, Existing Methods, and Key Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is designed to develop and disseminate to members of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the public at large, and participants in the world's evolving carbon markets a set of lessons learned about the aggregation of individual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions offset projects into larger, organized configurations that can yield large-scale GHG emissions offsets. Aggregation puts together geographically and/or temporally dispersed activities that reduce emissions in a similar manner to ...

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Detector Performance of Ammonium-Sulfide-Passivated CdZnTe and CdMnTe Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dark currents, including those in the surface and bulk, are the leading source of electronic noise in X-ray and gamma detectors, and are responsible for degrading a detector's energy resolution. The detector material itself determines the bulk leakage current; however, the surface leakage current is controllable by depositing appropriate passivation layers. In previous research, we demonstrated the effectiveness of surface passivation in CZT (CdZnTe) and CMT (CdMnTe) materials using ammonium sulfide and ammonium fluoride. In this research, we measured the effect of such passivation on the surface states of these materials, and on the performances of detectors made from them.

Kim, K.H.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Camarda, G.S.; Marchini, L.; Yang, G.; Hossain, A.; Cui, Y.; Xu, L.; and James, R.B.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Reduced-Order Modeling of Aggregated Thermostatic Loads With Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand Response is playing an increasingly important role in smart grid control strategies. Modeling the behavior of populations of appliances under demand response is especially important to evaluate the effectiveness of these demand response programs. In this paper, an aggregated model is proposed for a class of Thermostatically Controlled Loads (TCLs). The model efficiently includes statistical information of the population, systematically deals with heterogeneity, and accounts for a second-order effect necessary to accurately capture the transient dynamics in the collective response. However, an accurate characterization of the collective dynamics however requires the aggregate model to have a high state space dimension. Most of the existing model reduction techniques require the stability of the underlying system which does not hold for the proposed aggregated model. In this work, a novel model reduction approach is developed for the proposed aggregated model, which can significantly reduce its complexity with small performance loss. The original and the reducedorder aggregated models are validated against simulations of thousands of detailed building models using GridLAB-D, which is a realistic open source distribution simulation software. Index Terms – demand response, aggregated model, ancillary

Zhang, Wei; Lian, Jianming; Chang, Chin-Yao; Kalsi, Karanjit; Sun, Yannan

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

432

A new high energy stabilized nickel-zinc rechargeable battery system for SLI and EV applications  

SciTech Connect

The nickel oxide-zinc rechargeable battery system is a serious candidate for a high power economical EV battery. The introduction of a new chemistry has resulted in stabilization of the performance of the zinc anode without adversely affecting the nickel electrode. The result has been a major enhancement of the cycle life capability with retention of the remarkably high practical energy density (both gravimetric and volumetric) of the nickel-zinc system. Near term practical applications for both passenger car truck SLI batteries as well as long term deep cycle applications for electric vehicles are discussed.

Reisner, D.; Eisenberg, M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Development of Thin Section Zinc Die Casting Technology  

SciTech Connect

A new high fluidity zinc high pressure die casting alloy, termed the HF alloy, was developed during laboratory trials and proven in industrial production. The HF alloy permits castings to be achieved with section thicknesses of 0.3 mm or less. Technology transfer activities were conducted to develop usage of the HF high fluidity alloy. These included production of a brochure and a one-hour webinar on the HF alloy. The brochure was then sent to 1,184 product designers in the Interzinc database. There was excellent reception to this mailing, and from this initial contact 5 technology transfer seminars were conducted for 81 participants from 30 companies across a wide range of business sectors. Many of the successful applications to date involve high quality surface finishes. Design and manufacturing assistance was given for development of selected applications.

Goodwin, Frank [International Lead Zinc Research Org., Inc.] [International Lead Zinc Research Org., Inc.

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

434

Study on thermal annealing of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) has attracted increasing interest with its promising potential as a room-temperature nuclear-radiation-detector material. However, different defects in CZT crystals, especially Te inclusions and dislocations, can degrade the performance of CZT detectors. Post-growth annealing is a good approach potentially to eliminate the deleterious influence of these defects. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we built up different facilities for investigating post-growth annealing of CZT. Here, we report our latest experimental results. Cd-vapor annealing reduces the density of Te inclusions, while large temperature gradient promotes the migration of small-size Te inclusions. Simultaneously, the annealing lowers the density of dislocations. However, only-Cd-vapor annealing decreases the resistivity, possibly reflecting the introduction of extra Cd in the lattice. Subsequent Te-vapor annealing is needed to ensure the recovery of the resistivity after removing the Te inclusions.

Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Fochuk, P.M.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.; Horace, J.; McCall, B.; Gul, R.; Xu, L.; Kopach, O.V.; and James, R.B.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Electric Field Distribution of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) is attracting increasing interest with its promise as a room-temperature nuclear-radiation-detector material. The distribution of the electric field in CZT detectors substantially affects their detection performance. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we employed a synchrotron X-Ray mapping technique and a Pockels-effect measurement system to investigate this distribution in different detectors. Here, we report our latest experimental results with three detectors of different width/height ratios. A decrease in this ratio aggravates the non-uniform distribution of electric field, and focuses it on the central volume. Raising the bias voltage effectively can minimize such non-uniformity of the electric field distribution. The position of the maximum electric field is independent of the bias voltage; the difference between its maximum- and minimum-intensity of electric field increases with the applied bias voltage.

Yang,G.; Bolotnikov, A.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.; James, R.B.

2009-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

436

Ion Beam Layer Separation of Cadmium Zinc Telluride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have investigated the approach of ion induced layer separation process for layer splitting from Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) bulk single crystal and transferring and bonding the separated layers with Silicon (Si) wafers. Layer separation experiments have been carried out at UES using 1 MeV H{sup +} ions from the high energy accelerator (1.7 MV Tandetron). Ion dose and annealing temperature for complete separation of 1 cmx1 cm size layers have been optimized. Bonding of CZT with Si was accomplished using various IR transmitting chalcogenide glasses. Cracking of separated CZT films was occurring for chalcogenide glass bonded films. Optimization of thermal treatment has led to the minimization of such cracks. Detailed characterizations of the separated films will be presented.

Bhattacharya, Rabi S.; He, P.; Xu, Y. [UES, Inc. 4401 Dayton-Xenia Road, Dayton, OH 45432 (United States); Goorsky, M. [University of California at Los Angeles, 10920 Wilshire Blvd, Suite 107, Los Angeles CA 90024 (United States)

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

437

Sulfide distribution in chemosynthetic communities at hydrocarbon seeps in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dense macrofaunal communities around hydrocarbon seeps in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) are supported by the activity of chemoautotrophic microorganisms that couple the oxidation of sulfide (H?S) or methane with the fixation of inorganic carbon into organic biomass. The connections and feedbacks between microbial activity and the geochemistry of these communities are not fully understood. The role of geochemistry in fueling microbially mediated processes was assessed by estimating sediment-water interface fluxes of H?S. Gradient driven H?S fluxes were calculated from fine-scale profiles and Fick's first law, for the top centimeter of sediments underlying Beggiatoa mats, tube worm bushes, and control sites. Profiles were obtained using solid-state mercury-gold amalgam microelectrodes capable of measuring O?, H?S, Mn²?, and Fe²? simultaneously via square and cyclic wave voltammetry. Sediment cores were collected from GOM hydrocarbon seeps using the submersible, Johnson Sea Link. Results focused on H?S as very low to undetectable concentrations of Mn²? and Fe²? were measured in porewaters. Lack of O? detection resulted from the high O? demand, which ranged from 0.006 to 0.584 mmol of O? hr?¹ according to estimates based on measured sulfate reduction rates, typical of these environments. Profiles of H?S in cores from Beggiatoa mats showed a consistent sharp increase in concentration across the sediment-water interface with little inter-annual variation, reflecting the ability of Beggiatoa to exploit favorable chemical environments. Profiles in cores collected distally and proximally to tube worm bushes in 1997 and 1998 were generally depleted over the top three to four centimeters, respectively, reflecting the potential for H?S uptake by underlying tube worm "roots". Fluxes in Beggiatoa mats ranged from -4.1 to -123.0 and -7.2 to -213.4 mmol m?² d?¹ in 1997 and 1998, respectively, into the overlying water. H?S flux from cores collected from tube worm bushes ranged from -50.6 to 5.0 and 0 to -240.2 mmol m?² d?¹ in 1997 and 1998, respectively. Variations in H?S profiles and fluxes in Beggiatoa mats, tube worms, and control sites may help delineate the distribution of different community types and their tolerance of what most consider a harsh environment.

Escorcia, Susie Patricia

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Fixed bed testing of durable, steam resistant zinc oxide containing sorbents  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is currently developing Integrated Gasification combined Cycle (IGCC) systems for electrical power generation. It has been predicted that IGCC plants with hot gas cleanup will be superior to conventional pulverized coal-fired power plants in overall plant efficiency and environmental performance. Development of a suitable regenerable sorbent is a major barrier issue in the hot gas cleanup program for IGCC systems. This has been a challenging problem during the last 20 years, since many of the sorbents developed in the program could not retain their reactivity and physical integrity during repeated cycles of sulfidation and regeneration reactions. Two promising sorbents and (METC6), which were capable of sustaining their reactivity and physical integrity during repeated sulfidation/regeneration cycles, have been developed at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) during the past year. These sorbents were tested (sulfided) both in low-pressure (260 kPa/37.7 psia) and high-pressure (1034 kPa/150 psia) fixed-bed reactors at 538{degrees}C (1000{degrees}F) with simulated KRW coal gas. High-pressure testing was continued for 20 cycles with steam regeneration. There were no appreciable changes in sulfidation capacity of the sorbents during the 20-cycle testing. The crush strength of the sorbent actually improved after 20 cycles and there were no indications of spalling or any other physical deterioration of the sorbents. In testing to date, these sorbents exhibit better overall sulfur capture performance than the conventional sorbents.

Siriwardane, R.V.; Grimm, U.; Poston, J. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Monaco, S.J. [EG& G dTechnical Services of West Virginia, Inc., Morgantown, WV (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

COAL LIQUEFACTION USING ZINC CHLORIDE CATALYST IN AN EXTRACTING SOLVENT MEDIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rate Data o a o u a a Catalyst Loading • . Reaction Time . •and Pressure Effect of CO-catalysts and Additives .Co-catalysts • • a. Zinc Metal • b. Nickel and Nickel

Gandhi, Shamim Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Relating the biogeochemistries of zinc, cobalt, and phosphorus to phytoplankton activities in the sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the potential of zinc, cobalt, and phosphorus to influence primary production in the subarctic North Pacific, the Bering Sea, and the North Atlantic Ocean. In the North Pacific and Bering Sea, total ...

Wisniewski, Rachel J. (Rachel Jane), 1978-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Flow-Assisted Zinc Anode Batteries for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6&91&>09-+&@C:40(:&O7B0& %.PQRR340(+;"""GS8P(+:S:75& FLOW-ASSISTED ZINC ANODE BATTERIES FOR GRID-SCALE ELECTRICITY STORAGE Prof. Sanjoy Banerjee, banerjee@che.ccny.cuny.e...

442

Biochemistry of mobile zinc and nitric oxide revealed by fluorescent sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biological mobile zinc and nitric oxide (NO) are two prominent examples of inorganic compounds involved in numerous signaling pathways in living systems. In the past decade, a synergy of regulation, signaling, and translocation ...

Pluth, Michael D.

443

Fabrication and corrosion resistance of superhydrophobic hydroxide zinc carbonate film on aluminum substrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Superhydrophobic hydroxide zinc carbonate (HZC) films were fabricated on aluminum substrate through a convenient in situ deposition process. Firstly, HZC films with different morphologies were deposited on aluminum substrates through immersing the aluminum ...

Jin Liang, Yunchu Hu, Yiqiang Wu, Hong Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

EFFECT OF THERMAL PROCESSES ON COPPER-TIN ALLOYS FOR ZINC GETTERING  

SciTech Connect

A contamination mitigation plan was initiated to address the discovery of radioactive zinc‐65 in a glovebox. A near term solution was developed, installation of heated filters in the glovebox piping. This solution is effective at retaining the zinc in the currently contaminated area, but the gamma emitting contaminant is still present in a system designed for tritium beta. A project was initiated to develop a solution to contain the {sup 65}Zn in the furnace module. Copper and bronze (a Cu/Sn alloy) were found to be candidate materials to combine with zinc‐65 vapor, using thermodynamic calculations. A series of binary Cu/Sn alloys were developed (after determining that commercial alloys were unacceptable), that were found to be effective traps of zinc vapor. The task described in this report was undertaken to determine if the bronze substrates would retain their zinc gettering capability after being exposed to simulated extraction conditions with oxidizing and reducing gases. Pure copper and three bronze alloys were prepared, exposed to varying oxidation conditions from 250 to 450{degree}C, then exposed to varying reduction conditions in He-H{sub 2} from 250-450{degree}C, and finally exposed to zinc vapor at 350{degree}C for four hours. The samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, mass change, and visual observation. It was observed that the as fabricated samples and the reduced samples all retained their zinc gettering capacity while samples in the "as-oxidized" condition exhibited losses in zinc gettering capacity. Over the range of conditions tested, i.e., composition, oxidation temperature, and reduction temperature, no particular sample composition appeared better. Samples reduced at 350{degree}C exhibited the greatest zinc capacity, although there were some testing anomalies associated with these samples. This work clearly demonstrated that the zinc gettering was not adversely affected by exposure to simulated process conditions and a full scale lithium and zinc trap should be fabricated for testing in the Tritium Extraction Facility.

Korinko, P.; Golyski, M.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

C:\Documents and Settings\burris\My Documents\My Files\Eco-SSLs\Contaminant Specific Documents\Zinc\June 2007\Eco-SSL for Zinc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zinc Zinc Interim Final OSWER Directive 9285.7-73 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 June 2007 This page intentionally left blank i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.0 SUMMARY OF ECO-SSLs FOR ZINC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3.0 ECO-SSL FOR TERRESTRIAL PLANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 4.0 ECO-SSL FOR SOIL INVERTEBRATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 5.0 ECO-SSL FOR AVIAN WILDLIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 5.1 Avian TRV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 5.2 Estimation of Dose and Calculation of the Eco-SSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 6.0 ECO-SSL FOR MAMMALIAN WILDLIFE .

446

Aggregating physical intensity indicators: results of applying the composite indicator approach to the Canadian industrial sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Issues surrounding the development, application and interpretation of energy intensity indicators are a continuing source of debate in the field of energy policy analysis. Although economic energy intensity indicators still dominate intensity/efficiency studies, the use of physical energy intensity indicators is on the rise. In the past, physical energy intensity indicators were not employed since it was often impossible to develop aggregate (sector-level or nation-wide) measures of physical energy intensity due to the difficulties associated with adding diverse physical products. This paper presents the results of research conducted specifically to address this ‘‘aggregation’ ’ problem. The research focused on the development of the Composite Indicator Approach, a simple, practical, alternative method for calculating aggregate physical energy intensity indicators. In this paper, the Composite Indicator Approach is used to develop physical energy intensity indicators for the Canadian industrial and manufacturing sectors, and is then compared to other existing methods of aggregation. The physical composite indicators developed using this approach are also evaluated in terms of their reliability and overall usefulness. Both comparisons suggest that the Composite Indicator Approach can be a useful, and ultimately suitable, way of addressing the aggregation problem typically associated with heterogeneous sectors of the economy. r

Mallika N; John Nyboer; Mark Jaccard

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Communal spaces: aggregation and integration in the Mogollon Region of the United States Southwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aggregation and integration are processes that occur in human societies throughout the globe. An informative example of population aggregation and social integration can be observed in the North American desert borderlands from A.D. 250 to 1450 in the area known as the Mogollon region. In fact, Mogollon communities oscillated from smaller social groups into larger ones and dispersed into smaller groups only to form larger ones again. For this reason, examining the groups of people living in the Mogollon region provides a magnified view of social change over a substantial period. Understanding patterns of aggregation and integration provides researchers with the promise for research into the nature of these phenomena. In general, the Mogollon region is characterized by limited water supplies and low average annual precipitation. However, pockets of the Mogollon area, including the Mimbres valley and the Gila River valley, represent oases, where permanent rivers and their associated tributaries allowed for the pursuit of agricultural endeavors and access to a wide variety of wild plant and animal resources. The areas with these kinds of potential became population centers for previously dispersed groups of people living in the region. These people exploited natural resources and practiced agriculture in areas surrounding their communities. Over time, more organized aggregated and socially integrated communities were established throughout the region. Using ancient Mogollon communal architecture, commonly called kivas, this study examines issues of, and evidence for, population aggregation and social integration.

Nisengard, Jennifer E.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Research, development and demonstration of nickel-zinc batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report for 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first annual report describing progress in the 33-month cooperative program between Argonne National Laboratory and Gould Inc.'s Nickel-Zinc/Electric Vehicle Project. The purpose of the program is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of the nickel-zinc battery for electric vehicle propulsion. The successful completion of the program will qualify the nickel-zinc battery for use in the Department of Energy's demonstration program under the auspices of Public Law 94-413.

Not Available

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Arsenate and Arsenite Retention and Release in Oxide and Sulfide Dominated Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal pollution of surface water resources in Texas is a significant problem, and is caused by the inflow of sediments from oil fields, old mines and industrial sites, and by the discharge of metal contaminated sewage and industrial effluents. In the preliminary phases of this project we were interested in a range of contaminant metals; however, following early experiments it was determined that emphasis would be given to arsenic due to the importance of several arsenic contaminated sites in east and central Texas. Three important general field and laboratory observations have been made concerning arsenic and have served as a basis for these studies: (1) correlations between metal concentrations of suspended solids or sediments (as measured by the recommended EPA and USGS methods) and metal levels in fish are often poor, (2) metal concentrations in pore waters of bottom sediments are often highly variable (with time and space) and often considerably higher (but sometimes lower) than in the overlying water column, (3) arsenic speciation and solubility are strongly influenced by redox potential. Existing EPA and USGS methods for quantifying the arsenic level of sediment or suspended solids primarily involve digestion by strong acids. While these methods do provide an indication of total concentration of metals, they often do not provide a reliable measure of bioavailability, either directly to aqueous animals or indirectly through the food chain. Inorganic arsenic exists primarily in the +3 or +5 oxidation states (depending on redox potential), and its reactions in soils and sediments are influenced by pH, redox potential, dissolved organic or inorganic components, and sediment colloids (especially Fe sulfides and Fe, Mn, and Al oxides and hydroxides) and organic matter. Arsenic is often concentrated at the surfaces of suspended and sediment colloids (as surface adsorbed and occluded species or possibly as poorly ordered solid solutions). Arsenic (+3 and +5) is bound, by ligand bonding mechanisms, at the surfaces of solid phase Fe, Al and Mn oxides, though there are major descrepencies in the literature concerning the relative bonding strengths of arsenate and arsenite. These reactions at colloidal surfaces strongly influence its availability within the biosphere in oxidized systems. Arsenic (+3) is readily precipitated as As2S3 or coprecipitated in the FeS2 or FeS structure, and these compounds often control the solubility of arsenic in low redox environments. Because of these reactions, arsenic is likely strongly influenced by the presence of inorganic sulfur. The objectives of the study were as follows: 1. To characterize the concentrations and chemical forms of arsenic and the factors which influence its retention and release 2. To evaluate the role of the periodic oxidation/reduction processes that may occur in sediments on retention and release of arsenic 3. To evaluate the probable role of biologically induced processes (e.g., oxidation/reduction, acidification, and ligand exchange) which may influence the mobilization of precipitated or adsorbed arsenic 4. To develop surface dissolution procedures to assess heavy metal mobilization potential in sediments in the aquatic environment, with emphasis on calcareous stream bed sediments. The primary benefit of this study will be to improve procedures for assessing the bioavailability and potential biological hazard of metals in suspended solids and sediments. Accomplishment of these objectives has enabled us to recommend procedures for assessing biohazard potential and ultimately to better monitor aquatic environments.

Loeppert, Richard H.; Jain, Amita; Raven, Klaus; Wang, Jianlin

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Ordered Nucleation Sites for the Growth of Zinc Oxide Nanofibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) offer a promising route to low cost photovoltaic (PV) technology that can be inexpensively manufactured on a large scale for use in power generation and commercial products. Solar power conversion efficiencies of laboratory scale OPV devices have recently reached ~5%; however, projected efficiencies of at least 10% will be required for commercialization. An analogous approach that has arisen recently that can potentially increase efficiencies employs metal oxide semiconductors as the electron acceptor, creating a hybrid organic-inorganic device. This approach offers the advantage that the conduction band of the oxide can be tuned in a systematic way through doping, thus potentially achieving higher photovoltages in the device. Additionally, nanostructures of these materials can be easily grown from precursor solutions, providing a technique to precisely control the nanoscale geometry. This work focuses on using ZnO, which is known to have high electron mobility (>100 cm2/Vs), as the electron acceptor. Nanofibers of ZnO can be grown from precursors such as zinc acetate or zinc nitrate to form arrays of nanofibers into which a conjugated polymer can be intercalated to form a composite PV device. The morphology of the nanofiber array is critical to the performance of the device, but current methods of nanofiber growth from a flat, polycrystalline nucleation layer allow for little morphological control. To overcome this limitation, we have created ordered arrays of ZnO nucleation sites with controllable size and spacing. Toluene solutions of diblock copolymer micelles with ZnCl2 incorporated into the micellar cores were spin-coated onto glass substrates and etched with an O2 plasma to yield hexagonally ordered arrays of ZnO nanoparticles that functioned as nucleation sites. Changing the concentration of ZnCl2 and the molecular weight and ratio of the diblock copolymer resulted in systematic variation in the size and spacing of the nucleation sites. Thermal anneal treatment provided further modification of the nucleation layer, from which ZnO nanofibers were successfully grown from solution, although at present it is not known if the geometry of the as-grown ZnO nanofibers precisely reflects that of the underlying nucleation layer. This work provides a simple and useful method for potentially controlling the nucleation of ZnO nanofibers to be used in hybrid ZnO/organic nanocomposite PV devices.

Wang, J.; Ginley, D.S.; Shaheen, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Ethanol synthesis and water gas shift over bifunctional sulfide catalysts. Final technical progress report, September 12, 1991--December 11, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to investigate sulfur-resistant catalysts for the conversion of synthesis gas having H{sub 2}/CO {le} 1 into C{sub 1}--C{sub 4} alcohols, especially ethanol, by a highly selective and efficient pathway, while also promoting the water gas shift reaction (WGSR). The catalysts chosen are bifunctional, base-hydrogenation, sulfur-tolerant transition metal sulfides with heavy alkali, e.g. Cs{sup +}, promoter dispersed on their surfaces. The modes of activation of H{sub 2} and CO on MoS{sub 2} and alkali-doped MoS{sub 2} were considered, and computational analyses of the thermodynamic stability of transition metal sulfides and of the electronic structure of these sulfide catalysts were carried out. In the preparation of the cesium-promoted MoS{sub 2} catalysts, a variety of preparation methods using CsOOCH were examined. In all cases, doping with CsOOCH led to a lost of surface area. The undoped molybdenum disulfide catalyst only produced hydrocarbons. Cs-doped MoS{sub 2} catalysts all produced linear alcohols, along with smaller amounts of hydrocarbons. With a 20 wt% CsOOCH/MoS{sub 2} catalyst, temperature, pressure, and flow rate dependences of the synthesis reactions were investigated in the presence and absence of H{sub 2}S in the H{sub 2}/CO = 1/1 synthesis gas during short term testing experiments. It was shown that with a carefully prepared 10 wt% CsOOCH/MoS{sub 2} catalyst, reproducible and high alcohol synthesis activity could be obtained. For example, at 295 C with H{sub 2}/CO = 1 synthesis gas at 8.3 MPa and with GHSV = 7,760 l/kg cat/hr, the total alcohol space time yield was ca 300 g/kg cat/hr (accompanied with a hydrocarbon space time yield of ca 60 g/kg cat/hr). Over a testing period of ca 130 hr, no net deactivation of the catalyst was observed. 90 refs., 82 figs., 14 tabs.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Deemer, M.; Richards-Babb, M.; Carr, T.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

HIGH-DENSITY CONCRETE WITH CERAMIC AGGREGATE BASED ON DEPLETED URANIUM DIOXIDE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DENSITY CONCRETE WITH CERAMIC AGGREGATE BASED ON DEPLETED URANIUM DENSITY CONCRETE WITH CERAMIC AGGREGATE BASED ON DEPLETED URANIUM DIOXIDE S.G. Ermichev, V.I. Shapovalov, N.V.Sviridov (RFNC-VNIIEF, Sarov, Russia) V.K. Orlov, V.M. Sergeev, A. G. Semyenov, A.M. Visik, A.A. Maslov, A. V. Demin, D.D. Petrov, V.V. Noskov, V. I. Sorokin, O. I. Uferov (VNIINM, Moscow, Russia) L. Dole (ORNL, Oak Ridge, USA) Abstract - Russia is researching the production and testing of concretes with ceramic aggregate based on depleted uranium dioxide (UO 2 ). These DU concretes are to be used as structural and radiation-shielded material for casks for A-plant spent nuclear fuel transportation and storage. This paper presents the results of studies aimed at selection of ceramics and concrete composition, justification of their production technology, investigation of mechanical properties, and chemical stability.

453

Approximate mechanism for measuring stability of Internet link in aggregated Internet pipe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we propose a method for measuring internet connection stability which is fast and has negligible overhead for the process of its complexity. This method finds a relative value for representing the stability of internet connections and can also be extended for aggregated internet connections. The method is documented with help of a real time implementation and results are shared. This proposed measurement scheme uses HTTP GET method for each connections. The normalized responses to identified sites like gateways of ISPs, google.com etc are used for calculating current link stability. The novelty of the approach is that historic values are used to calculate overall link stability. In this discussion, we also document a method to use the calculated values as a dynamic threshold metric. This is used in routing decisions and for load-balancing each of the connections in an aggregated bandwidth pipe. This scheme is a very popular practice in aggregated internet connections.

M, Vipin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Aggregation of dialkyl-substituted diphosphonic acids and its effect on metal ion extraction.  

SciTech Connect

Solvent extraction reagents containing the diphosphonic acid group exhibit an extraordinary affinity for tri-, tetra- and hexavalent actinides. Their use has been considered for actinide separation and pre-concentration procedures. Solvent extraction data obtained with P,P{prime}-di(2-ethylhexyl) methane-, ethane- and butanediphosphonic acids exhibit features that are difficult to explain without Knowledge of the aggregation state of the extractants. Information about the aggregation of the dialkyl-substituted diphosphonic acids in aromatic diluents has been obtained using the complementary techniques of vapor pressure osmometry (VPO), small angle neutron scattering (SANS), infrared spectroscopy and molecular mechanics. The results from these techniques provide an understanding of the aggregation behavior of these extractants that is fully compatible with the solvent extraction data. The most important results and their relevance to solvent extraction are reviewed in this paper.

Chiarizia, R.; Barrans, R. E., Jr.; Ferraro, J. R. Herlinger, A. W.; McAlister, D. R.

1999-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

455

Patterns of gravity induced aggregate migration during casting of fluid concretes  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, aggregate migration patterns during fluid concrete castings are studied through experiments, dimensionless approach and numerical modeling. The experimental results obtained on two beams show that gravity induced migration is primarily affecting the coarsest aggregates resulting in a decrease of coarse aggregates volume fraction with the horizontal distance from the pouring point and in a puzzling vertical multi-layer structure. The origin of this multi layer structure is discussed and analyzed with the help of numerical simulations of free surface flow. Our results suggest that it finds its origin in the non Newtonian nature of fresh concrete and that increasing casting rate shall decrease the magnitude of gravity induced particle migration.

Spangenberg, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) (Denmark)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) (Denmark); Roussel, N., E-mail: Nicolas.roussel@lcpc.fr [Universite Paris Est, Laboratoire Central des Ponts et Chaussees (LCPC) (France); Hattel, J.H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) (Denmark)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) (Denmark); Sarmiento, E.V.; Zirgulis, G. [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) (Norway)] [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) (Norway); Geiker, M.R. [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) (Norway) [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) (Norway); Department of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) (Denmark)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

456

Geoenvironmental and engineering properties of rock, soil, and aggregate. Transportation research record  

SciTech Connect

Partial Contents: Use of Waste Materials in Highway Construction: State of the Practice and Evaluation of the Selected Waste Products; Physical and Environmental Properties of Asphalt-Amended Bottom Ash; Use of Cement Kiln Dust, Fly Ash, and Recycling Technique in Low-Volume Road Rehabilitation; Use of By-Product Phosphogypsum in Road Construction; Stabilization of Water Treatment Plant Sludge for Possible Use as Embankment Material; Construction and Performance of a Shredded Waste Tire Test Embankment; Corrosion of Steel Piles in Some Waste Fills; Recycled Plastics for Highway Agencies; Effect of Chloride and Sulfate Contamination in Soils on Corrosion of Steel and Concrete; Permeability and Leaching Characteristics of Fly Ash Liner Materials; Evaluation of Recycled Concrete, Open-Graded Aggregate, and Large Top-Size Aggregate Bases; Engineering Properties of Phosphogypsum-Based Slag Aggregate.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Synthetic aggregate compositions derived from spent bed materials from fluidized bed combustion and fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cementitious compositions useful as lightweight aggregates are formed from a blend of spent bed material from fluidized bed combustion and fly ash. The proportions of the blend are chosen so that ensuing reactions eliminate undesirable constituents. The blend is then mixed with water and formed into a shaped article. The shaped article is preferably either a pellet or a "brick" shape that is later crushed. The shaped articles are cured at ambient temperature while saturated with water. It has been found that if used sufficiently, the resulting aggregate will exhibit minimal dimensional change over time. The aggregate can be certified by also forming standardized test shapes, e.g., cylinders while forming the shaped articles and measuring the properties of the test shapes using standardized techniques including X-ray diffraction.

Boyle, Michael J. (Aston, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

ZINC/AIR BATTERY R & D RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF BIFUNCTIONAL OXYGEN ELECTRODE TASKS I AND II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requirements, weight of battery and cost comparisons arecost, convenience and com- plexity of each of the schemes. The following zinc-air battery

Klein, M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Active particles under confinement: Aggregation at the wall and gradient formation inside a channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I study the confinement-induced aggregation phenomenon in a minimal model of self-propelled particles inside a channel. Starting from first principles, I derive a set of equations that govern the density profile of such a system at the steady-state, and calculate analytically how the aggregation at the walls varies with the physical parameters of the system. I also investigate how the gradient of the particle density varies if the inside of the channel is partitioned into two regions within which the active particles exhibit distinct levels of fluctuations in their directions of travel.

Chiu Fan Lee

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

460

Understanding the defect structure of solution grown zinc oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a wide bandgap semiconducting oxide with many potential applications in various optoelectronic devices such as light emitting diodes (LEDs) and field effect transistors (FETs). Much effort has been made to understand the ZnO structure and its defects. However, one major issue in determining whether it is Zn or O deficiency that provides ZnO its unique properties remains. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is an ideal, atom specific characterization technique that is able to probe defect structure in many materials, including ZnO. In this paper, comparative studies of bulk and aqueous solution grown ({lighting and other optoelectronic device applications. - Graphical abstract: Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO powders have been synthesized through an aqueous solution method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Defect structure studied using XAS and XPDF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zn-Zn correlations are less in the ZnO powders synthesized in solution than bulk. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zn vacancies are present in the powders synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EXAFS and XPDF, when used complementary, are useful characterization techniques.

Liew, Laura-Lynn [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A-STAR), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Block N4.1 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Sankar, Gopinathan, E-mail: g.sankar@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Handoko, Albertus D. [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A-STAR), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); Goh, Gregory K.L., E-mail: g-goh@imre.a-star.edu.sg [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A-STAR), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Block N4.1 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Kohara, Shinji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), Mikazuki, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zinc sulfide aggregation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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461

Zinc-chlorine battery plant system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A zinc-chlorine battery plant system and method of redirecting the electrical current around a failed battery module. The battery plant includes a power conditioning unit, a plurality of battery modules connected electrically in series to form battery strings, a plurality of battery strings electrically connected in parallel to the power conditioning unit, and a bypass switch for each battery module in the battery plant. The bypass switch includes a normally open main contact across the power terminals of the battery module, and a set of normally closed auxiliary contacts for controlling the supply of reactants electrochemically transformed in the cells of the battery module. Upon the determination of a failure condition, the bypass switch for the failed battery module is energized to close the main contact and open the auxiliary contacts. Within a short time, the electrical current through the battery module will substantially decrease due to the cutoff of the supply of reactants, and the electrical current flow through the battery string will be redirected through the main contact of the bypass switch.

Whittlesey, Curtis C. (Birmingham, MI); Mashikian, Matthew S. (Huntington Woods, MI)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Proof-of-concept zinc/bromine electric vehicle battery  

SciTech Connect

At the inception of the contract, Johnson Controls acquired and tested the zinc/bromine battery design developed by Exxon Research and Engineering Corporation (the Z-design) and, with Exxon, determined the key problems in this design: expansion and warping of electrodes, leaking of electrolyte from the battery stack, and excessive self-discharge brought about by transfer of bromine across the separator. The problems of electrode expansion and high self-discharge were mitigated by developing improved electrode and separator materials. Starting in the second year of the contract, JCI developed a new V-design battery stack which used different hardware and tooling to address the problem of stack leakage. The V-design uses thermal welding to achieve a hermetically sealed construction. The flow distribution is improved, and the massive endblocks of the original system have been replaced by thinner, lighter endblocks which are stiffened by means of rigid aluminum honeycomb inserts. Highlights of performance characteristics of batteries built and tested under the contract given. The battery was developed for the ETX-II, a Ford Aerostar minivan. 44 figs., 21 tabs.

Bolsted, J.; Eidler, P.; Miles, R.; Petersen, R.; Yaccarino, K. (Johnson Controls, Inc., Milwaukee, WI (USA). Advanced Battery Engineering); Lott, S. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Root Uptake of Lipophilic Zinc?Rhamnolipid Complexes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated the formation and plant uptake of lipophilic metal-rhamnolipid complexes. Monorhamnosyl and dirhamnosyl rhamnolipids formed lipophilic complexes with copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), and zinc (Zn). Rhamnolipids significantly increased Zn absorption by Brassica napus var. Pinnacle roots in {sup 65}Zn-spiked ice-cold solutions, compared with ZnSO{sub 4} alone. Therefore, rhamnolipid appeared to facilitate Zn absorption via a nonmetabolically mediated pathway. Synchrotron XRF and XAS showed that Zn was present in roots as Zn-phytate-like compounds when roots were treated with Zn-free solutions, ZnSO{sub 4}, or Zn-EDTA. With rhamnolipid application, Zn was predominantly found in roots as the Zn-rhamnolipid complex. When applied to a calcareous soil, rhamnolipids increased dry matter production and Zn concentrations in durum (Triticum durum L. cv. Balcali-2000) and bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. BDME-10) shoots. Rhamnolipids either increased total plant uptake of Zn from the soil or increased Zn translocation by reducing the prevalence of insoluble Zn-phytate-like compounds in roots.

Stacey, Samuel P.; McLaughlin, Michael J.; Cakmak, Ismail; Hettiarachchi, Ganga M.; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Karkkainen, Michael (Sabanci); (EPA); (CSIRO/LW); (Adelaide)

2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

464

PROMOTED ZINC CHROMITE CATALYSTS FOR HIGHER ALCOHOL SYNTHESIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the analytical protocols that were developed during the last two years to analyze ''spent'' THQ (tetrahydroquinoline) slurry liquid. Identification of the components of the ''spent'' THQ should help to understand the influence of the slurry medium on the methanol synthesis reaction, and on other reactions with THQ as the slurry liquid. Silica gel liquid chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were used to isolate and purify the major compounds in the ''spent'' slurry liquid. Gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were applied to identify the major compounds. Methyl-, dimethyl-, and trimethyl-THQ were found to comprise more than 80% of the ''spent'' liquid. The balance was various methylated indoles. A methyl group always is attached to the N atom in the ring structure. Speculative mechanisms are presented that may help to understand the interaction between the catalyst and the alkylated THQ slurry liquid, and the effect of liquid composition on the methanol synthesis reaction. A poster entitled ''Promoted Zinc Chromite Catalyst for Higher Alcohol Synthesis in a Slurry Reactor-2. Spent Liquid Analysis'' was presented at the AIChE National Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Nov 12-17, 2000.

Ms. Xiaolei Sun; Professor George W. Roberts

2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z