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  1. Chama

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    Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering ...

  2. Volunteering is for everyone

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    Volunteering is for everyone Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues ยป submit Volunteering is for everyone People from all walks of life can find meaningful ways to give back June 1, 2014 Shep, one of the many animals rescued and fostered by volunteers at the Chama Valley Humane Society. She now is a registered therapy dog and here enjoys being read to at Tierra Amarilla Elementary School. Shep,

  3. Installation of a Low Flow Unit at the Abiquiu Hydroelectric Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack Q. Richardson

    2012-06-28

    Final Technical Report for the Recovery Act Project for the Installation of a Low Flow Unit at the Abiquiu Hydroelectric Facility. The Abiquiu hydroelectric facility existed with two each 6.9 MW vertical flow Francis turbine-generators. This project installed a new 3.1 MW horizontal flow low flow turbine-generator. The total plant flow range to capture energy and generate power increased from between 250 and 1,300 cfs to between 75 and 1,550 cfs. Fifty full time equivalent (FTE) construction jobs were created for this project - 50% (or 25 FTE) were credited to ARRA funding due to the ARRA 50% project cost match. The Abiquiu facility has increased capacity, increased efficiency and provides for an improved aquatic environment owing to installed dissolved oxygen capabilities during traditional low flow periods in the Rio Chama. A new powerhouse addition was constructed to house the new turbine-generator equipment.

  4. Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Catfish and Carp Collected from the Rio Grande Upstream and Downstream of Los Alamos National Laboratory: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert J. Gonzales Philip R. Fresquez

    2008-05-12

    Concern has existed for years that the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a complex of nuclear weapons research and support facilities, has released polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to the environment that may have reached adjacent bodies of water through canyons that connect them. In 1997, LANL's Ecology Group began measuring PCBs in fish in the Rio Grande upstream and downstream of ephemeral streams that cross LANL and later began sampling fish in Abiquiu and Cochiti reservoirs, which are situated on the Rio Chama and Rio Grande upstream and downstream of LANL, respectively. In 2002, we electroshocked channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and common carp (Carpiodes carpio) in the Rio Grande upstream and downstream of LANL and analyzed fillets for PCB congeners. We also sampled soils along the Rio Chama and Rio Grande drainages to discern whether a background atmospheric source of PCBs that could impact surface water adjacent to LANL might exist. Trace concentrations of PCBs measured in soil (mean = 4.7E-05 {micro}g/g-ww) appear to be from background global atmospheric sources, at least in part, because the bimodal distribution of low-chlorinated PCB congeners and mid-chlorinated PCB congeners in the soil samples is interpreted to be typical of volatilized PCB congeners that are found in the atmosphere and dust from global fallout. Upstream catfish (n = 5) contained statistically (P = 0.047) higher concentrations of total PCBs (mean = 2.80E-02 {micro}g/g-ww) than downstream catfish (n = 10) (mean = 1.50E-02 {micro}g/g-ww). Similarly, upstream carp (n = 4) contained higher concentrations of total PCBs (mean = 7.98E-02 {micro}g/g-ww) than downstream carp (n = 4) (3.07E-02 {micro}g/g-ww); however, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.42). The dominant PCB homologue in all fish samples was hexachlorobiphenyls. Total PCB concentrations in fish in 2002 are lower than 1997; however, differences in analytical methods and other uncertainties exist. A review of historical quantitative PCB data for fish from the Rio Grande and Abiquiu and Cochiti reservoirs does not indicate a distinct contribution of PCBs from LANL to fish in the Rio Grande or Cochiti. Analysis of homologue patterns for fish does not provide sufficient evidence of a LANL contribution. Nevertheless, concentrations of PCBs in fillets of fish sampled from the Rio Grande are indicative of potential adverse chronic health impact from consumption of these fish on a long-term basis.

  5. Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Predator and Bottom-Feeding Fish from Abiquiu and Cochiti Reservoirs in North-Central New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.J. Gonzales, P.R. Fresquez

    2006-03-01

    Concern has existed for years that the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a complex of nuclear weapons research and support facilities, has released polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to the environment that may have reached adjacent bodies of water through canyons that connect them. In 1997, we began measuring PCBs in fish in the Rio Grande upstream and downstream of ephemeral streams that cross LANL and later began sampling fish in Abiquiu and Cochiti reservoirs, which are situated on the Rio Chama and Rio Grande upstream and downstream of LANL, respectively. In 2005, six species of fish from Abiquiu and Cochiti reservoirs were collected and the edible portion (fillets) was analyzed for 209 possible PCB congeners. Fish from the reservoirs were last sampled in 2001. Mean total PCB concentrations in fish from Abiquiu Reservoir ({mu} = 2.4 ng/g) were statistically similar ({alpha} = 0.01; P (T{le}t) [range = 0.23-0.71]) to mean total PCB concentrations in fish from Cochiti Reservoir ({mu} = 2.7 ng/g), implying that LANL is not the source of PCBs in fish in Cochiti Reservoir. The levels of PCBs in fish from Cochiti Reservoir generally appear to be declining, at least since 2001, which is when PCB levels might have peaked resulting from storm water runoff after the Cerro Grande Fire. Although a PCB ''fingerprinting'' method can be used to relate PCB ''signatures'' in one area to signatures in another area, this method of implicating the source of PCBs cannot be effectively used for biota because they alter the PCB signature through metabolic processes. Regardless of the source of the PCBs, certain species of fish (catfish and carpsuckers) at both Abiquiu and Cochiti reservoirs continue to harbor levels of PCBs that could be harmful to human health if they are consistently eaten over a long period of time. Bottom-feeding fish (carpsucker and catfish) from Cochiti Reservoir contained statistically higher levels of total PCBs ({mu} = 4.25 ng/g-fillet-wet) than predator fish (walleye, northern pike, bass) ({mu} = 1.67 ng/g) and the bottom-feeding fish had levels of PCBs that fall into a restricted consumption category in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) charts. Similarly, bottom-feeding fish from Abiquiu Reservoir also contained statistically higher levels of total PCBs ({mu} = 4.25 ng/g-wet) than predator fish (walleye, bass) ({mu} = 0.68 ng/g-wet) and only the bottom-feeding fish had levels of PCBs that fall into a restricted consumption category in the EPA charts.