Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zimbabwe tanzania swaziland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Swaziland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Swaziland: Energy Resources Swaziland: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"390px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-26.5,"lon":31.5,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

'Pirate' radio, convergence and reception in Zimbabwe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a qualitative research approach, this study examines the appropriation of digital technologies and their implications for the reception of the so-called 'pirate' radio in Zimbabwe. It specifically explores how the use of the Internet (and its associated ... Keywords: Convergence, Internet, Mobile phone, Oral tradition, Pirate radio, Reception, SMS, SW Radio Africa, Studio 7, Zimbabwe

Hayes Mawindi Mabweazara

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Solar Power for Tanzania  

SciTech Connect

Condensed list of products and activities: 8 educational posters and 1 informational brochure (all original illustrations and text); a business plan with micro-agreements; corporation created called Tanzanian Power, LLC; business feasibility study developed with the University of Albany; Hampshire College collaborated in project development; research conducted seeking similar projects in underdeveloped countries; Citibank proposal submitted (but rejected); cleaned and sent PV panels to Tanzania; community center built in Tanzania; research and list provided to Robinson for educational TV videos and product catalogs; networked with Chase Manhattan Bank for new solar panels; maintained flow of information among many people (stateside and Tanzania); wrote and sent press releases and other outreach information. Several families purchased panels.

Chen, Christine; Gerace, Jay; Mehner, Nicole; Mohamed, Sharif; Reiss, Kelly

1999-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

4

Business | Embassy of the United States Mbabane, Swaziland  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mbabane, Swaziland Mbabane, Swaziland Enter search terms Enter Search Term(s) Search Home About Us Ambassador Offices and Departments Business Hours Holidays Vacancy Announcements Business Opportunities Visas Non Immigrant Visas Immigrant Visas Visa Fraud Expedited Visa Appointments Travel & Tourism in the U.S. U.S. Citizen Services Emergency Contact Information for Travelers Applying for a U.S. Passport Birth Certificates Public Services U.S. Income Taxes Voting Information Appointments Worldwide Caution News & Events Topics of Interest Press Release Archive Programs and Events Elections 2012 Business Useful Trade Links Investing in the USA Key Business Links PEPFAR Resources Information Resource Center Cultural Programs Educational Support Exchange Programs Multimedia Streaming Video Skip Breadcrumb Navigation

5

Crustal Structure of Southeastern Tanzania.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??AbstractThe structure of Jurassic to Neogene coastal basins along the Tanzania passive margin and crustal thickness beneath them have been investigated in this thesis using… (more)

Young, Alysa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

The Impact of the HIV/AIDS Epidemic on Orphanhood Probabilities and Kinship Structure in Zimbabwe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Zimbabwe for the period 2030-2039. . . . . . . . . . .males in absence of AIDS in Zimbabwe for the period 2030-males in presence of AIDS in Zimbabwe for the period 2030-

Zagheni, Emilio

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Zimbabwe: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zimbabwe: Energy Resources Zimbabwe: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"390px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-19,"lon":29,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

8

Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Development and Environment Organization (TaTEDO) is a local NGO responsible for developing and promoting Renewable Energy Technologies in Tanzania. TaTEDO is a coalition...

9

Tanzania Roads Evaluation - Baseline | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tanzania Roads Evaluation - Baseline Tanzania Roads Evaluation - Baseline Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Tanzania Roads Evaluation - Baseline Dataset Summary Description Baseline survey for impact evaluation of MCC's roads improvement investments in Tanzania. The evaluation will examine the project's household- and community-level effects on local standards of living along the roads. For the evaluation of major roads on the mainland, Economic Development Initiatives conducted a survey of 3,000 households in 200 communities in 2009. For the Pemba rural roads evaluation, Economic Development Initiatives conducted a survey on 570 households in the treatment group and 630 households in the comparison group.

10

Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS Jump to: navigation, search Name Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Market analysis, Pathways analysis Website http://cdkn.org/ Country Zimbabwe UN Region Southern Africa References CDKN-Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References ↑ "CDKN-Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Zimbabwe-Terms_of_Reference_for_Future_LEDS&oldid=698706"

11

CDKN-Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS Jump to: navigation, search Name CDKN-Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Market analysis, Pathways analysis Website http://cdkn.org/ Country Zimbabwe UN Region Southern Africa References CDKN-Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References ↑ "CDKN-Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=CDKN-Zimbabwe-Terms_of_Reference_for_Future_LEDS&oldid=407560"

12

Zimbabwe-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zimbabwe-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production Zimbabwe-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production (RECP) in Developing and Transition Countries Jump to: navigation, search Name Zimbabwe-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production (RECP) in Developing and Transition Countries Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Ministry of Energy, Ministry of Planning, Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Environment, Ministry of Industry Sector Climate, Energy, Water Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Economic Development, Goods and Materials, Industry, People and Policy, Water Conservation Topics Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health, - Macroeconomic, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, -TNA, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment, Technology characterizations

13

Tanzania-Developing Energy Enterprises Project (DEEP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tanzania-Developing Energy Enterprises Project (DEEP) Tanzania-Developing Energy Enterprises Project (DEEP) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Tanzania-Developing Energy Enterprises Project (DEEP) Name Tanzania-Developing Energy Enterprises Project (DEEP) Agency/Company /Organization Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) International Partner European Union (EU), the Netherlands Sector Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Economic Development, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, People and Policy Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment Website http://www.gvepinternational.o Program Start 2008 Program End 2013 Country Tanzania Eastern Africa References Developing Energy Enterprises Project (DEEP)[1]

14

Tanzania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tanzania: Energy Resources Tanzania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"390px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-6,"lon":35,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

15

Tanzania - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Statoil and ExxonMobil have made four discoveries amounting to 10 to 13 Tcf of recoverable natural gas resources. Along with natural gas, Tanzania also produces coal.

16

Tanzania - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The country expects to increase natural gas production in the next coming years ... percent of Tanzania's population has access to electricity. Electricity net ...

17

Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization (TaTEDO) Jump to: navigation, search Name Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization (TaTEDO) Place Tanzania Phone number 255.22. 27.00.438 Coordinates -6.369028°, 34.888822° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-6.369028,"lon":34.888822,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

18

National Action Programmes on Desertification | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Programmes on Desertification Programmes on Desertification Jump to: navigation, search Name National Action Programmes on Desertification Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification Sector Land Focus Area Forestry, Agriculture Topics Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.unccd.int/actionpro Country Algeria, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe

19

Tanzania-Capital Markets Climate Initiative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tanzania-Capital Markets Climate Initiative Tanzania-Capital Markets Climate Initiative Jump to: navigation, search Name Tanzania-Capital Markets Climate Initiative Agency/Company /Organization World Economic Forum Partner UK Department of Energy and Climate Sector Climate Topics Finance, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/cont Country Tanzania Eastern Africa References CMCI[1] World Economic Forum[2] The Capital Markets Climate Initiative (CMCI) is a public-private initiative designed to support the scale up of private finance flows for low carbon technologies, solutions and infrastructure in developing economies by: Developing a common understanding amongst policy makers of why and how public sector action can help mobilise private capital and encourage

20

Tanzania-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tanzania-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network Tanzania-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network (CTI PFAN) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Tanzania-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network (CTI PFAN) Name Tanzania-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network (CTI PFAN) Agency/Company /Organization Climate Technology Initiative (CTI), United States Agency for International Development (USAID), Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership (REEEP) Partner International Centre for Environmental Technology Transfer Sector Energy Focus Area Agriculture, Biomass, - Biofuels, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Greenhouse Gas, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health, - Macroeconomic, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, -TNA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zimbabwe tanzania swaziland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Crustal shear wave velocity structure of Tanzania from ambient seismic noise tomography and the thicknesses of Karoo and younger basins in Southeastern Tanzania.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The thickness of the Karoo (Permian-Jurassic) sedimentary basins and the Jurassic- Neogene coastal sedimentary basins in southeastern Tanzania are investigated in this study. The Karoo… (more)

Boyle, Katie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Tanzania-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tanzania-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production Tanzania-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production (RECP) in Developing and Transition Countries Jump to: navigation, search Name Tanzania-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production (RECP) in Developing and Transition Countries Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Ministry of Energy, Ministry of Planning, Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Environment, Ministry of Industry Sector Climate, Energy, Water Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Economic Development, Goods and Materials, Industry, People and Policy, Water Conservation Topics Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health, - Macroeconomic, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, -TNA, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment, Technology characterizations

23

Tanzania Energy Development and Access Expansion Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Development and Access Expansion Project Energy Development and Access Expansion Project Jump to: navigation, search Name of project Tanzania Energy Development and Access Expansion Project Location of project Tanzania Energy Services Lighting, Cooking and water heating, Space heating, Cooling Year initiated 2007 Organization World Bank Website http://documents.worldbank.org Coordinates -6.369028°, 34.888822° References The World Bank[1] The objective of the Energy Development and Access Expansion Project of Tanzania is to improve the quality and efficiency of the electricity service provision in the three main growth centers of Dar es Salaam, Arusha, and Kilimanjaro and to establish a sustainable basis for energy access expansion. The project is consistent with the latest Joint Assistance Strategy (2007-2010) by specifically supporting the goals of the

24

Tanzania-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tanzania-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods Tanzania-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods Agency/Company /Organization International Institute for Environment and Development Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Renewable Energy, Biomass, Forestry, Agriculture Topics Co-benefits assessment, Implementation, Resource assessment, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.iied.org/pubs/pdfs/ Country Tanzania UN Region "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

25

Tanzania-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tanzania-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification Tanzania-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification Jump to: navigation, search Name Tanzania-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification in East Africa Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), International Council for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid-Tropics (ICRISAT), International Water Management Institute (IWMI), Ministry of Agriculture Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Adaptation, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -TNA

26

www.deafrica.net Botswana Ghana Mali Senegal Tanzania Zambia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to development and poverty alleviation. · Particular focus on M&E and impact analysis of energy projects Market conditions Can information on development impacts influence policy and project design? #12;7 DEA1 www.deafrica.net Botswana Ghana Mali Senegal Tanzania Zambia Development and Energy in Africa

27

Seasonal Maize Forecasting for South Africa and Zimbabwe Derived from an Agroclimatological Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal maize water-stress forecasts were derived for area averages of the primary maize-growing regions of South Africa and Zimbabwe. An agroclimatological model was used to create a historical record of maize water stress as a function of ...

Randall V. Martin; Richard Washington; Thomas E. Downing

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Negotiating reforms at home: Natural resources and the politics of energy access in urban Tanzania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

woodfuel markets." Energy Policy May: 474-490. Carter, M. R.energy use in Tanzania." Energy Policy May: 454-473. Kaiser,Africa's urban poor." Energy Policy 30: 1015-1028. Katyega,

Ghanadan, Rebecca

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Compound vulnerabilities: The intersection of climate variability and HIV/AIDS in northwestern Tanzania  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drawing on ethnographic research conducted in Nsisha, a rural village located close to the shores of Lake Victoria in northwestern Tanzania, this article analyzes how climate change and variability intersect with other stressors that affect rural ...

Valerie Githinji; Todd A. Crane

30

Tanzania-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tanzania-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Tanzania-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Tanzania-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

31

Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mozambique, Nicaragua, Peru, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovakia, South Africa, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, Tunisia, Uganda, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vietnam, Zimbabwe Western...

32

Genetic diversity and performance of maize varieties from Zimbabwe, Zambia and Malawi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large scale and planned introduction of maize (Zea mays) in southern Africa was accomplished during the last 100 years. Since then, smallholder farmers and breeders have been selecting varieties best adapted to their specific growing conditions. Six studies were conducted to generate information on the current levels of genetic diversity and agronomic performance of both farmer-developed and commercially-bred maize varieties in Zimbabwe, Zambia and Malawi to help in the identification of sources of new alleles for improving yield, especially under the main abiotic stresses that prevail in the region. In the first study, 267 maize landraces were collected from smallholder farmers in different agro-ecological zones of the three countries for conservation and further studies. Passport data and information on why smallholder farmers continue to grow landraces despite the advent of modern varieties were also collected along with the landraces. The second study revealed considerable variation for phenological, morphological and agronomic characters, and inter-relationships among the landraces and their commercial counterparts. A core sample representing most of the diversity in the whole collection of landraces was selected for further detailed analyses. The third study revealed high levels of molecular diversity between landraces originating from different growing environments and between landraces and commercially-bred varieties. The Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) data also showed that the genetic diversity introduced from the original gene pool from the USA about 100 years ago is still found in both the descendant landraces and commercially-bred varieties. The fourth study showed that in general, commercially-bred varieties outyielded landraces under both abiotic stress and nonstress conditions with some notable exceptions. Landraces were more stable across environments than improved varieties. The most promising landraces for pre-breeding and further investigation were also identified. The clustering patterns formed based on agronomic data were different from SSR markers, but in general the genotype groupings were consistent across the two methods of measuring diversity. In the fifth study, the more recently-bred maize varieties in Zimbabwe showed consistent improvement over older cultivars in grain yield. The apparent yearly rate of yield increase due to genetic improvement was positive under optimum growing conditions, low soil nitrogen levels and drought stress. The sixth study revealed that in general, genetic diversity in Zimbabwean maize has neither significantly decreased nor increased over time, and that the temporal changes observed in this study were more qualitative than quantitative. The results from the six studies confirm the origin of maize in southern Africa and reveals that considerable genetic variation exists in the region which could be used to broaden the sources of diversity for maize improvement under the current agro-ecological conditions in southern Africa.

Magorokosho, Cosmos

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Energy use in agriculture and the articulation of modes of production in Zimbabwe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The political economy of energy utilization in Zimbabwe's agricultural sector is analyzed. The geography of agricultural energy use is assessed by tracing the articulation of modes of production through time. It is argued that in the production process, labor mediates between humans and the environment. The level of development of the productive forces indicates the intensity that labor applies energy to a given space. Production relations influence the rate and direction of energy flows. Hence, energy is a fundamental component of a mode of production. The linkage between energy use in farming and the articulation of modes of production is made through the conceptualization of distinct agricultural production systems consisting of social relations and productive forces, the relationship to the state, and access to natural resources. After independence came changes in state-peasant relations and industrialization of African production in high potential reserves. Changing social relations on settler farms has caused a rapid displacement of labor by capital at a time when national job creation is dangerously low. In the absence of significant land transfers, a contradictory distribution of agricultural energy resources will continue. New forms of uneven agricultural development are emerging.

Weiner, D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Hydrocarbon implications of Karoo Supergroup turbidites and tectonics in northern Zimbabwe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field research in the relatively unstudied Lower Zambezi trough of northernmost Zimbabwe and adjacent Zambia and Mozambique has revealed a sedimentary tectonic history unlike other Karoo basin (Late Carboniferous to Early Jurassic) of the region. This presents a much better setting for petroleum deposits than has been found in those other areas. Aerial photo interpretation and reconnaissance geophysical data show strike-slip folds and faults at the surface and subbasins up to 10 km deep. This contrast with other Karoo basins, which are of a half-graben genesis, is further evident in the sedimentary sequences of the Lower Zambezi basin complex. Lacustrine turbidites occur in the Lower Karoo Kondo Pools Formation. Upper fan facies of a restricted active margin subaqueous fan system are found in limited outcrops in an accommodation zone uplift between the two subbasins. The overlying units are classical Karoo alluvial layers, but intercalated with a higher frequency of unconformities. Syndepositional and postdepositional deformation includes thrust faulting and detachment. Hydrocarbon potential is enhanced by three virtues that are lacking in other parts of southern Africa. Distal facies to those seen in exposures of the Kondo Pools Formation subaqueous fans should be rich in sapropelic mudstone, the source rock so elusive elsewhere. Second, basin depth is sufficient for thermal maturity. Finally, the tectonic regime was conducive to the formation of convex as well as unconformity traps. Mobil Oil is in the midst of an exploration program that may capitalize on these factors.

Tromp, P.L. (Univ. of Zimbabwe, Harare (Zimbabwe))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

An overview of the global threat reduction initiative's physical protection work in Tanzania.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) established the Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) mission to reduce and protect nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide. Internationally, over 80 countries are cooperating with GTRI to enhance security of facilities with these materials. In 2004, a GTRI delegation began working with the Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission, (TAEC). The team conducted site assessments for the physical protection of radiological materials in Tanzania. Today, GTRI and the Government of Tanzania continue cooperative efforts to enhance physical security at several radiological sites, including a central sealed-source storage facility, and sites in the cities of Arusha, Dar Es Salaam, and Tanga. This paper describes the scope of physical protection work, lessons learned, and plans for future cooperation between the GTRI program and the TAEC. Additionally the paper will review the cooperative efforts between TAEC and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) with regards to a remote monitoring system at a storage facility and to the repackaging of radioactive sources.

Banzi, Firmi Paul (Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission Arusha, United Republic of Tanzania); Itamura, Michael Takeshi (U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration, Washington, DC); Robinson, Phillip W. (U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration, Washington, DC); Strosinski, Micheal Vernon

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Soils of Ultramafic Origin from the Great Dyke, Zimbabwe and Gillespie County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although soils developed from ultramafic parent materials have significance to agriculture, ecology and health, their bio-geochemistry is poorly understood. The mineralogical and bio-geochemistry of soils formed from the ultramafic parent materials of the Great Dyke, Zimbabwe and Gillespie County, Texas was investigated. The objectives were to determine the mineralogical and bio-geochemical properties of the soils in order to assess the potential impact and challenges to agriculture, and environmental quality. Soil samples were taken from the crest, shoulder, footslope and the toeslope. Chemical analyses were performed by nuclear and spectroscopic techniques. Mineral characterization was conducted by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and spectroscopic techniques. Microbial whole-community structure was determined by the fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) technique. The results indicate wide chemical and mineralogical compositions among the studied sites. The soils contain relatively high concentrations of heavy metals (some sites contain Cr(VI)), but low levels of K and Ca. The highest concentrations of trace metal were associated with chromite, Fe oxides and serpentinite. The concentrations of Mg were higher than those of Ca and varied between Zimbabwe and Texas soils largely due to the parent materials. Unique to these soils is the occurrence of talc, serpentine, chlorite, Fe-rich smectite, amphiboles, pyroxenes, Fe and Cr oxides in relatively large amounts. These soils also lack micas and have neglible amounts of kaolinite and feldspars. Palygorskite and serpentine occurred in specific soil horizons and at specific landscape positions. FAME profiles indicate that the soil microbial community structure is predominantly bacteria and fungi (including arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi) at each landscape position across the transect. Biomarkers for actinomycetes were undetectable. The proportions of Gram-positive bacteria were higher than those of the Gram-negative bacteria. Very low levels of nutrients (Ca and K), higher Mg/Ca molar ratios, and the relatively high concentrations of heavy metals in these soils impact agricultural productivity. High concentrations of heavy metals, the presence of the Cr(VI) as well as its great potential to form in these soils might impact microbial activity and environmental quality. The occurrence of fibrous minerals (e.g serpentine and amphiboles) in these soils will likely impact human health.

Bangira, Courage

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The contents of this book are: Introduction; Kenya; Korea (Republic of); Lesotho; Liberia; Malagasy; Malawi; Mali; Mauritania; Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal; Nicaragua; Niger; Nigeria; Pakistan; Panama; Paraguay; Peru; Philippines; Rwanda; Senegal; Sierra Leone; Somalia; Sri Lanka; Sudana; Surinam; Swaziland; Tanzania; Thailand; Togo; Uganda; Uruguay; Venezuela; Zaire; Zambia; Appendix I. Conventional and Energetic Yields; Appendix II, Phytomass Files; and References.

Duke, J.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

An Ecological Analysis of the Impact of Weather, Land Cover and Politics on Childhood Pneumonia in Tanzania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pneumonia is the main killer of under-five children worldwide. The developing nations suffer the most. But within such countries, the spatial and temporal distribution of pneumonia cases is not uniform; yet little is known of the spatial and temporal distribution of pneumonia or the factors that might affect spatial and temporal variability. This dissertation explores the causes of spatial and temporal variation in under-five pneumonia morbidity in Tanzania. This study uses an ecological analysis to explore weather, land cover and politics as potential drivers of the observed differences in the distribution of pneumonia. A study is at an ecological level when it examines the population-level health aspects. That is, ecological analyses in health studies evaluate groups of people rather than individuals. The current study found that weather variables such as temperature and atmospheric pressure partially explained pneumonia variance. The strength of weather-pneumonia association varies over space and time in both seasonal elements (temporal factors) and broadly-defined climate zones (spatial factors). For example, the prevalence rate was higher in the regions with bimodal rainfall compared with the regions with unimodal rainfall, with a statistically difference 117.3 (95% confidence interval: 36.6 to 198.0) cases per 100,000. In addition, within the regions (mikoa) with unimodal rainfall regime, however, the rainy season (msimu) had lower rates of pneumonia compared to the dry season (kiangazi). Land use and land cover also were partial drivers of pneumonia. Some land cover types—particularly urban areas and croplands—were associated with high rates of childhood pneumonia. In addition, districts (wilaya) categorized as urban land cover had high rates of pneumonia compared to those categorized as only rural. To determine the associations between politics and pneumonia, this study compared the pneumonia cases in the administrative locations that received less central government funding with those locations that were financially rewarded for voting for the ruling party. The locations with lower funding generally had higher rates of childhood pneumonia. However, it is unclear whether these locations had higher rates of childhood pneumonia because of, or in addition, to their funding gaps. In sum, this dissertation evaluated population-level factors affecting distribution of childhood pneumonia. Like other similarly population-level studies, this dissertation provides an understanding of the coarse-scale dynamics related to childhood pneumonia. By so doing, it contributes to the pneumonia etiology scientific literature. That is, this dissertation contributes to the understanding of within-nation pneumonia distribution in developing nations. It is the first in Tanzania to evaluate the impact of weather, land cover and politics on childhood pneumonia. By evaluating the impact of weather and land cover, this dissertation also provides an example of non socio-economic factors affecting health inequalities. By analyzing a large landmass of two main climatic types, this dissertation also contributes appreciation of non-stationarity of temporal variations of childhood pneumonia, in addition to the commonly-evaluated spatial variations.

Mgendi, Mlenge 1971-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Newsletter Signup Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EETD NEWSLETTER - MANAGE SUBSCRIPTIONS EETD NEWSLETTER - MANAGE SUBSCRIPTIONS (red fields are required) Manage subscriptions: Subscribe Unsubscribe Name E-Mail Affiliation Address Address (line 2) City State/Province Zip/Postal Code Country (please select a country) none Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegowina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d'Ivoire Croatia (Hrvatska) Cuba Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic East Timor Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France France, Metropolitan French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard and Mc Donald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran (Islamic Republic of) Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People's Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint LUCIA Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia (Slovak Republic) Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands Spain Sri Lanka St. Helena St. Pierre and Miquelon Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Islands Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan, Province of China Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States United States Minor Outlying Islands Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Viet Nam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Wallis and Futuna Islands Western Sahara Yemen Yugoslavia Zambia Zimbabwe

40

Trade liberalisation in Swaziland : its impact on the agricultural sector.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In recent years, the world has been experiencing rapid and extensive global shifts that have had a positive and negative impact on different countries around… (more)

Msibi, Mandlondlo Faith.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zimbabwe tanzania swaziland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Swaziland - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

US EIA provides data, forecasts, country analysis brief and other analyses, focusing on the energy industry including oil, natural gas and electricity.

42

Slide23 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Slide23 Slide23 Slide23 Developing Country Access Afghanistan Guatemala Nigeria Albania Guinea Pakistan Algeria Guinea-Bissau Palestinian Territories (West Bank/ Gaza) Angola Guyana Papua New Guinea Armenia Haiti Paraguay Azerbaijan Honduras Peru Bangladesh Indonesia Philippines Belize Iraq Rwanda Benin Jordan Samoa Bhutan Kenya Sao Tome and Principe Bolivia Kiribati Senegal Burkina Faso Kyrgyzstan Sierra Leone Burundi Lao People's Democratic Republic Solomon Islands Cambodia Lesotho Somalia Cameroon Liberia Sri Lanka Cape Verde Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Swaziland Central African Republic Madagascar Tajikistan Chad Malawi Tanzania, United Republic of Colombia Maldives Thailand Comoros Mali Timor-Leste Congo Marshall Islands Togo Congo, The Democratic Republic of Mauritania Tonga

43

SAFARI 2000 Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Set Released Set Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of the data set "SAFARI 2000 MISR Level 2 Data, Southern Africa, Dry Season 2000". This data set is a product of the Southern African Regional Science Initiative containing 240 HDF-EOS formatted MISR Level 2 Top-of-Atmosphere/Cloud and Aerosol/Surface Products focused in a southern African study area which includes: Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The MISR Level 2 Products are geophysical measurements derived from the Level 1B2 data which consists of parameters that have been geometrically corrected and projected to a standard map grid. The products are in swaths, each derived from a single MISR orbit, where the imagery is 360 km wide and

44

Zimbabwe - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

US EIA provides data, forecasts, country analysis brief and other analyses, focusing on the energy industry including oil, natural gas and electricity.

45

Reply to comment | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reply to comment Reply to comment Slide23 Submitted by gibsone on Fri, 2013-08-30 06:22 FY2011-hitson Slide23 Developing Country Access Afghanistan Guatemala Nigeria Albania Guinea Pakistan Algeria Guinea-Bissau Palestinian Territories (West Bank/ Gaza) Angola Guyana Papua New Guinea Armenia Haiti Paraguay Azerbaijan Honduras Peru Bangladesh Indonesia Philippines Belize Iraq Rwanda Benin Jordan Samoa Bhutan Kenya Sao Tome and Principe Bolivia Kiribati Senegal Burkina Faso Kyrgyzstan Sierra Leone Burundi Lao People's Democratic Republic Solomon Islands Cambodia Lesotho Somalia Cameroon Liberia Sri Lanka Cape Verde Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Swaziland Central African Republic Madagascar Tajikistan Chad Malawi Tanzania, United Republic of Colombia Maldives Thailand Comoros Mali Timor-Leste

46

Tanzania-National Adaptation Programme of Action | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Adaptation Programme of Action AgencyCompany Organization United Nations Environment Programme, Global Environment Facility Topics Adaptation, Background analysis...

47

Tanzania - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

US EIA provides data, forecasts, country analysis brief and other analyses, focusing on the energy industry including oil, natural gas and electricity.

48

The private biogas sector in Tanzania: The companies are coming.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abstract Biogas is a form of renewable energy that can be used on a small scale. This is ideal for rural areas that are far… (more)

Dijkstra, A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Epidemiology and control of human schistosomiasis in Tanzania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lead to the formation of sandy patches, ulcerations and polypoid lesions in the bladder and ureters, resulting in haematuria, obstruc- tions of urine flow, calcified bladder wall and cancer [14,18,95,96]. Common early signs include dysuria, pro...

Mazigo, Humphrey D; Nuwaha, Fred; Kinung’hi, Safari M; Morona, Domenica; de Moira, Angela Pinot; Wilson, Shona; Heukelbach, Jorg; Dunne, David W

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Interannual Variability of the Onset of the Maize Growing Season over South Africa and Zimbabwe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsistence farmers within southern Africa have identified the onset of the maize growing season as an important seasonal characteristic, advance knowledge of which would aid preparations for the planting of rain-fed maize. Onset over South ...

M. A. Tadross; B. C. Hewitson; M. T. Usman

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Impact of the HIV/AIDS Epidemic on Orphanhood Probabilities and Kinship Structure in Zimbabwe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Group (Edition 2). [6] Brass W. 1974. Perspectives inwe can fit a model life table, such as the Brass relationallogit model ( Brass 1974), to the estimates and projections

Zagheni, Emilio

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Social Work Education, Training and Employment in Africa: The case of Zimbabwe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experiences in literacy training in Brazil. His best knownSocial Work Education, Training, and Employment in Africa:work education, training, and employment opportunities in

Chogugudza, Cris

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

A supply forecasting model for Zimbabwe's corn sector: a time series and structural analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Zimbabwean government utilizes the corn supply forecasts to establish producer prices for the following growing season, estimate corn storage and handling costs, project corn import needs and associated costs, and to assess the Grain Marketing Board's financial resource needs. Thus, the corn supply forecasts are important information used by the government for contingency planning, decision-making, policy-formulation and implementation. As such, the need for accurate forecasts is obvious. The objectives of the study are: (a) determine how changes in the government-established producer price affects the quantity of corn supplied to the Grain Marketing Board by the large-scale corn-producing sector and (b) whether including rainfall or rainfall probabilities into econometric models would result in an improvement of corn supply forecasts compared to current forecasts by the government. In order to accomplish the first objective a supply elasticity model was specified and estimated using ordinary least squares. This model is intended to provide 'de insight to the government regarding the influence of the government-established corn price and other related variables on corn supplied to the Grain Marketing Board by the large-scale producers. Thus, the estimated model would be useful to the government when establishing corn prices in March/April for production in the following growing season (October - February). To achieve the second objective, preliminary analysis was carried out to verify whether there is statistical evidence to support the hypothesis that rainfall cause" corn production and supply, and also corn prices and sales. Specifically the preliminary analysis involved using the Granger causality tests, stationarity tests and innovation accounting (impulse responses and forecast error decomposition). Having verified and quantified the causal effects of rainfall on corn production and supply, the next task was to investigate whether including rainfall and/or drought probabilities into forecasting econometric models would help provide improved out-of-sample forecasts compared to the government's forecasts. The forecasting accuracy of the models (short-run) was evaluated using standard statistical measures such as, the mean square error (MSE), mean absolute percentage error (MAPEI), improved mean absolute percentage error (IMAPE) and Theil's U-statistic, and thereupon select the best model. The results indicated that by incorporating rainfall and/or rainfall probabilities into econometric forecasting models, there was substantial improvement in corn supply forecasts. It follows that the the government would likely find it beneficial to incorporate the rainfall variable into their forecasting effort.

Makaudze, Ephias

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Comparison of geoelectric and seismic reection models of the Zambezi Valley basins, northern Zimbabwe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time 0-1 1-2 2-3 3-4 4-5 5-6 6-7 7-8 8-9 9-10 Ttl Spp Ttl Hours 2) BEIGE: West Coast, Karoo and Western ___ Karoo Eremomela0626 1 ___ Karoo Chat0566 5 ___ Karoo Korhaan0220 2 ___ Karoo Lark0461 4 ___ Karoo Long-billed Lark4127 7 ___ Karoo Prinia4139 9 ___ Karoo Scrub-Robin0583 8 ___ Karoo Thrush1104 2 ___ Kelp Gull0287

55

Age of the Batoka basalts, northern Zimbabwe, and the duration of Karoo Large Igneous Province  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUUSVIRDIE SKANOORD-KAAP Maart 2013 Op die oomblik is die SKA-terrein in die Karoo `n miernes van opgraderingswerk aan die Karoo-substasie op Carnarvon is ook afgehandel en in Desember 2012 aan Eskom oorhandig gebou vir die Karoo Array-verwerker en terreinkragfasiliteit. n Alles gereed, sĂȘ Meer

Niocaill, Conall Mac

56

Effects Of Cash Crop Production On Food Crop Productivity In Zimbabwe: Synergies Or Trade-Offs?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is published by the Department of Agricultural Economics and the Department of Economics, Michigan State University (MSU). Support for this study was provided by the Food Security and Productivity Unit of the Productive Sectors Growth and Environmental Division, Office of Sustainable Development, Africa Bureau, USAID (AFR/SD/PSGE/FSP), through the Food Security II Cooperative Agreement between Michigan State University and the United States Agency for International Development, through the Africa Bureau's Office of Sustainable Development, Africa Bureau, AID/Washington. Govereh is a visiting research scholar and Jayne is a visiting associate professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics, Michigan State University. The authors acknowledge the help of Paul Strasberg, Takashi Yamano, Maxwell Mudhara, and E. Mazhangara in the preparation of the paper; all remaining errors are ours. ii

Carl Liedholm; Michael T. Weber; Jones Govereh; Jones Govereh; T.S. Jayne; T. S. Jayne

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Object-oriented change detection for the city of Harare, Zimbabwe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Object building and the extraction of homogeneous landscape units on which spatial statistics can be applied is useful in assessing land use and land cover change. Object-oriented processing techniques are becoming more popular compared to traditional ... Keywords: Change detection, Classification, Land cover, Land use, Object-oriented, Remote sensing, Satellite, Sustainable development

Ruvimbo Gamanya; Philippe De Maeyer; Morgan De Dapper

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Attached is the file containing the word or phrase searchers ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Zimbabwe, elephants, protection. * Poland, bison, protected forest area. * Paraguay, parrots, banning trade in live animals. ...

59

FACULTY OF HUMANITIES DEAN: PROFESSOR T KUPE BA Hons MA (Zimbabwe) PhD (University of Oslo)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Africa: Karoo to Recent, edited by B.R. Rosendahl, J.J.W. Rogers, and N.M. Rach, J. African Earth Sci in Africa: Karoo to Recent, edited by B.R. Rosendahl, J.J.W. Rogers, and N.M. Rach, J. African Earth Sci, in Rifting in Africa: Karoo to Recent, edited by B.R. Rosendahl, J.J.W. Rogers, and N.M. Rach, J. African

Wagner, Stephan

60

This article is from the June 2006 issue of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences; it in- cluded strains of F. subglutinans from Egypt, Florida (Israel, Malaysia, and Pakistan), Africa (Egypt, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, and Uganda

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zimbabwe tanzania swaziland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Negotiating reforms at home: Natural resources and the politics of energy access in urban Tanzania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Press. TANESCO (2003). Electricity Tariff Schedules, 1997-Figure 1. Average Electricity Tariff (nominal TanzanianL) Figure 3. Average electricity tariffs and estimated long

Ghanadan, Rebecca

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Negotiating reforms at home: Natural resources and the politics of energy access in urban Tanzania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

within a longer history of energy and development. TheseTogether both the history of energy provision and thestudy combining history and energy analysis of household

Ghanadan, Rebecca

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Perception and realities of biofuels investment in rural livelihood: the case of Kisarawe district,Tanzania.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Increase demand for biofuel in the world as the means to mitigate global climate change, energy option and reduced fule import expenses have attracted… (more)

Mandari, Zamda

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Negotiating reforms at home: Natural resources and the politics of energy access in urban Tanzania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C - Primary energy price reflects market price on a per MJDifferent Fuels A Market Price B Energy Content C PrimaryHousehold Energy Access Figure 11. Market Prices for

Ghanadan, Rebecca

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

Brown, S.

2002-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

66

Total All Countries Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination: Total All Countries Afghanistan Albania Algeria Andora Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahama Islands Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Bermuda Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djbouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Pacific Islands Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guinea Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Jordon Kazakhstan Kenya Korea, South Korea, North Kyrgyzstan Kutubu Kuwait Latvia Lebanon Liberia Libya Lithuania Macau S.A.R. Macedonia Madagascar Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Midway Islands Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Namibia Nepal Netherlands Netherlands/Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papau New Guinea Paracel Islands Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia St. Kitts and Nevis St. Lucia St. Pierre and Miquelon St. Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia and Montenegro Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Soloman Islands South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Tonga Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Vietnam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen Yugoslavia Zambia Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

67

Total Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the U.S.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Country: Total All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iran Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Afghanistan Albania Andora Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djbouti Dominica Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Ethiopia Eritrea Estonia Fiji Finland France French Pacific Islands French Guiana Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guinea Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Korea, South Kutubu Kyrgyzstan Latvia Lebanon Liberia Lithuania Macau S.A.R. Macedonia Madagascar Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Midway Islands Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Namibia Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papau New Guinea Paracel Islands Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia St. Kitts and Nevis St. Lucia St. Pierre and Miquelon St. Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Senegal Serbia and Montenegro Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Sri Lanka Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vietnam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen Yugoslavia Other Non OPEC Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

68

Instances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... St Lucia, Y, Zimbabwe, Y, Bealiba, Y, Y, Poland, Y, Y, Bulgaria, Y, Y, Y, Ecuador, Y, ... St Lucia, Zimbabwe, Y, Bealiba, Poland, Y, Y, Y, Bulgaria, Y, Y, Y, ...

69

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

+ , Panama + , Philippines + , Rwanda + , Senegal + , South Africa + , Tanzania + , Thailand + , Togolese Republic + , Trinidad and Tobago + , Uganda + , Ukraine + , Vietnam + ,...

70

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

+ , Lebanon + , Malaysia + , Mexico + , Moldova + , Morocco + , Peru + , Tanzania + , Thailand + , Philippines + , Trinidad and Tobago + , Uganda + , Vietnam + , Zambia +...

71

The Application of Seasonal to Interannual Climate Forecasts Based on El Nińo - Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Events: Australia, Brazil, Ethiopia, Peru, and Zimbabwe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monitoring Center (Kenya), the South African Weather Bureau,African Weather Bureau; Drought Monitoring Center (Kenya)Weather Service; NOAA; Australian BoM SADC REWS; Southern African RCOF; Drought Monitoring Centre (Kenya)

Orlove, Benjamin S; Tosteson, Joshua L.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Carbon mitigation potential and costs of forestry options in Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, the Phillippines and Tanzania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and benefits’, Biomass and Bioenergy 8(5). Fearnside, P.M. :change’, Biomass and Bioenergy 8(5), 279— Sathaye, JA. ,mitigation options’, Biomass and Bioenergy 8(5), 345—356.

Sathaye, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Carbon mitigation potential and costs of forestry options in Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, the Phillippines and Tanzania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential for carbon sequestration and emission reductionForestry Options on Carbon Sequestration in India, Workinggas emissions and carbon sequestration in the forest sector

Sathaye, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Carbon mitigation potential and costs of forestry options in Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, the Phillippines and Tanzania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parameters between 2000 and 2030. The approach requires thePg) C between 2000 and 2030 in the seven countries (aboutcountry for the period 2000—2030. The baseline scenario

Sathaye, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Implementation of Technology Integration in Higher Education: A Case Study of the University of Dar-es-Salaam in Tanzania.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of technology in education is one of the major trends in educational reforms all over the world. Integrating technology into the learning and… (more)

Kajuna, Laxford W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Carbon mitigation potential and costs of forestry options in Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, the Philippines and Tanzania  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes studies of carbon (C) mitigation potential and costs of about 40 forestry options in seven developing countries. Each study uses the same methodological approach - Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (COMAP) - to estimate the above parameters between 2000 and 2030. The approach requires the projection of baseline and mitigation land-use scenarios. Coupled with data on a per ha basis on C sequestration or avoidance, and costs and benefits, it allows the estimation of monetary benefit per Mg C, and the total costs and carbon potential. The results show that about half (3.0 Pg C) the cumulative mitigation potential of 6.2 Petagram (Pg) C between 2000 and 2030 in the seven countries (about 200 x 106 Mg C yr-1) could be achieved at a negative cost and the remainder at costs ranging up to $100 Mg C-1. About 5 Pg C could be achieved, at a cost less than $20 per Mg C. Negative cost potential indicates that non-carbon revenue is sufficient to offset direct costs of these options. The achievable potential is likely to be smaller, however, due to market, institutional, and sociocultural barriers that can delay or prevent the implementation of the analyzed options.

Sathaye, J.; Makundi, W.; Andrasko, K.; Boer, R.; Ravindranath, N.; Sudha, P.; Rao, S.; Lasco, R.; Pulhin, F.; Masera, O.; Ceron, A.; Ordonez, J.; Deying, X.; Zhang, X.; Zuomin, S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

A political ecology of community-based forest and wildlife management in Tanzania: politics, power and governance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in perspective. Finally, to Jonathan, who is always steady as a rock and untiring in his insistence that it will all be better than alright. Thank you for joining me in my adventures and for taking me on yours. Table of Contents... management rights for natural resources to local communities, who retain full revenue from diverse income sources, including hunting, tourism and non-timber forest products (Roe et al., 2009). In 1999 a report by the Food and Agriculture Organisation...

Humphries, Kathryn

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

78

U.S. Motor Gasoline Blending Components Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Spatly Islands : 2007-2007: Swaziland : 1999-1999: Sweden: 4 : 5: 1 : 1997-2013: Switzerland : 1997-1997: Syria : 2011-2011: Taiwan : 5 : 2000-2013: Thailand : 1999-2007:

79

U.S. Products Imports - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Spatly Islands: 0 : 2004-2007: Swaziland : 1995-2003: Sweden: 25: 29: 17: 18: 25: 10: 1993-2012: Switzerland: 0: 0 : 0: 1995-2012: Syria: 2: 6: 7: 9: 6 : 1993-2011 ...

80

U.S. Motor Gasoline Blending Components Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Spatly Islands : 2007-2007: Swaziland : 1999-1999: Sweden : 142: 44 : 1997-2013: Switzerland : 1997-1997: Syria : 2011-2011: Taiwan : 150 : 2000-2013: Thailand

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zimbabwe tanzania swaziland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

U.S. Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Spatly Islands : 2004-2007: Swaziland : 1995-2003: Sweden: 501: 240: 152: 49: 9: 3: 1993-2013: Switzerland : 1995-2012: Syria : 1993-2011: Taiwan: 84 : 195: 70 : 1995 ...

82

President Obama Announces More Key Administration Posts | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

worked to support human rights defenders in countries as diverse as Russia, Zimbabwe, Iran, Cuba, China, Uganda, Haiti, the Philippines, El Salvador and Egypt. He also has been...

83

The Theory of Human Development: A Cross-Cultural Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jordan Egypt Moldova Iran Azerbaijan Zimbabwe Developed FarAlbania Belarus Nigeria Azerbaijan Egypt Yugosl. ChinaORTHODOX EASTERN EUROPE Azerbaijan PROTESTANT WESTERN ZONE

Welzel, Christian; Inglehart, Ronald; Klingemann, Hans-Dieter

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Malaysia + , Mexico + , Moldova + , Morocco + , Peru + , Philippines + , Tanzania + , Thailand + , Trindand and Tobago + , Uganda + , Vietnam + , Zambia + ProgramSector Climate +...

85

Building `capacity' for education research among scholars of the global South: Learning from the case of an international research collaboration in Tanzania.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??University of Minnesota Ph.D. dissertation. July 2013. Major:Educational Policy and Administration. Advisor: Dr. Frances K. Vavrus. 1 computer file (PDF); xiii, 269 pages, appendices A-E.… (more)

Thomas, Matthew Aaron Martin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The Making of the Entrepreneur in Tanzania: experimenting with neo-liberal power through discourses of partnership, entrepreneurship, and participatory education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Garvey. Gaynair, G. (2010). Exxon Mobil Explands Support forpotential entrepreneurs. Exxon Mobil for example, partneringefforts such as those of Exxon- Mobil (which has one of the

Boner, Elizabeth Helene

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

The role of ICTs on enhancing collaborative capital in developing economies: a case of SMEs and non-state actors in Tanzania  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organizations (private, public), large and small, are increasingly facing more challenges due scarcity of resources, short delivery time requirement, frequent emergence of new technologies, demand for wide variety of competencies, and limited availability ... Keywords: ICTs, SMEs, collaborative capital, collaborative networks, developing economies, non state actors

Simon Samwel Msanjila; Faustin R. Kamuzora

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Essays on the politics of regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benin Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana BruneiTanzania Georgia Bosnia and Herzegovina Latvia YugoslaviaUkraine Cambodia Bosnia and Herzegovina Kazakhstan Turkey

Weymouth, Stephen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

The Demand for Currency Approach and the Size of the Shadow Economy: A Critical Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantifying the Black Economy: ‘Measurement without Theory’1985), “Estimating the second economy in Tanzania”, Worldand Development of the Shadow Economy in the Asia-Pacific,”

Ahumada, Hildegart; Alvaredo, Facundo; Canavese, Alfredo J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Demand for Currency Approach and the Size of the Shadow Economy: A Critical Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantifying the Black Economy: ‘Measurement without Theory’1985), “Estimating the second economy in Tanzania”, Worldand Development of the Shadow Economy in the Asia-Pacific,”

Ahumada, Hildegart; Alvaredo, Facundo; Canavese, Alfredo J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya, Lebannon, Malaysia, Mexico, Moldova, Morocco, Peru, Philippines, Tanzania, Thailand, Trindand and Tobago, Uganda, Vietnam, Zambia South America, Southern Asia, South...

92

National Metrology Laboratories, Page 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Tanzania Bureau of Standards PO Box 9524 Dar es Salaam Phone: (255 22) 245 0206 Fax: (255 22) 245 0959 E-mail: tbs@simbanet.net. Thailand. ...

2010-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

93

Waste Management Sector Network (WMSN) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mozambique Nepal Nigeria Panama Philippines Rwanda Senegal South Africa Tanzania Thailand Togolese Republic Trinidad and Tobago Uganda Ukraine Vietnam Zambia Climate...

94

Epidemiology of subpatent Plasmodium falciparum infection: implications for detection of hotspots with imperfect diagnostics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

details National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR,Mwanza Medical Research Centre, Mwanza, Tanzania. 2 TheInstitute for Medical Research (NIMR, Mwanza Medical

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

A thermotectonic framework for the growth and stabilization of the eastern Kaapvaal craton, southern Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continents are an amalgamation of crust and mantle lithosphere assembled over -4 Gyr and are therefore our best record of the early Earth. Exposures of rocks -3.0-3.7 Ga cover -20,000 km2 of eastern S. Africa and Swaziland, ...

Schoene, Robert Blair

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

U.S. Motor Gasoline Blending Components Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Spatly Islands: 43 : 2007-2007: Swaziland : 1999-1999: Sweden: 2,847: 3,729: 3,197: 2,490: 5,846: 1,388: 1997-2012: Switzerland : 1997-1997: Syria : 134 : 2011-2011 ...

97

Accredited by Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, Inc. Student Health Service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? ____ ____ Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Brazil, Cambodia, Cameroon, China, CĂŽte d'Ivoire , Democratic People, Viet Nam, Zambia, Zimbabwe 2. Have you used intravenous drugs or had a history of alcoholism

Dyer, Bill

98

Modeling tuberculosis in areas of high HIV prevalence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a discrete event simulation model of tuberculosis (TB) and HIV disease, parameterized to describe the dual epidemics in Harare, Zimbabwe. TB and HIV are the leading causes of death from infectious disease among adults worldwide and the number ...

Georgina R. Hughes; Christine S. M. Currie; Elizabeth L. Corbett

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

ANY OPINIONS EXPRESSED ARE THOSE OF THE AUTHOR(S) AND NOT NECESSARILY THOSE OF THE SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS & SOCIAL SCIENCES, SMUTwo-sample estimation of poverty rates for disabled people: an application to Tanzania ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Working Paper is brought to you for free and open access by the School of Economics at Institutional Knowledge at Singapore Management

Tomoki Fujii; Tomoki Fujii; Tomoki Fujii

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Making use of renewable energy  

SciTech Connect

This book describes renewable energy projects proposed for the rural areas of developing countries. Topics considered include biogas generation in Zimbabwe, biogas technology for water pumping in Botswana, soil fertility and energy problems in rural development in the Zaire rain forest, international scientific collaboration on biogas technologies for rural development, alcohol from biomass, an ethanol project in Zimbabwe, biomass alcohol and the fuel-food issue, solar water heating in Zimbabwe, absorbent box solar cookers, solar crop drying in Zimbabwe, the use of passive solar energy in Botswana buildings, the potential of mini hydro systems, woodfuel as a potential renewable energy source, small-scale afforestation for domestic needs in the communal lands of Zimbabwe, muscle power, the use of human energy in construction, hand-operated water pumps, animal power for water pumping in Botswana, the production of charcoal in Zambia, improving the efficiency of a traditional charcoal-burning Burmese cooking stove, social impacts, non-engineering constraints affecting energy use in a rural area, women and energy, and non-technical factors influencing the establishment of fuels-from-crops industries in developing countries.

Johnston, J.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zimbabwe tanzania swaziland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A quest to expand educational opportunities in rural East Africa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that are the essence of photography, there was the contrasts of fortunes found in rural Kenya and Tanzania - experiences evoking a full range of emotions. Carter made the trip as a...

102

Acceptance of repeat population-based voluntary counseling and testing for HIV in rural Malawi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and testing intervention in rural Uganda. Health Policy andestimates: The case of rural Malawi. Paper presented at theof the AIDS epidemic in a rural area in Tanzania with a

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Business | Embassy of the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tanzania, and Uganda) and aims to double intra-regional trade in the EAC, increase EAC exports to the United States by 40%, and make it easier for goods to reach Uganda, Rwanda,...

104

Creating Sustainable Fiscal Space for Infrastructure:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Working Paper should not be reported as representing the views of the IMF. The views expressed in this Working Paper are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent those of the IMF or IMF policy. Working Papers describe research in progress by the author(s) and are published to elicit comments and to further debate. A common dilemma facing governments around the world is how to meet the sizeable fiscal costs of providing and maintaining infrastructure networks. Over the past decade, developed and developing countries have looked to fiscal rules, budgetary reforms, tax policy and administration measures, public-private partnerships and other innovative financial instruments to raise additional finance for infrastructure investment. This paper looks at the range of options for raising the financing to meet Tanzania’s infrastructure needs. It begins with a brief survey of the evidence on the relationship between infrastructure, public investment, and economic growth, and then goes on to consider the case for additional infrastructure investment in Tanzania. The second part of the paper looks at five broad options for mobilizing additional resources to meet Tanzania’s infrastructure needs: (i) direct private investment and PPPs, (ii) expenditure reprioritization and efficiency, (iii) domestic revenue mobilization, (iv) external grants and concessional financing, and (v) sovereign borrowing on domestic or international credit markets. The paper concludes with some general recommendations on what combination of the above approaches might be suitable for Tanzania.

Teresa Ter-minassian; Richard Hughes; Prepared Teresa Ter-minassian; Richard Hughes; Ro Hajdenberg

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Introduction I.1. Generalities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and any large igneous province cannot be demonstrated. Even though radiometric data from some of the Karoo and new Ar-Ar data have demonstrated that the youngest Karoo-Ferrar flows are around 180­179 m.yr. oldNiocaill, C. 2001. Age of the Batoka basalts, northern Zimbabwe, and the duration of the Karoo Large Igneous

Polteau, Stephane

106

Gametic incompatibilities between races of Drosophila melanogaster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

melanogaster from Zimbabwe, Africa, do not mate readily with cosmopolitan males. This polymorphism in mate melanogaster is currently known to have two behavioural races, i.e. the cosmopolitan (M for melanogaster-female lines Two races of D. melanogaster were used in this study; these were the cosmopolitan (M lines

Palumbi, Stephen

107

EARTH-SCIENCES CONTEMPORARY ART  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Age of the Batoka basalts, northern Zimbabwe, and the duration of Karoo Large Igneous Province.98N, 260.68E, A95 = 14.98. In South Africa, Lesotho, and Namibia the vast majority of Karoo basalts difference is real and hence confirms the estimate of $5 Myr for the duration of emplacement of the Karoo

Polteau, Stephane

108

Interdecadal Variability of the Relationship between the Indian Ocean Zonal Mode and East African Coastal Rainfall Anomalies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variance of the rainfall during the October–November–December (OND) “short rain” season along the coast in Kenya and Tanzania correlates strongly with sea surface temperature (SST) in the Indian Ocean between 1950 and 1999. A zonal pattern of ...

Christina Oelfke Clark; Peter J. Webster; Julia E. Cole

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Arthur Cruickshank --19322011 A native of Gondwanaland, who studied the former  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Karoo sequences in the Northern Karoo Basin of South Africa and Rhodesia. In: Geokongress 77 Abstracts Tanzania and the Karoo Basin, South Africa: ecostratigraphy rules? (special abstracts issue, issued.R.I. 1977. Report on Karoo Palaeontology Symposium. South African Journal of Science 73, 232­234. 84

Benton, Michael

110

Sustaining mobile pastoralists in the mountains of northern Pakistan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustaining mobile pastoralists in the mountains of northern Pakistan Mobile pastoralism According-West Frontier Province), in northern Pakistan. But the provision of these goods and services is at risk payments for ecosystem services. Case studies featured here were conducted in: Pakistan, Tanzania

Richner, Heinz

111

Biofuels War: The New Scramble for Africa by Western Big Money Profiteers : EcoWorldly Explore GO Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuels War: The New Scramble for Africa by Western Big Money Profiteers : EcoWorldly About Like this post? Subscribe to our RSS feed and stay up to date. Biofuels War: The New Scramble in Africa, Ethiopia, Europe, Ghana, Global, Tanzania, United States of America Biofuels war has broken out

112

Program of Energy Enterprise Development and Investment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To provide training in enterprise development and technical applications, local partner capacity building, individualized enterprise development services and seed capital investment to catalyze the creation of sustainable renewable energy enterprises that deliver clean energy services to households and businesses in South Africa, Ethiopia and Tanzania.

Christine Eibs Singer

2005-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

113

Electricity and Development: Global Trends and Key Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity and Development: Global Trends and Key Challenges Romeo Pacudan, PhD Risoe National · Prospects for electricity development · Investment requirements · Key challenges · Final remarks #12 and the transport burden in Tanzania. Source: Modi, 2004 #12;2. Energy and Human Development Access to electricity

114

Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from All Countries  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Albania Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cameroon Canada Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Estonia Finland France Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibralter Greece Guatemala Guinea Hong Kong Hungary India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Kazakhstan Korea, South Kyrgyzstan Latvia Liberia Lithuania Malaysia Malta Mauritania Mexico Midway Islands Morocco Namibia Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Zealand Nicaragua Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papua New Guinea Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia Senegal Singapore Slovakia South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Thailand Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Ukraine United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vietnam Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen

115

Intergral Drive Systems AG IDS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Intergral Drive Systems AG IDS Intergral Drive Systems AG IDS Jump to: navigation, search Name Intergral Drive Systems AG (IDS) Place Zurich, Swaziland Zip CH-8005 Sector Wind energy Product Zurich based producer of power electronics systems for wind turbines, PV plants, and propulsion systems. Coordinates 47.37706°, 8.53955° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.37706,"lon":8.53955,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

116

Developing Energy Enterprises Programme in Africa | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Enterprises Programme in Africa Energy Enterprises Programme in Africa Jump to: navigation, search Name Developing Energy Enterprises Programme in Africa Agency/Company /Organization Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Sector Energy Topics Market analysis, Background analysis Website http://www.gvepinternational.o Program Start 2008 Program End 2013 Country Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania Eastern Africa, Eastern Africa, Eastern Africa References GVEP Regional Activities [1] "GVEP International set up the Developing Energy Enterprises Programme (DEEP) in 2008. Spanning five years, the programme aims to provide modern energy services and products to 1.8 million people in rural and peri-urban Areas in the East African countries of Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania." References ↑ "GVEP Regional Activities"

117

The REDD Opportunities Scoping Exercise (ROSE) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

REDD Opportunities Scoping Exercise (ROSE) REDD Opportunities Scoping Exercise (ROSE) Jump to: navigation, search Name The REDD Opportunities Scoping Exercise (ROSE): A Tool for Prioritizing Sub-National REDD+ Activities - Case Studies from Ghana, Tanzania, and Uganda Agency/Company /Organization The Katoomba Group, Forest Trends, Nature Conservation Research Centre Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Resource Type Guide/manual Website http://www.forest-trends.org/d Country Ghana, Tanzania, Uganda UN Region "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

118

The importance of context in delivering effective EIA: Case studies from East Africa  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews and compares the condition of the environmental impact assessment (EIA) system in three countries in the East Africa region: Kenya, Rwanda and Tanzania. The criteria used for the evaluation and the comparison of each system are based on the elements of the legal, administrative and procedural frameworks, as well as the context in which they operate. These criteria are adapted from the evaluation and quality control criteria derived from a number of literature sources. The study reveals that the EIA systems of Kenya and Tanzania are at a similar stage in their development. The two countries, the first to introduce the EIA concept into their jurisdiction in this part of Africa, therefore have more experience than Rwanda in the practice of environmental impact assessment, where the legislation and process requires more time to mature both from the governmental and societal perspective. The analysis of the administrative and procedural frameworks highlights the weakness in the autonomy of the competent authority, in all three countries. Finally a major finding of this study is that the contextual set up i.e. the socio-economic and political situation plays an important role in the performance of an EIA system. The context in developing countries is very different from developed countries where the EIA concept originates. Interpreting EIA conditions in countries like Kenya, Rwanda and Tanzania requires that the analysis for determining the effectiveness of their systems should be undertaken within a relevant framework, taking into account the specific requirements of those countries.

Marara, Madeleine; Okello, Nick; Kuhanwa, Zainab; Douven, Wim; Beevers, Lindsay, E-mail: l.beevers@hw.ac.uk; Leentvaar, Jan

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

UNEP-Risoe-Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Name UNEP-Risoe - Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series Agency/Company /Organization UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector Energy, Land Topics Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis, Background analysis, Resource assessment Website http://www.uneprisoe.org/Econo References Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations[1] Country study series: Argentina, Ecuador, Estonia, Hungary, Indonesia, Mauritius, Senegal, Vietnam Parallel country studies: Botswana, Tanzania, Zambia Regional Studies: Andean Region, Southern African Development Community (SADC) References ↑ "Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=UNEP-Risoe-Economics_of_GHG_Limitations:_Country_Study_Series&oldid=377226"

120

Gender Equality and Female Empowerment Policy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GENDER EQUALITY GENDER EQUALITY AND FEMALE EMPOWERMENT POLICY USAID POLICY MARCH 2012 "Achieving our objectives for global development will demand accelerated efforts to achieve gender equality and women's empowerment. Otherwise, peace and prosperity will have their own glass ceiling." Hillary Clinton JANUARY 2012 USAID GENDER EQUALITY AND FEMALE EMPOWERMENT POLICY MARCH 2012 WASHINGTON, DC i Photo credits: Cover (clockwise from top left): Erwin Rose/USAID;The Hunger Project; Unilever Tea Tanzania, Limited (UTTL); page 5,The Hunger Project; page 18, Erwwin Rose/USAID; page 20, Karen Homer/AWARD. ii USAID Policy on Gender Equality and Female Empowerment Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS Message from the Administrator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zimbabwe tanzania swaziland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Agriculture Rural Energy Enterprise Development (AREED) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enterprise Development (AREED) Enterprise Development (AREED) Jump to: navigation, search Name Agriculture Rural Energy Enterprise Development (AREED) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Agriculture, Biomass, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency Topics Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health, Finance Website http://www.areed.org/ Country Ghana, Mali, Tanzania, Senegal, Zambia Western Africa, Western Africa, Eastern Africa, Western Africa, Eastern Africa References AREED[1] Agriculture Rural Energy Enterprise Development (AREED) Screenshot "The United Nations Environment Programme's Rural Energy Enterprise Development (REED) initiative operates in Africa as AREED to develop new

122

Developing Energy Enterprises Project (DEEP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enterprises Project (DEEP) Enterprises Project (DEEP) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Developing Energy Enterprises Project (DEEP) Name Developing Energy Enterprises Project (DEEP) Agency/Company /Organization Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) International Partner European Union (EU), the Netherlands Sector Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Economic Development, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, People and Policy Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment Website http://www.gvepinternational.o Program Start 2008 Program End 2013 Country Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda Eastern Africa, Eastern Africa, Eastern Africa References Developing Energy Enterprises Project (DEEP)[1]

123

Immunophoretic rapid diagnostic tests as a source of immunoglobulins for estimating malaria sero-prevalence and transmission intensity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the University of Copenhagen. The work was supported by a grant to ER, PC and CD from the Wellcome Trust (078925). References 1. Drakeley C, Corran P, Coleman PG, Tongren JE, McDonald S, Car- neiro I, Malima R, Lusingu JPA, Manjurano A, Nkya WM, Lemnge M, Cox J... , Abdulla S, Kachur SP, Bloland PB: Dispensary level pilot implementation of rapid diagnostic tests: an evaluation of RDT acceptance and usage by providers and patients – Tanzania, 2005. Malar J 2008, 7:239. 6. Lubell Y, Hopkins H, Whitty CJ, Staedke SG...

Williams, Geoffrey S; Mweya, Clement; Stewart, Laveta; Mtove, George; Reyburn, Hugh T; Cook, Jackie; Corran, Patrick H; Riley, Eleanor M; Drakeley, Chris J

2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

124

REDD Country Activity Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

REDD Country Activity Database REDD Country Activity Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: REDD Country Activity Database Agency/Company /Organization: Global Canopy Programme, Forum on Readiness for REDD Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset, Case studies/examples User Interface: Website Website: www.theredddesk.org/countries Country: Brazil, Cameroon, Vietnam, Guyana, Tanzania, Indonesia Cost: Free UN Region: Southern Africa, South America, South-Eastern Asia REDD Country Activity Database Screenshot References: REDD Country Activity Database[1] Logo: REDD Country Activity Database The REDD Countries Database is a centralised and collaborative database of the diverse and rapidly evolving range of ongoing REDD activities in

125

Forest Carbon Partnership Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Name Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Co-benefits assessment, Finance Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices, Training materials Website http://www.forestcarbonpartner Country Argentina, Bolivia, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of Congo, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Indonesia, Kenya, Laos, Laos, Liberia, Madagascar, Mexico, Moldova, Mozambique, Nepal, Nicaragua, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Republic of the Congo, Suriname, Tanzania, Thailand, Uganda, Vanuatu, Vietnam

126

East Coast (PADD 1) Imports from All Countries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Import Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Import Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Cameroon Canada Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Denmark Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Estonia Finland France Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibralter Greece Guatemala Guinea Hong Kong Hungary India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Kazakhstan Korea, South Kyrgyzstan Latvia Liberia Lithuania Malaysia Malta Mauritania Mexico Morocco Namibia Netherlands Netherlands Antilles Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia Senegal Singapore South Africa Spain Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Thailand Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Ukraine United Kingdom Uruguay Vietnam Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen

127

Decentralized Rural Electrification: the Critical Success Factors | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Decentralized Rural Electrification: the Critical Success Factors Decentralized Rural Electrification: the Critical Success Factors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Decentralized Rural Electrification: the Critical Success Factors Agency/Company /Organization: Ray Holland, Lahiru Perera, Teodoro Sanchez, Dr Rona Wilkinson Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Phase: Create a Vision Topics: - Energy Access Resource Type: Publications User Interface: Website Website: cdn1.practicalaction.org/r/u/4d927f75-6660-426f-941e-13a02e33baf9.pdf? Cost: Free Language: English This review of recent practice draws on ITDG's twenty years experience of supporting off-grid solutions in Sri Lanka, Nepal, Zimbabwe and Peru in particular, and on work by other organisations in other countries, such as Indonesia, Kenya, Vietnam, South Africa.

128

International Student Enrolment Vancouver Campus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Visiting Total Central Asia Afghanistan 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Azerbaijan 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 0 6 Kazakhstan 0 0 8 0 0.1% Zimbabwe 0 0 1 1 1 3 4 5 5 5 4 5 5 0.1% Azerbaijan 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 4 0.1% Bermuda 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 3 0.1% Vietnam 0 4 4 3 7 7 7 8 8 6 3 4 3 0.1% Azerbaijan 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 0.1% Bolivia 0 0

Michelson, David G.

129

An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Rift Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Previous interpretations of seismic data collected by the Kenya Rift International Seismic Project (KRISP) experiments indicate the presence of crustal thickening within the rift valley area beneath the Kenya dome, an uplift centred on the southern part of the Kenya rift. North of the dome, these interpretations show thinning of the crust and an increase in crustal extension. To the south near the Kenya/Tanzania border, crustal thinning associated with the rift is modest. Our study was aimed at further investigating crustal structure from this dome southwards via a

130

Capital Markets Climate Initiative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Markets Climate Initiative Markets Climate Initiative Jump to: navigation, search Name Capital Markets Climate Initiative Agency/Company /Organization World Economic Forum Partner UK Department of Energy and Climate Sector Climate Topics Finance, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/cont Country India, Kenya, South Africa, Mexico, Tanzania Southern Asia, Eastern Africa, Southern Africa, Central America, Eastern Africa References CMCI[1] World Economic Forum[2] The Capital Markets Climate Initiative (CMCI) is a public-private initiative designed to support the scale up of private finance flows for low carbon technologies, solutions and infrastructure in developing economies by: Developing a common understanding amongst policy makers of why and

131

Climate-Proofing Energy Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Proofing Energy Systems Proofing Energy Systems Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Climate-Proofing Energy Systems Agency/Company /Organization: Helio-International Sector: Energy Topics: GHG inventory, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Security, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual Website: www.helio-international.org/uploads/Global%20Report.En.pdf?size=429055 Country: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, Tanzania, Uganda UN Region: Middle Africa Climate-Proofing Energy Systems Screenshot References: CPES[1] Overview "This report explains why a metric for the vulnerability and resilience of energy systems is needed and proposes a methodology. It summarises anticipated climate-induced impacts on key energy systems and outlines

132

News From the D.C. Office: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Workshops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerial view of Washington D.C. Aerial view of Washington D.C. News From the D.C. Office Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Workshops LBNL brought technical training to four continents this summer with a series of regional greenhouse gas mitigation workshops. As part of LBNL's continued work on the U.S. Country Studies Program (USCSP), staff members of the Energy Analysis Program from Washington, D.C. and Berkeley worked together to put on workshops in Warsaw, Poland; Cancun, Mexico; Arusha, Tanzania; and Seoul, Korea. LBNL began working with USCSP more than a year and a half ago, when it was awarded the contract to provide mitigation assistance to some 35 countries. The Program grew out of the U.S.'s commitment to help developing and transitional countries address climate-change issues- specifically to

133

United States Announces New Bilateral Partnership with Ghana | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Announces New Bilateral Partnership with Ghana United States Announces New Bilateral Partnership with Ghana United States Announces New Bilateral Partnership with Ghana March 16, 2012 - 2:16pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The United States announced today that it has formed a new bilateral partnership with Ghana that will build on the strong bilateral ties between the two countries and support further cooperation on a range of economic development issues. On March 9, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Ghana Finance Minister Kwabena Duffuor signed a Statement of Principles reaffirming our bilateral commitment to supporting President Obama's Partnership for Growth (PfG) Initiative. Ghana is one of the first four countries globally - including El Salvador, Tanzania, and the Philippines - to participate in the interagency PfG Initiative.

134

Business Models for Energy Access | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Business Models for Energy Access Business Models for Energy Access Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Business Models for Energy Access Agency/Company /Organization: EASE-Enabling Access to Sustainable Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, Grid Assessment and Integration Topics: Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Lessons learned/best practices, Publications Website: www.ease-web.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/EASE-Business-models-for-e Country: Bolivia, Tanzania, Cambodia, Uganda, Laos, Mali, Vietnam, Senegal Cost: Free South America, Eastern Africa, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Africa, South-Eastern Asia, Western Africa, South-Eastern Asia, Western Africa

135

Property:EnergyAccessYearInitiated | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EnergyAccessYearInitiated EnergyAccessYearInitiated Jump to: navigation, search Property Name EnergyAccessYearInitiated Property Type Date Description Year Initiated Pages using the property "EnergyAccessYearInitiated" Showing 10 pages using this property. B Benin: Increased Access to Modern Energy Project + 2009 + Burkina Faso Energy Access Project + 2007 + E Ethiopia Energy Access Project + 2005 + G Ghana Energy Development and Access Project (GEDAP) + 2007 + M Mongolia Renewable Energy and Rural Electricity Access Project + 2006 + P Papua New Guinea Improved Energy Access for Rural Communities + 2012 + R Republic of Yemen Energy Access Project + 2006 + S Sri Lanka Credit to Connect + 2011 + T Tanzania Energy Development and Access Expansion Project + 2007 + V Viet Nam Rural Electrification + 2009 +

136

Potential of biomass conversion in meeting the energy needs of the rural populations of developing countries: an overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary assessment is presented of the contribution that biomass conversion could make in the context of the rural areas of six developing countries: India, Indonesia, Peru, Sudan, Tanzania, and Thailand. The technologies selected for analysis are: anaerobic digestion of wet biomass to produce methane and pyrolysis of dry biomass to produce charcoal, liquid fuels, and low-Btu gases. Preliminary estimates are made of the amounts of fuels that could be produced in each of the selected countries by a combination of these technologies. It was found that, with the exception of India, implementation of these technologies could potentially meet the future energy needs of their rural populations for both subsistence and development. (MHR)

Mubayi, V.; Lee, J.; Chatterjee, R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Strategies for Adapting to Climate Change in Rural Sub-Saharan Africa |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Adapting to Climate Change in Rural Sub-Saharan Africa Adapting to Climate Change in Rural Sub-Saharan Africa Jump to: navigation, search Name Strategies for Adapting to Climate Change in Rural Sub-Saharan Africa Agency/Company /Organization International Food Policy Research Institute Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory Resource Type Publications Website http://www.ifpri.org/sites/def Country Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda UN Region "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

138

UNEP-Risoe-Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from UNEP-Risoe - Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study (Redirected from UNEP-Risoe - Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series) Jump to: navigation, search Name UNEP-Risoe - Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series Agency/Company /Organization UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector Energy, Land Topics Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis, Background analysis, Resource assessment Website http://www.uneprisoe.org/Econo References Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations[1] Country study series: Argentina, Ecuador, Estonia, Hungary, Indonesia, Mauritius, Senegal, Vietnam Parallel country studies: Botswana, Tanzania, Zambia Regional Studies: Andean Region, Southern African Development Community (SADC) References ↑ "Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=UNEP-Risoe-Economics_of_GHG_Limitations:_Country_Study_Series&oldid=377226"

139

United States Announces New Bilateral Partnership with Ghana | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Announces New Bilateral Partnership with Ghana United States Announces New Bilateral Partnership with Ghana United States Announces New Bilateral Partnership with Ghana March 16, 2012 - 2:16pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The United States announced today that it has formed a new bilateral partnership with Ghana that will build on the strong bilateral ties between the two countries and support further cooperation on a range of economic development issues. On March 9, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Ghana Finance Minister Kwabena Duffuor signed a Statement of Principles reaffirming our bilateral commitment to supporting President Obama's Partnership for Growth (PfG) Initiative. Ghana is one of the first four countries globally - including El Salvador, Tanzania, and the Philippines - to participate in the interagency PfG Initiative.

140

Shear Wave Velocity Structure of Southern African Crust: Evidence for Compositional Heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic Terrains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crustal structure in southern Africa has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations spanning much of the Precambrian shield of southern Africa. 1-D shear wave velocity profiles obtained from the inversion yield Moho depths that are similar to those reported in previous studies and show considerable variability in the shear wave velocity structure of the lower part of the crust between some terrains. For many of the Archaean and Proterozoic terrains in the shield, S velocities reach 4.0 km/s or higher over a substantial part of the lower crust. However, for most of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain, mean shear wave velocities of {le} 3.9 km/s characterize the lower part of the crust along with slightly ({approx}5 km) thinner crust. These findings indicate that the lower crust across much of the shield has a predominantly mafic composition, except for the southwest portion of the Kaapvaal Craton and western portion of the Zimbabwe Craton, where the lower crust is intermediate-to-felsic in composition. The parts of the Kaapvaal Craton underlain by intermediate-to-felsic lower crust coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, and thus we suggest that the intermediate-to-felsic composition of the lower crust and the shallower Moho may have resulted from crustal melting during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga and concomitant crustal thinning caused by rifting.

Kgaswane, E M; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Dirks, P H H M; Durrheim, R J; Pasyanos, M E

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zimbabwe tanzania swaziland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Sexual Violence in Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The true extent of sexual violence in accordance to the WHO definition is unknown, though varied studies highlight its pervasiveness. The WHO multi-country study 1 on women’s health and domestic violence against women, provides the first comparative data across the world and included three African countries: Namibia (the capital), Tanzania (a rural and urban setting) and Ethiopia (a rural setting). According to the WHO multi-country study, between 16 % and 59 % women from Africa had ever experienced sexual violence from intimate partners. Younger women (<15years) were more likely to report force at first sex (between 18 % and 43%). Other studies shows high levels of sexual violence in-country but data is scant. Data from demographic health surveys are Sexual violence: ‘any physical, psychological or sexual act, attempt to obtain a sexual act, unwanted sexual comments or advances against a person’s sexuality using coercion by any person regardless of their relationship with the victim, in any setting, including but not limited to home and work’ (Krug et al, 2002). limited by a general tendency to under-report. No nationally representative data on sexual violence existed until

Agenda For Kenya; Catherine Maternowska; Jill Keesbury; Nduku Kilonzo; Bixby Centre; Global Reproductive Health

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Amounts and Photosynthesis Carbon Dioxide Amounts and Photosynthesis Name: Alex Status: student Grade: K-3 Location: Outside U.S. Country: Tanzania Date: Spring 2012 Question: Do plants produce more oxygen when they take in more carbon dioxide? Replies: Alex Yes, plants produce more oxygen when they take in more carbon dioxide Because that indicates a greater rate of photosynthesis is occurring. Here are some online articles that might help you understand more about photosynthesis. http://www.biology4kids.com/files/plants_photosynthesis.html http://www.google.com/search?q=photosynthesis+for+kids&hl=en&prmd =imvns&tbm=isch&tbo= u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=yD JvT5vANKTw0gHTq5n4Bg&ved=0CDsQsAQ&biw=1024&bih=653 Sincere regards, Mike Stewart Remember that in photosynthesis, the source of O2 is H2O. The following should be helpful to you:

143

Lessons and Guidance on Securing financing for RE/EE projects in Southern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lessons and Guidance on Securing financing for RE/EE projects in Southern Lessons and Guidance on Securing financing for RE/EE projects in Southern Africa through Gold Standard Carbon Revenues Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Lessons and Guidance on Securing financing for RE/EE projects in Southern Africa through Gold Standard Carbon Revenues Agency/Company /Organization: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics: Implementation, Finance Website: toolkits.reeep.org/index.php?work=detail&asset=projectOutput&id=135 Country: Tanzania, Mozambique Eastern Africa, Eastern Africa Coordinates: -25.9577855°, 32.5623996° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-25.9577855,"lon":32.5623996,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

144

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Permanence of Ocean Currents Permanence of Ocean Currents Name: Teresia Status: student Grade: 6-8 Country: Tanzania Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: Are ocean currents permanent? Replies: Teresia: Although many ocean currents have been around for many thousands or years, they can and do change over time. One of the problems some scientists see with global warming is that some currents may shift or stop all together. For example, some folks, are worried that much fresh water may flow into the sea from melting ice in Greenland This would, they say, stop the Gulf Stream in the Atlantic ocean which keeps Europe warm That would plunge Europe into another ice age. But, on the whole, ocean currents do not change over the life of a human being. Mr.Avakian Teresia, Since ocean currents are controlled by several factors: wind - which is the main cause of the different rotations in the northern and southern hemisphere, salinity - which, for example is the main factor in the southward diffusion from the north pole in the Atlantic ocean and the gulf stream, temperature, general ocean floor topography, etc. - changes (on a geological time scale) will cause changes in the ocean currents.

145

Poverty and Forests Linkages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Poverty and Forests Linkages Poverty and Forests Linkages Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Poverty and Forests Linkages Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Partner: Program on Forests Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Background analysis Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.profor.info/profor/Documents/pdf/livelihoods/PovertyForestsLinkage Country: India, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Guinea, Laos, Tanzania Southern Asia, Southern Asia, Melanesia, Western Africa, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Africa Coordinates: 28.86°, 81.56° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":28.86,"lon":81.56,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

146

International Energy and Climate Initiative - Energy+ | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Initiative - Energy+ Initiative - Energy+ Jump to: navigation, search Name International Energy and Climate Initiative - Energy+ Agency/Company /Organization Norway Ministry of Foreign Affairs Partner Government of Kenya, Government of Bhutan, Government of Liberia, Government of Ethiopia, Government of Maldives, Government of Senegal, Government of Morocco, Government of Tanzania, Government of Nepal, Government of United Kingdom, Government of France, Government of Denmark, Government of Switzerland, Government of The Netherlands, Government of Republic of Korea, Government of Norway, World Bank, Asian Development Bank, African Development Bank, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), International Energy Agency (IEA), Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD), Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP), ECOWAS Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (ECREEE), Latin American Energy Organization (OLADE), International Hydropower Association (IHA), World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD), United Nations Foundation (UNF), Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP), World Wildlife Fund, Friends of the Earth Norway, Practical Action UK, World Future Council, Bellona

147

Two-Stage Fungal Pre-Treatment for Improved Biogas Production from Sisal Leaf Decortication Residues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Sisal leaf decortications residue (SLDR) is amongst the most abundant agroindustrial residues in Tanzania and is a good feedstock for biogas production. Pretreatment of the residue prior to its anaerobic digestion (AD) was investigated using a twostage pre-treatment approach with two fungal strains, CCHT-1 and Trichoderma reesei in succession in anaerobic batch bioreactors. AD of the pre-treated residue with CCTH-1 at 10 % (wet weight inoculum/SLDR) inoculum concentration incubated for four days followed by incubation for eight days with 25 % (wet weight inoculum/SLDR) of T. reesei gave a methane yield of 0.292 ± 0.04 m 3 CH4/kg volatile solids (VS)added. On reversing the pre-treatment succession of the fungal inocula using the same parameters followed by AD, methane yield decreased by about 55%. Generally, an increment in the range of 30–101% in methane yield in comparison to the un-treated SLDR was obtained. The results confirmed the potential of CCHT-1 followed by Trichoderma reesei fungi pre-treatment prior to AD to achieve significant improvement in biogas production from SLDR.

Mutemi Muthangya; Anthony Manoni Msh; Amelia Kajumulo Kivaisi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

AN ABUNDANCE OF LITHIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keith Evans, a geologist by profession, first became involved in the lithium business in the early 1970’s when, on behalf of Selection Trust Ltd., was asked to evaluate the future potential of Bikita Minerals in what, at that time, was Southern Rhodesia (later Zimbabwe). Selection Trust was the majority owner of the operation which, prior to the imposition of United Nations sanctions, had been the dominant producer of lithium ores for direct usage in the glass and ceramics industry. Subsequently, he joined Lithium Corporation of America, the then leading lithium chemical producer and later moved to Amax Exploration. On behalf of Amax and a Chilean partner he negotiated with Corfo, a Chilean government entity, the rights to evaluate and develop that part of the Salar de Atacama that had not been leased to the Foote Mineral Company. He was responsible for all aspects of the evaluation but when Amax decided not to proceed with the project it was acquired by Sociedad Quimica y Minera (SQM) and the company is now the world’s largest lithium chemicals producer. Throughout his career in the lithium industry it was his responsibility to monitor industry developments particularly in respect of new resources and he has continued as a consultant in a In 1976 a National Research Council Panel estimated that Western World lithium reserves and resources totaled 10.6 million tonnes as elemental lithium. Subsequent discoveries, particularly in brines in the southern Andes and the plateaus of western China and Tibet have increased the tonnages significantly. Geothermal brines and lithium bearing clays add to the total. This current estimate totals 28.4 million tonnes Li equivalent to more than 150.0 million tonnes of lithium carbonate of which nearly 14.0 million tonnes lithium (about 74.0 million tonnes of carbonate) are at active or proposed operations. This can be compared with current demand for lithium chemicals which approximates to 84,000 tonnes as lithium carbonate equivalents (16,000 tonnes Li). Concerns regarding lithium availability for hybrid or electric vehicle batteries or other foreseeable applications are unfounded.

R. Keith Evans

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Structure of continental rifts: Role of older features and magmatism  

SciTech Connect

Recent geological and geophysical studies in several continental rifts have begun to shed light on the details of the processes which govern the structural evolution of these important exploration targets. In Kenya and Tanzania, the classic East African rift has been the object of several investigations which reveal that its location follows the boundary (suture ) between the Tanzanian craton (Archean) and Mozambiquan belt (Proterozoic), The Baikal rift also follows a similar boundary, and the Mid-continent rift of North America appears to do the same. Rifts themselves often act as zones of weakness which are reactivated by younger tectonic regimes. The classic North American example of this effect is the Eocambrian Southern Oklahoma aulacogen which was deformed to create the Anadarko basin and Wichita uplift in the late Paleozoic. The Central basin platform has a similar history although the original rift formed at [approximately]1,100Ma. Integration of geophysical data with petrologic and geochemical data from several rift zones has also provided a new picture of the nature and extent of magmatic modification of the crust. An interesting contradiction is that Phanerozoic rifts, except the Afar region, show little evidence for major magmatic modification of the crust whereas, at least in North America, many Precambrian rifts are associated with very large mafic bodies in the crust. The Kenya rift displays evidence for modification of the lower crust in a two-phase magmatic history, but upper crustal magmatic features are limited to local intrusions associated with volcanoes. In this rift, complex basement structure plays a much more important role than previously realized, and the geophysical signatures of basement structure and magmatism are easy to confuse. If this is also the case in other rifts, additional rift basins remain to be discovered.

Keller, G.R. (Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

The Development of an Academically-Based Entertainment-Education (ABEE) Model: Co-opting Behavioral Change Efficacy of Entertainment-Education for Academic Learning Targeting the Societal Landscape of U.S. Geographic Illiteracy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Educators and scholars continue to lament United States citizens' geographic illiteracy and are calling on Congress to address the crisis. However, despite recent public attention, a lack of national commitment to teaching geography in all public school grade levels persists. Therefore, non-formal educational avenues need to be pursued to address this crisis. One such avenue may be Entertainment-Education (E-E). E-E interventions have been used outside of the U.S. to impact social problems and detrimental behaviors by presenting positive role models in entertainment products designed to stimulate changes in viewers' behavior. For example, soap operas promote condoms use as a HIV prevention strategy (Tanzania), model culturally-sensitive actions to stop domestic violence (South Africa), and promote infant oral-rehydration therapy (Egypt). This study posits academic learning can be facilitated in a similar fashion as behavior change through an E-E methodology. Beginning with an examination of the E-E field by indexing E-E literature found in scholarly publication databases, this study demonstrates the 30-year health message focus of the field and presents a catalogue of E-E interventions cross-referenced by name and target country. The combination of these two products illuminates how U.S. audiences and non-behaviorally based outcomes have not been targeted, leaving academic subject learning as an area into which E-E can expand. The expansion of E-E methodology into geography education (or any other subject) requires understanding of how academic concepts interact with the structure of fictional narratives. Using a grounded theory approach, this study analyzes the U.S. television series NUMB3RS, which uses math to drive the story (as opposed to simply serving as context), to develop an Academically-Based Entertainment-Education (ABEE) model. ABEE is then applied to Google Earth, exploring how to leverage non-linear and visually dependent narratives as well as develop user-driven learning experiences. The implications of research presented here and through future refinement of the ABEE model may potentially (1) develop educative entertainment products supporting formal education and (2) bring geographic knowledge into the realm of popular culture through mass media, thereby impacting geographic literacy at a societal level in the U.S. The electronic version of this dissertation is accessible from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-05-9128.

Simms, Michelle

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/home.cfm?attr=24 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/canadian-national-energy-use-database Language: "English,French" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volap√Âșk, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

152

Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Agency/Company /Organization: various Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Prepare a Plan, Create Early Successes Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Guide/manual, Presentation, Video User Interface: Website Website: ttp://www.bioenergylists.org/ Cost: Free Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volap√Âșk, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

153

Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.hbefa.net/e/index.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/handbook-emission-factors-road-transp Language: "English,French,German" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volap√Âșk, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

154

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policy Impacts Website: toolkits.reeep.org/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/renewable-energy-and-energy-efficienc Language: "English,Chinese,French,Portuguese,Spanish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volap√Âșk, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

155

Miljoforden Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miljoforden Website Miljoforden Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Miljoforden Website Focus Area: Natural Gas Topics: Deployment Data Website: www.miljofordon.se/in-english/this-is-miljofordon-se Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/miljoforden-website Language: "English,Swedish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volap√Âșk, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

156

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Focus Area: Propane Topics: Socio-Economic Website: theicct.org/sites/default/files/publications/Retrosp_final_bilingual.p Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/overview-china's-vehicle-emission-con Language: "English,Chinese" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volap√Âșk, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

157

Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Agency/Company /Organization: Solar Energy International Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, - Solar PV Resource Type: Training materials User Interface: Other Website: www.solarenergy.org/bookstore/photovoltaics-design-installation-manual Cost: Paid Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volap√Âșk, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

158

OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal Agency/Company /Organization: Latin American Energy Organization (OLADE) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, - Concentrating Solar Power, - Solar Hot Water User Interface: Website Website: www.solarthermalworld.org/ Cost: Free UN Region: Caribbean, South America Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volap√Âșk, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

159

Freight Best Practice Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Freight Best Practice Website Freight Best Practice Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Freight Best Practice Website Focus Area: Public Transit Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.freightbestpractice.org.uk/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/freight-best-practice-website Language: "English,Welsh" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volap√Âșk, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

160

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Industrial Development Organization Focus Area: Industry Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.unido.org/index.php?id=o3470 Language: "Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volap√Âșk, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "zimbabwe tanzania swaziland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Sustainable Logistics Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Logistics Website Sustainable Logistics Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Logistics Website Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Best Practices Website: www.duurzamelogistiek.nl/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/sustainable-logistics-website Language: "English,Dutch" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volap√Âșk, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

162

IGES-Market Mechanism Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IGES-Market Mechanism Group IGES-Market Mechanism Group Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IGES-Market Mechanism Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market analysis Resource Type: Training materials Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cdm/index.html Cost: Free Language: "English, Japanese" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volap√Âșk, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

163

Eco TransIT World | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eco TransIT World Eco TransIT World Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Eco TransIT World Focus Area: Low Carbon Communities Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: www.ecotransit.org/index.en.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/eco-transit-world Language: "English,Dutch,French,German,Spanish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volap√Âșk, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

164

CRiSTAL Project Management Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CRiSTAL Project Management Tool CRiSTAL Project Management Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CRiSTAL Project Management Tool Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.iisd.org/cristaltool/ Cost: Free Language: "English, French, Portuguese, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volap√Âșk, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.