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Sample records for zealand rb serbia

  1. Wave Energy Technology New Zealand | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zealand Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wave Energy Technology New Zealand Address: PO Box 25456 Panama St Place: Wellington Zip: 6146 Region: New Zealand Sector: Marine and...

  2. Renewable Energy Systems (RES Australia and New Zealand) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Australia and New Zealand) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Renewable Energy Systems (RES Australia and New Zealand) Name: Renewable Energy Systems (RES Australia and New Zealand)...

  3. New Zealand Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home New Zealand Geothermal Region Details Areas (2) Power Plants (2) Projects (0) Techniques (0) References Geothermal Region Data Area USGS Resource...

  4. New Zealand Clean Energy Centre | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clean Energy Centre Jump to: navigation, search Name: New Zealand Clean Energy Centre Place: New Zealand Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Government ...

  5. New Zealand Joins International Carbon Storage Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Zealand Joins International Carbon Storage Group New Zealand Joins International Carbon Storage Group June 29, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis San Francisco, CA - The Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) today announced that New Zealand has become the newest member of the international carbon storage body. CSLF members approved New Zealand's bid for membership during a meeting of the Forum's Policy Group held here. With today's action, New Zealand becomes the 23rd member of CSLF. The other members

  6. Magnetic dipole sequences in {sup 83}Rb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwengner, R.; Schnare, H.; Wagner, A.; Doenau, F.; Rainovski, G.; Frauendorf, S.; Jungclaus, A.; Hausmann, M.; Lieb, K. P.; Yordanov, O.; Napoli, D. R.; De Angelis, G.; Axiotis, M.; Marginean, N.; Brandolini, F.; Alvarez, C. Rossi

    2009-10-15

    High-spin states in {sup 83}Rb were populated in the reaction {sup 11}B+{sup 76}Ge at beam energies of 45 and 50 MeV. {gamma} rays were detected with the spectrometer GASP. The level scheme of {sup 83}Rb was extended up to 13.9 MeV. Mean lifetimes of 23 levels were determined using the Doppler-shift-attenuation method. Among the bands newly established is a sequence comprising intense M1 transitions and crossover E2 transitions. This sequence turns out to be irregular and thus shows that magnetic rotation as observed in the neighboring odd-odd isotopes is not realized in this odd-even nuclide. Excited states in {sup 83}Rb were interpreted in terms of the shell model using the model space {pi}(0f{sub 5/2},1p{sub 3/2},1p{sub 1/2},0g{sub 9/2}) {nu}(1p{sub 1/2},0g{sub 9/2}). The configurations predicted for the negative-parity M1 sequence reproduce the M1 transition strengths fairly well.

  7. New Zealand: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name New Zealand Population 4,242,048 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code NZ 3-letter ISO code NZL Numeric ISO code...

  8. Circular dichroism of RbHe and RbN{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lancor, B.; Wyllie, R.; Walker, T. G.; Babcock, E.

    2010-10-15

    We present measurements of the circular dichroism of optically pumped Rb vapor near the D{sub 1} resonance line. Collisions with the buffer gases {sup 3}He and N{sub 2} reduce the transparency of the vapor, even when fully polarized. We use two methods to measure this effect, show that the He results can be understood from RbHe potential curves, and show how this effect conspires with the spectral profile of the optical pumping light to increase the laser power demands for optical pumping of very optically thick samples.

  9. Water Sampling At International Geothermal Area, New Zealand...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At International Geothermal Area, New Zealand (Wood, 2002) Exploration...

  10. Optical pumping in a microfabricated Rb vapor cell using a microfabricated Rb discharge light source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatraman, V.; Kang, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G.; Shea, H.

    2014-02-03

    Miniature (Rb discharge lamp light source, as well as (2) a conventional glass-blown Rb discharge lamp. The microfabricated Rb lamp cell is a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) light source, having the same inner cell volume of around 40 mm{sup 3} as that of the resonance cell, both filled with suitable buffer gases. A miniature (∼2 cm{sup 3} volume) test setup based on the M{sub z} magnetometer interrogation technique was used for observation of optical-radiofrequency double-resonance signals, proving the suitability of the microfabricated discharge lamp to introduce efficient optical pumping. The pumping ability of this light source was found to be comparable to or even better than that of a conventional glass-blown lamp. The reported results indicate that the micro-fabricated DBD discharge lamp has a high potential for the development of a new class of miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and quantum sensors.

  11. Rb-Sr Geochronologic Investigation Of Precambrian Samples From...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rb-Sr Geochronologic Investigation Of Precambrian Samples From Deep Geothermal Drill Holes, Fenton Hill, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  12. .sup.82 Sr-.sup.82 Rb Radioisotope generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grant, Patrick M.; Erdal, Bruce R.; O'Brien, Harold A.

    1976-01-01

    An improved .sup.82 Sr-.sup.82 Rb radioisotope generator system, based upon the complexing ion exchange resin Chelex-100, has been developed. Columns of this material can be easily and rapidly milked, and the Rb-Sr separation factor for a fresh generator was found to be > 10.sup.7. Approximately 80 percent of the .sup.82 Rb present was delivered in a 15-ml volume of aqueous 0.2 M NH.sub.4 Cl solution. After more than 6 liters of eluant had been put through the generator, the Rb-Sr separation factor was still observed to be > 10.sup.5, and no unusual strontium breakthrough behavior was seen in the system over nearly three .sup.82 Sr half lives.

  13. New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Agency...

  14. New Zealand-Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zealand-Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment: A Guidance Manual for Local Government in New...

  15. Geotechnical Drilling in New-Zealand | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Geotechnical Drilling in New-Zealand Citation SonicSampDrill. Geotechnical...

  16. New Zealand: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that foreign oil firms may choose to leave for countries with friendlier tax climates, perhaps Southeast Asia or Papua New Guinea. New tax reform legislation became effective in October 1990 enraging the Petroleum Exploration Association of New Zealand (PEANZ) and disappointing petroleum explorers. Oil companies like Arco are already considering pulling out of future prospecting. Taxation Reform Bill 7 allows tax deductions only after prospects in a license are exhausted without success or allows costs to be written off over 10 years when a well comes on production. Exploration cost has to be capitalized, and farm-outs are taxed under the new regime.

  17. Microporous titanosilicate AM-2: Rb-exchange and thermal behaviour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doebelin, Nicola . E-mail: nicola@doebelin.org; Armbruster, Thomas

    2007-01-18

    Rb-exchange and thermal stability of the microporous titanosilicate AM-2 were analysed by powder X-ray diffraction, thermo-gravimetric analysis, and chemical analysis of the mother liquid after exchange. The dehydration and thermal stability of the exchanged structure were monitored with in situ high temperature powder X-ray diffraction. Crystal structures were refined with Rietveld methods at 25 and 400 deg. C. The AM-2 structure was found to incorporate Rb{sup +} by replacing K{sup +}. After four exchange cycles and 166 h reaction time at 90 deg. C, the chemical composition was refined to K{sub 0.18}Rb{sub 1.82}TiSi{sub 3}O{sub 9}.H{sub 2}O. Extrapolation suggests that higher exchange ratios may be obtained after further cycles. H{sub 2}O was expelled by heating, leading to a dehydrated structure at 360 deg. C. Dehydration was associated with a change of space group symmetry from orthorhombic P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} to monoclinic P2{sub 1}, which proved to be reversible after rehydration. This change of symmetry leaves the AM-2 characteristic structural topology uninfluenced and causes only minor distortions. The monoclinic AM-2 structure breaks down above 600 deg. C to become X-ray amorphous, and at 750 deg. C a wadeite-type phase (K {sub x}Rb{sub 2-x}TiSi{sub 3}O{sub 9}) crystallises. This transformation is irreversible and leads to immobilisation of Rb{sup +}.

  18. Validation of hydrogeochemical codes using the New Zealand geothermal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We have initiated such a test of geochemical and hydrological simulation codes, using the ... The Lake Rotokawa region, New Zealand, has been used in our first test effort, since it ...

  19. Establishing radiation therapy advanced practice in New Zealand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Karen; Jasperse, Marieke; Herst, Patries; Yielder, Jill

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Advanced practice (AP) is of increasing interest to many radiation therapists (RTs) both nationally and internationally. In New Zealand, initial research (2005–2008) showed strong support for the development of an AP role for medical radiation technologists (MRTs). Here, we report on a nationwide survey in which RTs validated and prioritised nine AP profiles for future development. Methods: All registered RTs in New Zealand (n = 260) were invited to take part in a survey in December 2011; 73 of whom returned a complete response. Results: RTs supported the implementation of AP roles in New Zealand and the requirement of a Master's degree qualification to underpin clinical knowledge. Most RTs endorsed the criteria attributed to each of the nine proposed AP profiles. The study identified that activities may qualify as either advanced practice or standard practice depending on the department. All participants agreed that an advanced practitioner should be a leader in the field, able to initiate and facilitate future developments within as well as outside this specific role. Acceptance of the AP roles by RTs and other health professionals as well as the availability of resources for successful implementation, were concerns expressed by some RTs. Conclusion: The authors recommend (1) the development of one scope of practice titled ‘advanced practitioner’ with generic and specialist criteria for each profile as the future career pathway, (2) promotion and support for the AP pathway by the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology and the New Zealand Medical Radiation Technologists Board.

  20. New Zealand and southwest Pacific islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, H.R.

    1981-10-01

    In New Zealand, new incentives by the government have greatly stimulated interest in exploration. On land, four wells were completed during 1980 at a total depth of 10,120 m. One well was a commercial oil and gas discovery. Offshore, the first exploratory well since 1978 was spudded shortly before the end of 1980. Offshore concession areas have increased over ten-fold, to 107,044 km/sup 2/; on-land licenses, which are all owned by the government company Petrocorp, decreased to 11,591 km/sup 2/. During 1980, the combined output of Kapuni and Maui gas was 1,069,049 x 10/sup 6/m/sup 3/, a decrease of 18.23%. This reflects the new gas-recycling operation at the Kapuni field, which started in April. Combined condensate production was down only 12.15%, amounting to 418,941 m/sup 3/. Natural gasoline was down 17.44%, to 7093 m/sup 3/, whereas LPG production went up 39.44%, to 27,301 m/sup 3/. In Tonga, 925 km of offshore multichannel seismic, gravity, and magnetic surveys run in 1979 have been processed and interpreted. In Fiji, the first two exploratory wells ever drilled were dry. In Vanuatu, the newly independent republic of the former New Hebrides Condominium, no petroleum legislation has so far been introduced. CCOP/SOPAC and ORSTOM jointly ran a 4000-km single-channel reflection seismic survey between the northern islands. Several sedimentary basins with over 2500 m of slightly deformed sediments of Miocene-Pliocene age have been delineated. In the Solomon Islands, there is still no petroleum legislation, but the draft of the Petroleum (Exploration and Development) Act has been completed and will go before Parliament during 1981. In Papua New Guinea, one well was drilled to 3027 m and abandoned as dry. It confirmed the regional stratigraphic interpretation and had encouraging hydrocarbon indications in the Mesozoic part of the sequence. 6 figures, 5 tables.

  1. New Zealand: Asia-Pacific energy series, country report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaguchi, N.D.; Keevill, H.D.

    1992-03-01

    The New Zealand energy sector has undergone significant changes in the past few years. Reform and deregulation came to New Zealand in large doses and at a rapid pace. Unlike Japan where deregulation was designed for a five-year phase-in period or even Australia where the government was fully geared up to handle deregulation, deregulation occurred in New Zealand almost with no phase-in period and very little planning. Under fast-paced Rogernomics,'' the energy sector was but one more element of the economy to be deregulated and/or privatized. While the New Zealand energy sector deregulation is generally believed to have been successful, there are still outstanding questions as to whether the original intent has been fully achieved. The fact that a competent energy bureaucracy was mostly lost in the process makes it even more difficult to find those with long enough institutional memories to untangle the agreements and understandings between the government and the private sector over the previous decade. As part of our continuing assessment of Asia-Pacific energy markets, the Resources Programs at the East-West Center has embarked on a series of country studies that discuss in detail the structure of the energy sector in each major country in the region. To date, our reports to the US Department of Energy, Assistant Secretary for International Affairs and Energy Emergencies, have covered Australia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, Pakistan, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand. The country studies also provide the reader with an overview of the economic and political situation in the various counties. We have particularly highlighted petroleum and gas issues in the country studies and have attempted to show the foreign trade implications of oil and gas trade. Finally, to the greatest extent possible, we have provided the latest available statistics.

  2. Short-lived isomers in {sup 94}Rb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsekhanovich, I.; Dare, J. A.; Smith, A. G.; Varley, B. J.; Simpson, G. S.; Urban, W.; Soldner, T.; Jolie, J.; Linnemann, A.; Orlandi, R.; Smith, J. F.; Scherillo, A.; Rzaca-Urban, T.; Zlomaniec, A.; Dorvaux, O.; Gall, B. J. P.; Roux, B.

    2008-07-15

    The medium-spin structure of the neutron-rich, odd-odd nucleus {sup 94}Rb was studied by means of {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. Excited levels were populated in the neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U and in the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf and {sup 248}Cm. Two isomeric states were found at 1485.2 and 2074.8 keV with half-lives of 18 and 107 ns, respectively. The probable structures of the two isomers involve the fully aligned, proton-neutron configurations [{pi}(g{sub 9/2}) x {nu}(g{sub 7/2})]{sub 8{sup +}} and [{pi}(g{sub 9/2}) x {nu}(h{sub 11/2})]{sub 10{sup -}}, respectively. These new data give information on the single-particle energies in the region.

  3. The electrical transport properties of liquid Rb using pseudopotential theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, A. B. Bhatt, N. K. Thakore, B. Y. Jani, A. R.; Vyas, P. R.

    2014-04-24

    Certain electric transport properties of liquid Rb are reported. The electrical resistivity is calculated by using the self-consistent approximation as suggested by Ferraz and March. The pseudopotential due to Hasegawa et al for full electron-ion interaction, which is valid for all electrons and contains the repulsive delta function due to achieve the necessary s-pseudisation was used for the calculation. Temperature dependence of structure factor is considered through temperature dependent potential parameter in the pair potential. Finally, thermo-electric power and thermal conductivity are obtained. The outcome of the present study is discussed in light of other such results, and confirms the applicability of pseudopotential at very high temperature via temperature dependent pair potential.

  4. Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis: Characterization Rb Promoted Iron Catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar,A.; Jacobs, G.; Ji, Y.; Hamdeh, H.; Davis, B.

    2008-01-01

    Rubidium promoted iron Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts were prepared with two Rb/Fe atomic ratios (1.44/100 and 5/100) using rubidium nitrate and rubidium carbonate as rubidium precursors. Results of catalytic activity and deactivation studies in a CSTR revealed that rubidium promoted catalysts result in a steady conversion with a lower deactivation rate than that of the corresponding unpromoted catalyst although the initial activity of the promoted catalyst was almost half that of the unpromoted catalyst. Rubidium promotion results in lower methane production, and higher CO2, alkene and 1-alkene fraction in FTS products. M{umlt o}ssbauer spectroscopic measurements of CO activated and working catalyst samples indicated that the composition of the iron carbide phase formed after carbidization was -Fe5 C2 for both promoted and unpromoted catalysts. However, in the case of the rubidium promoted catalyst, '-Fe2.2C became the predominant carbidic phase as FTS continued and the overall catalyst composition remained carbidic in nature. In contrast, the carbide content of the unpromoted catalyst was found to decline very quickly as a function of synthesis time. Results of XANES and EXAFS measurements suggested that rubidium was present in the oxidized state and that the compound most prevalent in the active catalyst samples closely resembled that of rubidium carbonate.

  5. New Zealand Asia-Pacific energy series country report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaguchi, N.D.; Keevill, H.D.

    1992-03-01

    This report on New Zealand is one of a series of country studies intended to provide a continuous, long-term source of energy sector analysis for the Asia-Pacific region. This report addresses significant changes occurring due to the reform, deregulation, and privatization of the economy in general and the energy sector in particular; provides the reader with an overview of the economic and political situation; petroleum and gas issues are highlighted, particularly the implications of foreign trade in oil and gas; provides the latest available statistics and insights to energy policy that are not generally available elsewhere.

  6. Ba2+-inhibitable /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes across membranes of vesicles from toad urinary bladder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garty, H.; Civan, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes have been measured in suspensions of vesicles prepared from the epithelium of toad urinary bladder. A readily measurable barium-sensitive, ouabain-insensitive component has been identified; the concentration of external Ba2+ required for half-maximal inhibition was 0.6 mM. The effects of externally added cations on /sup 86/Rb+ influx and efflux have established that this pathway is conductive, with a selectivity for K+, Rb+ and Cs+ over Na+ and Li+. The Rb+ uptake is inversely dependent on external pH, but not significantly affected by internal Ca2+ or external amiloride, quinine, quinidine or lidocaine. It is likely, albeit not yet certain, that the conductive Rb+ pathway is incorporated in basolateral vesicles oriented right-side-out. It is also not yet clear whether this pathway comprises the principle basolateral K+ channel in vivo, and that its properties have been unchanged during the preparative procedures. Subject to these caveats, the data suggest that the inhibition by quinidine of Na+ transport across toad bladder does not arise primarily from membrane depolarization produced by a direct blockage of the basolateral channels. It now seems more likely that the quinidine-induced elevation of intracellular Ca2+ activity directly blocks apical Na+ entry.

  7. Establishing advanced practice for medical imaging in New Zealand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yielder, Jill; Young, Adrienne; Park, Shelley; Coleman, Karen

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: This article presents the outcome and recommendations following the second stage of a role development project conducted on behalf of the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology (NZIMRT). The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that may be used to formulate Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession. It commenced in 2011, following on from initial research that occurred between 2005 and 2008 investigating role development and a possible career structure for medical radiation technologists (MRTs) in New Zealand (NZ). Methods: The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that could be used to develop Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession through inviting 12 specialist medical imaging groups in NZ to participate in a survey. Results: Findings showed strong agreement on potential profiles and on generic criteria within them; however, there was less agreement on specific skills criteria within specialist areas. Conclusions: The authors recommend that one Advanced Scope of Practice be developed for Medical Imaging, with the establishment of generic and specialist criteria. Systems for approval of the overall criteria package for any individual Advanced Practitioner (AP) profile, audit and continuing professional development requirements need to be established by the Medical Radiation Technologists Board (MRTB) to meet the local needs of clinical departments. It is further recommended that the NZIMRT and MRTB promote and support the need for an AP pathway for medical imaging in NZ.

  8. High-spin states and level structure in {sup 84}Rb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen Shuifa; Han Guangbing; Wen Shuxian; Gu Jianzhong; Wu Xiaoguang; Zhu Lihua; He Chuangye; Li Guangsheng; Yu Beibei; Pan Feng; Zhu Jianyu; Draayer, J. P.; Wen Tingdun; Yan, Yupeng

    2010-07-15

    High-spin states in {sup 84}Rb have been studied by using the {sup 70}Zn({sup 18}O,p3n){sup 84}Rb reaction at beam energy of 75 MeV. The gamma-gamma coincidence, excitation function, and ratios for directional correlation of oriented states were determined. A new level scheme was established in which the positive- and negative-parity bands have been extended up to 17{sup +} and 17{sup -} with an excitation energy of about 7 MeV. The signature splitting and signature inversion of the positive-parity yrast band were observed. To understand the microscopic origin of the signature inversion in the yrast positive-parity bands of doubly odd Rb nuclei, as an example, we performed calculations using the projected shell model to describe the energy spectra in {sup 84}Rb. It can be seen that the main features are reproduced in the calculations. This analysis shows that the signature splitting, especially its inversion, can be reproduced by varying only the gamma deformation with increasing spin. To research the deformation of {sup 84}Rb carefully, we calculate the total Routhian surfaces of positive-parity yrast states by the cranking shell model formalism. In addition, the results of theoretical calculations about the negative-parity yrast band in {sup 84}Rb with configuration pi(p{sub 3/2},f{sub 5/2}) x nug{sub 9/2} are compared with experimental data, and a band diagram calculated for this band is also shown to extract physics from the numerical results.

  9. Half metallic ferromagnetism in alkali metal nitrides MN (M = Rb, Cs): A first principles study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murugan, A. Rajeswarapalanichamy, R. Santhosh, M. Sudhapriyanga, G.; Kanagaprabha, S.

    2014-04-24

    The structural, electronic and elastic properties of two alkali metal nitrides (MN: M= Rb, Cs) are investigated by the first principles calculations based on density functional theory using the Vienna ab-initio simulation package. At ambient pressure the two nitrides are stable in ferromagnetic state with CsCl structure. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the available results. The electronic structure reveals that these materials are half metallic in nature. A pressure-induced structural phase transition from CsCl to ZB phase is observed in RbN and CsN.

  10. New Zealand and Australia wind energy in a non subsidised market environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lieshout, P. van

    1996-12-31

    Significant preliminary work has been undertaken by New Zealand and Australian Power/Generation Companies regarding Wind Power. Turbines are installed in Australia and New Zealand to test the wind and the technical applicability in the Australian wind diesel and the New Zealand high wind speed environment. Projects in Esperance, Thursday Island and King Island illustrate hybrid wind diesel applications. A single Wind Turbine Generator (WTG) has been successfully operated in New Zealand for the last 3 years. A new 3.5 MW wind farm is operational and Resource Consent has been granted for a 65 MW wind farm in New Zealand. Design Power is very proud to be involved in many of the New Zealand and Australian projects. It is obvious that wind power is just starting here, however the start has been promising and it is expected that wind power is here to stay. This paper will address some of the issues associated with wind power in New Zealand and Australia, particularly those that are different from Europe and America. It shows the opportunities and challenges regarding the operation of WTGs in these countries. It addresses the non subsidized electrical pricing structure and the influence of the economically necessary high wind speeds or diesel systems on the choice of technology, particularly the control algorithm of WTGs and the subsystems. It reviews several of the issues associated with predicting the amount of energy that a WTG can generate, again taking into account the high wind speed control algorithms. It further addresses the issue of embedded generation and the influence that a wind farm might have on the electrical network. It continues to address issues associated with wind diesel systems. The paper concludes that wind power will be viable in the near future both in New Zealand and Australia, but also that care should be taken with data analysis and hardware choices during the next phase of implementation of wind power in New Zealand and Australia. 7 figs.

  11. Total absorption spectroscopy study of ?Rb decay: A major contributor to reactor antineutrino spectrum shape [Total absorption spectroscopy study of ?Rb: A major contributor to reactor antineutrino flux

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sonzogni, A.; Zakari-Issoufou, A. -A.; Fallot, M.; Porta, A.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.; Valencia, E.; Rice, S.; Bui, V. M.; Cormon, S.; et al

    2015-03-09

    The accurate determination of the emitted reactor antineutrino flux is still a major challenge for actual and future neutrino experiments at reactors, especially after the evidence of a disagreement between the measured antineutrino energy spectrum by Double Chooz, Daya Bay, and Reno and calculated antineutrino spectra obtained from the conversion of the unique integral beta spectra measured at the ILL reactor. Using nuclear data to compute reactor antineutrino spectra may help understanding this bias, with the study of the underlying nuclear physics. Summation calculations allow identifying a list of nuclei that contribute importantly to the antineutrino energy spectra emitted aftermorethe fission of ?,?Pu and ?,?U, and whose beta decay properties might deserve new measurements. Among these nuclei, ?Rb exhausts by itself about 16% of of the antineutrino energy spectrum emitted by Pressurized Water Reactors in the 5 to 8 MeV range. In this Letter, we report new Total Absorption Spectroscopy (TAS) results for this important contributor. The obtained beta feeding from ?Rb shows beta intensity unobserved before in the 4.5 to 5.5 MeV energy region and gives a ground state to ground state branch of 87.5 % 3%. These new data induce a dramatic change in recent summation calculations where a 51% GS to GS branch was considered for ?Rb, increasing the summation antineutrino spectrum in the region nearby the observed bias.The new data still have an important impact on other summation calculations in which more recent data were consideredless

  12. U.S. and New Zealand Take Steps to Launch International Partnership to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Further the Development of Clean Energy on Island Nations | Department of Energy New Zealand Take Steps to Launch International Partnership to Further the Development of Clean Energy on Island Nations U.S. and New Zealand Take Steps to Launch International Partnership to Further the Development of Clean Energy on Island Nations July 24, 2008 - 2:14pm Addthis U.S. to Work with New Zealand to Encourage Utilization of Natural Renewable Energy Resources NASSAU, BAHAMAS - The U.S. Department of

  13. Terrestrial Heat Flow In The North Island Of New Zealand | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Terrestrial Heat Flow In The North Island Of New Zealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Terrestrial Heat Flow In The North...

  14. DE-AI26-06NT42878 - New Zealand Task | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Zealand Task Gas Hydrate Research in Deep Sea Sediments - New Zealand Task DE-AI26-06NT42878 Project Goal The objective of this research is to determine the extent and dynamics of gas hydrate deposits and their relation to areas of focused fluid flux at and beneath the seafloor. Specific objectives include: a). Refine geophysical, geochemical and microbiological technologies for prospecting hydrate distribution and content; b). Contribute to establishing high-priority geographical regions of

  15. Total absorption spectroscopy study of ?Rb decay: A major contributor to reactor antineutrino spectrum shape [Total absorption spectroscopy study of ?Rb: A major contributor to reactor antineutrino flux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonzogni, A.; Zakari-Issoufou, A. -A.; Fallot, M.; Porta, A.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.; Valencia, E.; Rice, S.; Bui, V. M.; Cormon, S.; Estienne, M.; Agramunt, J.; Aysto, J.; Bowry, M.; Briz Monago, J. A.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cucoanes, A.; Eloma, V.; Estvez, E.; Farrelly, G. F.; Garcia, A.; Gelletly, W.; Gomez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gorlychev, V.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Jordan, M. D.; Kankainen, A.; Kondev, F. G.; Martinez, T.; Mendoza, E.; Molina, F.; Moore, I.; Perez, A.; Podolyak, Zs.; Penttil, H.; Regan, P. H.; Shiba, T.; Rissanen, J.; Rubio, B.; Weber, C.

    2015-03-09

    The accurate determination of the emitted reactor antineutrino flux is still a major challenge for actual and future neutrino experiments at reactors, especially after the evidence of a disagreement between the measured antineutrino energy spectrum by Double Chooz, Daya Bay, and Reno and calculated antineutrino spectra obtained from the conversion of the unique integral beta spectra measured at the ILL reactor. Using nuclear data to compute reactor antineutrino spectra may help understanding this bias, with the study of the underlying nuclear physics. Summation calculations allow identifying a list of nuclei that contribute importantly to the antineutrino energy spectra emitted after the fission of ?,?Pu and ?,?U, and whose beta decay properties might deserve new measurements. Among these nuclei, ?Rb exhausts by itself about 16% of of the antineutrino energy spectrum emitted by Pressurized Water Reactors in the 5 to 8 MeV range. In this Letter, we report new Total Absorption Spectroscopy (TAS) results for this important contributor. The obtained beta feeding from ?Rb shows beta intensity unobserved before in the 4.5 to 5.5 MeV energy region and gives a ground state to ground state branch of 87.5 % 3%. These new data induce a dramatic change in recent summation calculations where a 51% GS to GS branch was considered for ?Rb, increasing the summation antineutrino spectrum in the region nearby the observed bias.The new data still have an important impact on other summation calculations in which more recent data were considered

  16. Precise Measurement of Strontium-82 Radioactivity in the Sr-Rb PET

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Generator | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Precise Measurement of Strontium-82 Radioactivity in the Sr-Rb PET Generator Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science Archives Small Business Innovation Research / Small Business Technology Transfer Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of

  17. Status of lithium-filled specimen subcapsules for the HFIR-MFE-RB10J experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, J.P.; Howell, M.; Lenox, K.E.

    1998-09-01

    The HFIR-MFE-RB-10J experiment will be irradiated in a Removable Beryllium position in the HFIR for 10 reactor cycles, accumulating approximately 5 dpa in steel. The upper region of the capsule contains two lithium-filled subcapsules containing vanadium specimens. This report describes the techniques developed to achieve a satisfactory lithium fill with a specimen occupancy of 26% in each subcapsule.

  18. Rb+ adsorption at the quartz(101)-aqueous interface: comparison of resonant anomalous x-ray reflectivity with ab initio calculations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bellucci, Francesco; Lee, Sang Soo; Kubicki, James D.; Bandura, Andrei V.; Zhang, Zhan; Wesolowski, David J.; Fenter, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We study adsorption of Rb+ to the quartz(101)–aqueous interface at room temperature with specular X-ray reflectivity, resonant anomalous X-ray reflectivity, and density functional theory. The interfacial water structures observed in deionized water and 10 mM RbCl solution at pH 9.8 were similar, having a first water layer at height of 1.7 ± 0.1 Å above the quartz surface and a second layer at 4.8 ± 0.1 Å and 3.9 ± 0.8 Å for the water and RbCl solutions, respectively. The adsorbed Rb+ distribution is broad and consists of presumed inner-sphere (IS) and outer-sphere (OS) complexes at heights of 1.8 ±more » 0.1 and 6.4 ± 1.0 Å, respectively. Projector-augmented planewave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of potential configurations for neutral and negatively charged quartz(101) surfaces at pH 7 and 12, respectively, reveal a water structure in agreement with experimental results. These DFT calculations also show differences in adsorbed speciation of Rb+ between these two conditions. At pH 7, the lowest energy structure shows that Rb+ adsorbs dominantly as an IS complex, whereas at pH 12 IS and OS complexes have equivalent energies. The DFT results at pH 12 are generally consistent with the two site Rb distribution observed from the X-ray data at pH 9.8, albeit with some differences that are discussed. In conclusion, surface charge estimated on the basis of the measured total Rb+ coverage was -0.11 C/m2, in good agreement with the range of the surface charge magnitudes reported in the literature.« less

  19. Two spatially separated phases in semiconducting Rb0.8Fe1.5S2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Meng; Tian, Wei; Valdivia, P.; Chi, Songxue; Bourret-Courchesne, E.; Dai, Pengcheng; Birgeneau, R. J.

    2014-09-26

    We report neutron scattering and transport measurements on semiconducting Rb0.8Fe1.5S2, a compound isostructural and isoelectronic to the well-studied A0.8FeySe2(A = K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K) superconducting systems. Both resistivity and DC susceptibility measurements reveal a magnetic phase transition at T = 275 K. Neutron diffraction studies show that the 275 K transition originates from a phase with rhombic iron vacancy order which exhibits an in-plane stripe antiferromagnetic ordering below 275 K. In addition, the stripe antiferromagnetic phase interdigitates mesoscopically with an ubiquitous phase with √5 x√5 iron vacancy order. This phase has a magnetic transition at TN = 425 K andmore » an iron vacancy order-disorder transition at TS = 600 K. These two different structural phases are closely similar to those observed in the isomorphous Se materials. Based on the close similarities of the in-plane antiferromagnetic structures, moments sizes, and ordering temperatures in semiconducting Rb0.8Fe1.5S2 and K0.81Fe1.58Se2, we argue that the in-plane antiferromagnetic order arises from strong coupling between local moments. Superconductivity, previously observed in the A0.8FeySe2₋ zSz system, is absent in A0.8Fe1.5S2, which has a semiconducting ground state. We discuss the implied relationship between stripe and block antiferromagnetism and superconductivity in these materials as well as a strategy for further investigation.« less

  20. (References: Klein SA, RB McCoy, H Morrison, AS Ackerman, A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of cloud microphysics can lead to improved simulations. The high-quality observations and broad participation of the modeling community in this study points to the importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds as a key target for climate modeling centers to improve with future cloud parameterization developments. (References: Klein SA, RB McCoy, H Morrison, AS Ackerman, A Avramov, G de Boer, M Chen, JN Cole, AD Del Genio, M Falk, MJ Foster, A Fridlind, JC Golaz, T Hashino, JY Harrington, C Hoose, MF

  1. Differential Light-Shift Cancellation in a Magnetic-Field-Insensitive Transition of {sup 87}Rb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chicireanu, R.; Nelson, K. D.; Olmschenk, S.; Porto, J. V.; Lundblad, N.; Derevianko, A.

    2011-02-11

    The precise measurement of transition frequencies of trapped atomic samples is susceptible to inaccuracy arising from the inhomogeneous differential shift of the relevant energy levels in the presence of the trapping fields. We demonstrate near-complete cancellation of the differential ac Stark shift (''light shift'') of a two-photon magnetic-field-insensitive microwave hyperfine (clock) transition in {sup 87}Rb atoms trapped in an optical lattice. Up to 95(2)% of the differential light shift is cancelled while maintaining magnetic-field insensitivity. This technique should have applications in quantum information and frequency metrology.

  2. Inhibition of white light of sup 86 Rb sup + absorption in the root apex of corn. [Zea mays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKendree, W.L.; Smith, R.C. )

    1990-06-01

    Measurements of cell lengths made at 0.5 millimeter intervals in median longitudinal sections of the primary roots of corn (Zea mays) were used to construct a growth curve. The region 1.5 to 4.0 millimeters from the apex contained the largest number of elongating cells. Absorption of {sup 86}Rb{sup +} was measured using intact, dark-grown corn seedlings. Following uptake and exchange, the terminal 8.0 millimeters of each root was cut into four 2.0 millimeter segments. Maximum {sup 86}Rb{sup +} uptake occurred in the region from 0.0 to 4.0 millimeter from the root tip. Washing the intact primary root in fresh 2.0 millimolar CaSO{sub 4} for 2 hours prior to uptake augmented the rate of {sup 86}Rb{sup +} uptake in all regions. Illumination with white light during washing caused a reduction of {sup 86}Rb{sup +} uptake as compared with controls washing in darkness, and the region of greatest light response was the region of elongation. Removal of the coleoptile prior to washing did not prevent the light inhibition of subsequent {sup 86}Rb{sup +} uptake. Removal of the root cap prior to washing in light partially reversed the light-induced inhibition of the washing response.

  3. Structure and optical properties of a noncentrosymmetric borate RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, M.J.; Li, R.K.

    2013-01-15

    A new noncentrosymmetric borate, RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} (abbreviated as RSBO), has been grown from Rb{sub 2}O--B{sub 2}O{sub 3}--RbF flux and its crystal structure was determined by single crystal x-ray diffraction. It crystallizes in space group Ama2 with cell parameters of a=11.128(10) A, b=12.155(15) A, c=6.952(7) A, Z=4. The basic structural units are isolated planar BO{sub 3} groups. Second harmonic generation (SHG) test of the title compound by the Kurtz-Perry method shows that RSBO can be phase matchable with an effective SHG coefficient about two-thirds as large as that of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KDP). Finally, based on the anionic group approximation, the optical properties of the title compound are compared with those of the structure-related apatite-like compounds with the formula 'A{sub 5}(TO{sub n}){sub 3}X'. - Graphical abstract: RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} and some other borate NLO compounds, namely Ca{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3}F RCa{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3}O (R=Y or Gd) and Na{sub 3}La{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} can be viewed as the derivatives of apatite. They have similar formula composed of five cations and three anion groups (we call them 5/3 structures). The detailed SHG coefficients and optical properties of the apatite-like NLO crystals were compared and summarized. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new noncentrosymmetric borate RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} was grown from flux. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} can be viewed as a derivative of the apatite-like structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure and its relationship to the optical properties of RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} are compared with other NLO crystals with apatite-like structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The basic structural units are the planar BO{sub 3} groups in the structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Second harmonic generation (SHG) test shows that RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} can be phase matchable with an

  4. Influence of coal ash and slag dumping on dump waste waters of the Kostolac power plants (Serbia)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popovic, A.; Djinovic, J.

    2006-10-01

    The content of selected trace and major elements in the river water used for transport, as well as in the subcategories of the waste waters (overflow and drainage) were analyzed in order to establish the influence of transport and dumping of coal ash and slag from the 'Kostolac A' and 'Kostolac B' power plants located 100 km from Belgrade (Serbia). It was found that during transport of coal ash and slag to the dump, the water used for transport becomes enriched with manganese, nickel, zinc, chromium, vanadium, titanium, cobalt, arsenic, aluminum, and silicon, while more calcium, iron, cadmium, and lead are adsorbed by the ash and slag than is released from them. There is also an equilibrium between the release and adsorption processes of copper and magnesium during transport. The vertical penetration of the water used for transport results in a release of calcium, magnesium, manganese, and cadmium to the environment, while iron, nickel, zinc, chromium, copper, lead, vanadium, titanium, cobalt, and arsenic are adsorbed by the fractions of coal ash and slag in the dump.

  5. Chloride-dependent acceleration of cell cycle via modulation of Rb and cdc2 in osteoblastic cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maki, Masahiro; Miyazaki, Hiroaki; Nakajima, Ken-ichi; Yamane, Junko; Niisato, Naomi; Morihara, Toru; Kubo, Toshikazu; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2007-10-05

    In the present study, we investigated if Cl{sup -} regulates the proliferation of the MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells. The proliferation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells was diminished by lowering the extracellular Cl{sup -} concentration ([Cl{sup -}]{sub o}) in the culture medium. The lowered in [Cl{sup -}]{sub o} increased the periods of the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} and the G{sub 2}/M phases in cell cycle. We further studied the effects of [Cl{sup -}]{sub o} on the key enzymes, Rb and cdc2, playing key roles in checking points of the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} and the G{sub 2}/M phases in cell cycle. The lowered in [Cl{sup -}]{sub o} diminished the active forms of enzymes, Rb and cdc2. We further found that the action of lowered [Cl{sup -}]{sub o} on the cell proliferation, the cell cycle, Rb and cdc2 was abolished by the presence of 2 mM glutamine, but not by that of pyruvate as another Krebs cycle substrate. Taken together, these observations indicate here for the first time that Cl{sup -} modulates Rb and cdc2, enhancing the proliferation of the MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells.

  6. Dipole-dipole broadening of Rb ns-np microwave transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Hyunwook; Tanner, P. J.; Claessens, B. J.; Shuman, E. S.; Gallagher, T. F.

    2011-08-15

    The dipole-dipole broadening of ns-np microwave transitions of cold Rb Rydberg atoms in a magneto-optical trap has been recorded for 28{<=}n{<=}51. Since the electric dipole transition matrix elements scale as n{sup 2}, a broadening rate scaling as n{sup 4} is expected and a broadening rate of 8.2x10{sup -15}n{sup 4} MHz cm{sup 3} is observed. The observed broadening is smaller than expected from a classical picture due to the spin-orbit interaction in the np atoms. The broadened resonances are asymmetric and cusp shaped, and their line shapes can be reproduced by a diatomic model which takes into account the dipole-dipole interaction, including the spin-orbit interaction, the strengths of the allowed microwave transitions, and the distribution of the atomic spacings in the trap.

  7. Ionization of Rb Rydberg atoms in the attractive nsnp dipole-dipole potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Hyunwook; Shuman, E. S.; Gallagher, T. F.

    2011-11-15

    We have observed the ionization of a cold gas of Rb Rydberg atoms which occurs when nsns van der Waals pairs of ns atoms of n{approx_equal} 40 on a weakly repulsive potential are transferred to an attractive dipole-dipole nsnp potential by a microwave transition. Comparing the measurements to a simple model shows that the initial 300-{mu}K thermal velocity of the atoms plays an important role. Excitation to a repulsive dipole-dipole potential does not lead to more ionization on a 15-{mu}s time scale than leaving the atoms in the weakly repulsive nsns state. This observation is slightly surprising since a radiative transition must occur to allow ionization in the latter case. Finally, by power broadening of the microwave transition, to allow transitions from the initial nsns state to the nsnp state over a broad range of internuclear spacings, it is possible to accelerate markedly the evolution to a plasma.

  8. Experimental observation of magic-wavelength behavior of {sup 87}Rb atoms in an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundblad, N.; Schlosser, M.; Porto, J. V.

    2010-03-15

    We demonstrate the cancellation of the differential ac Stark shift of the microwave hyperfine clock transition in trapped {sup 87}Rb atoms. Recent progress in metrology exploits so-called magic wavelengths, whereby an atomic ensemble can be trapped with laser light whose wavelength is chosen so that both levels of an optical atomic transition experience identical ac Stark shifts. Similar magic-wavelength techniques are not possible for the microwave hyperfine transitions in the alkali metals due to their simple electronic structure. We show, however, that ac Stark shift cancellation is indeed achievable for certain values of wavelength, polarization, and magnetic field. The cancellation comes at the expense of a small magnetic-field sensitivity. The technique demonstrated here has implications for experiments involving the precise control of optically trapped neutral atoms.

  9. Cation ordering and effect of biaxial strain in double perovskite CsRbCaZnCl6

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pilania, G.; Uberuaga, B. P.

    2015-03-19

    Here, we investigate the electronic structure, energetics of cation ordering, and effect of biaxial strain on double perovskite CsRbCaZnCl6 using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. The two constituents (i.e., CsCaCl3 and RbZnCl3) forming the double perovskite exhibit a stark contrast. While CsCaCl3 is known to exist in a cubic perovskite structure and does not show any epitaxial strain induced phase transitions within an experimentally accessible range of compressive strains, RbZnCl3 is thermodynamically unstable in the perovskite phase and exhibits ultra-sensitive response at small epitaxial strains if constrained in the perovskite phase. We show that combining the two compositionsmore » in a double perovskite structure not only improves overall stability but also the strain-polarization coupling of the material. Our calculations predict a ground state with P4/nmm space group for the double perovskite, where A-site cations (i.e., Cs and Rb) are layer-ordered and B-site cations (i.e., Ca and Zn) prefer a rocksalt type ordering. The electronic structure and bandgap in this system are shown to be quite sensitive to the B-site cation ordering and is minimally affected by the ordering of A-site cations. We find that at experimentally accessible compressive strains CsRbCaZnCl6 can be phase transformed from its paraelectric ground state to an antiferroelectric state, where Zn atoms contribute predominantly to the polarization. Furthermore, both energy difference and activation barrier for a transformation between this antiferroelectric state and the corresponding ferroelectric configuration are predicted to be small. As a result, the computational approach presented here opens a new pathway towards a rational design of novel double perovskites with improved strain response and functionalities.« less

  10. Spectroscopy and applications of the 3?{sup 3}?{sup +} electronic state of {sup 39}K{sup 85}Rb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Jayita Rahmlow, David; Carollo, Ryan; Bellos, Michael; Eyler, Edward E.; Gould, Phillip L.; Stwalley, William C.

    2013-11-07

    We report new results on the spectroscopy of the 3?{sup 3}?{sup +} electronic state of {sup 39}K{sup 85}Rb. The observations are based on resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of ultracold KRb molecules starting in vibrational levels v?? = 1823 of the a?{sup 3}?{sup +} state and ionized via the intermediate 3?{sup 3}?{sup +} state. The a-state ultracold molecules are formed by photoassociation of ultracold {sup 39}K and {sup 85}Rb atoms to the 3(0{sup +}) state of KRb followed by spontaneous emission. We discuss the potential applications of this state to future experiments, as a pathway for populating the lowest vibrational levels of the a state as well as the X state.

  11. A full dimensional investigation of infrared spectroscopy of the RbCs dimer using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Huihui; Yang, Yonggang Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2013-12-28

    The geometry and infrared absorption spectrum of (RbCs){sub 2} have been studied by full dimensional quantum dynamics simulations. For this purpose, the potential energy and dipole moment surfaces are generated by means of a cluster expansion with all two and three mode correlations, and fitted to analytical expressions with negligible deviations. Accordingly, the ground state (RbCs){sub 2} has a diamond geometry with D{sub 2h} symmetry. The infrared spectrum with frequencies up to 120 cm{sup −1}, exhibits rich details of the fundamentals, overtones, and combination bands; the highest fundamental frequency of (RbCs){sub 2} is only 40.26 cm{sup −1}. The present study unravels important details of the interactions between the widely investigated ultracold RbCs molecules.

  12. Oil and gas developments in New Zealand and southwest Pacific Islands in 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herzer, R.H.; Katz, H.R.

    1987-10-01

    In New Zealand, 5 new licenses were granted in offshore Taranaki and 4 licenses were relinquished in other parts of the country. Seismic survey activity increased, partly due to a dense survey over Maui field. Sniffer surveys were used for the first time in New Zealand in 5 licensees. Onshore seismic totaled 717 line-km, and offshore seismic totaled 3693 line-km. Drilling continued at a high level for New Zealand with 12 onshore and 5 offshore wells totaling 57,147 m. Two gas and condensate discoveries, Tariki-1A and Ahuroa-2A, were made in the overthrust play of eastern Taranaki, and a gas and condensate (possible oil) discovery was made off the south Taranaki coast at Kupe South-1. Total petroleum production increased to 4546 million m/sup 3/ of gas, 1208 thousand m/sup 3/ of condensate, 186.7 thousand m/sup 3/ of LPG, and 501 thousand m/sup 3/ of oil. Early depletion of the D-sand reservoir in Maui-A field led Shell BP Todd to shoot 1598 km of seismic over the field and to drill 3 appraisal wells. Tonga has released a new license map with 119 blocks offered. Significant changes in legislation include increased royalties, a reduction of exploration license duration to 11 years (but 25 years for development of a discovery), and replacement of expenditure commitments by license work programs. In Papua New Guinea, Iagifu-2X discovery was confirmed with the drilling of Iagifu-3X, which established 4 oil pay zones in the field. The Papuan foldbelt is now considered a very attractive oil province, and most of the basin is under license. 4 figures, 6 tables.

  13. Rb+ adsorption at the quartz(101)-aqueous interface: comparison of resonant anomalous x-ray reflectivity with ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellucci, Francesco; Lee, Sang Soo; Kubicki, James D.; Bandura, Andrei V.; Zhang, Zhan; Wesolowski, David J.; Fenter, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We study adsorption of Rb+ to the quartz(101)–aqueous interface at room temperature with specular X-ray reflectivity, resonant anomalous X-ray reflectivity, and density functional theory. The interfacial water structures observed in deionized water and 10 mM RbCl solution at pH 9.8 were similar, having a first water layer at height of 1.7 ± 0.1 Å above the quartz surface and a second layer at 4.8 ± 0.1 Å and 3.9 ± 0.8 Å for the water and RbCl solutions, respectively. The adsorbed Rb+ distribution is broad and consists of presumed inner-sphere (IS) and outer-sphere (OS) complexes at heights of 1.8 ± 0.1 and 6.4 ± 1.0 Å, respectively. Projector-augmented planewave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of potential configurations for neutral and negatively charged quartz(101) surfaces at pH 7 and 12, respectively, reveal a water structure in agreement with experimental results. These DFT calculations also show differences in adsorbed speciation of Rb+ between these two conditions. At pH 7, the lowest energy structure shows that Rb+ adsorbs dominantly as an IS complex, whereas at pH 12 IS and OS complexes have equivalent energies. The DFT results at pH 12 are generally consistent with the two site Rb distribution observed from the X-ray data at pH 9.8, albeit with some differences that are discussed. In conclusion, surface charge estimated on the basis of the measured total Rb+ coverage was -0.11 C/m2, in good agreement with the range of the surface charge magnitudes reported in the literature.

  14. Charging Properties of Cassiterite (alpha-SnO2) surfaces in NaCl and RbCl Ionic Media.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenqvist, Jorgen K; Machesky, Michael L.; Vlcek, Lukas; Wesolowski, David J

    2009-09-01

    The acid-base properties of cassiterite (alpha-SnO2) surfaces at 10-50 degrees C were studied using potentiometric titrations of powder suspensions in aqueous NaCl and RbCl media. The proton sorption isotherms exhibited common intersection points in the pH range of 4.0-4.5 under all conditions, and the magnitude of charging was similar but not identical in NaCl and RbCl. The hydrogen bonding configuration at the oxide-water interface, obtained from classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was analyzed in detail, and the results were explicitly incorporated in calculations of protonation constants for the reactive surface sites using the revised MUSIC model. The calculations indicated that the terminal SnOH2 group is more acidic than the bridging Sn2OH group, with protonation constants (log KH) of 3.60 and 5.13 at 25 degrees C, respectively. This is contrary to the situation on the isostructural alpha-TiO2 (rutile), apparently because of the difference in electronegativity between Ti and Sn. MD simulations and speciation calculations indicated considerable differences in the speciation of Na+ and Rb+, despite the similarities in overall charging. Adsorbed sodium ions are almost exclusively found in bidentate surface complexes, whereas adsorbed rubidium ions form comparable numbers of bidentate and tetradentate complexes. Also, the distribution of adsorbed Na+ between the different complexes shows a considerable dependence on the surface charge density (pH), whereas the distribution of adsorbed Rb+ is almost independent of pH. A surface complexation model (SCM) capable of accurately describing both the measured surface charge and the MD-predicted speciation of adsorbed Na+/Rb+ was formulated. According to the SCM, the deprotonated terminal group (SnOH(-0.40)) and the protonated bridging group (Sn2OH+0.36) dominate the surface speciation over the entire pH range of this study (2.7-10). The complexation of medium cations increases significantly with increasing

  15. Charging Properties of Cassiterite (alpha-SnO2) Surfaces in NaCl and RbCl Ionic Media.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenqvist, Jorgen K; Machesky, Michael L.; Vlcek, Lukas; Wesolowski, David J

    2009-09-01

    The acid-base properties of cassiterite ({alpha}-SnO{sub 2}) surfaces at 10-50 C were studied using potentiometric titrations of powder suspensions in aqueous NaCl and RbCl media. The proton sorption isotherms exhibited common intersection points in the pH range of 4.0-4.5 under all conditions, and the magnitude of charging was similar but not identical in NaCl and RbCl. The hydrogen bonding configuration at the oxide-water interface, obtained from classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was analyzed in detail, and the results were explicitly incorporated in calculations of protonation constants for the reactive surface sites using the revised MUSIC model. The calculations indicated that the terminal SnOH{sub 2} group is more acidic than the bridging Sn{sub 2}OH group, with protonation constants (log K{sub H}) of 3.60 and 5.13 at 25 C, respectively. This is contrary to the situation on the isostructural {alpha}-TiO{sub 2} (rutile), apparently because of the difference in electronegativity between Ti and Sn. MD simulations and speciation calculations indicated considerable differences in the speciation of Na{sup +} and Rb{sup +}, despite the similarities in overall charging. Adsorbed sodium ions are almost exclusively found in bidentate surface complexes, whereas adsorbed rubidium ions form comparable numbers of bidentate and tetradentate complexes. Also, the distribution of adsorbed Na{sup +} between the different complexes shows a considerable dependence on the surface charge density (pH), whereas the distribution of adsorbed Rb{sup +} is almost independent of pH. A surface complexation model (SCM) capable of accurately describing both the measured surface charge and the MD-predicted speciation of adsorbed Na{sup +}/Rb{sup +} was formulated. According to the SCM, the deprotonated terminal group (SnOH{sup -0.40}) and the protonated bridging group (Sn{sub 2}OH{sup +0.36}) dominate the surface speciation over the entire pH range of this study (2.7-10). The

  16. Oil and gas developments in New Zealand and southwest Pacific islands in 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, H.R.; Herzer, R.H.

    1986-10-01

    In New Zealand, a moratorium on petroleum exploration licensing was in effect throughout 1985. Seismic surveying activity was greatly reduced, with 960 km shot offshore and 780 km shot onshore. Drilling continued at a high rate, with 25 wells drilled, 5 offshore and 20 onshore. Total meterage exceeded 41,000 m. Although there were good indications of hydrocarbons, no major discoveries were made. At the end of 1985, the government lifted the licensing moratorium with the announcement of an offer of 50 blocks in the offshore Taranaki basin. Total petroleum production figures for New Zealand were 3802 million m/sup 3/ of gas, 1095 thousand m/sup 3/ of condensate, and 452 thousand m/sup 3/ of oil. The entire production is from fields in the Taranaki basin. In 1985, production of synthetic gasoline began at the Motunui synfuels plant using Maui and Kapuni gas and condensate as feedstock. Tonga introduced new petroleum legislation and is offering license blocks for exploration. No activity was reported from Fiji, Vanuatu, and Solomon Islands. License holdings in Papua New Guinea increased 78.3% to 16 petroleum prospecting licenses with a total of 1894 blocks. Seismic surveys amounts to 1500 km on land and 500 km offshore in 1985, after virtually no seismic in 1984. Drilling was up 23.9%. 3 figures, 6 tables.

  17. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Developmental toxicity of chloroprene vapors in New Zealand white rabbits. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Westerberg, R.B.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.

    1994-04-01

    Chloroprene, 2-chloro-1,3-butadiene, is a colorless liquid with a pungent ethereal odor that is primarily used as an intermediate in the manufacture of neoprene rubber, and has been used as such since about 1930. This study addressed the potential for chloroprene to cause developmental toxicity in New Zealand white rabbits following gestational exposure to 0, 10, 40, or 175 ppm chloroprene vapors, 6h/dy, 7dy/wk. Each treatment group consisted of 15 artificially inseminated females exposed on 6 through 28 days of gestation (dg). Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice on 29 dg. Implants were enumerated and their status recorded and live fetuses were examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. There were no overt signs of maternal toxicity and the change in maternal body weight over the course of the study was not affected. Exposure of pregnant rabbits to chloroprene vapors on 6-28 dg had no effect on the number of implantation, the mean percent of live pups per litter, or on the incidence of resorptions per litter. The incidence of fetal malformations was not increased by exposure to chloroprene. Results of this study indicate that gestational exposure of New Zealand white rabbits to 10, 40, or 175 ppm chloroprene did not result in observable toxicity to either the dam or the offspring.

  18. Topologically identical, but geometrically isomeric layers in hydrous α-, β-Rb[UO{sub 2}(AsO{sub 3}OH)(AsO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2})]·H{sub 2}O and anhydrous Rb[UO{sub 2}(AsO{sub 3}OH)(AsO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2})

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Na; Klepov, Vladislav V.; Villa, Eric M.; Bosbach, Dirk; Suleimanov, Evgeny V.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.; Alekseev, Evgeny V.

    2014-07-01

    The hydrothermal reaction of uranyl nitrate with rubidium nitrate and arsenic (III) oxide results in the formation of polymorphic α- and β-Rb[UO{sub 2}(AsO{sub 3}OH)(AsO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2})]·H{sub 2}O (α-, β-RbUAs) and the anhydrous phase Rb[UO{sub 2}(AsO{sub 3}OH)(AsO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2})] (RbUAs). These phases were structurally, chemically and spectroscopically characterized. The structures of all three compounds are based upon topologically identical, but geometrically isomeric layers. The layers are linked with each other by means of the Rb cations and hydrogen bonding. Dehydration experiments demonstrate that water deintercalation from hydrous α- and β-RbUAs yields anhydrous RbUAs via topotactic reactions. - Graphical abstract: Three different layer geometries observed in the structures of Rb[UO{sub 2}(AsO{sub 3}OH)(AsO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2})] and α- and β- Rb[UO{sub 2}(AsO{sub 3}OH)(AsO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2})]·H{sub 2}O. Two different coordination environments of uranium polyhedra (types I and II) are shown schematically on the top of the figure. - Highlights: • Three new uranyl arsenates were synthesized from the hydrothermal reactions. • The phases consist of the topologically identical but geometrically different layers. • Topotactic transitions were observed in the processes of mono-hyrates dehydration.

  19. Total Absorption Spectroscopy Study of ⁹²Rb Decay: A Major Contributor to Reactor Antineutrino Spectrum Shape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonzogni, A.; Zakari-Issoufou, A. -A.; Fallot, M.; Porta, A.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.; Valencia, E.; Rice, S.; Bui, V. M.; Cormon, S.; Estienne, M.; Agramunt, J.; Aysto, J.; Bowry, M.; Briz Monago, J. A.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cucoanes, A.; Eloma, V.; Estvez, E.; Farrelly, G. F.; Garcia, A.; Gelletly, W.; Gomez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gorlychev, V.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Jordan, M. D.; Kankainen, A.; Kondev, F. G.; Martinez, T.; Mendoza, E.; Molina, F.; Moore, I.; Perez, A.; Podolyak, Zs.; Penttil, H.; Regan, P. H.; Shiba, T.; Rissanen, J.; Rubio, B.; Weber, C.

    2015-03-09

    The accurate determination of the emitted reactor antineutrino flux is still a major challenge for actual and future neutrino experiments at reactors, especially after the evidence of a disagreement between the measured antineutrino energy spectrum by Double Chooz, Daya Bay, and Reno and calculated antineutrino spectra obtained from the conversion of the unique integral beta spectra measured at the ILL reactor. Using nuclear data to compute reactor antineutrino spectra may help understanding this bias, with the study of the underlying nuclear physics. Summation calculations allow identifying a list of nuclei that contribute importantly to the antineutrino energy spectra emitted after the fission of ²³⁹,²⁴¹Pu and ²³⁵,²³⁸U, and whose beta decay properties might deserve new measurements. Among these nuclei, ⁹²Rb exhausts by itself about 16% of of the antineutrino energy spectrum emitted by Pressurized Water Reactors in the 5 to 8 MeV range. In this Letter, we report new Total Absorption Spectroscopy (TAS) results for this important contributor. The obtained beta feeding from ⁹²Rb shows beta intensity unobserved before in the 4.5 to 5.5 MeV energy region and gives a ground state to ground state branch of 87.5 % ± 3%. These new data induce a dramatic change in recent summation calculations where a 51% GS to GS branch was considered for ⁹²Rb, increasing the summation antineutrino spectrum in the region nearby the observed bias.The new data still have an important impact on other summation calculations in which more recent data were considered

  20. Total Absorption Spectroscopy Study of ⁹²Rb Decay: A Major Contributor to Reactor Antineutrino Spectrum Shape

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sonzogni, A.; Zakari-Issoufou, A. -A.; Fallot, M.; Porta, A.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.; Valencia, E.; Rice, S.; Bui, V. M.; Cormon, S.; et al

    2015-03-09

    The accurate determination of the emitted reactor antineutrino flux is still a major challenge for actual and future neutrino experiments at reactors, especially after the evidence of a disagreement between the measured antineutrino energy spectrum by Double Chooz, Daya Bay, and Reno and calculated antineutrino spectra obtained from the conversion of the unique integral beta spectra measured at the ILL reactor. Using nuclear data to compute reactor antineutrino spectra may help understanding this bias, with the study of the underlying nuclear physics. Summation calculations allow identifying a list of nuclei that contribute importantly to the antineutrino energy spectra emitted aftermore » the fission of ²³⁹,²⁴¹Pu and ²³⁵,²³⁸U, and whose beta decay properties might deserve new measurements. Among these nuclei, ⁹²Rb exhausts by itself about 16% of of the antineutrino energy spectrum emitted by Pressurized Water Reactors in the 5 to 8 MeV range. In this Letter, we report new Total Absorption Spectroscopy (TAS) results for this important contributor. The obtained beta feeding from ⁹²Rb shows beta intensity unobserved before in the 4.5 to 5.5 MeV energy region and gives a ground state to ground state branch of 87.5 % ± 3%. These new data induce a dramatic change in recent summation calculations where a 51% GS to GS branch was considered for ⁹²Rb, increasing the summation antineutrino spectrum in the region nearby the observed bias.The new data still have an important impact on other summation calculations in which more recent data were considered« less

  1. Crystal structural study of ternary molybdate LiRbBi{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klevtsova, R.F.; Glinskaya, L.A.; Alekseev, V.I.

    1994-03-01

    Single crystals of the title compound have been synthesized and its crystal structure has been determined. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group C2/c, Z = 2 (a = 5.3056, b = 12.976, c = 19.578 {angstrom}, {beta} = 92.583{degrees}, R = 0.029). A distinctive feature of the structure is lacy layers of eight-vertex Bi polyhedra and Mo tetrahedra connected to them via common vertices. The adjacent layers are linked together by ten-vertex Rb polyhedra and Li octahedra.

  2. First-principles studies of the structural, electronic, and optical properties of a novel thorium compound Rb{sub 2}Th{sub 7}Se{sub 15}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brik, M.G.

    2014-04-01

    The structural, electronic, and optical properties of a recently synthesized thorium compound Rb{sub 2}Th{sub 7}Se{sub 15} have been calculated in the density functional theory framework for the first time. The calculated direct band gap was 1.471 eV (generalized gradient approximation) and 1.171 eV (local density approximation), with both results being close to the experimental result of 1.83 eV. High covalency/iconicity of the Th–Se/Rb–Se bonds was demonstrated by calculating effective Mulliken charges of all ions. The polarized calculations of the complex dielectric function are presented; dependence of the calculated index of refraction was fitted to the Sellmeyer equation in the wavelength range from 500 to 2500 nm. - Graphical abstract: Calculated band structure of Rb{sub 2}Th{sub 7}Se{sub 15}. - Highlights: • The first theoretical analysis of the Rb{sub 2}Th{sub 7}Se{sub 15} properties is reported. • Structural, electronic and optical properties of Rb{sub 2}Th{sub 7}Se{sub 15} were calculated. • An indirect character of Rb{sub 2}Th{sub 7}Se{sub 15} band gap was confirmed. • Dependence of the refractive index on the wavelength was calculated.

  3. Biosafety assessment protocols for new organisms in New Zealand: Can they apply internationally to emerging technologies?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barratt, B.I.P. . E-mail: barbara.barratt@agresearch.co.nz; Moeed, A.; Malone, L.A.

    2006-05-15

    An analysis of established biosafety protocols for release into the environment of exotic plants and biological control agents for weeds and arthropod pests has been carried out to determine whether such protocols can be applied to relatively new and emerging technologies intended for the primary production industries, such as transgenic plants. Example case studies are described to indicate the scope of issues considered by regulators who make decisions on new organism releases. No transgenic plants have been released to date in New Zealand, but two field test approvals are described as examples. An analysis of the biosafety protocols has shown that, while many of the risk criteria considered for decision-making by regulators are similar for all new organisms, a case-by-case examination of risks and potential impacts is required in order to fully assess risk. The value of post-release monitoring and validation of decisions made by regulators is emphasised.

  4. Performance of a prototype atomic clock based on lin parallel lin coherent population trapping resonances in Rb atomic vapor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikhailov, Eugeniy E.; Horrom, Travis; Belcher, Nathan; Novikova, Irina

    2010-03-15

    We report on the performance of the first table-top prototype atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances with parallel linearly polarized optical fields (lin parallel lin configuration). Our apparatus uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) tuned to the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb with the current modulation at the {sup 87}Rb hyperfine frequency. We demonstrate cancellation of the first-order light shift by the proper choice of rf modulation power and further improve our prototype clock stability by optimizing the parameters of the microwave lock loop. Operating in these optimal conditions, we measured a short-term fractional frequency stability (Allan deviation) 2x10{sup -11}{tau}{sup -1/2} for observation times 1 s{<=}{tau}{<=}20 s. This value is limited by large VCSEL phase noise and environmental temperature fluctuation. Further improvements in frequency stability should be possible with an apparatus designed as a dedicated lin parallel lin CPT resonance clock with environmental impacts minimized.

  5. Novel defect pyrochlores ABi/sub 2/B/sub 5/O/sub 16/ (A = Cs, Rb; B = Ta, Nb)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlert, M.K., Greedan, J.E.; Subramanian, M.A.

    1988-07-01

    The crystal structures of three oxides with compositions CsBi/sub 2/Nb/sub 5/O/sub 16/, CsBi/sub 2/Ta/sub 5/O/sub 16/, and RbBi/sub 2/Ta/sub 5/O/sub 16/ have been determined from powder neutron diffraction data. A common structure of the defect pyrochlore types has been found. Atomic positions in space group Fd3m are 3.2 O and 3.2 Cs(Rb) in 8b, 6.4 Bi in 16d, 16 Ta(Nb) in 16c, and 48 O in 48f. There is some evidence that the Rb atoms actually occupy 32e sites. On electrostatic grounds it is highly unlikely that the Cs(Rb) and O atoms are randomly distributed in 8b. Evidence for short-range order is apparent in the X-ray powder diffraction data. Cell constants are 10.528(1) A (Cs, Nb), 10.504(1) A (Cs, Ta), and 10.510(2) A (Rb, Ta), respectively, with 48f x parameters 0.3139(2) (Cs, Nb), 0.3152(2) (Cs, Ta), and 0.3153(2) (Rb, Ta). Isotropic temperature factors for the 8b and 16d site atoms ranged from 3 to 6 (A)/sup 2/. These large values suggest anharmonic behavior or high mobility for some of the ions. Evidence for this is found in the presence of significant dielectric loss effects in all of the compounds studied.

  6. Constrained Surface Complexation Modeling: Rutile in RbCl, NaCl, and NaCF3SO3 Media to 250 °C

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Machesky, Michael L.; Předota, Milan; Ridley, Moira K.; Wesolowski, David J.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive set of molecular-level results, primarily from classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations, are used to constrain CD-MUSIC surface complexation model (SCM) parameters describing rutile powder titrations conducted in RbCl, NaCl, and NaTr (Tr = triflate, CF3SO3–) electrolyte media from 25 to 250 °C. Rb+ primarily occupies the innermost tetradentate binding site on the rutile (110) surface at all temperatures (25, 150, 250 °C) and negative charge conditions (-0.1 and -0.2 C/m2) probed via CMD simulations, reflecting the small hydration energy of this large, monovalent cation. Consequently, variable SCM parameters (Stern-layer capacitance values and intrinsic Rb+ bindingmore » constants) were adjusted relatively easily to satisfactorily match the CMD and titration data. The larger hydration energy of Na+ results in a more complex inner-sphere distribution, which shifts from bidentate to tetradentate binding with increasing negative charge and temperature, and this distribution was not matched well for both negative charge conditions, which may reflect limitations in the CMD and/or SCM approaches. Finally, in particular, the CMD axial density profiles for Rb+ and Na+ reveal that peak binding distances shift toward the surface with increasing negative charge, suggesting that the CD-MUSIC framework may be improved by incorporating CD or Stern-layer capacitance values that vary with charge.« less

  7. Calcium accumulated by sickle cell anemia red cells does not affect their potassium (86Rb+) flux components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, O.E.; Lew, V.L.; Bookchin, R.M.

    1986-03-01

    We investigate here the hypothesis that the high Ca content of sickle cell anemia (SS) red cells may produce a sustained activation of the Ca2+-dependent K+ permeability (Gardos effect) and that the particularly high Ca levels in the dense SS cell fraction rich in irreversibly sickled cells (ISCs) might account for the Na pump inhibition observed in these cells. We measured active and passive 86Rb+ influx (as a marker for K+) in density-fractionated SS cells before and after extraction of their excess Ca by exposure to the Ca ionophore (A23187) and ethylene glycol tetra-acetic acid and with or without adenosine triphosphate depletion or addition of quinine. None of these maneuvers revealed any evidence of a Ca2+-dependent K leak in SS discocytes or dense cells. Na pump inhibition in the dense SS cells was associated with normal activation by external K+ and a low Vmax that persisted after Ca extraction from the cells. These results are consistent with our recent findings that the excess Ca in these cells is compartmentalized in intracellular inside-out vesicles and unavailable as free Ca2+ to the inner membrane surface. Although the steady-state free cytoplasmic Ca2+ in oxygenated SS cells must be below the levels needed to activate the K+ channel, possible brief activation of the channels of some SS cells resulting from transient elevations of cell Ca2+ during deoxygenation-induced sickling cannot be excluded. The dense, ISC-rich SS cell fraction showed a Ca2+-independent increase in the ouabain-resistant, nonsaturable component of 86Rb+ influx that, if uncompensated by Na+ gain, could contribute to the dehydration of these cells.

  8. Baicalein induces G1 arrest in oral cancer cells by enhancing the degradation of cyclin D1 and activating AhR to decrease Rb phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Ya-Hsin; Li, Lih-Ann; Lin, Pinpin; Cheng, Li-Chuan; Hung, Chein-Hui; Chang, Nai Wen; Lin, Chingju

    2012-09-15

    Baicalein is a flavonoid, known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. As an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand, baicalein at high concentrations blocks AhR-mediated dioxin toxicity. Because AhR had been reported to play a role in regulating the cell cycle, we suspected that the anti-cancer effect of baicalein is associated with AhR. This study investigated the molecular mechanism involved in the anti-cancer effect of baicalein in oral cancer cells HSC-3, including whether such effect would be AhR-mediated. Results revealed that baicalein inhibited cell proliferation and increased AhR activity in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle was arrested at the G1 phase and the expression of CDK4, cyclin D1, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma (pRb) was decreased. When the AhR was suppressed by siRNA, the reduction of pRb was partially reversed, accompanied by a decrease of cell population at G1 phase and an increase at S phase, while the reduction of cyclin D1 and CDK4 did not change. This finding suggests that the baicalein activation of AhR is indeed associated with the reduction of pRb, but is independent of the reduction of cyclin D1 and CDK4. When cells were pre-treated with LiCl, the inhibitor of GSK-3β, the decrease of cyclin D1 was blocked and the reduction of pRb was recovered. The data indicates that in HSC-3 the reduction of pRb is both mediated by baicalein through activation of AhR and facilitation of cyclin D1 degradation, which causes cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, and results in the inhibition of cell proliferation. -- Highlights: ► Baicalein causes the G1 phase arrest by decreasing Rb phosphorylation. ► Baicalein modulates AhR-mediated cell proliferation. ► Both AhR activation and cyclin D1 degradation results in hypophosphorylation of Rb. ► Baicalein facilitates cyclin D1 degradation by signalling the GSK-3β pathway.

  9. Drainage capture and discharge variations driven by glaciation in the Southern Alps, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ann V. Rowan; Mitchell A. Plummer; Simon H. Brocklehurst; Merren A. Jones; David M. Schultz

    2013-02-01

    Sediment flux in proglacial fluvial settings is primarily controlled by discharge, which usually varies predictably over a glacial–interglacial cycle. However, glaciers can flow against the topographic gradient to cross drainage divides, reshaping fluvial drainage networks and dramatically altering discharge. In turn, these variations in discharge will be recorded by proglacial stratigraphy. Glacial-drainage capture often occurs in alpine environments where ice caps straddle range divides, and more subtly where shallow drainage divides cross valley floors. We investigate discharge variations resulting from glacial-drainage capture over the past 40 k.y. for the adjacent Ashburton, Rangitata, and Rakaia basins in the Southern Alps, New Zealand. Although glacial-drainage capture has previously been inferred in the range, our numerical glacier model provides the first quantitative demonstration that this process drives larger variations in discharge for a longer duration than those that occur due to climate change alone. During the Last Glacial Maximum, the effective drainage area of the Ashburton catchment increased to 160% of the interglacial value with drainage capture, driving an increase in discharge exceeding that resulting from glacier recession. Glacial-drainage capture is distinct from traditional (base level–driven) drainage capture and is often unrecognized in proglacial deposits, complicating interpretation of the sedimentary record of climate change.

  10. Geochemical characteristics of oils from New Zealand, Papua New Guinea and Taiwan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung-Nan, Oung; Philp, P.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Oils from a number of convergent margin settings of the Pacific and Philippine plates have been characterized by geochemical techniques including gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and carbon isotopic analysis. The oils, collected from New Zealand, New Guinea, and Taiwan, are described in terms of their biomarker compositions, and these distributions are used to evaluate the nature of the source material responsible for the oils. For the most part these oils are of Tertiary age and the source materials were derived predominantly from higher plants. The authors describe the effects of a convergent margin on the relative maturity of the oils as reflected by their biomarker distributions. In other words, do any of the oils from these regions have anomalous maturity values that can be attributed to additional heating resulting from plate movement in the area. The results will also be compared with oils from similar source materials but not in convergent margin settings (for example, the Gippsland basin, Australia) to further evaluate the effects of the convergent margin setting on the biomarker distributions.

  11. Isolation of cellulolytic anaerobic extreme thermophiles from New Zealand thermal sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sissons, C.H.; Sharrock, K.R.; Daniel, R.M.; Morgan, H.W.

    1987-04-01

    Avicel enrichment cultures from 47 thermal-pool sites in the New Zealand Rotorua-Taupo region were screened for growth and carboxymethyl cellulase activity at 75/sup 0/C. Eight anaerobic cellulolytic cultures were obtained. The effect of temperature on carboxymethyl cellulase activity was measured, and bacteria were isolated from the five best cultures. Bacteria from two sources designated TP8 and TP10 grew at 75/sup 0/C, accumulated reducing sugar in the growth medium and gave free cellulases with avicelase activity. Bacteria from sources designated Tok4, Tok8, and Wai21 grew at 75/sup 0/C, accumulated no free sugars in the medium, and gave free carboxymethyl cellulases with virtually no avicelase activity. All were obligate anaerobic nonsporeforming rods which stained gram pentoses as well as hexoses, and gave ethanol and acetate as major fermentation end products. The isolated strain which produced the most active and stable cellulases had lower rates of free endocellulase accumulation at 75/sup 0/C than did Clostridium thermocellum at 60/sup 0/C, but its cellulase activity against avicel and filter paper in culture supernatants was comparable. Tested at 85/sup 0/C, TP8.T carboxymethyl cellulases included components which were very stable, whereas C. thermocellum carboxymethyl cellulases were all rapidly inactivated. The TP8.T avicelase activity was relatively unaffected by Triton X-100, EDTA, and dithiothreitol. Evidence was obtained for the existence of unisolated, cellulolytic extreme thermophiles producing cellulases which were more stable and active than those from TP8.T.

  12. Late Quaternary glacier sensitivity to temperature and precipitation distribution in the Southern Alps of New Zealand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ann V. Rowan; Simon H. Brocklehurst; David M. Schultz; Mitchell A. Plummer; Leif S. Anderson; Neil F. Glasser

    2014-05-01

    Glaciers respond to climate variations and leave geomorphic evidence that represents an important terrestrial paleoclimate record. However, the accuracy of paleoclimate reconstructions from glacial geology is limited by the challenge of representing mountain meteorology in numerical models. Precipitation is usually treated in a simple manner and yet represents difficult-to-characterize variables such as amount, distribution, and phase. Furthermore, precipitation distributions during a glacial probably differed from present-day interglacial patterns. We applied two models to investigate glacier sensitivity to temperature and precipitation in the eastern Southern Alps of New Zealand. A 2-D model was used to quantify variations in the length of the reconstructed glaciers resulting from plausible precipitation distributions compared to variations in length resulting from change in mean annual air temperature and precipitation amount. A 1-D model was used to quantify variations in length resulting from interannual climate variability. Assuming that present-day interglacial values represent precipitation distributions during the last glacial, a range of plausible present-day precipitation distributions resulted in uncertainty in the Last Glacial Maximum length of the Pukaki Glacier of 17.1?km (24%) and the Rakaia Glacier of 9.3?km (25%), corresponding to a 0.5°C difference in temperature. Smaller changes in glacier length resulted from a 50% decrease in precipitation amount from present-day values (-14% and -18%) and from a 50% increase in precipitation amount (5% and 9%). Our results demonstrate that precipitation distribution can produce considerable variation in simulated glacier extents and that reconstructions of paleoglaciers should include this uncertainty.

  13. Sequence stratigraphy of the Miocene, Pohokura field, Taranaki Basin, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalid, Nur Zulfa Abdul; Hamzah, Umar

    2014-09-03

    A sequence stratigraphic study of the Miocene age was conducted in the Pohokura field, that is located offshore from the northern coast of Taranaki Penisula, New Zealand. It is a low-relief, north-south elongated anticline approximately 16 km long and 5 km wide. The study was carried out with two objectives which are to identify the Miocene seismic facies and to identify the sequence stratigraphic parameters. One seismic line and Pohokura-2 well was use in the study. Various seismic facies were observed in the seismic section including parallel, subparallel, continuous, subcontinuous, wavy, free reflection, subchaotic, high amplitude-high frequency and high amplitude-low frequency reflection. The interpreted seismic line showed three chronostratigraphic units which is sequence boundary 1 (SB1) represent top Manganui, sequence boundary 2 (SB2) represent top Mount Messenger and sequence boundary 3 (SB3) represent top Urenui. SB1, was separated by two distinct seismic facies namely sub-parallel and sub-chaotic. Parallel and sub-parallel reflection was observed on top of the sequence boundary SB2 while sub-chaotic and wavy seismic facies is found below the sequence boundary. SB3 is characterize by erosional truncation as shown by the present of toplap and downlap terminations in the western part of the seismic section. It is also supported by the clear difference of very high amplitud-high frequency reflection on top of SB3 overlying low amplitud-low frequency reflection of Urenui Formation. A complete depositional system including highstand, lowstand and transgressive system tracts are observed in the incised valley within the Urenui Formation.

  14. Developments in New Zealand and Southwest Pacific island region in 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, H.R.

    1980-11-01

    Exploration in New Zealand in 1979 reached one of the lowest levels recorded. Offshore, there was no drilling or seismic work, and the remaining concession area amounts to a mere 9088 sq km. Onland concession areas, all owned by the government company Petrocorp, are 14,771.4 sq km; 2 important areas were relinquished and others were enlarged. One rig was drilling throughout the year, totaling 6230 m. Seismic surveys amounted to 7 party-months and 554.55 km, which is 66% of 1978. Platform A of the Maui field started production in June. Despite this, the combined production of the Kapuni and Maui fields decreased to 61.5% for gas and 64.3% for condensate - or 1,307.464 x 10/sup 6/ cu m of gas and 476,893 cu m of condensate. LPG was obtained at some higher rates, that is, 19,577.93 cu m or 128.8% of last year's production, and natural gasoline at 8,591.61 cu m or 102.1%. In Tonga, last year's unsuccessful drilling of 3 dry holes was followed by marine seismic surveys north and east of Tongatapu Island. In Fiji, offshore seismic surveys of 6000 line-km were completed, as well as geochemical surveys looking for sea-bottom anomalies. With the farm-in of Chevron Overseas Inc., drilling is planned for at least 2 offshore wells early in 1980. In the New Hebrides, draft legislation is now underway for a petroleum act. Also, in the Solomon Islands, draft legislation was put before parliament near year end, and final arrangements are to be completed in 1980. In Papua New Guinea no seismic or geologic field surveys were conducted. No drilling was undertaken, but access and site preparations were carried out for Kiunga 1 well to be drilled by Niugini Gulf Oil Pty. Ltd. early in 1980. Minor concession changes have been made.

  15. Oil and gas developments in New Zealand and southwest Pacific islands in 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, H.R.

    1982-11-01

    New Zealand has experienced a strong increase in exploration activity. Offshore license holdings are up to 164,015 km/sup 2/, an increase of 53%. Onshore licences are 20,467 km/sup 2/, an increase of 77%. Four offshore wells were drilled to a total depth of 13,690 m; they were all dry. Onshore drilling amounted to 8548 m and was concentrated around last year's oil discovery of McKee-2A. Onland seismic surveys covered 484 line-km, while marine seismic work amounted to 6561 km. Because of increased re-injection of gas in the Kapuni field, the saleable production slightly went down, but condensate production rose by nearly 50,000 m/sup 3/; 21% more than last year. With the strongly increased output from the offshore Maui field, total gas production for sale was 1286 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/, up 20.2%, while the total production of condensate was 550,101 m/sup 3/, up 31.3%. LPG production rose to 41,179 m/sup 3/, up 50.8%. In Papua New Guinea, the total concession areas increased to 72,600 km/sup 2/. Oil companies recorded 550 km of seismic lines onshore, and 1716 km offshore; aeromagnetic surveys covered 9779 line-km. Outside concession areas, CCOP/SOPAC conducted single-channel seismic surveys in the New Ireland basin between Bougainville and Manus Island, for a total length of 4964 km. Interpretation of these surveys has been completed and prepared for publication. An appraisal well, Barikewa-2, was spudded shortly before year-end; initial reserve estimates for this large anticline had run as high as 10 tcf of gas in place. Drilling depth will be about 2120 m. (JMT)

  16. Oil and gas developments in New Zealand and southwest Pacific islands in 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahill, J.P.; Katz, H.R.

    1988-10-01

    In New Zealand, 14 new licenses were granted: 6 in the East Coast region, 6 offshore Taranaki, and 2 in the South Island. Two licenses were relinquished, and the onshore Taranaki license held by petrocorp expired. Onshore seismic activity totaled 525 km; offshore seismic activity totaled 3,221 km (reconnaissance seismic surveys by TCPL accounted for much of the offshore activity). Drilling decreased slightly, with 18 wells drilled (13 onshore and 5 offshore) total 55,203 m. The drilling of Kora-1 on a volcanic structure in the North Taranaki basin has led to speculation about a possible oil discovery. Total petroleum production remained steady at 4,360 million m/sup 3/ of gas, 1,127 thousand m/sup 3/ of condensate, 190 thousand m/sup 3/ of LPG, and 509 thousand m/sup 3/ of oil. In Papua New Guinea, further discoveries in the overthrust belt of the Papuan basin have confirmed the highly prospective nature of this area. A major gas and condensate field with 4 pay zones was established in the Hides structure east of Juha field, and early in 1988 gas, condensate, and oil were found in the Hedinia structure south of the Iagifu oil field discovered in 1986. Total drilling amounted to 15,725.55 m during 1987. Seismic surveys covered 858 km onshore and 4,747 km offshore. There are 36 active Petroleum Prospecting Licenses: 32 in the Papuan basin and 4 in the North New Guinea basin. No new developments were reported in Solomon Islands, Tonga, and Vanuatu. 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Oil and gas developments in New Zealand and southwest Pacific Islands in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, H.R.; Herzer, R.H.

    1985-10-01

    New Zealand had an increase in petroleum production, while exploration drilling continued at 1983's high level. Although there was an overall drop in licensed acreage, the amount of seismic exploration increased markedly, with 1,100 km of acquisition onshore and 4,300 km offshore. A new oil discovery, Toetoe-1A, was made near McKee field. Combined production from Kapuni, Maui, McKee, and Kaimiro fields was 2,978.56 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/ of gas (up 25%) and 962,323 m/sup 3/ of condensate (up 14%). The combined McKee and Pouri fields, which came on line in November, are producing oil at about 5,200 b/d (830 m/sup 3//day). All licenses in Tonga have been relinquished, and all company data are on open file. New petroleum legislation will be in force in 1985. Fiji had no exploration activities. Three license blocks have been renewed at reduced acreage. Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands are still awaiting legislation for petroleum exploration. A second stage of a CCOP/SOPAC-sponsored tripartite project (S. P. Lee cruise) was carried out in both countries, and also in Tonga and the New Ireland basin of Papua New Guinea. On the mainland of Papua New Guinea, 5 wells were drilled to a combined depth of 10,158 m (up 10.9%). All were dry. Concession areas comprise 11 Petroleum Prospecting Licences with a total of 1,062 blocks (at 5-min graticules).

  18. Oil and gas developments in New Zealand and southwest Pacific islands in 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, H.R.

    1984-10-01

    New Zealand had an increase in exploration activity, particularly drilling. 30,876 m were drilled onshore (up 62%) and 14,034 m offshore. Concession holdings slightly increased offshore (to 230,665 km), but dropped to nearly half onshore (to 34,353 km). Seismic surveys decreased to 477.5 line-km onshore and 1128 km offshore, down 56% and 93%, respectively. Oil, gas, and condensate were found in several wells on small structures close to the recently discovered McKee field. Regular production from McKee began in April 1984, at an initial rate of 1000 BOPD. Production from Kapuni and Maui fields combined was 2,381.313 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/ of gas (up 9.4%) and 845,286 m/sup 3/ of condensate (down 2.3%). Construction of a 1200-MT/day methanol plant, which uses natural gas from these fields, was completed. No exploration was carried out in Tonga, Fiji, Vanuatu, and the Solomon Islands. In Fiji, all prospecting licenses expired, but renewal terms on areas reduced by 50% were agreed on in principle. Papua New Guinea had 4 wells drilled to a combined depth of 9158 m (up 23.2%). The Juha-2X appraisal well confirmed the discovery of gas and condensate in the Juha anticline. In the Gulf of Papua, the offshore appraisal well, Pasca-A3, blew out and was abandoned. The total area of petroleum prospecting licenses slightly increased to 74,715 km. 4 figures, 5 tables.

  19. Oil and gas developments in New Zealand and southwest Pacific Islands in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, H.R.; Herzer, R.H.

    1985-10-01

    New Zealand had an increase in petroleum production, while exploration drilling continued at 1983's high level. Although there was an overall drop in licensed acreage, the amount of seismic exploration increased markedly, with 1100 km of acquisition onshore and 4300 km offshore. A new oil discovery, Toetoe-1A, was made near McKee field. Combined production from Kapuni, Maui, McKee, and Kaimiro fields was 2978.56 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/ of gas (up 25%) and 962,323 m/sup 3/ of condensate (up 14%). The combined McKee and Pouri fields, which came on line in November, are producing oil at about 5200 b/d (830 m/sup 3//day). All licenses in Tonga have been relinquished, and all company data are on open file. New petroleum legislation will be in force in 1985. Fiji had no exploration activities. Three license blocks have been renewed at reduced acreage. Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands are still awaiting legislation for petroleum exploration. A second stage of a CCOP/SOPAC-sponsored tripartite project (S.P. Lee cruise) was carried out in both countries, and also in Tonga and the New Ireland basin of Papua New Guinea. On the mainland of Papua New Guinea, 5 wells were drilled to a combined depth of 10,158 m (up 10.9%). All were dry. Concession areas comprise 11 Petroleum Prospecting Licenses with a total of 1062 blocks (at 5-min graticules). 5 figures, 5 tables.

  20. Synthesis and structural characterization of the new clathrates K8Cd4Ge42, Rb8Cd4Ge42, and Cs8Cd4Ge42

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schafer, Marion; Bobev, Svilen

    2016-03-25

    This paper presents results from our exploratory work in the systems K-Cd-Ge, Rb-Cd-Ge, and Cs-Cd-Ge, which yielded the novel type-I clathrates with refined compositions K8Cd3.77(7)Ge42.23, Rb8Cd3.65(7)Ge42.35, and Cs7.80(1)Cd3.65(6)Ge42.35. The three compounds represent rare examples of clathrates of germanium with the alkali metals, where a d10 element substitutes a group 14 element. The three structures, established by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, indicate that the framework-building Ge atoms are randomly substituted by Cd atoms on only one of the three possible crystallographic sites. Furthermore, this and several other details of the crystal chemistry are elaborated.

  1. Synthesis and structural characterization of a new rubidium borosulfate, Rb{sub 5}BS{sub 4}O{sub 16}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Lingyun; Pan, Shilie; Wang, Ying; Yu, Hongwei; Lin, Xiaoxia; Han, Shujuan

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Rb{sub 5}BS{sub 4}O{sub 16} has been synthesized using (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} as a source of sulfate ions for the first time. • Zero-dimensional anion groups, [B(SO{sub 4}){sub 4}]{sup 5−}, exist in the title compound. • Spectral properties and thermal analysis of Rb{sub 5}BS{sub 4}O{sub 16} were reported. - Abstract: A new rubidium borosulfate, Rb{sub 5}BS{sub 4}O{sub 16}, has been synthesized using (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} as a source of sulfate ions for the first time. The compound crystallizes in the space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 (No. 96) of the tetragonal system with a = 10.148(4) Å, c = 16.689(14) Å, V = 1718.8(17) Å{sup 3}, and Z = 4. Zero-dimensional anion groups, [B(SO{sub 4}){sub 4}]{sup 5−}, a central BO{sub 4} tetrahedron sharing all its four vertices with neighboring sulfate tetrahedra, exist in the title compound, and then the rubidium atoms are situated in the voids of the resulting structure. The IR spectrum confirms the presence of BO{sub 4} and SO{sub 4} units. The UV–vis-NIR diffuse reflectance spectrum exhibits a band gap of about 3.99 eV. The TG-DSC analysis suggests that Rb{sub 5}BS{sub 4}O{sub 16} is an incongruent melting compound.

  2. Shape resonances in ground-state diatomic molecules: General trends and the example of RbCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Londono, B. E.; Mahecha, J. E.; Luc-Koenig, E.; Crubellier, A.

    2010-07-15

    The presence of shape resonances due to tunneling through the centrifugal barrier modifies strongly the dynamics of cold atom scattering. As shown on the example of the ground and lowest triplet electronic states of the {sup 85}Rb{sup 133}Cs molecule, the crucial parameter is, as usual for cold collisions, the scattering length. A general description of shape resonances of diatomic molecules is given from three simple single channel asymptotic models, whose respective performances are discussed. The first model, which consists of a R{sup -6} potential limited at short range by a repulsive wall, positioned to reproduce the s-wave scattering length, accounts satisfactorily for the main system-independent properties of shape resonances. Introduction in the model of energy- and angular-momentum-dependent nodal lines specific to the inner part of the potential greatly improves its efficiency. When the energy and angular momentum dependence of the nodal lines cannot be deduced from full potential calculations or from experiment, a rough, but universal, estimate of these properties is obtained by extending the R{sup -6} behavior of the potential up to the origin.

  3. The application of strategic environmental assessment in a non-mandatory context: Regional transport planning in New Zealand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGimpsey, Paul; Morgan, Richard K.

    2013-11-15

    There is no legal mandate for strategic environmental assessment (SEA) in New Zealand. However, a requirement to consider environmental and sustainability issues is a key feature of many statutes, including that relating to regional transport planning. Given this, the research sought to determine whether SEA could be used to improve the incorporation of environmental and sustainability aspects into the regional transport planning process in New Zealand. Existing practice was evaluated, examining what factors currently limiting the consideration of environmental and sustainability issues and to what extent elements of SEA are currently being used. The research culminated in the development of a conceptual model where SEA elements could be incorporated into the existing framework to promote improved consideration of environmental and sustainability issues. The results provide some reassurance about the value of SEA even where its application is not legally mandated. However, it also highlighted some ongoing issues around the integration of SEA in existing frameworks and around the scope of SEA as a decision-aiding tool. -- Highlights: • The research examined whether SEA can provide benefits even where it is not mandated. • The research examined the extent to which SEA elements are currently being used. • A conceptual model was developed to incorporate necessary SEA elements into an existing framework.

  4. Oil and gas developments in New Zealand and southwest Pacific islands in 1982. [Papua New Guinea; Fiji

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, H.R.

    1983-10-01

    New Zealand experienced a marked increase in activity. Concession holdings went up 205% onshore to 62,429 km/sup 2/, and 31% offshore to 215,439 km/sup 2/. Seismic coverage more than doubled both onshore and offshore, to 1,075 and 15,321 line-km, respectively. Several new targets have been delineated offshore, and 2 drillships are scheduled to arrive in the country and start drilling during 1983. Onshore, the total depth drilled more than doubled to 18,993 m. Drilling was concentrated in the recently discovered McKee field, where 2 additional oil producers were completed, and on 3 other structures nearby, where 1 well tested gas and condensate. Production of gas and condensate from the Kapuni and Maui fields combined was 2,177.122 X 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/ (up 69.3%) and 865,454 m/sup 3/ (up 57.3%), respectively. Expansion of the only refinery in New Zealand and the realization of large petrochemical projects using natural gas are well under way. These projects include an ammonia-urea plant, which was completed by year end, a methanol plant, and a methanol-to-synthetic petrol plant now under construction.

  5. Estimation of total cloud cover from solar radiation observations at Lake Rotorua, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Liancong; Hamilton, David; Han, Boping

    2010-03-15

    The DYRESM-CAEDYM model is a valuable tool for simulating water temperature for biochemical studies in aquatic ecosystem. The model requires inputs of surface short-wave radiation and long-wave radiation or total cloud cover fraction (TC). Long-wave radiation is often not measured directly so a method to determine TC from commonly measured short-wave solar irradiance (E{sub 0}) and theoretical short-wave solar irradiance under a clear sky (E{sub c}) has broad application. A more than 17-year (15 November 1991 to 20 February 2009) hourly solar irradiance data set was used to estimate the peak solar irradiance for each ordinal date over one year, which was assumed to be representative of solar irradiance in the absence of cloud. Comparison between these daily observed values and the modelled clear-sky solar radiation over one year was in close agreement (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = 0.995 and root mean squared error, RMSE = 12.54 W m{sup -2}). The downloaded hourly cloudiness measurements from 15 November 1991 to 20 February 2009 was used to calculate the daily values for this period and then the calculated daily values over the 17 years were used to calculate the average values for each ordinal date over one year. A regression equation between (1 - E{sub 0}/E{sub c}) and TC produced a correlation coefficient value of 0.99 (p > 0.01, n = 71). The validation of this cloud cover estimation model was conducted with observed short-wave solar radiation and TC at two sites. Values of TC derived from the model at the Lake Rotorua site gave a reasonable prediction of the observed values (RMSE = 0.10, r = 0.86, p > 0.01, n = 61). The model was also tested at Queenstown (South Island of New Zealand) and it provided satisfactory results compared to the measurements (RMSE = 0.16, r = 0.67, p > 0.01, n = 61). Therefore the model's good performance and broad applicability will contribute to the DYRESM-CAEDYM accuracy of water temperature simulation when long-wave radiation

  6. X-ray absorption studies of mixed salt polymer electrolytes: ZnBr{sub 2}/CaBr{sub 2}-PEO, ZnBr{sub 2}/LiBr-PEO, and ZnBr{sub 2}/RbBr-PEO complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBreen, J.; Yang, X.Q.; Lee, H.S.; Okamoto, Y.

    1995-02-01

    Polyethylene oxide (PEO)-salt systems are an important new class of electrolytes that are being considered for many uses. X-ray absorption (XAS) studies of ZnBr{sub 2}-PEO complexes, at the Zn K edge, at temperatures between 25 and 120 C, indicate that additions of bromide salts of Li, Rb, or Ca result in the formation of ZnBr{sub 4}{sup {minus} 2} complexes with a Zn-Br bond length of 2.42 {angstrom}. XAS, at the Rb K edge, in mixed RbBr/ZnBr{sub 2}-PEO complexes with an excess of ZnBr{sub 2}, shows that the ZnBr{sub 2} causes the RbBr to dissolve in the polymer. The Rb{sup +} ions are weakly complexed with the PEO with an Rb-O bond distance of 2.93 {angstrom}.

  7. Construction of an in vitro primary lung co-culture platform derived from New Zealand white rabbits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Joshua D.; Hess, Becky M.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Straub, Tim M.

    2015-05-01

    We report the construction of an in vitro three dimensional (3D) co-culture platform consisting of differentiated lung epithelial cells and monocytes from New Zealand white rabbits. Rabbit lung epithelial cells were successfully grown at air-liquid interface, produced mucus, and expressed both sialic acid alpha-2,3 and alpha-2,6. Blood-derived CD14+ monocytes were deposited above the epithelial layer resulting in the differentiation of a subset of monocytes into CD11c+ cells within the co-culture. These proof-of-concept findings provide a convenient means to comparatively study in vitro versus in vivo rabbit lung responses as they relate to inhalation or lung-challenge studies.

  8. Observation of cold Rb{sub 2} molecules trapped in an optical dipole trap using a laser-pulse-train technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menegatti, Carlos R.; Marangoni, Bruno S.; Marcassa, Luis G.

    2011-11-15

    In this work, we have developed and characterized a laser-pulse-train technique to observe cold Rb{sub 2} molecules trapped in an optical dipole trap. The molecules are produced in a magneto-optical trap, and then loaded into a crossed optical dipole trap. The time evolution of the molecular population is obtained by applying a laser pulse train, which photoionizes the ground-state molecules through intermediate molecular bands. Our results show that this technique allows us to obtain a faster data acquisition rate of the time evolution of the molecule population than other techniques.

  9. A combined Sm-Nd, Rb-Sr, and U-Pb isotopic study of Mg-suite norite 78238: Further evidence for early differentiation of the Moon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmunson, J; E.Borg, L; Nyquist, L E; Asmerom, Y

    2008-11-17

    Lunar Mg-suite norite 78238 was dated using the Sm-Nd, Rb-Sr, and U-Pb isotopic systems in order to constrain the age of lunar magma ocean solidification and the beginning of Mg-suite magmatism, as well as to provide a direct comparison between the three isotopic systems. The Sm-Nd isotopic system yields a crystallization age for 78238 of 4334 {+-} 37 Ma and an initial {var_epsilon}{sub Nd}{sup 143} value of -0.27 {+-} 0.74. The age-initial {var_epsilon}{sub Nd}{sup 143} (T-I) systematics of a variety of KREEP-rich samples, including 78238 and other Mg-suite rocks, KREEP basalts, and olivine cumulate NWA 773, suggest that lunar differentiation was completed by 4492 {+-} 61 Ma assuming a Chondritic Uniform Reservoir bulk composition for the Moon. The Rb-Sr isotopic systematics of 78238 were disturbed by post-crystallization processes. Nevertheless, selected data points yield two Rb-Sr isochrons. One is concordant with the Sm-Nd crystallization age, 4366 {+-} 53 Ma. The other is 4003 {+-} 95 Ma and is concordant with an Ar-Ar age for 78236. The {sup 207}Pb-{sup 206}Pb age of 4333 {+-} 59 Ma is concordant with the Sm-Nd age. The U-Pb isotopic systematics of 78238 yield linear arrays equivalent to younger ages than the Pb-Pb system, and may reflect fractionation of U and Pb during sample handling. Despite the disturbed nature of the U-Pb systems, a time-averaged {mu} ({sup 238}U/{sup 204}Pb) value of the source can be estimated at 27 {+-} 30 from the Pb-Pb isotopic systematics. Because KREEP-rich samples are likely to be derived from source regions with the highest U/Pb ratios, the relatively low {mu} value calculated for the 78238 source suggests the bulk Moon does not have an exceedingly high {mu} value.

  10. Investigating the experiences of New Zealand MRI technologists: Exploring intra-orbital metallic foreign body safety practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, Philippa K; Henwood, Suzanne

    2013-12-15

    Qualitative research is lacking regarding the experiences of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologists and their involvement in workplace safety practices. This article provides a gateway to explore, describe and document experiences of MRI technologists in New Zealand (NZ) pertaining to intra-orbital metallic foreign body (IMFB) safety practices. This phenomenological study describes the experiences of seven MRI technologists all with a minimum of 5 years' NZ work experience in MRI. The MRI technologists were interviewed face-to-face regarding their professional IMFB workplace experiences in order to explore historical, current and potential issues. Findings demonstrated that aspects of organization and administration are fundamentally important to MRI technologists. Varying levels of education and knowledge, as well as experience and skills gained, have significantly impacted on MRI technologists’ level of confidence and control in IMFB practices. Participants’ descriptions of their experiences in practice regarding decision-making capabilities further highlight the complexity of these themes. A model was developed to demonstrate the interrelated nature of the themes and the complexity of the situation in totality. Findings of this study have provided insight into the experiences of MRI technologists pertaining to IMFB safety practices and highlighted inconsistencies. It is hoped that these findings will contribute to and improve the level of understanding of MRI technologists and the practices and protocols involved in IMFB safety screening. The scarcity of available literature regarding IMFB safety practices highlights that more research is required to investigate additional aspects that could improve MRI technologists’ experiences.

  11. High temperature redox reactions with uranium: Synthesis and characterization of Cs(UO{sub 2})Cl(SeO{sub 3}), Rb{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}O{sub 2}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2}, and RbNa{sub 5}U{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 7}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babo, Jean-Marie; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2013-10-15

    Cs(UO{sub 2})Cl(SeO{sub 3}) (1), Rb{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}O{sub 2}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 3} (2), and RbNa{sub 5}U{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 7} (3) single crystals were synthesized using CsCl, RbCl, and a CuCl/NaCl eutectic mixture as fluxes, respectively. Their lattice parameters and space groups are as follows: P2{sub 1}/n (a=6.548(1) Å, b=11.052(2) Å, c=10.666(2) Å and β=93.897(3)°), P1{sup ¯} (a=7.051(2) Å, b=7.198(2) Å, c=8.314(2) Å, α=107.897(3)°, β=102.687(3)° and γ=100.564(3)°) and C2/c (a=17.862(4) Å, b=6.931(1) Å, c=20.133(4) Å and β=109.737(6)°. The small anionic building units found in these compounds are SeO{sub 3}{sup 2−} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} tetrahedra, oxide, and chloride. The crystal structure of the first compound is composed of [(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup 2−} chains separated by Cs{sup +} cations. The structure of (2) is constructed from [(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}O{sub 11}]{sup 16−} chains further connected through selenite units into layers stacked perpendicularly to the [0 1 0] direction, with Rb{sup +} cations intercalating between them. The structure of compound (3) is made of uranyl sulfate layers formed by edge and vertex connections between dimeric [U{sub 2}O{sub 16}] and [SO{sub 4}] polyhedra. These layers contain unusual sulfate–metal connectivity as well as large voids. - Graphical abstract: A new family of uranyl selenites and sulfates has been prepared by high-temperature redox reactions. This compounds display new bonding motifs. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Low-dimensional Uranyl Oxoanion compounds. • Conversion of U(IV) to U(VI) at high temperatures. • Dimensional reduction by both halides and stereochemically active lone-pairs.

  12. Synthesis and structure of R{sub 2}[UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2}] (R = Rb or Cs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serezhkin, V. N.; Peresypkina, E. V.; Grigor’eva, V. A.; Virovets, A. V.; Serezhkina, L. B.

    2015-01-15

    Crystals Rb{sub 2}[UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2}] (I) and Cs{sub 2}[UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2}] (II) have been synthesized and studied by IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Crystals I are monoclinic, with the following parameters: a = 12.2118(5) Å, b = 10.2545(3) Å, c = 11.8754(4) Å, β = 110.287(1)°, sp. gr. C2/c, Z = 4, and R = 0.0523. Crystals II are orthorhombic, with a = 13.7309(3) Å, b = 10.5749(2) Å, c = 10.1891(2) Å, sp. gr. Pnma, Z = 4, and R = 0.0411. The basic structural units of crystals I and II are one-core complexes [UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2}]{sup 2−}, which belong to the crystallochemical group cis-AB{sub 2}{sup 01}M{sub 2}{sup 1} (A = UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, B{sup 01} = NO{sub 3}{sup −}, M{sup 1} = NCS{sup −}), which are combined into a framework via electrostatic interactions with ions of alkaline metals R (R = Rb or Cs). The structural features of crystals I and II, which condition the formation of [UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2}]{sup 2−} complexes with a cis rather than a trans position of isothiocyanate ions in the coordination sphere of uranyl ions, are discussed.

  13. Luminescent properties of phosphor converted LED using an orange-emitting Rb{sub 2}CaP{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Hee Jo; Yim, Dong Kyun; Cho, In-Sun; Roh, Hee-Suk; Kim, Ju Seong; Kim, Dong-Wan; Hong, Kug Sun

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Phase-pure Rb{sub 2}CaP{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Eu{sup 2+} powders were synthesized by a solid state reaction process. ► The optimum emission intensity was observed at the Eu{sup 2+} ion concentration of 0.006. ► The dipole–dipole interaction was the major concentration quenching mechanism. ► The pc-LED coated with Rb{sub 2}CaP{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Eu{sup 2+} had higher CRI than commercial red phosphor. -- Abstract: A series of orange-emitting Rb{sub 2}CaP{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphors were synthesized by a conventional solid-state reaction method. The as-prepared phosphors were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), fluorescence spectroscopy, and spectroradiometry. XRD showed that all prepared samples exhibited a monoclinic Rb{sub 2}CaP{sub 2}O{sub 7} phase. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the photoluminescence efficiency of Rb{sub 2}Ca{sub 1−x}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Eu{sub x}{sup 2+} phosphors increased with increasing Eu{sup 2+} concentration until x = 0.006, then decreased at higher concentrations, due to a concentration quenching effect. The thermal activation energy was also measured to be 0.40 eV. Furthermore, a phosphor-converted LED (pc-LED) coated with Rb{sub 2}Ca{sub 0.994}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Eu{sub 0.006}{sup 2+} was fabricated, which exhibited bright orange emission under a forward bias, from 200 to 300 mA. The color rendering index (CRI) of pc-LED coated with Rb{sub 2}Ca{sub 0.994}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Eu{sub 0.006}{sup 2+} was higher than the CRI of pc-LED coated with commercial red phosphor, due to the broad emission band of Rb{sub 2}CaP{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphor. In applying with three-band pc-LEDs, moreover, white pc-LED using Rb{sub 2}CaP{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphor had a higher CRI, than using commercial phosphor. These results indicated that Rb{sub 2}CaP{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphor could be a good candidate for a near-UV based w-LED.

  14. Warming and glacier recession in the Rakaia valley, Southern Alps of New Zealand, during Heinrich Stadial 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaron E. Putnam; Joerg M. Schaefe; George H .Denton; DavidJ. A. Barrell; Bjørn G. Andersen; Tobias N.B. Koffman; Ann V. Rowan; Robert C. Finkel; Dylan H. Rood; Roseanne Schwartz; Marcus J. Vandergoes; Mitchell A. Plummer; Simon H. Brocklehurst; Samuel E. Kelley; Kathryn L. Ladig

    2013-11-01

    The termination of the last ice age featured a major reconfiguration of Earth's climate and cryosphere, yet the underlying causes of these massive changes continue to be debated. Documenting the spatial and temporal variations of atmospheric temperature during deglaciation can help discriminate among potential drivers. Here, we present a 10Be surface-exposure chronology and glaciological reconstruction of ice recession following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in the Rakaia valley, Southern Alps of New Zealand. Innermost LGM moraines at Big Ben have an age of 17,840 +/- 240 yrs, whereas ice-marginal moraines or ice-molded bedrock surfaces at distances up-valley from Big Ben of 12.5 km (Lake Coleridge), approximately 25 km (Castle Hill), approximately 28 km (Double Hill), approximately 43 km (Prospect Hill), and approximately 58 km (Reischek knob) have ages of 17,020 +/- 70 yrs, 17,100 +/- 110 yrs, 16,960 +/- 370 yrs, 16,250 +/- 340 yrs, and 15,660 +/- 160 yrs, respectively. These results indicate extensive recession of the Rakaia glacier, which we attribute primarily to the effects of climatic warming. In conjunction with geomorphological maps and a glaciological reconstruction for the Rakaia valley, we use our chronology to infer timing and magnitude of past atmospheric temperature changes. Compared to an overall temperature rise of approximately 4.65?degrees C between the end of the LGM and the start of the Holocene, the glacier recession between approximately 17,840 and approximately 15,660 yrs ago is attributable to a net temperature increase of approximately 4.0?degrees C (from -6.25 to -2.25?degrees C), accounting for approximately 86% of the overall warming. Approximately 3.75?degrees C (approximately 70%) of the warming occurred between approximately 17,840 and approximately 16,250 yrs ago, with a further 0.75?degrees C (approximately 16%) increase between approximately 16,250 and approximately 15,660 yrs ago. A sustained southward shift of the Subtropical

  15. Constrained Surface Complexation Modeling: Rutile in RbCl, NaCl, and NaCF3SO3 Media to 250 °C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machesky, Michael L.; Předota, Milan; Ridley, Moira K.; Wesolowski, David J.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive set of molecular-level results, primarily from classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations, are used to constrain CD-MUSIC surface complexation model (SCM) parameters describing rutile powder titrations conducted in RbCl, NaCl, and NaTr (Tr = triflate, CF3SO3) electrolyte media from 25 to 250 °C. Rb+ primarily occupies the innermost tetradentate binding site on the rutile (110) surface at all temperatures (25, 150, 250 °C) and negative charge conditions (-0.1 and -0.2 C/m2) probed via CMD simulations, reflecting the small hydration energy of this large, monovalent cation. Consequently, variable SCM parameters (Stern-layer capacitance values and intrinsic Rb+ binding constants) were adjusted relatively easily to satisfactorily match the CMD and titration data. The larger hydration energy of Na+ results in a more complex inner-sphere distribution, which shifts from bidentate to tetradentate binding with increasing negative charge and temperature, and this distribution was not matched well for both negative charge conditions, which may reflect limitations in the CMD and/or SCM approaches. Finally, in particular, the CMD axial density profiles for Rb+ and Na+ reveal that peak binding distances shift toward the surface with increasing negative charge, suggesting that the CD-MUSIC framework may be improved by incorporating CD or Stern-layer capacitance values that vary with charge.

  16. Direct evidence for a pressure-induced nodal superconducting gap in the Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2 superconductor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guguchia, Z.; Amato, A.; Kang, J.; Luetkens, H.; Biswas, P. K.; Prando, G.; von Rohr, F.; Bukowski, Z.; Shengelaya, A.; Keller, H.; et al

    2015-11-09

    The superconducting gap structure in iron-based high-temperature superconductors (Fe-HTSs) is non-universal. Contrasting with other unconventional superconductors, in the Fe-HTSs both d-wave and extended s-wave pairing symmetries are close in energy. Probing the proximity between these very different superconducting states and identifying experimental parameters that can tune them is of central interest. Here we report high-pressure muon spin rotation experiments on the temperature-dependent magnetic penetration depth in the optimally doped nodeless s-wave Fe-HTS Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2. Upon pressure, a strong decrease of the penetration depth in the zero-temperature limit is observed, while the superconducting transition temperature remains nearly constant. More importantly, the low-temperaturemore » behaviour of the inverse-squared magnetic penetration depth, which is a direct measure of the superfluid density, changes qualitatively from an exponential saturation at zero pressure to a linear-in-temperature behaviour at higher pressures, indicating that hydrostatic pressure promotes the appearance of nodes in the superconducting gap.« less

  17. Milestone Report - M4FT-15OR03120218 - A Literature Search on the Effects of the Decay of 85Kr to 85Rb on Long-term Storage Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruffey, Stephanie H.; Strachan, Denis M.; Jubin, Robert Thomas; Spencer, Barry B.

    2015-10-01

    Reprocessing of UNF that has been out of the reactor for less than about 50 y requires the removal of 85Kr from the process off-gas streams. This is needed despite the relatively small amount of that isotope in the combined Xe and Kr inventory (Table 1). The decay of 85Kr to 85Rb presents challenges to the materials that will potentially be used to remove and store the Kr recovered from the off-gas. To address some of these problems, a thorough literature survey was completed, and the results of that analysis are summarized in this document.

  18. One-pot occurrence of two polymorphs of Rb{sub 2}Sc[Si{sub 4}O{sub 10}]F and their structural, spectroscopic and computational characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahlenberg, Volker; Manninger, Tanja; Perfler, Lukas; Többens, Daniel M.

    2014-12-15

    Single-crystal growth experiments in the system RbF–Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SiO{sub 2} resulted in the crystallization of two forms of Rb{sub 2}Sc[Si{sub 4}O{sub 10}]F within the same run. Basic crystallographic data of the two concomitant polymorphs at ambient conditions are as follows: phase I: space group I4/m, a=11.2619(3) Å, c=8.3053(4) Å, V=1053.36(6) Å{sup 3}, Z=4; phase II: space group P2{sub 1}/m, a=11.5085(6) Å, b=8.3805(3) Å, c=11.6750(6) Å, β=111.147(6)°, V=1050.19(9) Å{sup 3}, Z=4. The structures were determined by direct methods and refined to residuals of R(|F|)=0.0231 (phase I) for 516 and 0.0249 (phase II) for 2050 independent observed reflections with I>2σ(I). Phase I showed twinning by merohedry which was accounted for during the refinement process. Both compounds are based on multiple chains of [SiO{sub 4}]-tetrahedra forming closed columns or tubes. The multiplicity of the unbranched fundamental chains is two (for phase I) and four (for phase II), respectively. The periodicity of the multiple chains has a value of four in both modifications which is also reflected in similar translation periods along the chain directions (phase I: t{sub [001]}=8.31 Å; phase II: t{sub [010]}=8.38 Å). Alternatively, both polymorphs can be described as mixed octahedral–tetrahedral frameworks, which can be classified according to their polyhedral microensembles. A topological analysis of both networks is presented. Structural investigations have been supplemented by micro-Raman spectroscopy. The interpretation of the spectroscopic data including the allocation of the bands to certain vibrational species has been aided by DFT-calculations. - Graphical abstract: Mixed tetrahedral–octahedral framework of the tetragonal polymorph of Rb{sub 2}Sc[Si{sub 4}O{sub 10}]F. - Highlights: • We report the crystal structures of two polymorphs of Rb{sub 2}ScSi{sub 4}O{sub 10}F. • Both phases crystallized concomitantly in the same flux-growth experiment. • The

  19. Identification of a genetic interaction between the tumor suppressor EAF2 and the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) signaling pathway in C. elegans and prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Liquan; Wang, Dan; Fisher, Alfred L.; Wang, Zhou

    2014-05-02

    the growth and survival of prostate cancer cells. Together these findings identify a novel physical and functional interaction between EAF2 and the Rb pathway.

  20. Final report on the developmental toxicity of ethylenediamine (CAS No. 107-15-3) in New Zealand white rabbits. Report for November-February 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    Ethylenediamine (EDA) is a major industrial chemical with an estimated U.S. production of 64 million pounds in 1985. EDA is used as a chemical intermediate or solvent in manufacturing, as a paint thinner, and as a constituent of certain cosmetic, pharmaceutical and veterinary products. Based upon its widespread applications and the potential for exposure in pregnant women, EDA was evaluated for maternal and developmental toxicity using a laboratory animal model. Artificially-inseminated New Zealand White rabbits (26/group) were administered ethylenediamine (0, 10, 40 or 80 mg/kg/day) by gavage on gestational days (gd) 6 through 19. The doses administered were equivalent to 0, 22, 89 or 178 of EDA.2HC1. Maternal clinical signs, body weight, and food consumption were monitored at regular intervals throughout gestation. At termination (gd 30), the uterus was removed and examined to determine pregnancy status and to evaluate the number of resorptions, and dead or live fetuses. Dead or live fetuses were weighed, and live fetuses examined for external, visceral and skeletal defects.

  1. Serbia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Natural Gas Reserves 48,140,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 66 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 77,500,000 Barrels (bbl) 75 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  2. Binding energies of the ground triplet state a{sup 3}?{sub u}{sup +} of Rb{sub 2} and Cs{sub 2} in terms of the generalized Le RoyBernstein near-dissociation expansion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sovkov, V. B.; Ivanov, V. S. [V.A. Fock Institute of Physics and Department of Physics of St. Petersburg State University, Ulyanovskaya Street 1, Petrodvoretz, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)] [V.A. Fock Institute of Physics and Department of Physics of St. Petersburg State University, Ulyanovskaya Street 1, Petrodvoretz, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-07

    Formulae of Le RoyBernstein near-dissociation theory are derived in a general isotopeinvariant form, applicable to any term in the rotational expansion of a diatomic ro-vibrational term value. It is proposed to use the generalized Le RoyBernstein expansion to describe the binding energies (ro-vibrational term values) of the ground triplet state a{sup 3}?{sub u}{sup +} of alkali metal dimers. The parameters of this description are determined for Rb{sub 2} and Cs{sub 2} molecules. This approach gives a recipe to calculate the whole variety of the binding energies with characteristic accuracies from ?1 10{sup ?3} to 1 10{sup ?2} cm{sup ?1} using a relatively simple algebraic equation.

  3. High-Pressure Single-Crystal Neutron Scattering Study of Magnetic and Fe Vacancy Orders in (Tl,Rb)2 Fe4 Se5 Superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Feng; Bao, Wei; Chi, Song-Xue; Santos, Antonio M. dos; Molaison, Jamie J.; Fang, Ming-Hu; Wang, Hang-Dong; Mao, Qian-Hui; Wang, Jin-Chen; Liu, Juan-Juan; Sheng, Jie-Ming

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the magnetic and iron vacancy orders in superconducting (Tl,Rb)2Fe4Se5 single-crystals by using a high-pressure neutron diffraction technique. Similar to the temperature effect, the block antiferromagnetic order gradually decreases upon increasing pressure while the Fe vacancy superstructural order remains intact before its precipitous disappearance at the critical pressure Pc = 8.3 GPa. Combined with previously determined Pc for superconductivity, our phase diagram under pressure reveals the concurrence of the block AFM order, the √5 × √5 iron vacancy order and superconductivity for the 245 superconductor. Lastly, a synthesis of current experimental data in a coherent physical picture is attempted.

  4. Direct evidence for a pressure-induced nodal superconducting gap in the Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2 superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guguchia, Z.; Amato, A.; Kang, J.; Luetkens, H.; Biswas, P. K.; Prando, G.; von Rohr, F.; Bukowski, Z.; Shengelaya, A.; Keller, H.; Morenzoni, E.; Fernandes, Rafael M.; Khasanov, R.

    2015-11-09

    The superconducting gap structure in iron-based high-temperature superconductors (Fe-HTSs) is non-universal. Contrasting with other unconventional superconductors, in the Fe-HTSs both d-wave and extended s-wave pairing symmetries are close in energy. Probing the proximity between these very different superconducting states and identifying experimental parameters that can tune them is of central interest. Here we report high-pressure muon spin rotation experiments on the temperature-dependent magnetic penetration depth in the optimally doped nodeless s-wave Fe-HTS Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2. Upon pressure, a strong decrease of the penetration depth in the zero-temperature limit is observed, while the superconducting transition temperature remains nearly constant. More importantly, the low-temperature behaviour of the inverse-squared magnetic penetration depth, which is a direct measure of the superfluid density, changes qualitatively from an exponential saturation at zero pressure to a linear-in-temperature behaviour at higher pressures, indicating that hydrostatic pressure promotes the appearance of nodes in the superconducting gap.

  5. A9RB1B5.tmp

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Real Gross State Product (Billion $2009) New England ................ 858 869 863 867 869 874 878 883 888 892 896 901 864 876 894 Middle Atlantic .............. 2,399 2,435 2,450 2,455 2,459 2,473 2,487 2,499 2,507 2,519 2,531 2,542 2,435 2,479 2,525 E. N. Central ................. 2,236 2,250 2,269 2,277 2,278 2,288 2,298 2,309 2,322 2,333 2,344 2,353 2,258 2,293 2,338 W. N. Central ................ 1,048 1,055 1,057 1,058 1,060 1,066 1,072 1,078 1,084 1,090 1,096 1,102 1,054 1,069 1,093 S.

  6. Synthesis and structural characterization of new defect pyrochlore type A{sub x}Ln{sub y}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 6+z} antimoniates (0Rb, Cs, Tl; Ln = Eu, Gd, and Y) prepared by coprecipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Haimouti, A.; Zambon, D.; El-Ghozzi, M.; Avignant, D.; Leroux, F.; El Aatmani, M.; Daoud, M

    2003-07-14

    New cubic defect pyrochlore type A{sub x}Ln{sub y}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 6+z} antimoniates (0Rb, Cs, Tl; Ln=Eu, Gd, and Y) (space group Fd3m) were prepared by calcination in air at 650 deg. C of compositions obtained by a coprecipitation method. Their crystal structures were refined by the Rietveld procedure and further confirmed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS) experiments. Refinements of the X-ray powder diffraction data show a partial and statistical occupation of the 8b site by alkaline or thallous ions and oxygen and lead to values close to 0.33 for the only refinable positional x parameter of the 48f oxygenated site.

  7. Serbia-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  8. Serbia-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    illustrates the U.S. perspective on LEDS: Integrated development goals and objectives, national greenhouse gas inventory, and economic and resource data Long-term projections of...

  9. Six novel transition-metal phosphite compounds, with structure related to yavapaiite: Crystal structures and magnetic and thermal properties of A{sup I}[M{sup III}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}] (A=K, NH{sub 4}, Rb and M=V, Fe)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamchaoui, Farida; Alonzo, Veronique; Universite Europeenne de Bretagne ; Venegas-Yazigi, Diego; Rebbah, Houria; Le Fur, Eric

    2013-02-15

    Six new transition metal(III) phosphites A{sup I}[V{sup III}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}], where A=K (1), NH{sub 4} (2) and Rb (3) and A{sup I}[Fe{sup III}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}] where A=K (4), NH{sub 4} (5) and Rb (6) have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions and the solid-state structures were solved from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. These compounds crystallize in the hexagonal system, space group P6{sub 3}mc (no. 186), with a=5.3294(2) A and c=12.3130(5) A for 1, a=5.3330(2) A and c=12.8760(4) A for 2, a=5.3459(2) A and c=12.6850(8) A for 3, a=5.3256(1) A and c=12.2362(3) A for 4, a=5.3229(2) A and c=12.8562(4) A for 5, a=5.3393(2) A and c=12.6913(5) A for 6, with Z=2 in the six phases. The crystal structures of these compounds are isotypic and exhibit a layered structure stacked along the c-axis with the A{sup +} cations located in the interlayer space. The [M{sup III}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup -} sheets are formed by MO{sub 6} octahedra interconnected by HPO{sub 3} tetrahedral phosphite oxoanions through sharing vertices. Thermal analysis shows a large range of stability for compounds containing potassium and rubidium cations with decomposition starting around 550 K for stable compounds and above 840 K for the most stable compounds leading in general to pyrophosphate compounds. Triangular nets of metallic centers are observed within the layers in which antiferromagnetic interactions are evidenced by magnetic susceptibility measurements suggesting magnetic frustration. - Graphical abstract: Six new transition metal(III) phosphites A{sup I}[M{sup III}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}], where A=K, NH{sub 4}, Rb and M=V, Fe, have been synthesized. The crystal structures of these compounds are isotypic and exhibit a lamellar structure related to Yavapaiite. The M(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2} layers separated by cationic species present the metallic centers in a triangular arrangement. Bulk antiferromagnetic behavior is observed for all the studied compounds. Highlights: Black

  10. High temperature synthesis of two open-framework uranyl silicates with ten-ring channels: Cs{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}Si{sub 8}O{sub 19} and Rb{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}Si{sub 5}O{sub 13}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babo, Jean-Marie; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2013-01-15

    The uranyl silicates Cs{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}Si{sub 8}O{sub 19} and Rb{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}Si{sub 5}O{sub 13} were obtained by mixing stoichiometric amounts of uranium metal, tellurium dioxide, silicon dioxide, and an excess of correspondent alkali metal halide flux. These compounds crystallize in the orthorhombic space groups Pnma and C222 with eight and two units per unit cell, respectively. Their crystal structures are dominated by zippered pentagonal bipyramidal chains of UO{sub 7} and silicates layer that are further connected into 3D frameworks. The cesium compound has silicate double layers while rubidium has a single layer. Six-ring voids and ten-ring channels are found in both compounds. - Graphical abstract: A view of the three-dimensional network structure of Cs{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}Si{sub 8}O{sub 19}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three-dimensional uranium silicates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analogs of natural uranyl silicate minerals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complexity and symmetry ambiguity of uranyl silicates.

  11. New hypodiphosphates of the alkali metals: Synthesis, crystal structure and vibrational spectra of the hypodiphosphates(IV) M{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] (M=Rb and Cs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Peng; Wiegand, Thomas; Eckert, Hellmut

    2012-10-15

    The new hypodiphosphates(IV) Rb{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] (1) and Cs{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] (2) were synthesized by soft chemistry reactions from aqueous solutions of hypophosphoric acid and the corresponding heavy alkali-metal carbonates. Their crystal structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Both compounds crystallize isotypic in the triclinic space group P-1 with one formula unit in the unit cell. The structures are built up by discrete (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} and (H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}) units in staggered conformation for the P{sub 2}O{sub 6} skeleton and the corresponding alkali-metal cations. In the (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} ion the hydrogen atoms are in a 'trans-trans' conformation. O{center_dot}H-O hydrogen bonds between the (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} and (H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}) groups consolidate the structures into a three-dimensional network. The FT-Raman and {sup 31}P and {sup 1}H and MAS NMR spectra of the title compounds have been recorded and interpreted, especially with respect to their assignment to the (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} and (H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}) groups. Thermogravimetric data of 2 have been interpreted in terms of a thermal decomposition model. - Graphical Abstract: The layered compounds Rb{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] and Cs{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] have been synthesized and investigated. Both crystallize isotypic. The structures are built up by discrete (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} and (H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}) units and the corresponding alkali-metal cations. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis and single-crystal structure of new alkali hypodiphosphates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structures are characterized by [(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})]{sup 2-} units and M{sup +} cations

  12. US, New Zealand Collaborate to Combat Trafficking of Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    will help establish the capacity for mobile radiation detection operations with law enforcement and other internal security organizations, which will complement existing ...

  13. The New Zealand Hacker Case: A Post Mortem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popovsky, Barbara; Ryan, Daniel J.; Frincke, Deborah A.

    2005-10-01

    A typical incident response pits technicians against networks that aren't prepared forensically. [1, 2] If practitioners do consider collecting network forensic data, they face a choice between expending extraordinary effort (time and money) collecting forensically sound data, or simply restoring the network as quickly as possible. In this context, the concept of organizational network forensic readiness has emerged. The following is a discussion of selected computer crime cases, using publically available information, spanning a period of time of several years, that together demonstrate the need for a preventive and proactive response to malicious intrusion over a reactive one. It concludes with recommendations for how to "operationalize" organizational network forensic readiness.

  14. Electron transport in carbon nanotube/RbAg{sub 4}I{sub 5} film...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    University, Beijing 100084 (China) Key Lab for Advanced Materials Processing Technology of Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, ...

  15. Materials Data on Rb2Si2O5 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Rb3Cu2Cl7 (SG:68) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-25

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Vapor Pressure and Molecular Composition of Vapors of the RbF...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in the vapor phase of the respective systems. Farther work on the NaF-ZrFsub 4 system points to the existence of the gaseous complex NaZrsub 2Fsub 9 rather than NaZrFsub ...

  18. Materials Data on RbBO2 (SG:167) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Rb2PdSe16 (SG:117) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on RbAg7S4 (SG:85) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Rb4(BS)9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on RbCr3O8 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Rb2Te5 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Rb(WO3)3 (SG:10) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Rb4Sn2Au7 (SG:166) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on RbBr (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on RbAu (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on RbCd(NO2)3 (SG:200) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on RbSO3 (SG:150) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Rb2SO4 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on RbSF5 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on RbInI4 (SG:161) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Rb2PtI6 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on RbTiI3 (SG:185) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-25

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on Rb2ZnI3 (SG:11) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-15

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Rb2TeI6 (SG:128) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on RbI3 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on RbAg2SbS4 (SG:154) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Rb2WS4 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on RbBSe3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on RbBS2 (SG:167) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Rb2B2Se7 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Rb4(BSe)9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Rb3ZnBr5 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Rb2Hg(BSe)9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on Rb3BS3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Precise Measurement of Strontium-82 Radioactivity in the Sr-Rb...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... Although analysis is continuing, we have the preliminary result that the medical isotope community should expect 14.93(37) -rays of 776.5 keV for every 100 atoms of 82Sr in the ...

  8. Materials Data on RbPaF6 (SG:67) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on RbLi2(IO3)3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on RbSbS2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Rb3Os2Br9 (SG:194) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on RbScBP2HO9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on RbGaBP2HO9 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on RbZn2P2HO8 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on RbP(HO)2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on RbP(HO2)2 (SG:43) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on RbMnP3HO10 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on RbAl(H2N)4 (SG:85) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-29

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on RbB(CN)4 (SG:88) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on RbCaF3 (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on RbAuF4 (SG:140) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Rb2Hg7 (SG:164) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on RbHg11 (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Rb5Hg19 (SG:87) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Rb6C5 (SG:189) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on RbCO3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on RbInTe2 (SG:140) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Rb(TeO3)2 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-15

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Rb6Te2O9 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Rb4P21I (SG:63) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Rb(WO3)6 (SG:71) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. A New Zealand Test Of The Track-Etch Method Of Prospecting For...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Track Etch radon cups with an improved type of detector were found to be usable in ground temperatures as high as 60C. There was no direct correlation of radon...

  13. U.S. and New Zealand Take Steps to Launch International Partnership...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    "Islands are often hit hardest by price volatility and dependency on oil," Assistant ... renewable resources, including wind, solar, geothermal, and ocean energy, while ...

  14. Electrical resistivity and magnetic investigations of the geothermal systems in the Rotorua area, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bibby, H.M. ); Dawson, G.B.; Rayner, H.H.; Bennie, S.L.; Bromley, C.J. )

    1992-04-01

    This paper reports that electrical and magnetic data are used in an investigation of a 450 km{sup 2} region in order to delineate the Rotorua City Geothermal system and determine its relationship with other geothermal systems in the region. Three distinct regions of low ({lt}30 Omega m) apparent resistivity are delineated. The southern of these outlines the Rotorua City Geothermal System which has an area of about 18 km{sup 2}, with the northern third covered by Lake Rotorua. The boundary of the system is characterized by a rapid lateral change in apparent resistivity which can be modeled as a single, near vertical zone in which the distance between hot and cold water is very narrow. Magnetic properties also change in the vicinity of the discontinuity in some areas, consistent with hydrothermal alteration having destroyed the magnetite in the rocks of the geothermal system. Hot water is believed to be rising, driven by buoyancy forces across the whole of the low resistivity region. There is some indication, particularly in the south, that the boundary between hot and cold fluids dips away from the field. A second low resistivity zone (the East Lake Rotorua anomaly) with an area of about 8 km{sup 2}, is believed to outline a second independent geothermal system, with surface manifestations on Mokoia Island, and on the eastern shore of the lake. High heat flow in lake bottom sediments, and a reduction in magnetic signature over this region supports this conclusion. A third resistivity low under the west of Lake Rotorua has no associated thermal features and is believed to be a fossil hydrothermal system. There is no apparent relationship between the location of the geothermal systems and the Rotorua caldera. The aeromagnetic measurements have delineated several highly magnetic bodies which cannot be linked with surface geology. These are believed to be caused by buried rhyolite dome complexes at shallow depth.

  15. Comparison of subsidence at Wairakei, Broadlands and Kawerau fields, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allis, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    Exploitation has caused over 9 m of subsidence at Wairakei since 1950, up to 30 cm at Broadlands between 1968 and 1974, and up to 25 cm at Kawerau since 1970. Despite these differences and large differences in the rate and amount of mass withdrawal, there are similarities in the pattern of subsidence at all 3 fields. In each field, pressure drawdown in the production zone can be identified as a nearly circular area of consolidation centered on the production borefield. The circular shape suggests that the predominant fault direction may not be the main factor controlling horizontal permeability. In addition to production zone consolidation, each field has a small area of relatively intense subsidence originating from shallow depth. The area of shallow consolidation is near to the natural outflow zone where geothermal water originally rose to near-surface and dispersed in highly compressible formations. Early identification of such areas in other fields is important because the high rate of consolidation at shallow depth can cause large horizontal strain and tilt of the ground surface. There is also evidence of cool groundwater inflow near the area of shallow consolidation in all three fields. Shallow reinjection into these areas may mitigate the effects of subsidence and groundwater invasion.

  16. Biogenicity of silica precipitation around geysers and hot-spring vents, North Island, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, B.; Renaut, R.W.; Rosen, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    Before anthropogenic modifications, Ohaaki Pool (Broadlands-Ohaaki) and Dragon`s Mouth Geyser (Wairakei) emitted waters at temperatures of 93--98 C. The siliceous sinter that precipitated around their vents has the characteristics of geyserite, a dense laminated deposit of presumed abiogenic origin, that was precipitated from waters too hot (>73C) to support microbes other than thermophilic bacteria. Petrographic and SEM examinations of the sinters show that they incorporate columnar stromatolites and silicified, laminated stromatolitic mats that contain well-preserved filamentous microbes. At both localities the microbes lack evidence of desiccation or shrinkage, which implies that they were silicified rapidly at or shortly after their death. Although boiling and very hot (>90 C) waters were discharged, temperatures at many sites surrounding the vents remained sufficiently low and moist to support a microbial community that included thermophilic bacteria and cyanobacteria. In these cooler niches, the microbes and their biofilms served as highly favorable templates for the nucleation and growth of amorphous silica, and collectively provided a microbial framework for the laminated accretionary sinter. Some columnar, spicular, and stratiform geyserites are probably not abiotic precipitates, but are true silica stromatolites.

  17. The Occurrence of Pyrrhotite in the Ngawha Geothermal System, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, M.E.; Browne, P.R.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Ngawha geothermal system is low in all sulfide minerals, but in comparison to systems in the Taupo Volcanic Zone it contains more widely distributed pyrrhotite which is currently depositing, mainly in fractures. This reflects the high proportion of vapor in the Ngawha system. Pyrrhotite is most common in the upper part of the reservoir and lower part of the aquitard. The Ngawha pyrrhotite is of monoclinic and monoclinic + hexagonal structure.

  18. DE-AI26-06NT42878 - New Zealand Task | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the formation of "sweet spots", or areas of highly concentrated gas hydrate. ... Titan" across several areas that may be candidates for the discovery of such sweet spots. ...

  19. Materials Data on Rb2Ti(Si2O5)3 (SG:9) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Neutron diffraction and scattering study on M/sub x/WO/sub 3/ (M=Rb and K)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, M.; Fujishita, H.; Moodenbaugh, A.R.; Hoshino, S.; Grier, B.H.

    1982-01-01

    To study the relationship between the lattice instability and the superconductivity of nonstoichiometric hexagonal tungsten bronze, M/sub x/WO/sub 3/, neutron diffraction and scattering studies were made. Two types of the structural phase transitions were observed. One is associated with the distortion of the corner linked WO/sub 6/ octahedra. The other is associated with the ordering of the M atoms which partially fill the sites in the WO/sub 3/ cage. A long period modulation of the structure appears for some values of x at low temperature. The discussion on the x dependence of the superconducting transition temperature is presented.

  1. Materials Data on Rb2Ni2(MoO4)3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Single-mode vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers for {sup 87}Rb-based chip-scale atomic clock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derebezov, I. A. Haisler, V. A.; Bakarov, A. K.; Kalagin, A. K.; Toropov, A. I.; Kachanova, M. M.; Gavrilova, T. A.; Semenova, O. I.; Tretyakov, D. B.; Beterov, I. I.; Entin, V. M.; Ryabtsev, I. I.

    2010-11-15

    The results of numerical simulation and study of lasing characteristics of semiconductor verticalcavity surface-emitting lasers based on Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As alloys are presented. Lasers exhibit stable single-mode lasing at a wavelength of 795 nm at low operating currents {approx}1.5 mA and an output power of 350 {mu}W, which offers prospects of their applications in next-generation chip-scale atomic clocks

  3. Materials Data on RbGa2P2H5O11 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Colloid formation study of U, Th, Ra, Pb, Po, Sr, Rb, and Cs in briny (high ionic strength) groundwaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maiti, T.C.; Smith, M.R.; Laul, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Colloid formation of uranium, thorium, radium, lead, polonium, strontium, rubidium, and cesium in briny (high ionic strength) groundwaters is studied to predict their capability as vectors for transporting radionuclides. This knowledge is essential in developing models to infer the transport of radionuclides from the source region to the surrounding environment. Except polonium, based on the experimental results, colloid formation of uranium, thorium, radium, lead, strontium, rubidium, and cesium is unlikely in brines with compositions similar to the synthetic Palo Duro Basin brine. This observation of no colloid formation is explained by electrokinetic theory and inorganic solution chemistry.

  5. PRODUCTIOR"OF TRORI~JW~IETALIWES PROCESS F6R RB)IJCIRO T&Old...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... with BY00 Rssearoh Divisioaor the etudy of the leoti6lytlo pro&as for Th produotioa, WEB also dwoloping a method of ThC14 "d suggested that Amoe review this pmaesee i " B. ...

  6. South Africa-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Peru, Philippines, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Senegal, Serbia, South Africa and Ukraine." References "UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services" Retrieved from "http:...

  7. CV-1b: Magmatic - Intrusive | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone in New Zealand. A cross section view of the Taupo Volcanic Zone in New Zealand (ref: Book: North New Zealand) According to Moeck and Beardsmore, magmatic-intrusive...

  8. Todd Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Todd Energy Place: New Zealand Sector: Renewable Energy Product: New Zealand energy company with operations in exploration, production and...

  9. Studies on Temperature Dependence of Rubidium Lamp for Atomic Frequency Standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosal, Bikash; Banik, Alak; Vats, Vaibhav; Pal, Sukamal; Bahl, R. K

    2011-10-20

    Rb lamp is a very critical component of the Rb atomic clock's Physics Package. The Rb lamp's performance is very sensitive to temperature and its stability. In this paper we discuss the behaviors of Rb Lamp with temperature. The Rb lamp exciter power and temperature of Rb bulb are very important parameters in controlling the performance of the Rb Lamp. It is observed that at temperatures beyond 110 deg. C, the lamp mode changes from the ring to red mode resulting in abnormal broadening of emission lines and self reversal. The results of our studies on spectral analysis of Rb lamp under various operating conditions are reported in the paper.

  10. SREL Reprint #3088

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drawer E, Aiken, South Carolina, USA 4AgResearch, Ruakura Research Centre, Hamilton, New Zealand 5AgResearch, Invermay Agricultural Centre, Mosgiel, New Zealand 6Department of ...

  11. Sola60 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Sola60 Place: New Zealand Sector: Solar Product: New Zealand-based solar water heating company, with about 600m square feet of solar panels installed. References:...

  12. 3atab.xlsx

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, ...

  13. Energy Technology Systems Analysis Program (MARKAL) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Switzerland, Albania, Australia, Austria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Colombia, Croatia, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, New Zealand, China, Philippines,...

  14. Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, New Zealand (Ranalli & Rybach, 2005)...

  15. LMS/RBL/S11219 Task Order LM00-502

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Samples were collected from a total of two onsite wells, four private wells from nearby ... well) 05142013 ND 2.04 ND RB-D-03 (private well) 05142013 ND 0.637 ND RB-W-01 ...

  16. Bandwidth and Electron Correlation-Tuned Superconductivity in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bandwidth and Electron Correlation-Tuned Superconductivity in Rb 0.8 Fe 2 ( Se 1 - z S z ) ... Title: Bandwidth and Electron Correlation-Tuned Superconductivity in Rb 0.8 Fe 2 ( Se 1 - ...

  17. Microsoft Word - S05988_2009RioLTHMPResults.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... ND a,c ND d RB-S-03 (on site well) 05142009 ND a ND RB-D-03 (private well) 05132009 ND ND RB-W-01 (private well) 05132009 ND a ND Johnson Artesian Well (private well) 05...

  18. Vestas Asia Pacific A S | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Division of Danish wind turbine manufacturer Vestas, providing sales and service in Australia, New Zealand, China, Japan, India and the rest of Asia. References: Vestas Asia...

  19. International Energy Agency (IEA) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States.2 Headlines IEA Deputy Executive Director explores...

  20. Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom and United States Mission OECD brings together the governments of...

  1. ORISE: Multiple research appointments available through Agricultural...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Other countries with above-average stay rates include Iran, Romania, Bulgaria and Yugoslavia. Thailand, Jordan, Brazil, South Africa, Chile, New Zealand and Indonesia all have the ...

  2. Ohaaki Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Ohaaki Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location 20km NE of Taupo, Waikato, New Zealand Coordinates...

  3. Mokai Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Mokai Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Waikato, New Zealand Coordinates -38.530556,...

  4. Poihipi Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Poihipi Power Station General Information Name Poihipi Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Poihipi Road, Near Taupo, Waikato, New Zealand...

  5. Rotokawa Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Plant General Information Name Rotokawa Geothermal Power Plant Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location 14km NE of Taupo, Waikato, New Zealand Coordinates...

  6. Kawerau Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Kawerau Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Bay of Plenty Region, New Zealand Coordinates...

  7. 3dtab.xlsx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, ...

  8. Wastewater Reclamation and Biofuel Production Using Algae

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    via digestion or hydrothermal liquefaction 8 Full-scale raceway systems in California, Israel, S. Africa, New Zealand (but not designed for nutrient removal). 9 Typical ...

  9. Property:Conference | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Imaging + World Geothermal Congress A Review of Geothermal Resource Estimation Methodology + 35th New Zealand Geothermal Workshop A Simple, Fast Method of Estimating...

  10. EERE Success Story—Advancing Technology Readiness: Wave Energy Testing and Demonstration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EERE’s support enabled Northwest Energy Innovations to verify the functionality of its Wave Energy Technology—New Zealand (WET-NZ) device.

  11. MHK Technologies/WET NZ | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to the MHK database homepage WET NZ.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Wave Energy Technology New Zealand WET NZ Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology...

  12. Power Projects Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name: Power Projects Limited Address: PO Box 25456 Panama Street Place: Wellington Zip: 6146 Region: New Zealand Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  13. U.S. and Iceland Sign Bilateral Agreement to Develop Clean Geothermal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nations represented in this week's events include Australia, Belgium, Canada, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Netherlands, ...

  14. Tongonan geothermal field Leyte, Philippines. Report on exploration...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report Number(s): NP-24999 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Kingston, Reynolds, Thom and Allardice Ltd., Auckland (New Zealand) Country of Publication: United States ...

  15. A Soil Gas Survey Over Rotorua Geothermal Field, Rotorua, New...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rotorua Geothermal Field, Rotorua, New Zealand Abstract Soil gases have been used as an exploration tool for minerals, oil and gas, and geothermal energy, through the detection...

  16. The mystery of milk: SAXS, anomalous SAXS, and resonant soft...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Bridget Ingham, Callaghan Innovation (Wellington, New Zealand) Program Description Most of the dietary calcium in milk is contained...

  17. Industrial Research Ltd IRL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Research Ltd IRL Jump to: navigation, search Name: Industrial Research Ltd (IRL) Place: New Zealand Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( State-owned...

  18. Unraveling the mystery of San Marcos Pueblo

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Participants come from a multitude of American and international educational institutions, ranging from New Mexico State University to universities as far away as New Zealand. ...

  19. Going completely renewable: is it possible (let alone desirable)?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sovacool, Benjamin K.; Watts, Charmaine

    2009-05-15

    With the right mix of leadership and policy, a completely renewable electricity sector for New Zealand and the United States is feasible, achievable, and desirable. (author)

  20. The Importance of Traditional Knowledge in Science Education...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... ARM has contracted with Hans Andersen from Tradewind Communications (New Zealand) for the design and development of this kiosk. Stand-alone interactive computer kiosks will be ...

  1. Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Function - Symposium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Cellulose-matrix interactions (Chaired by Charlie Anderson and Jeffrey Catchmark) Roger Newman, Scion, New Zealand; Physical analysis of primary and secondary cell walls Mike ...

  2. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The ARM Facility will be supporting Australian agencies measuring cloud conditions from remote Macquarie Island between New Zealand and Antarctica. Image courtesy of M. Murphy, via ...

  3. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * SAVANNAH RIVER SITE * AIKEN * SC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... It has also been recommended by an independent environmental consultant to protect groundwater resources in New Zealand. Partnering opportunities SRNS invites interested companies ...

  4. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    More than 100 attendees, representing such countries as Jamaica, Taiwan, Mexico, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Korea, Russia, and Japan asked questions about the ARM and the ...

  5. Microsoft Word - fy09_annualtarget_climatemodeling1_Q1 _2_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... This includes multiple domains in Africa, Europe, Asia, North America, Central and South America, Australia and New Zealand, Polar regions, and small islands. Large watersheds will ...

  6. SREL Reprint #3203

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA 4Bulmer and Associates, Auckland, New Zealand Abstract: In 1957, Troughton described the wild dog of New Guinea, naming it Canis hallstromi. ...

  7. VZCOMML©, Version 4.0 - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... It has also been recommended by an independent environmental consultant to protect groundwater resources in New Zealand. Technology Status Technology ID Development Stage ...

  8. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Thom and Allardice Ltd., Auckland (New Zealand)","Not Available","15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; TONGONAN GEOTHERMAL FIELD; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; GEOTHERMAL POWER...

  9. A U-Th Calcite Isochron Age From An Active Geothermal Field In...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    more detailed studies of the evolution of the New Zealand geothermal systems. Authors Stephen Grimes, David Rickard, Chris Hawkesworth, Peter van Calsteren and Patrick Browne...

  10. Climate Information for Development Needs: An Action Plan for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property. Climate Information for Development...

  11. Low-Emission Development Strategies and National Appropriate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property. Low-Emission Development Strategies...

  12. Advancing Technology Readiness: Wave Energy Testing and Demonstration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EEREs support enabled Northwest Energy Innovations to verify the functionality of its Wave Energy TechnologyNew Zealand (WET-NZ) device.

  13. Clean Coal and Waste to Energy Session

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Brazil Canada China European Union France Germany Greece India Italy Japan Mexico Netherlands New Zealand Norway Poland Saudi Arabia South Africa Korea United Kingdom United ...

  14. WWS_LorrieC157L_0915

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ireland Italy Japan Kenya Latvia Lesotho Libya Lithuania Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Mauritius Mexico Mozambique Nepal The Netherlands New Zealand Nicaragua Nigeria Norway ...

  15. WorldWide Science.org

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Libya Lithuania Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Mauritius Mexico Mozambique Nepal The Netherlands New Zealand Nicaragua Nigeria Norway Philippines Poland Portugal Russia Rwanda Saudi ...

  16. The Evolution of Host Specialization in the Vertebrate Gut Symbiont...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    University of Nebraska, Lincoln University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, United Kingdom U.S. Department of Energy,...

  17. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Reunion Romania ...

  18. Western Pacific; Gas line plans continue to increase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quarles, W.R.; Thiede, K.; Parent, L.

    1990-11-01

    The authors report on pipeline activity in the Western Pacific. They discuss projects underway in Australia, Indonesia, Malaysia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, and Singapore.

  19. WaikatoLink Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name: WaikatoLink Limited Place: New Zealand Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Individual Angel network )...

  20. Africa - CCS capacity building | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property. References CCS Africa1 Funded by the...

  1. LEDSGP/about/members | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - logo.jpg Governmental Members Alternative Energy Promotion Centre, Ministry of science, Technology and Environment Auckland New Zealand City Government Australian Agency...

  2. Meridian Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Meridian Energy Ltd Place: Wellington, New Zealand Zip: 6011 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Wellington-based electricity generator, generating only from renewable...

  3. UNFCCC-Global Map-Annex 1 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States Cost: Free Australia and New Zealand, Western...

  4. Journal of Physical Chemistry A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid ... Equilibrated molecular structure of interlayer Cs+ (yellow), Rb+ ...

  5. Parameterization of GCM subgrid nonprecipitating cumulus and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The motivation is to improve the understanding and prediction of climate change by more accurately describing radiative and cloud processes. Authors: Stull, R.B. Publication Date: ...

  6. Expression of eukaryotic polypeptides in chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2013-06-04

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  7. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2006-10-17

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  8. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayfield, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  9. SREL Reprint #3328

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fred L. Cunningham2 1Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, ... of Agriculture, Animal Plant Health Inspection ... observed in any samples collected pre-RB administration. ...

  10. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Analysis Activity Date - 1983 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes See linked abstract for a synopsis of chemical analyses and Rb-Sr age determinations for gneissic...