National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for yr row crop

  1. Wavelet analysis of MODIS time series to detect expansion and intensification of row-crop agriculture in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    and agriculture, including changes in carbon and nitrogen storage, trace gas emissions, quality of surface water from natural vegetation and pastures to row-crop agricultural with the potential to affect regional changed. Today, pastures and areas of natural vegetation are being converted to large-scale croplands

  2. Economic Implications of New Crops, Row Damming and Land Clearing in the Texas Winter Garden†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muncrief, G.E.; Lacewell, R. D.; Cornforth, G. C.; Pena, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    cotton), row damming, and conversion of range to cropland was evaluated using a regional linear programming model. Temporal analysis, 1981-2001, incorporated changes in groundwater availability, static groundwater levels, and corresponding fixed...

  3. Effects of plant density and row spacing on the ratooning of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench)†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priwin A., Ricardo A

    1977-01-01

    and 296, 000 plants/ha and row widths of 101. 6 cm and 67. 7 cm. After grain harvest of the parent crop the plants were cut down to 8 cm above ground level and al- lowed to regrow. Data obtained were days to 50'4 flower, plant measurements, yield... with each population increase. Rows 67. 7 cm wide were two days earlier in reaching SOS flower and had a higher grain and stover yield. Rows -101. 6 cm wide had a higher percent of survival after cutting but rows 67. 7 cm wide gave a higher number of re...

  4. Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through nitrate leaching and N2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mark B.

    219 Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through biofuel crops established on a rich Mollisol soil. Reduced Nitrogen Losses after Conversion of Row Crop Agriculture to Perennial Biofuel Crops Candice M. Smith, Mark B. david,* Corey A. Mitchell, Michael d. Masters

  5. Installing a Subsurface Drip Irrigation System for Row Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enciso, Juan

    2004-09-07

    be used to trap the sand, followed by a disk or sand media fil- ter. When water comes from a canal, it is common to have both a media filter and a screen filter. Media filters need the most adjustment during installation. Media filters consist of several... system The main components of an irrigation system are the filters, mainlines, manifolds (submains), field blocks, flush lines, drip lines (laterals) and accessories (Fig. 1). All the drip lines (laterals) connected to the same submain make up a field...

  6. Installing a Subsurface Drip Irrigation System for Row Crops (Spanish)†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enciso, Juan

    2004-09-07

    de gasto Bomba Controlador V?lvula de liberaci?n de vac?o Proceso de filtraci?n Proceso de retrolavado Valvola de retrolavado EntradaEntrada SalidaSalida retrolavado (Fig. 13). Los tanques deben ser retrolavados cuando est?n sucios, una condici?n que...

  7. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  8. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrLogs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformation SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrWoodChips Jump to:

  9. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrNaturalGas | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformation SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrWoodChips Jump to:Information

  10. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrOil-FiredBoiler | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformation SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrWoodChips Jump

  11. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrPellets | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformation SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrWoodChips JumpInformation

  12. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrTotal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformation SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrWoodChips

  13. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrTownGas | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformation SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrWoodChipsInformation

  14. Taiwan geology Plate collision at 80 mm/yr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gung, Yuancheng

    4 #12;Meander #12;#12;#12;=/ #12;: () () () () () : : 2.0 1.51.75 1.25 1.0 #12/yr (Ratio: 1.9%, Area: 0.024%) Average sediment discharge to ocean: 384 Mt/yr --- 160 Mt/yr (544 Mt.m.s) = Sediments (ton.s-1) Sediments (ton.s-1) ų Density (t/m3) ų Area (m2) = Erosion (mm.s-1) Calculation: Stream

  15. Standing corn rows needed to help

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Standing corn rows needed to help reduce drifting snow By PAULA MOHR T HE Minnesota Department of Transportation is looking for more farmers to par- ticipate in its standing corn row program to help reduce and pays farmers to leave cornstalks up throughout the winter. Farmers are reimbursed for standing corn

  16. Roswell International Air Center Airport (ROW) Pavement Condition and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cal, Mark P.

    Roswell International Air Center Airport (ROW) Pavement Condition and Analysis Submitted to: Jane M ................................................1. Conditions at Roswell International Air Center (ROW) 4 .................................Figure 1. Geographic Location of Roswell International Air Center (ROW) 4 ..............................Table 1

  17. Optimization of row spacing and nitrogen fertilization for cotton†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clawson, Ernest Leslie

    2004-09-30

    Ultra-narrow row (UNR) cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is a production system using high plant populations in reduced row spacings. The responses of this production system to nitrogen fertilizer have not been fully investigated. Evaluations...

  18. Effect of plant populations and row spacings on plant and ear characters and grain yield of corn hybrids†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silapapun, Anek

    1976-01-01

    break- age and barren stalks increased with increase in population densities. Allessi and Power (2) also found that number of barren stalks increased and ear weight decreased with increased plant population. Bleasdale (7) proposed that if a crop...EFFECT OF PLANT POPULATIONS AND ROW SPACINGS ON PLANT AND EAR CHARACTERS AND GRAIN YIELD OF CORN HYBRIDS A Thesis by ANEK SILAPAPUN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

  19. The Equivalence between Row and Column Linear Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tresp, Volker

    The Equivalence between Row and Column Linear Regression: A Surprising Feature of Linear Regression and Communications 81730 M®unchen, Germany Abstract The rows of the design matrix in linear regression are the inputs of the training data set. Normal regression is row regression: the goal is to predict a training target from

  20. Propulsive Efficiency of Rowing Oars David S. Cabrera1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruina, Andy L.

    Propulsive Efficiency of Rowing Oars David S. Cabrera1 Andy L. Ruina2 Department of Theoretical Is the common folklore, that oars are less efficient at propulsion than propellers, correct? Here we examine the propulsive efficiency of the oars used in competitive rowing. We take the propulsive efficiency of rowing

  1. Property:Geothermal/AnnualGenGwhYr | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 Jump to: navigation, search This is aAnnualGenGwhYr Jump to: navigation,

  2. BLM ROW Grant Template | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex AAustria GeothermalInformationColor40 -Open EnergyROW Grant

  3. CSLB ROW Forms | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine:Kansas: Energy Resources JumpCIA-TheCSC/UND Team 3 <News andROW

  4. CSLC ROW Forms | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine:Kansas: Energy Resources JumpCIA-TheCSC/UND Team 3 <NewsFormsROW

  5. Magnetized Target Fusion: Input to the 35-yr Fusion Long-Range Electric Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnetized Target Fusion: Input to the 35-yr Fusion Long-Range Electric Plan G. A. Wurden Fusion to the 35-yr Fusion Long-Range Electric Plan · Imagine a fusion concept where: · The plasma beta ranges from to the 35-yr Fusion Long-Range Electric Plan · MTF offers a uniquely different pathway to achieving

  6. Integrating Cover Crops into Strip-Till Cropping Systems in a Semi-Arid Environment†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noland, Reagan Lee

    2014-05-02

    į12'34.47"N, 99į45'5.97"W; 282 m), TX. The main effect was row crop with split-plots strip-tilled into the residue of four legume species [Medicago polymorpha L. cv. Armadillo (burr medic), M. lupulina L. cv. Bee Black (black medic), M. minima (L.) L. cv... planted using a Tye Pasture Pleaser no-till drill (The Tye Co., Lockney, Texas) on November 8, 2011 and November 12, 2012. Seeding rates were the same as those commonly recommended and were 11 kg ha- 1 for Armadillo and Bee Black, 6.7 kg ha-1 for Devine...

  7. GPS interseismic periods interseismic slip rate deficit 23.6 mm/yr 294

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wen-Shan

    interseismic slip rate deficit 23.6 mm/yr 294į 21.6-27.7 mm/y lock 8-12 700 0.65 3.4 26.4 mm/yr 285 Kuochen et al., 2004 40 km1991-2002ML3 19831992 2000 1983 1974 16-23į30 mm/yrChen et al., 199119141979 Biq, 198411į Yu et al., 199028.5Ī3.0mm/yr 353-1į2004-2006GPS 30į19.3 mm/yr 300į 1954 #12

  8. Regional Uptake and Release of Crop Carbon in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O.; Bandaru, Varaprasad; Brandt, Craig C.; Schuh, A.E.; Ogle, S.M.

    2011-08-03

    Carbon fixed by agricultural crops in the US creates regional CO2 sinks where it is harvested and regional CO2 sources where it is released back to the atmosphere. The quantity and location of these fluxes differ depending on the annual supply and demand of crop commodities. Data on the harvest of crop biomass, storage, import and export, and on the use of biomass for food, feed, fiber, and fuel were compiled to estimate an annual crop carbon budget for 2000 to 2008. Net sources of CO2 associated with the consumption of crop commodities occurred in the Eastern Uplands, Southern Seaboard, and Fruitful Rim regions. Net sinks associated with the production of crop commodities occurred in the Heartland, Northern Crescent, Northern Great Plains, and Mississippi Portal regions. The national crop carbon budget was balanced to within 0.7 to 6.6% yr-1 during the period of this analysis.

  9. Wind Turbines Benefit Crops

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Takle, Gene

    2013-03-01

    Ames Laboratory associate scientist Gene Takle talks about research into the effect of wind turbines on nearby crops. Preliminary results show the turbines may have a positive effect by cooling and drying the crops and assisting with carbon dioxide uptake.

  10. Wind Turbines Benefit Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takle, Gene

    2010-01-01

    Ames Laboratory associate scientist Gene Takle talks about research into the effect of wind turbines on nearby crops. Preliminary results show the turbines may have a positive effect by cooling and drying the crops and assisting with carbon dioxide uptake.

  11. Homogenisation of a Row of Dislocation Dipoles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen Jonathan Chapman; Yang Xiang; Yichao Zhu

    2015-04-27

    Conventional discrete-to-continuum approaches have seen their limitation in describing the collective behaviour of the multi-polar configurations of dislocations, which are widely observed in crystalline materials. The reason is that dislocation dipoles, which play an important role in determining the mechanical properties of crystals, often get smeared out when traditional homogenisation methods are applied. To address such difficulties, the collective behaviour of a row of dislocation dipoles is studied by using matched asymptotic techniques. The discrete-to-continuum transition is facilitated by introducing two field variables respectively describing the dislocation pair density potential and the dislocation pair width. It is found that the dislocation pair width evolves much faster than the pair density. Such hierarchy in evolution time scales enables us to describe the dislocation dynamics at the coarse-grained level by an evolution equation for the slowly varying variable (the pair density) coupled with an equilibrium equation for the fast varying variable (the pair width). The time-scale separation method adopted here paves a way for properly incorporating dipole-like (zero net Burgers vector but non-vanishing) dislocation structures, known as the statistically stored dislocations (SSDs) into macroscopic models of crystal plasticity in three dimensions. Moreover, the natural transition between different equilibrium patterns found here may also shed light on understanding the emergence of the persistent slip bands (PSBs) in fatigue metals induced by cyclic loads.

  12. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Row Homes at Perrin's Row by New Town Builders

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8, 2015 GATEWAY Takes onandField| Department of Energy Row

  13. Crop Revenue Coverage (CRC)†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, Kenneth; Barnaby, G. A. Art; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe

    2008-10-17

    Crop Revenue Coverage guarantees a stated amount of revenue based on commodity futures prices. This publication explains how CRC works and gives examples based on harvest price scenarios....

  14. Atmospheric inversion of the surface carbon flux with consideration of the spatial distributions of US crop production and consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J. M.; Fung, J. W.; Mo, G.; Deng, F.; West, Tristram O.

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve quantification of the spatial distribution of carbon sinks and sources in the conterminous USA, we conduct a nested global atmospheric inversion with consideration of the spatial information of crop production and consumption. Spatially distributed 5 county-level cropland net primary productivity, harvested biomass, soil carbon change, and human and livestock consumption data over the conterminous USA are used for this purpose. Time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversions are conducted based on CO? observations at 210 stations to infer CO? fluxes globally at monthly time steps with a nested focus on 30 regions in North America. Prior land surface carbon 10 fluxes are first generated using a biospheric model, and the inversions are constrained using prior fluxes with and without adjustments for crop production and consumption over the 2002Ė2007 period. After these adjustments, the inverted regional carbon sink in the US Midwest increases from 0.25 Ī 0.03 Pg C yr?Ļ to 0.42 Ī 0.13 Pg C yr?Ļ, whereas the large sink in the US Southeast forest region is weakened from 0.41Ī0.12 Pg C yr?Ļ 15 to 0.29 Ī0.12 Pg C yr?Ļ. These adjustments also reduce the inverted sink in the West region from 0.066 Ī 0.04 Pg C yr?Ļ to 0.040 Ī 0.02 Pg C yr?1 because of high crop consumption and respiration by humans and livestock. The general pattern of sink increase in crop production areas and sink decreases (or source increases) in crop consumption areas highlights the importance of considering the lateral carbon transfer in crop 20 products in atmospheric inverse modeling, which provides an atmospheric perspective of the overall carbon balance of a region.

  15. Opportunities for Energy Crop Production Based on Subfield Scale Distribution of Profitability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Bonner; Kara Cafferty; David Muth Jr.; Mark Tomer

    2014-10-01

    Incorporation of dedicated herbaceous energy crops into row crop landscapes is a promising means to supply an expanding biofuel industry while increasing biomass yields, benefiting soil and water quality, and increasing biodiversity. Despite these positive traits energy crops remain largely unaccepted due to concerns over their practicality and cost of implementation. This paper presents a case study on Hardin County, Iowa to demonstrate how subfield decision making can be used to target candidate areas for conversion to energy crop production. The strategy presented integrates switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) into subfield landscape positions where corn (Zea mays L.) grain is modeled to operate at a net economic loss. The results of this analysis show that switchgrass integration has the potential to increase sustainable biomass production from 48 to 99% (depending on the rigor of conservation practices applied to corn stover collection) while also improving field level profitability. Candidate land area is highly sensitive to grain price (0.18 to 0.26 US$ kg-1) and dependent on the acceptable net profit for corn production (ranging from 0 to -1,000 US$ ha-1). This work presents the case that switchgrass can be economically implemented into row crop production landscapes when management decisions are applied at a subfield scale and compete against areas of the field operating at a negative net profit.

  16. 30.-DEEP-WATER OYSTER CULTURE. BP HENRY C. ROWE.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    30.-DEEP-WATER OYSTER CULTURE. BP HENRY C. ROWE. It is conceded,I think, that the oyster-growersof Ckmnecticut have taken the lead in the artificial propagation and cultivation of oysters in deep water; by deep water I mean a depth of from 30 to 75 feet. It is but twenty years since the commencement

  17. Thread Row Buffers: Improving Memory Performance Isolation and Throughput

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullsen, Dean M.

    and energy efficiency. Furthermore, concurrent execution of applications also has shown the needThread Row Buffers: Improving Memory Performance Isolation and Throughput in Multiprogrammed of performance isolation among threads in the memory controller to enforce a quality of service in virtualized

  18. PERFORMANCE OF A SINGLE-ROW HEAT EXCHANGER AT LOW IN-TUBE FLOW RATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Mihir

    PERFORMANCE OF A SINGLE-ROW HEAT EXCHANGER AT LOW IN-TUBE FLOW RATES A Thesis Submitted April 1995 #12;PERFORMANCE OF A SINGLE-ROW HEAT EXCHANGER AT LOW IN-TUBE FLOW RATES by Xiangwei Zhao Abstract The steady and time-dependentbehavior of a single-row heat exchanger with water and air in the in

  19. Effects of row spacing on diseases, herbicide persistence, and qualitative characteristics of peanut†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besler, Brent Alan

    2005-08-29

    in twin rows to reduce diclosulam and imazapic residual concentrations was not apparent. Georgia Green and Tamrun 96 planted in twin rows at three of the four locations in 1999 and 2000 yielded higher than peanuts planted in conventional rows. Yields...

  20. Texas Crop Profile: Watermelon†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Kent D.; Holloway, Rodney L.; Smith, Dudley

    2000-04-12

    .? Texas Agricultural Extension Service. B-5022, ?Weed Control in Vegetable, Fruit and Nut Crops.? Texas Agricultural Extension Service. National Agricultural Pesticide Impact Assessment Program Web Site http://ipmwww.ncsu.edu/opmppiap/. Texas A...

  1. Weed Management in Organic Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    Weed Management in Organic Crops Research Results Update Bill Curran Penn State University #12;Weed management tactics for organic production ∑ Crop rotation ∑ Cover crops - dead mulches and green manures ∑ Primary and secondary tillage ∑ Irrigation and drainage ∑ Crop residue management ∑ Planting date

  2. Radioactivity in food crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

  3. ReproducedfromCropScience.PublishedbyCropScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 47, MAYJUNE 2007 1281

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfrender, Michael

    ReproducedfromCropScience.PublishedbyCropScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. CROP in Crop Sci. 47:1281≠1288 (2007). doi: 10.2135/cropsci2006.11.0702 © Crop Science Society of America 677 S online May 31, 2007Published online May 31, 2007 #12;ReproducedfromCropScience.PublishedbyCropScience

  4. SALARY REDUCTION AGREEMENT (Yr 2015) FOR 403(b) and 403(b)(7) ACCOUNTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Richard

    SALARY REDUCTION AGREEMENT (Yr 2015) FOR 403(b) and 403(b)(7) ACCOUNTS INSTRUCTIONS: See the second the agreement is in effect. Only compensation that is NOT "currently available" is eligible for salary reduction under this agreement. It shall continue until the Employee completes another Salary Reduction Agreement

  5. CTHB Mentorship group of 2011. Back Row (left to right): Markus Wilken, Angelique du Preez, Brigitte Van Dyk, Shaun van der Walt, Ethan Besaans. Third row: Tanweer Mahomed, Danielle Roodt, Estine Theron, Wilke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Brigitte Van Dyk, Shaun van der Walt, Ethan Besaans. Third row: Tanweer Mahomed, Danielle Roodt, Estine

  6. Fig 1. First rotation biomass yield [Mg (oven dry) ha-1 ] of top 5 clones with biomass crop yield trials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Fig 1. First rotation biomass yield [Mg (oven dry) ha-1 yr-1 ] of top 5 clones with biomass crop about growing SRWCs for bioenergy is that SRWCs may not produce sufficient biomass as a feasible (Fig 1) is well below the required amount of biomass necessary to sustain feasibility of bioenergy

  7. Smarter Cropping: Internet program helps farmers make decisions about crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Wythe tx H2O | pg. 26 Smarter Cropping Internet program helps farmers make decisions about crops Along the coastal plains of Texas, farmers and crop managers are using the Internet to make more informed decisions about growing cotton. This Web...

  8. CROP STAGES Keith Mason

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    are at early fruit coloring. WEATHER NOTES Complete weather data for your area can be found at enviroweather through the weekend with temperatures returning to normal. DEGREE DAYS GDD (from March 1) Base 42 Base 50-23-08 1242 726 6-30-08 1423 852 Projected for 7-7-08 1609 982 Contents ∑ Crop Stages ∑ Weather notes

  9. Crop Biotechnology: Feeds for Livestock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Eenennaam, Alison L.

    ? A biotech crop is a crop plant that has been genetically engineered using recombinant DNA technology either also been developed using biotechnology, and crops with modified composition or nutritional properties they are grown. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible for evaluating

  10. Plant Science 200: Modern Crop Production Instructor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    classification, soil conservation and tillage. Crop classification and morphology (distinguish among the grains Crop Production Introduction Crop Importance Soil Survey/Soil Conservation Crop Classification /Sustainable Agriculture #12;References on Reserve in Chang Library: Forages: An Introduction to Grassland

  11. File:UtilityROW.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New Pages RecentTempCampApplicationWorksheet 2011.pdfSD.pdf JumpUstactUtilityROW.pdf Jump to:

  12. NMSLO Application for ROW Easement | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformationOliver,Minnesota:EnergyNARI|Forms12State Lands | OpenROW

  13. UK, Europe, & ROW (excl. Australia & Canada): USA: Australia: Direct Customer Services, Palgrave Macmillan, VHPS, Customer Services,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallenrode, May-Britt

    UK, Europe, & ROW (excl. Australia & Canada): USA: Australia: Direct Customer Services, Palgrave migration in Europe, this book is a welcome contribution to the literature on migration." - Rhacel ParreŮas

  14. Variable Crop Share Leases.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sartin, Marvin; Sammons, Ray

    1980-01-01

    and management. To adequately value these items, an understanding of the concepts of fixed cost is necessary. FIXED (OWNERSHIP) COSTS of particular assets consist primarily of depreciation and interest on investment. These costs are not always apparent because... broad categories: cash and crop-shares. Under a cash lease, the tenant pays for the rights to farm the land. Cash leases usually provide the tenant operator with more freedom in making management decisions, and the tenant must accept more...

  15. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrWoodChips | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformation SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrWoodChips Jump to: navigation,

  16. Turbine Blade Row Optimization Through Endwall Contouring by an Adjoint Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Feng

    function, regardless of the number of design parameters. Flow loss through the blade row is minimized while blade at off-design conditions is also evaluated and compared with that of the original blade algorithms (GAs) [4≠6] aregaining usage in practical engineering design of turbomachinery blade rows. Besides

  17. High Fidelity Modeling of Blade Row Interaction in a Transonic Compressor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cincinnati, University of

    High Fidelity Modeling of Blade Row Interaction in a Transonic Compressor Michael G. List on the compressor. Three dierent axial spacings between the rotor and the upstream blade row have been simulated of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, 45221 In order to accurately model the physics associated with losses

  18. Texas Crop Profile: Peppers†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Kent D.; Holloway, Rodney L.

    2001-02-13

    -head sorghum can get 10 to 12 feet high. Onion yields have been shown to increase by 50 percent to 100 percent with windbreaks. Currently, only about 10 percent to 25 percent of growers use windbreaks. Planting: Statewide, 80 to 90 percent of the peppers... and liniments. Peppers also play a part in rituals, magic and folklore. Gulamic acid (AuxiGro ? ) is a newly registered agrochemical that acts as a plant growth regula- tor. It enhances crop growth and yield. It is registered on bell peppers and other vegetables...

  19. Power Handling of the Bulk Tungsten Divertor Row at JET: First Measurements and Comparison to the GTM Thermal Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Handling of the Bulk Tungsten Divertor Row at JET: First Measurements and Comparison to the GTM Thermal Model

  20. The effects of agricultural land use patterns on pollutant runoff from watersheds: rangeland/pastureland and row cropping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayne, Andrew A.

    1995-01-01

    was compiled for testing/monitoring. This list was based on two components, nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), of agricultural fertilizers which are typically a combination of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and sulfur (N, P, K, S) and sometimes chelated micro...

  1. Effect of tillage systems, row configuration-spacing and plant population on soil physical properties, evapotranspiration and dryland sorghum yields†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salinas-Garcia, Jaime Roel

    1981-01-01

    in the convencional plots (101. 6-cm rows). The increase in yield was due primarily to the larger number of heads at harvest as compared with the conventional row-spacing. Clegg et al. (1972) observed that variation of row width can be used in greater utilization...

  2. Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    plant fuel. We examine potential biomass energy demand in the 5-county area, and then review cropBiomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential Prepared for: Massachusetts Division of Energy is thought to have significantly more potential than forest biomass energy (Perlack, Wright et al. 2005). One

  3. Collection Policy: Crop and Soil Sciences Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Collection Policy: Crop and Soil Sciences ___________________________________________________________________________________ Introduction: This 2007 collection policy review for the Department of Crops and Soil Sciences comes several the Department of Atmospheric and Earth Sciences. Since then, Crops and Soil Sciences has reorganized into three

  4. The Environmental Impacts of Subsidized Crop Insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaFrance, Jeffrey T.; Shimshack, J. P.; Wu, S. Y.

    2001-01-01

    May 1996): 428-438. Environmental Impacts of Subsidized CropPaper No. 912 THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF SUBSIDIZED CROPsuch copies. The Environmental Impacts of Subsidized Crop

  5. Atmospheric inversion of surface carbon flux with consideration of the spatial distribution of US crop production and consumption

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, J. M.; Univ. of Toronto, ON; Fung, J. W.; Mo, G.; Deng, F.; West, T. O.

    2015-01-19

    In order to improve quantification of the spatial distribution of carbon sinks and sources in the conterminous US, we conduct a nested global atmospheric inversion with detailed spatial information on crop production and consumption. County-level cropland net primary productivity, harvested biomass, soil carbon change, and human and livestock consumption data over the conterminous US are used for this purpose. Time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversions are conducted based on CO? observations at 210 stations to infer CO? fluxes globally at monthly time steps with a nested focus on 30 regions in North America. Prior land surface carbon fluxes are first generated usingmore†Ľa biospheric model, and the inversions are constrained using prior fluxes with and without adjustments for crop production and consumption over the 2002Ė2007 period. After these adjustments, the inverted regional carbon sink in the US Midwest increases from 0.25 Ī 0.03 to 0.42 Ī 0.13 Pg C yr?Ļ, whereas the large sink in the US southeast forest region is weakened from 0.41 Ī 0.12 to 0.29 Ī 0.12 Pg C yr?Ļ. These adjustments also reduce the inverted sink in the west region from 0.066 Ī 0.04 to 0.040 Ī 0.02 Pg C yr?Ļ because of high crop consumption and respiration by humans and livestock. The general pattern of sink increases in crop production areas and sink decreases (or source increases) in crop consumption areas highlights the importance of considering the lateral carbon transfer in crop products in atmospheric inverse modeling, which provides a reliable atmospheric perspective of the overall carbon balance at the continental scale but is unreliable for separating fluxes from different ecosystems.ę†less

  6. Atmospheric inversion of surface carbon flux with consideration of the spatial distribution of US crop production and consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J. M.; Fung, J. W.; Mo, G.; Deng, F.; West, T. O.

    2015-01-19

    In order to improve quantification of the spatial distribution of carbon sinks and sources in the conterminous US, we conduct a nested global atmospheric inversion with detailed spatial information on crop production and consumption. County-level cropland net primary productivity, harvested biomass, soil carbon change, and human and livestock consumption data over the conterminous US are used for this purpose. Time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversions are conducted based on CO? observations at 210 stations to infer CO? fluxes globally at monthly time steps with a nested focus on 30 regions in North America. Prior land surface carbon fluxes are first generated using a biospheric model, and the inversions are constrained using prior fluxes with and without adjustments for crop production and consumption over the 2002Ė2007 period. After these adjustments, the inverted regional carbon sink in the US Midwest increases from 0.25 Ī 0.03 to 0.42 Ī 0.13 Pg C yr?Ļ, whereas the large sink in the US southeast forest region is weakened from 0.41 Ī 0.12 to 0.29 Ī 0.12 Pg C yr?Ļ. These adjustments also reduce the inverted sink in the west region from 0.066 Ī 0.04 to 0.040 Ī 0.02 Pg C yr?Ļ because of high crop consumption and respiration by humans and livestock. The general pattern of sink increases in crop production areas and sink decreases (or source increases) in crop consumption areas highlights the importance of considering the lateral carbon transfer in crop products in atmospheric inverse modeling, which provides a reliable atmospheric perspective of the overall carbon balance at the continental scale but is unreliable for separating fluxes from different ecosystems.

  7. Atmospheric inversion of surface carbon flux with consideration of the spatial distribution of US crop production and consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J. M. [Nanjing Univ., Jiangsu (China); Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Fung, J. W. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Mo, G. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Deng, F. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); West, T. O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve quantification of the spatial distribution of carbon sinks and sources in the conterminous US, we conduct a nested global atmospheric inversion with detailed spatial information on crop production and consumption. County-level cropland net primary productivity, harvested biomass, soil carbon change, and human and livestock consumption data over the conterminous US are used for this purpose. Time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversions are conducted based on CO? observations at 210 stations to infer CO? fluxes globally at monthly time steps with a nested focus on 30 regions in North America. Prior land surface carbon fluxes are first generated using a biospheric model, and the inversions are constrained using prior fluxes with and without adjustments for crop production and consumption over the 2002Ė2007 period. After these adjustments, the inverted regional carbon sink in the US Midwest increases from 0.25 Ī 0.03 to 0.42 Ī 0.13 Pg C yr?Ļ, whereas the large sink in the US southeast forest region is weakened from 0.41 Ī 0.12 to 0.29 Ī 0.12 Pg C yr?Ļ. These adjustments also reduce the inverted sink in the west region from 0.066 Ī 0.04 to 0.040 Ī 0.02 Pg C yr?Ļ because of high crop consumption and respiration by humans and livestock. The general pattern of sink increases in crop production areas and sink decreases (or source increases) in crop consumption areas highlights the importance of considering the lateral carbon transfer in crop products in atmospheric inverse modeling, which provides a reliable atmospheric perspective of the overall carbon balance at the continental scale but is unreliable for separating fluxes from different ecosystems.

  8. Crop Insurance Terms and Definitions†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, Kenneth; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe; Barnaby, G. A. Art

    2008-10-17

    on the date coverage begins for the crop year. To qualify, an enterprise unit must contain all of the insurable acreage of the same insured crop in: One or more basic units that are located 1. in two or more separate sections, section equivalents, FSA... by the termination date specified in the Crop Provisions. Earliest planting date. The initial planting date contained in the Special Provisions, which is the earliest date the insured may plant an in- sured agricultural commodity and qualify for a replanting...

  9. The Making of a Hemispheric Intellectual-Statesman: Leo S. Rowe in Argentina (1906Ė1919)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvatore, Ricardo D.

    2010-01-01

    had†been†sent†by†the† Spanish†government†to†spread†the†idea†Spanish†translation†of†Roweís†book†on† municipal†government. † †ideals† of† government. †Only†that†Spanish†political†

  10. Row spacing effects on the canopy light extinction coefficient of upland cotton†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steglich, Evelyn Marie

    2000-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted in 1998 and 1999 at the Stiles Farm, Thrall, Texas and the Blackland Research Center, Temple, Texas, respectively, to characterize the influence of row spacing, plant density and time of day on the extinction...

  11. Self-organization of S adatoms on Au(111). ?3R30į rows at low coverage

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Walen, Holly; Liu, Da-Jiang; Oh, Junepyo; Lim, Hyunseob; Evans, J. W.; Kim, Yousoo; Thiel, P. A.

    2015-07-06

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy, we observe an adlayer structure that is dominated by short rows of S atoms, on unreconstructed regions of a Au(111) surface. This structure forms upon adsorption of low S coverage (less than 0.1 monolayer) on a fully reconstructed cleansurface at 300 K, then cooling to 5 K for observation. The rows adopt one of three orientations that are rotated by 30į from the close-packed directions of the Au(111) substrate, and adjacent S atoms in the rows are separated by ?3 times the surface lattice constant, a. Monte Carlo simulations are performed on lattice-gas models, we derivedmore†Ľusing a limited cluster expansion based on density functional theory energetics. Furthermore, models which include long-range pairwise interactions (extending to 5a), plus selected trio interactions, successfully reproduce the linear rows of S atoms at reasonable temperatures.ę†less

  12. Analysis of conventional and plutonium recycle unit-assemblies for the Yankee (Rowe) PWR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mertens, Paul Gustaaf

    1971-01-01

    An analysis and comparison of Unit Conventional UO2 Fuel-Assemblies and proposed Plutonium Recycle Fuel Assemblies for the Yankee (Rowe) Reactor has been made. The influence of spectral effects, at the watergaps -and ...

  13. A Case for Small Row Buffers in! Non-Volatile Main Memories!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mutlu, Onur

    mapping schemes! Buffering large rows is energy-inefficient! 8-cores, DDR3-1066 simulator; modified for NVM timing and energy; 31 workloads! 47/67% less main memory energy for PCM/ STT-RAM with 64B row (Relative to DRAM)! PCM! STT-RAM! Energy (Read/Write)! 2x/100x! 0.5x/1x! Latency (Read/Write)! 5x/10x! 1x/1x

  14. Cover Crops for the Garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    matter for your soil or compost pile. Organic matter is thatin the spring or made into compost, cover crops will act asgathered up and added to your compost pile. The first method

  15. ReproducedfromCropScience.PublishedbyCropScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. 2558 CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 47, NOVEMBERDECEMBER 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    ReproducedfromCropScience.PublishedbyCropScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. 2558 CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 47, NOVEMBER≠DECEMBER 2007 BOOK REVIEW Dirt: The Erosion of Civilization. David R science along with very readable prose to document the boom and bust cycles in agricul- ture that have

  16. Effect of row spacing on yield and yield components of winter wheat cultivars†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Ross Jay

    1977-01-01

    was found at McGrego~ for this trait. Culms per m were increased by 2 decreased row width at all locations and in all cultivars except 'Coker 68-15' and 'TAM N-101' at McGregor. These cultivars decreased in culm number. Five hundred seed weight... width on cereals. He noted that reducing row width generally increased yields, particularly at high population levels. While culms per unit area behaved in a similar manner, data on other yield components were inconclusive or not mentioned. Holliday...

  17. Emergency Alternative Crops for South Texas†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livingston, Stephen; Bade, David H.

    1996-10-21

    is the best choice. Details are provided on soybeans, various types of peas, alyce clover, sorghums and other crops....

  18. Evaluation of sweet sorghum as a potential ethanol crop in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, David Scott

    2011-08-01

    Petroleum prices have made alternative fuel crops a viable option for ethanol production. Sweet sorghum [Sorghum bicolor] is a non-food crop that may produce large quantities of ethanol with minimal inputs. Eleven cultivars were planted in 2008 and 2009 as a half-season crop. Four-row plots 6.9 m by 0.5 m, were monitored bimonthly for √?¬?√?¬įBrix, height, and sugar accumulation. Yield and extractable sap were taken at the end of season. Stalk yield was greatest for the cultivar Sugar Top (4945 kg ha-1) and lowest for Simon (1054 kg ha-1). Dale ranked highest ethanol output (807 L ha-1) while Simon (123 L ha-1) is the lowest. All cultivars peak Brix accumulation occurs in early October. Individual sugar concentrations indicated sucrose is the predominant sugar with glucose and fructose levels dependent on cultivar. Supplemental ethanol in fermented wort was the best preservative tested to halt degradation of sorghum wort.

  19. Regional Focus on GM Crop Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    Regional Focus on GM Crop Regulation THE RECENT MEDIA COVERAGE OF THE DEVEL- opments in Brazil for com- mercial genetically modified (GM) crops in both the scientific and regulatory arena. The release of GM crops in these coun- tries might result in the unintentional entry of GM seeds into neighboring

  20. Interdisciplinary Pest Management Potentials of Cover Cropping Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachie, Oli Gurmu

    2011-01-01

    Cover Crop. J. Agronomy & Crop Science 186, 145-149 Allisonresistance in cowpea. Crop Science 40:611-618. Finch S. andProduction. J. Agronomy & Crop Science 191: 172ó Krueger

  1. THE SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD. XXV. DISCOVERY OF NEW PROPER MOTION STARS WITH 0.''40 yr{sup -1} > {mu} {>=} 0.''18 yr{sup -1} BETWEEN DECLINATIONS -47{sup 0} AND 00{sup 0}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Mark R.; Winters, Jennifer G.; Henry, Todd J.; Jao, Wei-Chun; Finch, Charlie T.; Subasavage, John P.; Hambly, Nigel C. E-mail: winters@chara.gsu.edu E-mail: jao@chara.gsu.edu E-mail: jsubasavage@ctio.noao.edu

    2011-07-15

    We present 2817 new southern proper motion systems with 0.''40 yr{sup -1} > {mu} {>=} 0.''18 yr{sup -1} and declination between -47{sup 0} and 00{sup 0}. This is a continuation of the SuperCOSMOS-RECONS (SCR) proper motion searches of the southern sky. We use the same photometric relations as previous searches to provide distance estimates based on the assumption that the objects are single main-sequence stars. We find 79 new red dwarf systems predicted to be within 25 pc, including a few new components of previously known systems. Two systems-SCR 1731-2452 at 9.5 pc and SCR 1746-3214 at 9.9 pc-are anticipated to be within 10 pc. We also find 23 new white dwarf (WD) candidates with distance estimates of 15-66 pc, as well as 360 new red subdwarf candidates. With this search, we complete the SCR sweep of the southern sky for stars with {mu} {>=} 0.''18 yr{sup -1} and R{sub 59F} {<=} 16.5, resulting in a total of 5042 objects in 4724 previously unreported proper motion systems. Here we provide selected comprehensive lists from our SCR proper motion search to date, including 152 red dwarf systems estimated to be within 25 pc (9 within 10 pc), 46 WDs (10 within 25 pc), and 598 subdwarf candidates. The results of this search suggest that there are more nearby systems to be found at fainter magnitudes and lower proper motion limits than those probed so far.

  2. Seismic waveform classification for automatic detection and improved location of volcanic events Charlotte Rowe and Jonathan MacCarthy, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charlotte Rowe and Jonathan MacCarthy, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, U: Dr. Charlotte Rowe EES-11, M.S. D-408 Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, new Mexico 87545 U

  3. Rate-Harmonized Scheduling for Saving Energy Anthony Rowe Karthik Lakshmanan Haifeng Zhu Ragunathan (Raj) Rajkumar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowe, Anthony

    Rate-Harmonized Scheduling for Saving Energy Anthony Rowe Karthik Lakshmanan Haifeng Zhu Ragunathan mode, substantially more energy savings can be obtained but it requires a significant amount of time such that processor idle times are lumped together. We next introduce the Energy-Saving Rate-Harmonized Scheduler

  4. Quarter Annulus Simulations of Blade Row Interaction at Several Gaps and Discussion of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cincinnati, University of

    loaded upstream blade row and its eect on the compressor. Three dierent axial spacings between the rotor by Research Professor Mark G. Turner In order to accurately model the physics associated with losses in a transonic compressor, a time-accurate simulation of a transonic compressor rig was developed. Parameters

  5. A Model of Compressor Blade Row Interaction with Shock Induced Vortex Shedding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cincinnati, University of

    A Model of Compressor Blade Row Interaction with Shock Induced Vortex Shedding Mark G. Turner". The mid and far spacings represent typical axial gaps found in operational fans and compressors. However behind a stator are modeled. The model is based on a Burger vortex core model for shed vortices

  6. 2/15/05 Page 1 A Structural Diffusion Approach to Labeling Rows and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salamon, Peter

    digitized images of an array of tissue sections mounted on a microscope slide is discussed. Keywords: Medical Imaging, Computational Intelligence Running Title: Labeling Rows and Columns in an Irregular Array and the series of slides is subjected to a battery of treatments. The sheer volume of data generated

  7. 11/17/01 Page 1 A Structural Diffusion Approach to Labeling Rows and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salamon, Peter

    digitized images of an array of tissue sections mounted on a microscope slide is discussed. Keywords: Medical Imaging, Computational Intelligence Running Title: Labeling Rows and Columns in an Irregular Array and the series of slides is subjected to a battery of treatments. The sheer volume of data generated

  8. Visual Light Landmarks for Mobile Devices Niranjini Rajagopal, Patrick Lazik, Anthony Rowe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowe, Anthony

    Visual Light Landmarks for Mobile Devices Niranjini Rajagopal, Patrick Lazik, Anthony Rowe}@andrew.cmu.edu Abstract--The omnipresence of indoor lighting makes it an ideal vehicle for pervasive communication lighting systems to send data to mobile devices using either cameras or light sensors. By exploiting

  9. First-row hydrides: Dissociation and ground state energies using quantum Monte Carlo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, James B.

    First-row hydrides: Dissociation and ground state energies using quantum Monte Carlo Arne Lu, Pennsylvania 16802 Received 20 May 1996; accepted 24 July 1996 Accurate ground state energies comparable FN-DQMC method. The residual energy, the nodal error due to the error in the nodal structure

  10. Heat transfer from multiple row arrays of low aspect ratio pin fins Seth A. Lawson a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thole, Karen A.

    Heat transfer from multiple row arrays of low aspect ratio pin fins Seth A. Lawson a, , Alan A 18 March 2011 Available online 5 May 2011 Keywords: Pin fins Heat transfer augmentation Array to enhance heat transfer. In modern gas turbines, for exam- ple, airfoils are designed with sophisticated

  11. Evaluating Crop-Share Leases.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sartin, Marvin; Brints, Norman

    1979-01-01

    with the greatest influence on yield (fertilizer, insecticide, irrigation, etc.) should be shared by the landowner and the tenant. An equitable crop-share lease encourages the tenant to use the same quantity of inputs and produce the same yield level... lease agree ment is calculation of the proportion of total (fixed and variable) inputs supplied by the tenant and landowner. While this approach requires time and detail, those who exercise care with data development can formulate an equitable lease...

  12. Engineered High Energy Crop (EHEC) Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement DOEEIS-0481 JULY 2015 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK...

  13. Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansson, C.

    2010-01-01

    18-673389 Keywords: cassava; bioethanol; biofuel; metabolicRecently, cassava-derived bioethanol production has beenbenefits compared to other bioethanol- producing crops in

  14. Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansson, C.

    2010-01-01

    Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China Christer Janssoncassava; bioethanol; biofuel; metabolic engineering; Chinathe potentials of cassava in the biofuel sector and point to

  15. "We Ain't Scared of No Mayor": LA's Skid Row Residents Fight for Their Right to the City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petit, Christine Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Racism on Trial: The Chicano Fight for Justice. Cambridge,Social Justice and the Fight for Public Space. New York andLAís Skid Row Residents Fight for Their Right to the City A

  16. ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    objectives for the integration of advanced logistical systems and focused bioenergy harvesting technologies that supply crop residues and energy crops in a large bale format....

  17. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reducing the negative...

  18. Crop physiology calibration in the CLM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilionis, I.; Drewniak, B. A.; Constantinescu, E. M.

    2015-04-15

    Farming is using more of the land surface, as population increases and agriculture is increasingly applied for non-nutritional purposes such as biofuel production. This agricultural expansion exerts an increasing impact on the terrestrial carbon cycle. In order to understand the impact of such processes, the Community Land Model (CLM) has been augmented with a CLM-Crop extension that simulates the development of three crop types: maize, soybean, and spring wheat. The CLM-Crop model is a complex system that relies on a suite of parametric inputs that govern plant growth under a given atmospheric forcing and available resources. CLM-Crop development used measurements of gross primary productivity (GPP) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) from AmeriFlux sites to choose parameter values that optimize crop productivity in the model. In this paper, we calibrate these parameters for one crop type, soybean, in order to provide a faithful projection in terms of both plant development and net carbon exchange. Calibration is performed in a Bayesian framework by developing a scalable and adaptive scheme based on sequential Monte Carlo (SMC). The model showed significant improvement of crop productivity with the new calibrated parameters. We demonstrate that the calibrated parameters are applicable across alternative years and different sites.

  19. Crop physiology calibration in the CLM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilionis, I. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Mathematics and Computer Science Div.; Drewniak, B. A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Science Div.; Constantinescu, E. M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Mathematics and Computer Science Div.

    2015-01-01

    Farming is using more of the land surface, as population increases and agriculture is increasingly applied for non-nutritional purposes such as biofuel production. This agricultural expansion exerts an increasing impact on the terrestrial carbon cycle. In order to understand the impact of such processes, the Community Land Model (CLM) has been augmented with a CLM-Crop extension that simulates the development of three crop types: maize, soybean, and spring wheat. The CLM-Crop model is a complex system that relies on a suite of parametric inputs that govern plant growth under a given atmospheric forcing and available resources. CLM-Crop development used measurements of gross primary productivity (GPP) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) from AmeriFlux sites to choose parameter values that optimize crop productivity in the model. In this paper, we calibrate these parameters for one crop type, soybean, in order to provide a faithful projection in terms of both plant development and net carbon exchange. Calibration is performed in a Bayesian framework by developing a scalable and adaptive scheme based on sequential Monte Carlo (SMC). The model showed significant improvement of crop productivity with the new calibrated parameters. We demonstrate that the calibrated parameters are applicable across alternative years and different sites.

  20. Crop physiology calibration in the CLM

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bilionis, I.; Drewniak, B. A.; Constantinescu, E. M.

    2015-04-15

    Farming is using more of the land surface, as population increases and agriculture is increasingly applied for non-nutritional purposes such as biofuel production. This agricultural expansion exerts an increasing impact on the terrestrial carbon cycle. In order to understand the impact of such processes, the Community Land Model (CLM) has been augmented with a CLM-Crop extension that simulates the development of three crop types: maize, soybean, and spring wheat. The CLM-Crop model is a complex system that relies on a suite of parametric inputs that govern plant growth under a given atmospheric forcing and available resources. CLM-Crop development used measurementsmore†Ľof gross primary productivity (GPP) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) from AmeriFlux sites to choose parameter values that optimize crop productivity in the model. In this paper, we calibrate these parameters for one crop type, soybean, in order to provide a faithful projection in terms of both plant development and net carbon exchange. Calibration is performed in a Bayesian framework by developing a scalable and adaptive scheme based on sequential Monte Carlo (SMC). The model showed significant improvement of crop productivity with the new calibrated parameters. We demonstrate that the calibrated parameters are applicable across alternative years and different sites.ę†less

  1. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, WC; Rosenstiel, TN; Guenther, A; Lamarque, J-F; Barsanti, K

    2015-01-01

    bioenergy crops such as eucalyptus, giant reed, anduse of crops such as poplar, eucalyptus, and switchgrass asemitters such as eucalyptus. The com- bined health bene?ts

  2. PETRO: Higher Productivity Crops for Biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    PETRO Project: The 10 projects that comprise ARPA-Eís PETRO Project, short for ďPlants Engineered to Replace Oil,Ē aim to develop non-food crops that directly produce transportation fuel. These crops can help supply the transportation sector with agriculturally derived fuels that are cost-competitive with petroleum and do not affect U.S. food supply. PETRO aims to redirect the processes for energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) capture in plants toward fuel production. This would create dedicated energy crops that serve as a domestic alternative to petroleum-based fuels and deliver more energy per acre with less processing prior to the pump.

  3. Data Sharing Report Characterization of Isotope Row Facilities Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge TN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Phyllis C

    2013-12-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM-OR) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support using funds provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Specifically, DOE EM-OR requested ORAU to plan and implement a survey approach, focused on characterizing the Isotope Row Facilities located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for future determination of an appropriate disposition pathway for building debris and systems, should the buildings be demolished. The characterization effort was designed to identify and quantify radiological and chemical contamination associated with building structures and process systems. The Isotope Row Facilities discussed in this report include Bldgs. 3030, 3031, 3032, 3033, 3033A, 3034, 3036, 3093, and 3118, and are located in the northeast quadrant of the main ORNL campus area, between Hillside and Central Avenues. Construction of the isotope production facilities was initiated in the late 1940s, with the exception of Bldgs. 3033A and 3118, which were enclosed in the early 1960s. The Isotope Row facilities were intended for the purpose of light industrial use for the processing, assemblage, and storage of radionuclides used for a variety of applications (ORNL 1952 and ORAU 2013). The Isotope Row Facilities provided laboratory and support services as part of the Isotopes Production and Distribution Program until 1989 when DOE mandated their shutdown (ORNL 1990). These facilities performed diverse research and developmental experiments in support of isotopes production. As a result of the many years of operations, various projects, and final cessation of operations, production was followed by inclusion into the surveillance and maintenance (S&M) project for eventual decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The process for D&D and final dismantlement of facilities requires that the known contaminants of concern (COCs) be evaluated and quantified and to identify and quantify any additional contaminants in order to satisfy the waste acceptance criteria requirements for the desired disposal pathway. Known facility contaminants include, but are not limited to, asbestos-containing material (ACM), radiological contaminants, and chemical contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and metals.

  4. Negative-Index Metamaterials: Second-Harmonic Generation, Manley-Rowe Relations and Parametric Amplification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Popov; Vladimir M. Shalaev

    2006-01-10

    Second harmonic generation and optical parametric amplification in negative-index metamaterials (NIMs) are studied. The opposite directions of the wave vector and the Poynting vector in NIMs results in a "backward" phase-matching condition, causing significant changes in the Manley-Rowe relations and spatial distributions of the coupled field intensities. It is shown that absorption in NIMs can be compensated by backward optical parametric amplification. The possibility of distributed-feedback parametric oscillation with no cavity has been demonstrated. The feasibility of the generation of entangled pairs of left- and right-handed counter-propagating photons is discussed.

  5. Modelling the UK perennial energy crop market†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Peter Mark William

    2014-11-27

    Biomass produced from perennial energy crops, Miscanthus and willow or poplar grown as short-rotation coppice, is expected to contribute to UK renewable energy targets and reduce the carbon intensity of energy production. ...

  6. SHORT ROTATION WOODY CROPS FACTSHEET SERIES # 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    SHORT ROTATION WOODY CROPS FACTSHEET SERIES # 5 Sustainability of SRWC for Energy1 WHAT of the SRWC systems and the relatively narrow genetic base in Salix, Populus or Eucalyptus SRWC may promote

  7. Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansson, C.

    2010-01-01

    as a means to produce novel biodiesel crops. We also donítto oil Ethanol and biodiesel are the two major bio-basedin transportation. Compared to biodiesel, the net energy

  8. Features . . . Cover Crop Value to Cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    .............................................................................................Page 6 Fuel Prices Projections - Encouraging News .......................Page 7 Agronomy Notes VolumeFeatures . . . Cotton Cover Crop Value to Cotton Cotton Price and Rotation ..............................................................Page 5 Miscellaneous Large differences in nitrogen prices.......................................Page 6

  9. Risk in agriculture : a study of crop yield distributions and crop insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gayam, Narsi Reddy

    2006-01-01

    Agriculture is a business fraught with risk. Crop production depends on climatic, geographical, biological, political, and economic factors, which introduce risks that are quantifiable given the appropriate mathematical ...

  10. Covering Note INTER-ACADEMY REPORT ON GM CROPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giri, Ranjit K.

    Covering Note for INTER-ACADEMY REPORT ON GM CROPS (Updated) The Inter-Academy Report on GM crops the main conclusions and recommendations. The literature on GM crops is voluminous. More than a hundred seek to enunciate a national strategy on GM crops. The rest deals with concerns, surveillance etc. #12

  11. Spatial variations in the spectral index of polarized synchrotron emission in the 9 yr WMAP sky maps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuskeland, U.; Eriksen, H. K.; Nśss, S. K. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Wehus, I. K., E-mail: unnif@astro.uio.no, E-mail: h.k.k.eriksen@astro.uio.no, E-mail: s.k.nass@astro.uio.no, E-mail: i.k.wehus@fys.uio.no [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We estimate the spectral index, ?, of polarized synchrotron emission as observed in the 9 yr Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe sky maps using two methods, linear regression ({sup T}-T plot{sup )} and maximum likelihood. We partition the sky into 24 disjoint sky regions and evaluate the spectral index for all polarization angles between 0į and 85į in steps of 5į. Averaging over polarization angles, we derive a mean spectral index of ?{sup all-sky} = Ė2.99 Ī 0.01 in the frequency range of 23-33 GHz. We find that the synchrotron spectral index steepens by 0.14 from low to high Galactic latitudes, in agreement with previous studies, with mean spectral indices of ?{sup plane} = Ė2.98 Ī 0.01 and ?{sup high-lat} = Ė3.12 Ī 0.04. In addition, we find a significant longitudinal variation along the Galactic plane with a steeper spectral index toward the Galactic center and anticenter than toward the Galactic spiral arms. This can be well modeled by an offset sinusoidal, ?(l) = Ė2.85 + 0.17sin (2l Ė 90į). Finally, we study synchrotron emission in the BICEP2 field, in an attempt to understand whether the claimed detection of large-scale B-mode polarization could be explained in terms of synchrotron contamination. Adopting a spectral index of ? = Ė3.12, typical for high Galactic latitudes, we find that the most likely bias corresponds to about 2% of the reported signal (r = 0.003). The flattest index allowed by the data in this region is ? = Ė2.5, and under the assumption of a straight power-law frequency spectrum, we find that synchrotron emission can account for at most 20% of the reported BICEP2 signal.

  12. 1132 WWW.CROPS.ORG CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 52, MAYJUNE 2012 While varying regionally, root-feeding plant-parasitic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    1132 WWW.CROPS.ORG CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 52, MAY≠JUNE 2012 RESEARCH While varying regionally, root, Statistician, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Plant and Soil Science Building, Michigan State University.08.0409 © Crop Science Society of America | 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA All rights reserved. No part

  13. 2212 WWW.CROPS.ORG CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, SEPTEMBEROCTOBER 2011 Turfgrass quality is evaluated by integrating factors of canopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2212 WWW.CROPS.ORG CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, SEPTEMBER≠OCTOBER 2011 RESEARCH Turfgrass quality.2135/cropsci2010.12.0728 Published online 6 July 2011. © Crop Science Society of America | 5585 Guilford Rd, reflectance at 661 nm; R935, reflectance at 935 nm. Published in Crop Sci. 51:2212≠2218 (2011). doi: 10

  14. Selection on Crop-Derived Traits and QTL in Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Crop-Wild Hybrids under Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, John M.

    Selection on Crop-Derived Traits and QTL in Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Crop-Wild Hybrids under grown under wild-like low water conditions. Crop-derived petiole length and head diameter were favored size and leaf pressure potential. Interestingly, the additive effect of the crop-derived allele

  15. Higher U.S. Crop Prices Trigger Little Area Expansion so Marginal Land for Biofuel Crops Is Limited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swinton, S.; Babcock, Bruce; James, Laura; Bandaru, Varaprasad

    2011-06-12

    By expanding energy biomass production on marginal lands that are not currently used for crops, food price increases and indirect climate change effects can be mitigated. Studies of the availability of marginal lands for dedicated bioenergy crops have focused on biophysical land traits, ignoring the human role in decisions to convert marginal land to bioenergy crops. Recent history offers insights about farmer willingness to put non-crop land into crop production. The 2006-09 leap in field crop prices and the attendant 64% gain in typical profitability led to only a 2% increase in crop planted area, mostly in the prairie states

  16. CliCrop: a Crop Water-Stress and Irrigation Demand Model for an Integrated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CliCrop: a Crop Water-Stress and Irrigation Demand Model for an Integrated Global Assessment Blanc and C. Adam Schlosser Report No. 214 April 2012 #12;The MIT Joint Program on the Science Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR). These two

  17. CropS/Pl P 403/503 Advanced Cropping Systems Fall 2013, 3 Credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappu, Hanu R.

    CropS/Pl P 403/503 Advanced Cropping Systems Fall 2013, 3 Credits Time: Tu,Th 1:25-2:40; Field, whichever you prefer on your transcripts. Undergraduates generally enroll as 403 and graduates as 503 to critically interpret agronomic literature. GRADING: 403 and 503 Credit: ∑ Five quizzes (40 points each

  18. Formation and spread of callus tissue and tangential rows of resin ducts in Larix decidua and Picea abies following rockfall impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, David R. - Department of Geography, Texas State University

    Formation and spread of callus tissue and tangential rows of resin ducts in Larix decidua and Picea After mechanical wounding, callus tissue and tangential rows of traumatic resin ducts (TRDs) are formed extension, traumatic resin ducts. Introduction Rockfall is a common mass movement process in alpine

  19. Life history and behavioral responses to time constraints in a damselfly. by Frank Johansson and Locke Rowe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolowski, Marla

    Life history and behavioral responses to time constraints in a damselfly. by Frank Johansson and Locke Rowe Time constraints, imposed by seasonality, are common to life histories. Recent theory in evolutionary ecology predicts independent behavioral and life history responses to such constraints

  20. Author's personal copy Variable field-of-view machine vision based row guidance of an agricultural robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    robot Jinlin Xue a , Lei Zhang b , Tony E. Grift b, a College of Engineering, Nanjing Agricultural guidance Autonomous guidance Agricultural robot Fuzzy logic control a b s t r a c t A novel variable field-of-view machine vision method was developed allowing an agricultural robot to navigate between rows in cornfields

  1. Matrix Operations Recall that an matrix A is a rectangular array of scalars arranged in rows and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Carl

    Matrix Operations Recall that an matrix A is a rectangular array of scalars arranged in rows and columns: We will also denote the matrix A by . In the case we call a square matrix. If all the entries of the matrix A are zero, we call A the zero matrix and denote it by . The term matrix was first used in 1850

  2. A multivariate view of the evolution of sexual dimorphism M. J. WYMAN, J. R. STINCHCOMBE & L. ROWE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolowski, Marla

    A multivariate view of the evolution of sexual dimorphism M. J. WYMAN, J. R. STINCHCOMBE & L. ROWE. Widespread dimorphism, despite a shared genome, may be more readily explained by considering the multivariate. By contrast, the multivariate formulation has greater generality and more flexibility. Although the number

  3. Issues Driving the Outlook for Specialty Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    % Vegetables and melons 19% Nursery/green house 10% Grains and cotton 9% Hay and forage crops 19% Fruits 15% Tree nuts 13%Vegetables and melons 9% Nursery/green house 0.004% Grains and cotton 38% #12;Geographic, ≠ Regulations (including greenhouse gas policy), water, labor, air quality, water quality, etc. #12;The

  4. Genetically modified food and crops: perceptions of risks†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Clare R.

    2010-01-01

    The debate around genetically modified food and crops has proved to be complex and far-reaching, involving diverse stakeholder groups and many issues. Although the extent of global uptake of GM crops has been substantial ...

  5. Test of a solar crop dryer Danish Technological Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Test of a solar crop dryer Danish Technological Institute Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences Aidt MiljÝ A/S SEC-R-6 #12;Test of a solar crop dryer SÝren ōstergaard Jensen Danish Technological/S January 2001 #12;Preface The report describes the tests carried out on a solar crop dryer. The work

  6. The Crop of the Day (c) Paul Gepts 2013 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gepts, Paul

    20130404 1 The Crop of the Day Strawberry (c) Paul Gepts 2013 1 Sources ∑ Sauer JD (1993) Fragaria Strawberries. In: Historical geography of crop plants. CRC, Boca Raton, FL: pp. 127130 ∑ Jones JK (1976) Strawberry, Fragaria ananassa (Rosaceae). In: N.W. Simmonds (ed), Evolution of crop plants, Longman, London

  7. Department of Soil and Crop Sciences Promotion and Tenure Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermķdez, Josť Luis

    Department of Soil and Crop Sciences Promotion and Tenure Policy Adopted by Action of the Soil & Crop Sciences Faculty on June 21, 1993. Modified by departmental action in January 2012. INTRODUCTION The Soil & Crop Sciences Department at Texas A&M University seeks to retain and reward faculty members who

  8. CliCrop: a Crop Water-Stress and Irrigation Demand Model for an Integrated Global Assessment Model Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fant, C.A.

    This paper describes the use of the CliCrop model in the context of climate change general assessment

  9. Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stapleton, James J; Banuelos, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Bioremediation crops should be compatible in rotations with other agronomic crops, such as cotton, wheat, of irrigation water

  10. Double row loop-coil configuration for high-speed electrodynamic maglev suspension, guidance, propulsion and guideway directional switching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    He, Jianliang (Naperville, IL); Rote, Donald M. (Lagrange, IL)

    1996-01-01

    A stabilization and propulsion system comprising a series of loop-coils arranged in parallel rows wherein two rows combine to form one of two magnetic rails. Levitation and lateral stability are provided when the induced field in the magnetic rails interacts with the superconducting magnets mounted on the magnetic levitation vehicle. The loop-coils forming the magnetic rails have specified dimensions and a specified number of turns and by constructing differently these specifications, for one rail with respect to the other, the angle of tilt of the vehicle can be controlled during directional switching. Propulsion is provided by the interaction of a traveling magnetic wave associated with the coils forming the rails and the super conducting magnets on the vehicle.

  11. First principles investigation of the initial stage of H-induced missing-row reconstruction of Pd(110) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padama, Allan Abraham B. [Department of Applied Physics, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kasai, Hideaki, E-mail: kasai@dyn.ap.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-06-28

    The pathway of H diffusion that will induce the migration of Pd atom is investigated by employing first principles calculations based on density functional theory to explain the origin of missing-row reconstruction of Pd(110).The calculated activation barrier and the H-induced reconstruction energy reveal that the long bridge-to-tetrahedral configuration is the energetically favored process for the initial stage of reconstruction phenomenon. While the H diffusion triggers the migration of Pd atom, it is the latter process that significantly contributes to the activated missing-row reconstruction of Pd(110). Nonetheless, the strong interaction between the diffusing H and the Pd atoms dictates the occurrence of reconstructed surface.

  12. Study of Row Phase Dependent Skew Quadrupole Fields in Apple-II Type EPUs at the ALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steier, C.; Marks, S.; Prestemon, Soren; Robin, David; Schlueter, Ross; Wolski, Andrzej

    2004-05-07

    Since about 5 years, Apple-II type Elliptically Polarizing Undulators (EPU) have been used very successfully at the ALS to generate high brightness photon beams with arbitrary polarization. However, both EPUs installed so far cause significant changes of the vertical beamsize, especially when the row phase is changed to change the polarization of the photons emitted. Detailed measurements indicate this is caused by a row phase dependent skew quadrupole term in the EPUs. Magnetic measurements revealed the same effect for the third EPU to be installed later this year. All measurements to identify and quantify the effect with beam will be presented, as well as some results of magnetic bench measurements and numeric field simulations.

  13. Double row loop-coil configuration for high-speed electrodynamic maglev suspension, guidance, propulsion and guideway directional switching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    He, J.; Rote, D.M.

    1996-05-21

    A stabilization and propulsion system are disclosed comprising a series of loop-coils arranged in parallel rows wherein two rows combine to form one of two magnetic rails. Levitation and lateral stability are provided when the induced field in the magnetic rails interacts with the superconducting magnets mounted on the magnetic levitation vehicle. The loop-coils forming the magnetic rails have specified dimensions and a specified number of turns and by constructing differently these specifications, for one rail with respect to the other, the angle of tilt of the vehicle can be controlled during directional switching. Propulsion is provided by the interaction of a traveling magnetic wave associated with the coils forming the rails and the superconducting magnets on the vehicle. 12 figs.

  14. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 96-0137-2607, Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Rowe, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sylvain, D.C.

    1996-10-01

    In response to a request from the Health and Safety Supervisor at the Yankee Nuclear Power Station (SIC-4911), Rowe, Massachusetts, an investigation was begun into ozone (10028156) exposure during plasma arc cutting and welding. Welders had reported chest tightness, dry cough, and throat and bronchial irritation. The nuclear power station was in the process of being decommissioned, and workers were dismantling components using welding and cutting methods. Of the operations observed during the site visit, the highest ozone concentrations were generated during plasma arc cutting, followed by metal inert gas (MIG) welding and arc welding. During plasma arc cutting the average and peak concentrations exceeded the NIOSH ceiling recommended exposure limit of 0.1 part per million. The author concludes that ozone exposure during plasma arc cutting and MIG welding presented a health hazard to welders. The author recommends that improvements be made in the local exhaust ventilation, that nitrogen-dioxide levels be monitored during hot work, and that many exposed workers wear protective clothing, use ultraviolet blocking lotion, and continue the use appropriate shade of eye protection.

  15. 298 WWW.CROPS.ORG CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, JANUARYFEBRUARY 2011 Pima cotton (Gossypium barbadense L.) was grown on 149,000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradford, Kent

    298 WWW.CROPS.ORG CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, JANUARY≠FEBRUARY 2011 RESEARCH Pima cotton (Gossypium. © Crop Science Society of America | 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA All rights reserved. No part by the publisher. #12;CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, JANUARY≠FEBRUARY 2011 WWW.CROPS.ORG 299 In the United States,

  16. An Economic Comparison of Conventional and Narrow-Row Cotton Production--Southern Plains of Texas.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Kenneth B.; Adams, James R.

    1977-01-01

    per crop acre) I~ Medium-textured soils Gross receipts 1 $85.51 $81.20 $177.59 $186.90 $85.51 $100.80 Variable costs 2 66.42 67.01 88.42 103.21 66.42 70.09 Fixed costs 3 15.67 16.63 15.67 17.18 15.67 10.02 Net returns 3.42 -2.44 73.50 66.51 3...

  17. Global crop yield losses from recent warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobell, D; Field, C

    2006-06-02

    Global yields of the world-s six most widely grown crops--wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, sorghum--have increased since 1961. Year-to-year variations in growing season minimum temperature, maximum temperature, and precipitation explain 30% or more of the variations in yield. Since 1991, climate trends have significantly decreased yield trends in all crops but rice, leading to foregone production since 1981 of about 12 million tons per year of wheat or maize, representing an annual economic loss of $1.2 to $1.7 billion. At the global scale, negative impacts of climate trends on crop yields are already apparent. Annual global temperatures have increased by {approx}0.4 C since 1980, with even larger changes observed in several regions (1). While many studies have considered the impacts of future climate changes on food production (2-5), the effects of these past changes on agriculture remain unclear. It is likely that warming has improved yields in some areas, reduced them in others, and had negligible impacts in still others; the relative balance of these effects at the global scale is unknown. An understanding of this balance would help to anticipate impacts of future climate changes, as well as to more accurately assess recent (and thereby project future) technologically driven yield progress. Separating the contribution of climate from concurrent changes in other factors--such as crop cultivars, management practices, soil quality, and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels--requires models that describe the response of yields to climate. Studies of future global impacts of climate change have typically relied on a bottom-up approach, whereby field scale, process-based models are applied to hundreds of representative sites and then averaged (e.g., ref 2). Such approaches require input data on soil and management conditions, which are often difficult to obtain. Limitations on data quality or quantity can thus limit the utility of this approach, especially at the local scale (6-8). At the global scale, however, many of the processes and impacts captured by field scale models will tend to cancel out, and therefore simpler empirical/statistical models with fewer input requirements may be as accurate (8, 9). Empirical/statistical models also allow the effects of poorly modeled processes (e.g., pest dynamics) to be captured and uncertainties to be readily quantified (10). Here we develop new, empirical/statistical models of global yield responses to climate using datasets on broad-scale yields, crop locations, and climate variability. We focus on global average yields for the six most widely grown crops in the world: wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, and sorghum. Production of these crops accounts for over 40% of global cropland area (11). 55% of non-meat calories, and over 70% of animal feed (12).

  18. A national research & development strategy for biomass crop feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.

    1997-07-01

    Planning was initiated in 1996 with the objective of reevaluating current biomass feedstock research and development strategies to: (1) assure that by 2005, one or more commercial lignocellulosic to ethanol projects will be able to acquire a dependable supply of biomass crop feedstocks; (2) assure that recently initiated demonstrations of crops to electricity will be successful and; (3) assure that the research base needed to support future biomass industry expansion is being developed. Multiple trends and analyses indicate that biomass energy research and development strategies must take into account the fact that competition for land will define the upper limits of available biomass energy crop supplies and will largely dictate the price of those supplies. Only crop production and utilization strategies which contribute profit to the farmer or landowner and to energy producers will be used commercially for biomass energy production. Strategies for developing biomass {open_quotes}energy{close_quotes} crop supplies must take into consideration all of the methods by which biomass crops will enter biomass energy markets. The lignocellulosic materials derived from crops can be available as primary residues or crop by-products; secondary residues or processing by-products; co-products (at both the crop production and processing stages); or, as dedicated energy crops. Basic research and development (R&D) leading to yield improvement continues to be recommended as a major long-term focus for dedicated energy crops. Many additional near term topics need attention, some of which are also applicable to by-products and co-products. Switchgrass R&D should be expanded and developed with greater collaboration of USDA and state extension groups. Woody crop research should continue with significant cost-share from industries developing the crops for other commercial products. Co-product options need more investigation.

  19. Isotopic validation for PWR actinide-only burnup credit using Yankee Rowe data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    Safety analyses of criticality control systems for transportation packages include an assumption that the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) loaded into the package is fresh or unirradiated. In other words, the spent fuel is assumed to have its original, as-manufactured U-235 isotopic content. The ``fresh fuel`` assumption is very conservative since the potential reactivity of the nuclear fuel is substantially reduced after being irradiated in the reactor core. The concept of taking credit for this reduction in nuclear fuel reactivity due to burnup of the fuel, instead of using the fresh fuel assumption in the criticality safety analysis, is referred to as ``Burnup Credit.`` Burnup credit uses the actual physical composition of the fuel and accounts for the net reduction of fissile material and the buildup of neutron absorbers in the fuel as it is irradiated. Neutron absorbers include actinides and other isotopes generated as a result of the fission process. Using only the change in actinide isotopes in the burnup credit criticality analysis is referred to as ``Actinide-Only Burnup Credit.`` The use of burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems enables more spent fuel to be placed in a package. Increased package capacity results in a reduced number of storage, shipping and disposal containers for a given number of SNF assemblies. Fewer shipments result in a lower risk of accidents associated with the handling and transportation of spent fuel, thus reducing both radiological and nonradiological risk to the public. This paper describes the modeling and the results of comparison between measured and calculated isotopic inventories for a selected number of samples taken from a Yankee Rowe spent fuel assembly.

  20. Traffic lights for crop-based biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phalan, Ben

    stream_source_info Phalan_311010.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 11462 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Phalan_311010.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Traffic lights for crop-based biofuels Ben... if it reduces the number of pedestrians killed and injured. How is this relevant to biofuels? There are many different kinds of biofuels, including some with considerable potential to generate cleaner energy and boost rural economies, but also others which...

  1. Money Crops in Place of Cotton.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyle, E. J.; Morgan, J. Oscar; Burns, J. C.; Ridgway, J. W.; Proctor, W. F.; Youngblood, B.; Connor, A. B.; Conway, T. J.; Eliot, H. M.; Ousley, Clarence

    1914-01-01

    down and to absorb moisture. Plant February 20th to March 15th. Thin to approxi- mately one stalk per square yard. BLANK PAGE IN ORIGINAL BLANK PAGE IN ORIGINAL MONEY CROPS IN PLACE OF COTTON. 9 Bur Clover, Bermuda and Rescue Pastures...: For pasture and waste lands. Plow the land, harrow and sow broadcast bur clover and rescue grass seed as early as possible and not later than November 15th, using ten pounds of seed of each per acre. Follow with a smoothing harrow to cover seed. In April...

  2. Ozone impacts on the productivity of selected crops. [Corn, wheat, soybean and peanut crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heck, W.W.; Cure, W.W.; Shriner, D.S.; Olson, R.J.; Heagle, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    The regional impacts of ozone on corn, wheat, soybean, and peanut crops are estimated by using dose-response functions to relate ambient maximum 7 h/d seasonal ozone concentrations to crop productivity data. Linear dose-response functions were developed from open-top field chamber studies. It was assumed that the limited number of cultivars and growing conditions available for the analysis were representative of major agricultural regions. Hourly ozone data were selected to represent rural concentrations and used to calculate maximum 7-h/d average values. Seasonal ozone averages for counties were extrapolated from approximately 300 monitoring sites. Results must be interpreted with knowledge of these assumptions and sources of uncertainty. Impacts are calculated for county units for the conterminous United States with maps showing patterns and tables summarizing the potential magnitude of ozone effects on selected crop yields. The assessment estimates that approximately three billion dollars of productivity could be gained if current maximum 7 hour per day ozone levels were reduced from present levels to below 25 parts per billion. Dollar values are based on 1978 crop prices, without accounting for price effects, to provide an overall estimate of the impact. Of the estimated economic impact, soybean represents 64%, corn 17%, wheat 12%, and peanuts 7%.

  3. HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2013 Table of Contents 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2013 Table of Contents 1 1 Regulations and Basic Information Safe Quantities of Water ............................................................................ 1-29 Table 1

  4. HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2014 Table of Contents 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2014 Table of Contents 1 1 Regulations and Basic Information Safe Quantities of Water ............................................................................ 1-29 Table 1

  5. Weather-based forecasts of California crop yields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobell, D B; Cahill, K N; Field, C B

    2005-09-26

    Crop yield forecasts provide useful information to a range of users. Yields for several crops in California are currently forecast based on field surveys and farmer interviews, while for many crops official forecasts do not exist. As broad-scale crop yields are largely dependent on weather, measurements from existing meteorological stations have the potential to provide a reliable, timely, and cost-effective means to anticipate crop yields. We developed weather-based models of state-wide yields for 12 major California crops (wine grapes, lettuce, almonds, strawberries, table grapes, hay, oranges, cotton, tomatoes, walnuts, avocados, and pistachios), and tested their accuracy using cross-validation over the 1980-2003 period. Many crops were forecast with high accuracy, as judged by the percent of yield variation explained by the forecast, the number of yields with correctly predicted direction of yield change, or the number of yields with correctly predicted extreme yields. The most successfully modeled crop was almonds, with 81% of yield variance captured by the forecast. Predictions for most crops relied on weather measurements well before harvest time, allowing for lead times that were longer than existing procedures in many cases.

  6. Agronomic Suitability of Bioenergy Crops in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemus, Rocky; Baldwin, Brian; Lang, David

    2011-10-01

    In Mississippi, some questions need to be answered about bioenergy crops: how much suitable land is available? How much material can that land produce? Which production systems work best in which scenarios? What levels of inputs will be required for productivity and longterm sustainability? How will the crops reach the market? What kinds of infrastructure will be necessary to make that happen? This publication helps answer these questions: √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę Which areas in the state are best for bioenergy crop production? √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę How much could these areas produce sustainably? √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę How can bioenergy crops impact carbon sequestration and carbon credits? √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę How will these crops affect fertilizer use and water quality? √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬

  7. Developing Switchgrass as a Bioenergy Crop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouton, J.; Bransby, D.; Conger, B.; McLaughlin, S.; Ocumpaugh, W.; Parrish, D.; Taliaferro, C.; Vogel, K.; Wullschleger, S.

    1998-11-08

    The utilization of energy crops produced on American farms as a source of renewable fuels is a concept with great relevance to current ecological and economic issues at both national and global scales. Development of a significant national capacity to utilize perennial forage crops, such as switchgrass (Panicum virgatum, L.) as biofuels could benefit our agricultural economy by providing an important new source of income for farmers. In addition energy production from perennial cropping systems, which are compatible with conventional fining practices, would help reduce degradation of agricultural soils, lower national dependence on foreign oil supplies, and reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and toxic pollutants to the atmosphere (McLaughlin 1998). Interestingly, on-farm energy production is a very old concept, extending back to 19th century America when both transpofiation and work on the farm were powered by approximately 27 million draft animals and fueled by 34 million hectares of grasslands (Vogel 1996). Today a new form of energy production is envisioned for some of this same acreage. The method of energy production is exactly the same - solar energy captured in photosynthesis, but the subsequent modes of energy conversion are vastly different, leading to the production of electricity, transportation fuels, and chemicals from the renewable feedstocks. While energy prices in the United States are among the cheapest in the world, the issues of high dependency on imported oil, the uncertainties of maintaining stable supplies of imported oil from finite reserves, and the environmental costs associated with mining, processing, and combusting fossil fuels have been important drivers in the search for cleaner burning fuels that can be produced and renewed from the landscape. At present biomass and bioenergy combine provide only about 4% of the total primary energy used in the U.S. (Overend 1997). By contrast, imported oil accounts for approximately 44% of the foreign trade deficit in the U.S. and about 45% of the total annual U.S. oil consumption of 34 quads (1 quad = 1015 Btu, Lynd et al. 1991). The 22 quads of oil consumed by transportation represents approximately 25% of all energy use in the US and excedes total oil imports to the US by about 50%. This oil has environmental and social costs, which go well beyond the purchase price of around $15 per barrel. Renewable energy from biomass has the potential to reduce dependency on fossil fhels, though not to totally replace them. Realizing this potential will require the simultaneous development of high yielding biomass production systems and bioconversion technologies that efficiently convert biomass energy into the forms of energy and chemicals usable by industry. The endpoint criterion for success is economic gain for both agricultural and industrial sectors at reduced environmental cost and reduced political risk. This paper reviews progress made in a program of research aimed at evaluating and developing a perennial forage crop, switchgrass as a regional bioenergy crop. We will highlight here aspects of research progress that most closely relate to the issues that will determine when and how extensively switchgrass is used in commercial bioenergy production.

  8. Research Master's Degree in Soil and Crop Sciences A candidate for a research master's degree in Soil and Crop Sciences is expected to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    ___________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ Research Master's Degree in Soil and Crop Sciences A candidate for a research master's degree in Soil and Crop Sciences is expected to demonstrate mastery of knowledge and skill in the Field of Soil and Crop research in the field of soil and crop sciences. Candidates are expected to synthesize and create new

  9. Water footprint assessment of crop production in Shaanxi, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellekoop, Michel

    #12;i Water footprint assessment of crop production in Shaanxi, China Bachelor Thesis Civil, Yangling, China Keywords: Agricultural crops, water footprint, Shaanxi province, CROPWAT #12;ii #12;iii ABSTRACT The water footprint, introduced by professor A.Y. Hoekstra, is an indicator of freshwater use

  10. Developing salt-tolerant crop plants: challenges and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumwald, Eduardo

    Developing salt-tolerant crop plants: challenges and opportunities Toshio Yamaguchi and Eduardo areas of the world; the need to produce salt-tolerant crops is evident. Two main approaches are being used to improve salt tolerance: (i) the exploitation of natural genetic variations, either through

  11. Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV July 21, 2005 David Francis and Allen Van Deynze At the recent ASHS meetings in Las Vegas, a workshop "Translational Genomics of Vegetable Crops interventions" (Minna and Gazdar, 1996). In applied plant science, "translational genomics" implies

  12. Profitability of Willow Biomass Crops Affected by Incentive Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Crops in New York Short-rotation woody crops (SRWC) like shrub willow (Salix spp.) are a potential source of biomass for energy generation and bioproducts in the USA [1, 2] and globally [3]. While@syr.edu Bioenerg. Res. (2013) 6:53≠64 DOI 10.1007/s12155-012-9234-y #12;result in a very positive net energy

  13. Faculty of Landscape Architecture, Horticulture and Crop Production Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Landscape Architecture, Horticulture and Crop Production Science Agroecology 2 years science. Among the subjects covered are:Agronomy with ecological and conservation awareness; Integrated - Environmental Issues in Crop Production, 15 credits - Project Based Research Training, 15 credits - or other

  14. GEOGRAPHICAL APPROACHES TO CROP CONSERVATION: THE PARTITIONINGOF GENETIC DIVERSITY IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    , University of Wisconsin, Mad- ison, W15 3706) and David S. Douches(Department of Crop and Soil ScienceGEOGRAPHICAL APPROACHES TO CROP CONSERVATION: THE PARTITIONINGOF GENETIC DIVERSITY IN ANDEAN POTATOES1 KARL S. ZIMMERER AND DAVID S. DOUCHES Zimmerer,Karl S. (Department of Geography, 384 Science Hall

  15. Energy Crops and their Implications on Surface Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Atul K.

    Energy Crops and their Implications on Surface Energy and Water Balance Yang Song Rahul Barman Phenological differences Variation in water and thermal energy consumption #12;Objectives Examine potential crops on energy and water balance Temporal and spatial patterns of · Evapotranspiration · Radiation

  16. May 27, 1996 Paul Gepts 1 The Crop of the DayThe Crop of the Day

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gepts, Paul

    ://monsterbit.com/touch/greentea.html: Touchstone - Green tea http://newcrop.hort.purdue.edu/hort/newcrops/Crops/Tea: New Crops (Purdue U.): Tea million lbs. ≠ green: 12 ≠ oolong: 2 ≠ jasmine: 0.5 Biggest suppliers? Argentina (33% of black tea), China. Three types of tea derived from Camellia sinensis: green, black, and oolong tea. ≠ For green tea, leaves

  17. Factors that Most Influence Success or Failure in Illicit Crop Reduction and Drug Supply Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Listerman, Jeffrey Sloan

    2014-12-31

    Several interrelated drivers of illicit crop cultivation appear remarkably consistent across virtually all illegal crop producing regions: insurgency or armed conflict, insufficient state authority and weak territorial ...

  18. Density derived estimates of standing crop and net primary production in the giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Daniel; Rassweiler, Andrew; Arkema, Katie

    2009-01-01

    1991) Production and standing stocks of the kelp MacrocystisDensity derived estimates of standing crop and net primarycult to measure variables of standing crop and net primary

  19. Functional Genomics of Drought Tolerance in Bioenergy Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Hengfu [ORNL; Chen, Rick [ORNL; Yang, Jun [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL; Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Ye, Ning [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Cheng, Zong-Ming [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    With the predicted trends in climate change, drought will increasingly impose a grand challenge to biomass production. Most of the bioenergy crops have some degree of drought susceptibility with low water-use efficiency (WUE). It is imperative to improve drought tolerance and WUE in bioenergy crops for sustainable biomass production in arid and semi-arid regions with minimal water input. Genetics and functional genomics can play a critical role in generating knowledge to inform and aid genetic improvement of drought tolerance in bioenergy crops. The molecular aspect of drought response has been extensively investigated in model plants like Arabidopsis, yet our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying drought tolerance in bioenergy crops are limited. Crops exhibit various responses to drought stress depending on species and genotype. A rational strategy for studying drought tolerance in bioenergy crops is to translate the knowledge from model plants and pinpoint the unique features associated with individual species and genotypes. In this review, we summarize the general knowledge about drought responsive pathways in plants, with a focus on the identification of commonality and specialty in drought responsive mechanisms among different species and/or genotypes. We describe the genomic resources developed for bioenergy crops and discuss genetic and epigenetic regulation of drought responses. We also examine comparative and evolutionary genomics to leverage the ever-increasing genomics resources and provide new insights beyond what has been known from studies on individual species. Finally, we outline future exploration of drought tolerance using the emerging new technologies.

  20. Mixed n-Step MIR Inequalities, n-Step Conic MIR Inequalities and a Polyhedral Study of Single Row Facility Layout Problem†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanjeevi, Sujeevraja

    2012-10-19

    study of the triplet formulation for the single row facility layout problem (SRFLP). For any number of departments n, we prove that the dimension of the triplet polytope (convex hull of solutions to the triplet formulation) is n(n - 1)(n - 2)/3. We...

  1. MODELING PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF HETEROGENEOUS ROSE CROP CANOPIES IN THE GREENHOUSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieth, J. Heinrich

    MODELING PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF HETEROGENEOUS ROSE CROP CANOPIES IN THE GREENHOUSE Soo-Hyung Kim and J training system ("bent canopy") is widely used in greenhouse rose production. The bent canopy consists

  2. Crop Production Variability and U.S. Ethanol Mandates†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Jason P.

    2014-07-08

    . Second, the short-run economic impact of RFS relaxation alternatives is investigated using an optimization modeling framework where crop mix and livestock breeding herds are held fixed. Third, the long-run implications of RFS relaxation are investigated...

  3. Manganese in Texas Soils and its Relation to Crops.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlyle, E. C. (Elmer Cardinal)

    1931-01-01

    to applications of manganese sulfate. Twenty-one Texas soils have been tested for their response to manganese sulfate by means of pot experiments. No marked increase in the growth of crops was produced by manganese sulfate. On six of the soils manganese... of Procecture 9 .............................. Ifethod for Pot Experiments 10 Determination of ISlanganese in Crops ...................... 10 T)etermination of Acid-soluble 3langanese in Soil ............ 10 Determination of Total Illlanganese in Soil...

  4. Plasma flows in the heliosheath along the Voyager 1 and 2 trajectories due to effects of the 11 yr solar cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Provornikova, E.; Opher, M.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Richardson, J. D.; Toth, G. E-mail: mopher@bu.edu E-mail: jdr@space.mit.edu

    2014-10-10

    We investigate the role of the 11 yr solar cycle variations in the solar wind (SW) parameters on the flows in the heliosheath using a new three-dimensional time-dependent model of the interaction between the SW and the interstellar medium. For boundary conditions in the model we use realistic time and the latitudinal dependence of the SW parameters obtained from SOHO/SWAN and interplanetary scintillation data for the last two solar cycles (1990-2011). This data set generally agrees with the in situ Ulysses measurements from 1991 to 2009. For the first ?30 AU of the heliosheath the time-dependent model predicts constant radial flow speeds at Voyager 2 (V2), which is consistent with observations and different from the steady models that show a radial speed decrease of 30%. The model shows that V2 was immersed in SW with speeds of 500-550 km s{sup Ė1} upstream of the termination shock before 2009 and in wind with upstream speeds of 450-500 km s{sup Ė1} after 2009. The model also predicts that the radial velocity along the Voyager 1 (V1) trajectory is constant across the heliosheath, contrary to observations. This difference in observations implies that additional effects may be responsible for the different flows at V1 and V2. The model predicts meridional flows (VN) higher than those observed because of the strong bluntness of the heliosphere shape in the N direction in the model. The modeled tangential velocity component (VT) at V2 is smaller than observed. Both VN and VT essentially depend on the shape of the heliopause.

  5. Crop and Soil Science Sequence This concentration emphasizes the scientific aspects of agronomy including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branoff, Theodore J.

    Crop and Soil Science Sequence This concentration emphasizes the scientific aspects of agronomy and improving the soil physical, chemical and microbial characteristics to enhance crop production breeding, soil and crop management, cropping systems, and plant nutrition. Agronomists are employed by seed

  6. Sept/Oct 2010 ListProc Newsletter 2009 Honey Crop Prices: Queens and Almonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Proc Newsletter 2009 Honey Crop Prices: Queens and Almonds Yellowjacket Bait CSBA Convention Bee World Revived

  7. Guidelines for graduate students in Soil and Crop Sciences, Cornell University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    1 Guidelines for graduate students in Soil and Crop Sciences, Cornell University Table of Contents and concentrations. About 33 faculty have been drawn together into the field of Soil and Crop Sciences by mutual, Field Crop Science, Soil Science, and Agronomy. The field of Soil and Crop Sciences is closely linked

  8. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Alex

    An expected global increase in bioenergy-crop cultivation as an alternative to fossil fuels will have consequences on both global climate and local air quality through changes in biogenic emissions of volatile organic ...

  9. Leucaena and tall grasses as energy crops in humid lower south USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prine, G.M.; Woodard, K.R.; Cunilio, T.V.

    1994-12-31

    The tropical leguminous shrub/tree, leucaena (Leucaena spp. mainly leucocephala), and perennial tropical tall grasses such as elephantgrass (Pennisetum purpureum), sugarcane, and energycane (Saccharum spp.) are well adapted to the long growing seasons and high rainfall of the humid lower South. In much of the area the topgrowth is killed by frost during winter and plants regenerate from underground parts in spring. Selected accessions from a duplicated 373 accession leucaena nursery had an average annual woody stem dry matter production of 31.4 Mg ha{sup -1}. Average oven dry stem wood yields from selected accessions adjusted for environmental enrichment over the 4 growth seasons were 78.9 Mg ha{sup -1} total and average annual yield of 19.7 Mg ha{sup -1}. The tall perennial grasses have linear growth rates of 18 to 27 g m{sup 2}d{sup -1} for long periods (140 to 196 d and sometimes longer) each season. Oven dry biomass yields of tall grasses have varied from 20 to 45 Mg ha{sup -1} in mild temperature locations to over 60 Mg ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} in warm subtropics of the lower Florida peninsula. Tall grasses and leucaena, once established, may persist for many seasons. A map showing the possible range of the crops in lower South is shown. Highest biomass yields of tall grasses have been produced when irrigated with sewage effluent or when grown on phosphatic clay and muck soils of south Florida. Several companies are considering using leucaena and/or tall grasses for bioenergy in the phosphatic mining area of Polk County, Florida.

  10. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Porter, William C.; Rosenstiel, Todd N.; Guenther, Alex; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Barsanti, Kelley

    2015-05-06

    An expected global increase in bioenergy-crop cultivation as an alternative to fossil fuels will have consequences on both global climate and local air quality through changes in biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). While greenhouse gas emissions may be reduced through the substitution of next-generation bioenergy crops such as eucalyptus, giant reed, and switchgrass for fossil fuels, the choice of species has important ramifications for human health, potentially reducing the benefits of conversion due to increases in ozone (O?) and fine particulate matter (PM???) levels as a result of large changes in biogenic emissions. Using the Community Earth Systemmore†ĽModel we simulate the conversion of marginal and underutilized croplands worldwide to bioenergy crops under varying future anthropogenic emissions scenarios. A conservative global replacement using high VOC-emitting crop profiles leads to modeled population-weighted O? increases of 5Ė27 ppb in India, 1Ė9 ppb in China, and 1Ė6 ppb in the United States, with peak PM??? increases of up to 2 ?gm?≥. We present a metric for the regional evaluation of candidate bioenergy crops, as well as results for the application of this metric to four representative emissions profiles using four replacement scales (10Ė100% maximum estimated available land). Finally, we assess the total health and climate impacts of biogenic emissions, finding that the negative consequences of using high-emitting crops could exceed 50% of the positive benefits of reduced fossil fuel emissions in value.ę†less

  11. Using Legumes to Enhance Sustainability of Sorghum Cropping Systems in the East Texas Pineywoods Ecoregion: Impacts on Soil Nitrogen, Soil Carbon, and Crop Yields†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neely, Clark B

    2013-05-03

    bicolor (L.) Moench], high-biomass sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench], and annual forage cropping systems. These studies quantified legume soil moisture usage and C and N contributions to the soil and subsequent crop yields in East Texas. Primary...

  12. License Agreement Ts and Cs Reach Through/FOU/3yr/50k Page 1 of 9 Rev. 29Oct2013 PATENT AND TECHNOLOGY EXCLUSIVE LICENSE AGREEMENT SHORT FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    License Agreement Ts and Cs ≠ Reach Through/FOU/3yr/50k Page 1 of 9 Rev. 29Oct2013 PATENT AND TECHNOLOGY EXCLUSIVE LICENSE AGREEMENT SHORT FORM STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS A. DEFINITIONS 1. AFFILIATE (50%) owned by a business entity that owns more than fifty percent (50%) of LICENSEE. 2. LICENSED

  13. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 SOYBEAN INSECT CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    scouting and treatment thresholds tailored for use in narrow rows. There are several sampling alternatives-382- 8473 or www.gemplers.com) and Forestry Suppliers (800-647-5368 or www.forestry-suppliers.com). Ask

  14. Cosmological constraints from measurements of type Ia supernovae discovered during the first 1.5 yr of the Pan-STARRS1 survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rest, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Scolnic, D.; Riess, A.; Rodney, S.; Brout, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Foley, R. J.; Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Stubbs, C. W.; Kirshner, R. P.; Challis, P.; Czekala, I.; Drout, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Huber, M. E.; Tonry, J. L. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Narayan, G. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Smartt, S. J. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT71NN (United Kingdom); Schlafly, E. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, KŲnigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Botticella, M. T. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Salita Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); and others

    2014-11-01

    We present griz {sub P1} light curves of 146 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia; 0.03 < z < 0.65) discovered during the first 1.5 yr of the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey. The Pan-STARRS1 natural photometric system is determined by a combination of on-site measurements of the instrument response function and observations of spectrophotometric standard stars. We find that the systematic uncertainties in the photometric system are currently 1.2% without accounting for the uncertainty in the Hubble Space Telescope Calspec definition of the AB system. A Hubble diagram is constructed with a subset of 113 out of 146 SNe Ia that pass our light curve quality cuts. The cosmological fit to 310 SNe Ia (113 PS1 SNe Ia + 222 light curves from 197 low-z SNe Ia), using only supernovae (SNe) and assuming a constant dark energy equation of state and flatness, yields w=?1.120{sub ?0.206}{sup +0.360}(Stat){sub ?0.291}{sup +0.269}(Sys). When combined with BAO+CMB(Planck)+H {sub 0}, the analysis yields ?{sub M}=0.280{sub ?0.012}{sup +0.013} and w=?1.166{sub ?0.069}{sup +0.072} including all identified systematics. The value of w is inconsistent with the cosmological constant value of Ė1 at the 2.3? level. Tension endures after removing either the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) or the H {sub 0} constraint, though it is strongest when including the H {sub 0} constraint. If we include WMAP9 cosmic microwave background (CMB) constraints instead of those from Planck, we find w=?1.124{sub ?0.065}{sup +0.083}, which diminishes the discord to <2?. We cannot conclude whether the tension with flat ?CDM is a feature of dark energy, new physics, or a combination of chance and systematic errors. The full Pan-STARRS1 SN sample with ?three times as many SNe should provide more conclusive results.

  15. Experiments with Fertilizers on Rotated and Non-Rotated Crops.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner)

    1928-01-01

    ., Assisiant; Ranch Recoi and Accounts RURAL HOME RESEARCH: JESSIE WHITACRE. Ph. D., Chief MAMIE GRIMES, M. S., Textile and Clothing S~ecral~st M. S.. Nutrition Spec L. G. RAGSDALE, B: S.. Soil Siruewor ROTANY: SIMON E. WOLFF, M. S., Botanist SWINE... This is a report of experiments conducted over a period of 14 years to study the effect of fertilizers, manure, removal. of crop residues, and rota- tion on the yield of crops. The fertilizer treatments included superphos- phate; superphosphate and manure...

  16. 2013 AnnuAl report Prairie StriPS and row CroPS Prairie Fish lAndScAping with nAtiVe SmAll treeS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to a lesson learned the hard way. The Dust Bowl of the 1930s resulted from a devastating drought that increased wind erosion, carrying fertile topsoil from the Midwest to as far away as Washington, D

  17. Reclaimed Water as an Alternative Water Source for Crop Irrigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Etxeberria, Edgardo

    Reclaimed Water as an Alternative Water Source for Crop Irrigation Lawrence R. Parsons1 University Francisco, CA 94114 Robert Holden Monterey Regional Water Pollution Control Agency, 5 Harris Court, Building D, Monterey, CA 93940 David W. York York Water Circle, 3158 S. Fulmer Circle, Tallahassee, FL 32303

  18. Effect of alkalinity in irrigation water on selected greenhouse crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valdez Aguilar, Luis Alonso

    2005-11-01

    Effect of Alkalinity in Irrigation Water on Selected Greenhouse Crops. (August 2004) Luis Alonso Valdez Aguilar, B.S., Universidad Aut??noma de Nuevo Le??n, Mexico; M.S., Universidad Aut??noma Chapingo, Mexico Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. David...

  19. Purpose-designed Crop Plants for Biofuels BIOENERGY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purpose-designed Crop Plants for Biofuels BIOENERGY PROGRAM The Texas AgriLife Research Center for the biofuels industry. This program recognizes that the ideal combination of traits required for an economically and energetically sustainable biofuels industry does not yet exist in a single plant spe- cies

  20. FIELD CROPS 2012 Weeds: Corn 5-53

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    in Delmarva corn production. To be successful in controlling weeds in corn, the weed control program must this record to plan your weed control program. Cultural control. Several aspects of cultural weed control should be considered in planning a corn weed control program. These include weed-free seed, cover crops

  1. Editor's Choice Editor's Choice: Crop Genome Plasticity and Its Relevance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Wayne

    . The term GE is preferred over the term "genetically modified" (commonly referred to as GMEditor's Choice Editor's Choice: Crop Genome Plasticity and Its Relevance to Food and Feed Safety of Genetically Engineered Breeding Stacks1 Genetically engineered (GE) stacks, combinations of two or more single

  2. HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2012 Table of Contents 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2012 Table of Contents 1 1 Regulations and Basic Information SafeQuantitiesofLiquidMaterials(EmulsifiableConcentrates,Etc.)for .......... 1-29 Various Quantities of Water Table 1.8 - Pounds of Active Ingredients per Gallon, Pounds per

  3. HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2011 Table of Contents 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2011 Table of Contents 1 1 Regulations and Basic Information SafeQuantitiesofLiquidMaterials(EmulsifiableConcentrates,Etc.)for .......... 1-30 Various Quantities of Water Table 1.8 - Pounds of Active Ingredients per Gallon, Pounds per

  4. Emergy Analysis of Sugarcane (energy crop) Water Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    diagrams Energy & Material Flow Data Emergy computations Analysis 5. Case Study #12;12Annual Southwest and Material Flow data #12;EmergyEvaluationTable 15 Unit Solar Solar Data EMERGY* EMERGY Note Item Unit (unitsEmergy Analysis of Sugarcane (energy crop) Water Management HENDRY COUNTY SUSTAINABLE BIOFUELS

  5. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa ≠ 2002 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs

  6. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa ≠ 2000 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agriculture cooperatives around the state. These costs estimates are representative

  7. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa ≠ 2006 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs

  8. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa ≠ 2005 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs

  9. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa ≠ 2001 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agriculture cooperatives around the state. These costs estimates are representative

  10. Emulating maize yields from global gridded crop models using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emulating maize yields from global gridded crop models using statistical estimates Elodie Blanc and Benjamin Sultan Report No. 279 March 2015 #12;The MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global from two established MIT research centers: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center

  11. Scientists, growers assess trade-offs in use of tillage, cover crops and compost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01

    depth depth depth depth compost was added two times perConv. crops were present. Compost was ap- Main effect Fof tillage, cover crops and compost Louise E. Jackson Irenee

  12. OUTLOOK: Specialty crops and methyl bromide alternatives: Taking stock after 7 years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Browne, Greg T

    2013-01-01

    finding alternatives to Outlook Specialty crops and methylNumber 3 Steve Fennimore Outlook Non-fumigant approaches to

  13. Effect of Organic Farming on Soil Fertility , Yield and Quality of Crops in the Tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhaskaran, Usha Pankajam; Krishna, Devi

    2009-01-01

    manures by the farmers in Kerala, the most southern State ofvegetable crops grown in Kerala, cowpea occupies a prime

  14. The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brentrup, Frank

    2009-01-01

    of food, feed and bio-energy. Intensive crop production withfor food, feed and bio-energy. The agricultural contribution

  15. Promoting policy development and an EU Action Plan for the Woody Energy Crops Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Promoting policy development and an EU Action Plan for the Woody Energy Crops Sector Kevin Lindegaard, Crops for Energy Ltd #12;What are short rotation plantations (SRPs)? ∑ Woody crops grown at close, Germany, Poland, Belgium Industry Public bodies Research Institutions Joint Action Plan Common Strategies

  16. CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, SEPTEMBEROCTOBER 2011 2219 The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, SEPTEMBER≠OCTOBER 2011 2219 RESEARCH The normalized difference vegetation.2135/cropsci2010.12.0729 Published online 6 July 2011. © Crop Science Society of America | 5585 Guilford Rd, reflectance at 661 nm; R935, reflectance at 935 nm. Published in Crop Sci. 51:2219≠2227 (2011). doi: 10

  17. CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, JANUARYFEBRUARY 2011 323 Turfgrass quality is evaluated by integrating factors of can-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, JANUARY≠FEBRUARY 2011 323 RESEARCH Turfgrass quality is evaluated: 10.2135/cropsci2010.05.0296 Published online 15 Nov. 2010. © Crop Science Society of America | 5585 area index; NDVI, normalized difference vegetation index. Published in Crop Sci. 51:323≠332 (2011). doi

  18. Collection Policy: SOIL, CROP AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES Subject Scope | Priority Tables | Other policies . . .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Collection Policy: SOIL, CROP AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES Subject Scope | Priority Tables | Other. Research is tending away from classical agronomy to the science of soil, crop, air. More emphasis is on the environment, less on agriculture. 1.3 Graduate program The Field of Soil, Crop and Atmospheric Sciences offers

  19. Reply to Brush et al.: Wake-up call for crop conservation science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey

    LETTER Reply to Brush et al.: Wake-up call for crop conservation science We strongly concur is increasing evidence that small-scale farmers throughout the world, and especially in areas of crop domestication and diversity, continue to maintain a diverse set of crop varieties" (3) and "after thirty years

  20. CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 52, MAYJUNE 2012 1209 Cereal cyst nematode (CCN) describes a group of closely

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappu, Hanu R.

    CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 52, MAY≠JUNE 2012 1209 RESEARCH Cereal cyst nematode (CCN) describes a group, Institute of Crop Sciences, Shanxi Acad- emy of Agricultural Sciences, Taiyuan 030032, China; T.D. Murray:1209≠1217 (2012). doi: 10.2135/cropsci2011.11.0591 © Crop Science Society of America | 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison

  1. Impacts of land use change due to biofuel crops on carbon balance, bioenergy production, and agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    Impacts of land use change due to biofuel crops on carbon balance, bioenergy production that biofuel crops have much higher net pri- mary production (NPP) than soybean and wheat crops. When food). Global biofuel production has increased dramatically in the last decade, especially in United States

  2. A LIDAR-based crop height measurement system for Miscanthus giganteus Lei Zhang, Tony E. Grift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G stem densities. The results showed an average error of 5.08% with a maximum error of 8% and a minimum of bioenergy crop performance. Field crops such as corn and soybean are harvested for their seeds, and various flow measurements. However, in the case of bioenergy crops, the complete above ground plant

  3. Industrial Crops and Products 33 (2011) 504513 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    online 5 January 2011 Keywords: Bioenergy Energy crops Specific energy consumption Mechanical size sizes after comminution were found inversely proportional to the bulk densities of all four energy crops crops. The bulk densities for 4-mm and smaller Miscanthus and switchgrass particles were higher than

  4. Effect of crop residue harvest on long-term crop yield, soil erosion, and carbon balance: tradeoffs for a sustainable bioenergy feedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregg, Jay S.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2010-08-26

    Agricultural residues are a potential feedstock for bioenergy production, if residue harvest can be done sustainably. The relationship between crop residue harvest, soil erosion, crop yield and carbon balance was modeled with the Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator/ Environment Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) using a factorial design. Four crop rotations (winter wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] Ė sunflower [Helianthus annuus]; spring wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] Ė canola [Brassica napus]; corn [Zea mays L.] Ė soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]; and cotton [Gossypium hirsutum] Ė peanut [Arachis hypogaea]) were simulated at four US locations each, under different topographies (0-10% slope), and management practices [crop residue removal rates (0-75%), conservation practices (no till, contour cropping, strip cropping, terracing)].

  5. Methods for generating or increasing revenues from crops

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Copenhaver, Gregory P.; Keith, Kevin; Preuss, Daphne

    2007-03-20

    The present invention provides methods of doing business and providing services. For example, methods of increasing the revenue of crops are provided. To this end, the method includes the use of a nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and mini chromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  6. Biomass fuel from woody crops for electric power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perlack, R.D.; Wright, L.L.; Huston, M.A.; Schramm, W.E.

    1995-06-22

    This report discusses the biologic, environmental, economic, and operational issues associated with growing wood crops in managed plantations. Information on plantation productivity, environmental issues and impacts, and costs is drawn from DOE`s Biofuels Feedstock Development as well as commercial operations in the US and elsewhere. The particular experiences of three countries--Brazil, the Philippines, and Hawaii (US)--are discussed in considerable detail.

  7. Accurate, objective, reliable, and timely predictions of crop yield over large areas are critical to helping ensure the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Shunlin

    /export plans and prices. Development of objective mathematical models of crop yield prediction using remote

  8. September 12, 2003 Crop Conditions: Harvesting is well underway. Peaches are just finishing up in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    drilling $ 5 million/yr for 5 to 15 years. 200 sites http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100023711 River Salt Waterways Salt NELSON TAILINGS Ymir Tailings Salmo Tailings COASTAL METALS Island Copper Myra

  9. Transgenic crops get a test in the wild

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cherfas, J.

    1991-02-22

    A novel British research program called PROSAMO - Planned Release of Selected and Modified Organisms - has just produced its first batch of results on the ecological behavior of a genetically manipulated variety of oil seed rape (known to Americans as canola). As expected, the preliminary data indicate that these plants do not outgrow their competitors in the wild, nor is there any evidence that they pass on their foreign genes to other species. PROSAMO is moving on to test other crops with other foreign genes. If these results are as reassuring, scientists around the world will have solid evidence with which to soothe fears.

  10. Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin:Pontiac Biomass Facility Jump to:Biola, California:CombustionCrop

  11. D1 Fuel Crops Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9) Wind Farm JumpAlum|Cyclone PowerD1 Fuel Crops

  12. The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brentrup, Frank

    2009-01-01

    the GHG emissions (ďcarbon footprintĒ) of crop production inMaterials and methods Ė ďcarbon footprintĒ calculation basedLCA) principles A carbon footprint is ďthe total set of

  13. Modeling Poplar Growth as a Short Rotation Woody Crop for Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Quinn James

    2014-01-01

    a Short Rotation Woody Crop for Biofuels Q. J. Hart 1,? , O.for cellulosic derived biofuels. The ability to accuratelycrops for bioenergy and biofuels applications. In vitro

  14. Toxic hazards of the industrial atmospheric pollutant sulphur dioxide on tree crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rani, B Dr.

    2009-01-01

    and Khan, 1984). In Kerala State, though atmosphericperennial tree crop of Kerala, which plays a major role inat Trivandrum district of Kerala State, concerned with the

  15. Tension wood holds clues to higher fuel yields from biomass crops...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tension wood holds clues to higher fuel yields from biomass crops October 25, 2011 Poplar stems (left) respond to bending stress by producing tension wood, which has...

  16. Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stapleton, James J; Banuelos, Gary

    2009-01-01

    liquid biofuels from biomass: The writings on the walls. Newreduced feed intake. Biomass crop sustainability flexibilityMC, et al. 2009. Cali- fornia biomass resources, potentials,

  17. Toxic hazards of the industrial atmospheric pollutant sulphur dioxide on tree crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rani, B Dr.

    2009-01-01

    of industrial activity. Coconut (Cocos nucifera L. ), theon tree crops such as coconut. The study aims at elucidatingnut characters of the coconut palm. MATERIALS AND METHODS

  18. The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brentrup, Frank

    2009-01-01

    emissions in fertiliser production. IFS (The InternationalImpact of Agricultural Crop Production using the Life CycleN fertilizer rates in cereal production. Europ. J. Agronomy

  19. Switchgrass is a promising, high-yielding crop for California biofuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    both as forage and as a biofuel crop, switchgrass may bepanic grass grown as a biofuel in southern England. Bioresfor switchgrass for biofuel systems. Biomass Bioenergy 30:

  20. Microsoft Word - S07963_MND 5yr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and MyersHr.Evaluation of GroundDraft Calendar

  1. Microsoft Word - S07963_MND 5yr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbinsMonumentThird6010 Task11 Groundwater MonitoringSite

  2. Microsoft Word - S07963_MND 5yr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbinsMonumentThird6010 Task11 Groundwater

  3. Microsoft Word - S07963_MND 5yr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbinsMonumentThird6010 Task11 GroundwaterCommunity

  4. 2632 WWW.CROPS.ORG CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 50, NOVEMBERDECEMBER 2010 Seashore paspalum is a warm-season turfgrass that is adapted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Wayne

    , Univ. of Georgia, Griffin Campus, 1109 Experiment St., Griffin, GA 30223. This research was supported Genetics and Genomics and Dep. of Crop and Soil Sciences, Univ. of Georgia, 111 Riverbend Rd., Athens, GA

  5. Reducing New Hampshire Crop Losses to a Serious Invasive Insect Dr. Alan Eaton, UNH Cooperative Extension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Reducing New Hampshire Crop Losses to a Serious Invasive Insect Dr. Alan Eaton, UNH Cooperative Extension February 2015 Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) is a Chinese insect that reached New Hampshire in 2011 that it occurred here, it caused $1.516 million in crop loss in New Hampshire. The UNH Cooperative Extension IPM

  6. THE POTENTIAL FOR MICRO-ALGAE AND OTHER "MICRO-CROPS" TO PRODUCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    THE POTENTIAL FOR MICRO-ALGAE AND OTHER "MICRO-CROPS" TO PRODUCE SUSTAINABLE BIOFUELS A REVIEW INTRODUCTION Biofuel derived from algae and other micro-crops has been proposed as an environmentally benign transportation fuel. Algae can be cultivated on low productivity lands using low quality water. Interest in algae

  7. Biomass resource potential for selected crops in Hawaii. [Koa haole (giant leucaena); napier and guinea grass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seki, A.

    1982-06-01

    The biomass crops selected for review were koa haole (giant leucaena), napier and guinea grass, and eucalyptus (saligna, grandis, and globulus). The islands examined were Hawaii, Kauai, Maui, and Molokai. The potential land acreage for growing these crops was estimated grossly. As anticipated, the island of Hawaii had the largest land potential with eucalyptus having the greatest potential land acreage.

  8. REVIEW PAPER Strategies for reducing the carbon footprint of field crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    REVIEW PAPER Strategies for reducing the carbon footprint of field crops for semiarid areas emission. To provide the potential solution, we estimated the carbon footprint [i.e., the total amount the effect of crop sequences on the carbon footprint of durum wheat. Key strategies for reducing the carbon

  9. 24 Crops & Soils magazine | NovemberDecember 2013 As the last of the corn and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    24 Crops & Soils magazine | November≠December 2013 As the last of the corn and soybean harvest crop rotation, disease-resistant hybrid selection, optimum planting timing, and post-harvest tillage." Other claims sug- gested strobilurins improve efficient use of water and nitrogen, and improve stalk

  10. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 WEED CONTROL IN PEANUT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 158 WEED CONTROL IN PEANUT Mike;South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 159 Preplant/Burndown Herbicides for Weed, wild radish, or Carolina geranium. GLYPHOSATE can also be tank-mixed with VALOR or AIM to improve

  11. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 COTTON NEMATODE CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 117 COTTON NEMATODE CONTROL John D it and will need to check that specific label for rules and restrictions. #12;South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 118 FUMIGANT, GRANULAR, AND LIQUID NEMATICIDES AVAILABLE IN SOUTH CAROLINA

  12. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 COTTON DISEASE CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 111 COTTON DISEASE CONTROL John D the label. Do not use treated seed for feed or food. #12;South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field by commercial seed treaters. #12;South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 113 AVAILABLE

  13. Influence of habitat and landscape perenniality on insect natural enemies in three candidate biofuel crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    biofuel crops Ben P. Werling a, , Timothy D. Meehan b , Claudio Gratton b , Douglas A. Landis April 2011 Accepted 22 June 2011 Available online 28 June 2011 Keywords: Biofuels Biodiversity Biological control Land use change a b s t r a c t Cultivation of biofuel crops could change agricultural

  14. Migration, isolation and hybridization in island crop populations: the case of Madagascar rice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purugganan, Michael D.

    Migration, isolation and hybridization in island crop populations: the case of Madagascar rice and Center for Genomics and Systems Biology, 1009 Silver, 100 Washington Square East, New York University or Asian rice is one of the key domesticated crop species in the world. The island of Madagascar off

  15. PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Horticultural Science/Crop Quality Position Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    , plastic mulches need to be disposed of at the end of the growing season. Biodegradable plastic mulches biodegradable plastic mulches degrade in soil and what their effect is on crop yield and quality. Field experiments will be conducted to investigate the effects of biodegradable plastic mulches on crop yield

  16. Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes Mary A Science+Business Media, LLC. 2010 Abstract Production of biofuel feedstocks in agricultural landscapes and generalist natural enemies in three model biofuel crops: corn, switch- grass, and mixed prairie, we tested

  17. Cost Methodology for Biomass Feedstocks: Herbaceous Crops and Agricultural Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Webb, Erin; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2009-12-01

    This report describes a set of procedures and assumptions used to estimate production and logistics costs of bioenergy feedstocks from herbaceous crops and agricultural residues. The engineering-economic analysis discussed here is based on methodologies developed by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) and the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA). An engineering-economic analysis approach was chosen due to lack of historical cost data for bioenergy feedstocks. Instead, costs are calculated using assumptions for equipment performance, input prices, and yield data derived from equipment manufacturers, research literature, and/or standards. Cost estimates account for fixed and variable costs. Several examples of this costing methodology used to estimate feedstock logistics costs are included at the end of this report.

  18. Biodiesel is produced from a wide variety of oilseed crops. In Europe, canola is the major biodiesel crop while in the U.S. soybeans dominates. Montana State University and USDA researchers have

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    for License Increased Oil Yield in Oilseed Crops to Enhance Biodiesel Production #12; have developed a protein that can be expressed in a variety of oilseed crops to increase the oil yield to work for a broad range of oilseed plants including biodiesel and cereal crops. Increased oil

  19. Slab retreat and active shortening along the central-northern The interpretation of CROP seismic profiles, integrated with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    linea sismica a riflessione CROP M-15 e la rielaborazione dei dati geologici e geofi- sici disponibili

  20. Impact of Climate Change on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirements and Soil Salinity in the SJV, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopmans, Jan W; Maurer, Edwin P

    2008-01-01

    many crops suffer heat stress beyond an optimal temperaturecrop growth due to heat stress and therefore a pronounced

  1. The Texas crop and livestock reporting service's data accumulation technique for cotton and an investigation into its reliability†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallant, Francis Xavier

    1971-01-01

    Texas Crop and Livestock Reporting Service Acreage and Production of Crops--1970. . . . . . 13 IV Farm Strata. 1969 Survey 14 16 VI Crop Reporter Questionnaire 20 VII Census Bureau Cotton Ginnings. . 23 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION: THE EXISTENCE... figures of Table I are derived from independent estimates of acreage planted, harvested, and total cotton production. The preliminary acreage planted and harvested figures are primarily the result of two sample surveys. These are the June Crop Survey...

  2. EFFICACY AND TIMING OF FUNGICIDES, BACTERICIDES, AND BIOLOGICALS for DECIDUOUS TREE FRUIT, NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adaskaveg, James E; Gubler, W D; Michailides, Themis J.; Holtz, Brent A.

    2010-01-01

    Apricot, plum, prune, peach Strawberry Apricot, peach,nectarine, plum StrawberryStrawberry Pome and stone fruit crops including almond;

  3. Impact of Climate Change on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirements and Soil Salinity in the SJV, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopmans, Jan W; Maurer, Edwin P

    2008-01-01

    on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirementsreduced surface water availability can be managed byrequirement and water availability (surface water and

  4. Development and Pilot Application of the California Urban and Biodiversity Analysis (CURBA) Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, John D.; Monzon, Juan Pablo; Reilly, Michael; Cogan, Chris

    1998-01-01

    projected urban growth are R o w & Field Crops, Orchards &Urban or Built- up Land Agricultural Land Row and Field Crops Irrigated Hayfield Pasture Orchard

  5. Essays on the Impact of Climate Change and Building Codes on Energy Consumption and the Impact of Ozone on Crop Yield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aroonruengsawat, Anin

    2010-01-01

    14 Impact of ozone on crop yield15 Data 15.1 OzoneEstimated effect of mean ozone on crop yields. . . . . . .

  6. CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 49, MARCHAPRIL 2009 589 The primary turf species used for golf course putting green

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsiang, Tom

    CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 49, MARCH≠APRIL 2009 589 RESEARCH The primary turf species used for golf course.2135/cropsci2008.06.0303 © Crop Science Society of America 677 S. Segoe Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA All rights. Laberge, Soils and Crops Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 2560 Hochelaga

  7. Fig 1. Willow biomass crops resprouting in the spring after being harvested the previous winter at the end of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Fig 1. Willow biomass crops resprouting in the spring after being harvested the previous winter BACKGROUND Research and development of shrub willows as biomass crops has been occurring since the mid to planting is an essential step in the biological and economic success of willow biomass crops. Typically

  8. THE SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD. XXVII. DISCOVERY OF NEW PROPER MOTION STARS WITH {mu} {>=} 0.''18 yr{sup -1} IN THE SOUTHERN SKY WITH 16.5 < R{sub 59F} {<=} 18.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Mark R.; Henry, Todd J.; Jao, Wei-Chun; Subasavage, John P.; Hambly, Nigel C. E-mail: thenry@chara.gsu.edu E-mail: jsubasavage@ctio.noao.edu

    2011-09-15

    Here we present 1584 new southern proper motion systems with {mu} {>=} 0.''18 yr{sup -1} and 16.5 > R{sub 59F} {>=} 18.0. This search complements the six previous SuperCOSMOS-RECONS (SCR) proper motion searches of the southern sky for stars within the same proper motion range, but with R{sub 59F} {<=} 16.5. As in previous papers, we present distance estimates for these systems and find that three systems are estimated to be within 25 pc, including one, SCR 1546-5534, possibly within the RECONS 10 pc horizon at 6.7 pc, making it the second nearest discovery of the searches. We find 97 white dwarf candidates with distance estimates between 10 and 120 pc, as well as 557 cool subdwarf candidates. The subdwarfs found in this paper make up nearly half of the subdwarf systems reported from our SCR searches and are significantly redder than those discovered thus far. The SCR searches have now found 155 red dwarfs estimated to be within 25 pc, including 10 within 10 pc. In addition, 143 white dwarf candidates and 1155 cool subdwarf candidates have been discovered. The 1584 systems reported here augment the sample of 4724 systems previously discovered in our SCR searches and imply that additional systems fainter than R{sub 59F} = 18.0 are yet to be discovered.

  9. Power Lines and Crops Can Be Good Neighbors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-08-01

    Two of the Pacific Northwestís greatest economic assets are its wealth of agriculture and its clean and reliable electricity fueled largely by hydropower. Sometimes the two intersect. Transmission lines carrying electricity to the regionís farms, businesses and homes must, of necessity, span large areas where people grow crops and orchards. To ensure a safe and reliable flow of electricity across these expanses, trees and other vegetation must be managed to certain standards. At the same time, the Bonneville Power Administration ó which owns and operates three-quarters of the regionís high-voltage transmission ó recognizes the importance of our regionís agricultural bounty. We are committed to working with individuals and agricultural communities to facilitate ongoing land-use activities in transmission rights-of-way as long as those uses are compatible with transmission safety and reliability standards. Our goal with vegetation management is to keep you and your property safe while protecting the reliability of our regionís electricity system. By working together, BPA and landowners can protect the system and public safety.

  10. Projecting net incomes for Texas crop producers: an application of probabilistic forecasting†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eggerman, Christopher Ryan

    2006-10-30

    Agricultural policy changes directly affect the economic viability of Texas crop producers because government payments make up a significant portion of their net farm income (NFI). NFI projections benefit producers, ...

  11. Crop water stress under climate change uncertainty : global policy and regional risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gueneau, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    Fourty percent of all crops grown in the world today are grown using irrigation, and shifting precipitation patterns due to climate change are viewed as a major threat to food security. This thesis examines, in the framework ...

  12. Field Guide to the Insects, Mites and Mollusks of Nursery, Floral and Greenhouse Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gouge, Dawn H.; Smith, Kirk A.; Wilkerson, Don

    2000-01-12

    This field guide provides excellent photo identification keys for numerous pests and beneficials found in nursery, greenhouse and floral crops. The text includes a physical description, examples of damage and information on the life cycle of each...

  13. Evaluation of Salmonella disinfection strategies for pre-slaughter broiler crop decontamination†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnhart, Eric Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the following studies was to evaluate selected potential decontamination methods for ability to reduce the incidence of Salmonella recovery from broiler crops during pre-slaughter feed withdrawal. The efficacy of prolonged lactose...

  14. Multisensor Fusion of Ground-based and Airborne Remote Sensing Data for Crop Condition Assessment†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Huihui

    2012-02-14

    provide applicators with guidance equipment configurations that can result in herbicide savings and optimized applications in other crops. The main focus of this research was to apply sensor fusion technology to ground-based and airborne imagery data...

  15. Establishing Crop Acreage Flexibility Restraints for Subregions of the Texas High Plains†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Condra, G. D.; Lacewell, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    Cropping pattern shifts in many aggregate linear programming (LP) models need to be constrained due to institutional, marketing machinery, and price uncertainty factors. The purpose of this study was to estimate constraints which are referred...

  16. Organic farming practices for rice under diversified cropping systems in humid tropics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varughese, Kuruvilla Dr; Rani, B Dr; Abraham, Suja; John, Jacob Dr; M, Vijayan Dr

    2009-01-01

    HTM (accessed on 15-1- KAU (Kerala Agricultural University).Crops. (2002) 12 th edition, Kerala Agricultural University,humid tropical regions of Kerala there is a reduction in

  17. Agronomy Journal Volume 106, Issue 2 2014 545 Crop Ecology & Physiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Eugster, Marc L. Fischer, John A. Gamon, Maheteme T. Gebremedhin, Aaron J. Glenn, Timothy J. Griffis- Ramirez et al., 2011; Gebremedhin et al., 2012). In these studies, including legume crops with different

  18. Novel enabling technologies of gene isolation and plant transformation for improved crop protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torok, Tamas

    2013-02-04

    Meeting the needs of agricultural producers requires the continued development of improved transgenic crop protection products. The completed project focused on developing novel enabling technologies of gene discovery and plant transformation to facilitate the generation of such products.

  19. Response of Peanuts to Irrigation Management at Different Crop Growth Stages†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howell, T. A.; McFarland, M. J.; Reddell, D. L.; Brown, K. W.; Newton, R. J.; Dahmen, P.

    1980-01-01

    for peanuts at different crop growth stages for the Spanish and the Florunner varieties. The yield of the two varieties was evaluated under seven different irrigation treatments including a "no stress" check treatment and a dryland treatment. Each treatment...

  20. Analysis of MODIS 250 m NDVI Using Different Time-Series Data for Crop Type Separability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Eunmok

    2014-08-31

    The primary objectives of this research were to: (1) investigate the use of different compositing periods of NDVI values of time-series MODIS 250 m data for distinguishing major crop types on the central Great Plains of ...

  1. Crop Protection 26 (2007) 894902 Integrated approaches to understanding and managing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    2007-01-01

    . Dudeke a College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824) in question, (ii) the effects of past and current crop production system practices on nematode behaviour

  2. Recursive Programming Model for Crop Production on the Texas High Plains†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reneau, D. R.; Lacewell, R. D.; Ellis, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    A flexible, recursive programming model of crop production on the Texas High Plains was developed. Besides the linear programming (LP) Optimization routine and recursive feedback section, the model also includes a matrix generator and report writer...

  3. Assessment of G3(MP2)//B3 theory including a pseudopotential for molecules containing first-, second-, and third-row representative elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocha, Carlos Murilo Romero; Morgon, Nelson Henrique; Custodio, Rogťrio; Pereira, Douglas Henrique; Departamento de CiÍncias Exatas e Biotecnolůgicas, Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Campus de Gurupi, 77410-530 Gurupi, Tocantins

    2013-11-14

    G3(MP2)//B3 theory was modified to incorporate compact effective potential (CEP) pseudopotentials, providing a theoretical alternative referred to as G3(MP2)//B3-CEP for calculations involving first-, second-, and third-row representative elements. The G3/05 test set was used as a standard to evaluate the accuracy of the calculated properties. G3(MP2)//B3-CEP theory was applied to the study of 247 standard enthalpies of formation, 104 ionization energies, 63 electron affinities, 10 proton affinities, and 22 atomization energies, comprising 446 experimental energies. The mean absolute deviations compared with the experimental data for all thermochemical results presented an accuracy of 1.4 kcal mol{sup ?1} for G3(MP2)//B3 and 1.6 kcal mol{sup ?1} for G3(MP2)//B3-CEP. Approximately 75% and 70% of the calculated properties are found with accuracy between Ī2 kcal mol{sup ?1} for G3(MP2)//B3 and G3(MP2)//B3-CEP, respectively. Considering a confidence interval of 95%, the results may oscillate between Ī4.2 kcal mol{sup ?1} and Ī4.6 kcal mol{sup ?1}, respectively. The overall statistical behavior indicates that the calculations using pseudopotential present similar behavior with the all-electron theory. Of equal importance to the accuracy is the CPU time, which was reduced by between 10% and 40%.

  4. Crop and vegetative growth impact on water infiltration into gulf coast soils†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Dwayne Jack

    1985-01-01

    CROP AND VEGETATIVE GROWTH IMPACT ON WATER INFILTRATION INTO GULF COAST SOILS A Thesis by DWAYNE JACK PEIRCE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1985 Major Subject: Soil Science CROP AND VEGETATIVE GROWTH IMPACT ON WATER INFILTRATION INTO GULF COAST SOILS A Thesis by DWAYNE JACK PEIRCE Approved as to style and content by: L. R. ossner (Chairman of Committee) M. J. Mc...

  5. The Effect of Cropping Upon the Active Potash of the Soil.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1924-01-01

    and the active potash lost from the soil, calculated from Table 3, is ,722 -L .016. This is a high correlation and shows a high relation between the pat- ash removed by crops and the 'active potash lost by soils. The correlation between the butter production... EXPEWMENT s r: ATION AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF %'EXAS W. B. BIZZELL, President -- -- BULLETIN NO. 325 SEPTEMBER, 1924 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY EFFECT OF CROPPING UPON THE ACTIVE POTASH OF THE SOIL B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION...

  6. Copyright 2014 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison

  7. Copyright 2012 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison

  8. GM Crops Are Not Containable: so what? E. Ann Clark, Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph (eaclark@uoguelph.ca) 2005 E. Ann Clark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, E. Ann

    GM Crops Are Not Containable: so what? E. Ann Clark, Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph years of commercial experience with GM crops allow us to explore two theses: 1. that the premise that GM field crops can co-exist without contaminating weedy relatives as well as non-GM crops is inconsistent

  9. A National Assessment of Promising Areas for Switchgrass, Hybrid Poplar, or Willow Energy Crop Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.; Walsh, M.E.

    1999-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to systematically assess the cropland acreage that could support energy crops and the expected farm gate and delivered prices of energy crops. The assessment is based on output from two modeling approaches: (1) the Oak Ridge County-Level Energy Crop (ORECCL) database (1996 version) and (2) the Oak Ridge Integrated Bioenergy Analysis System (ORIBAS). The former provides county-level estimates of suitable acres, yields, and farmgate prices of energy crops (switchgrass, hybrid poplar, willow) for all fifty states. The latter estimates delivered feedstock prices and quantities within a state at a fine resolution (1 km2) and considers the interplay between transportation costs, farmgate prices, cropland density, and facility demand. It can be used to look at any type of feedstock given the appropriate input parameters. For the purposes of this assessment, ORIBAS has been used to estimate farmgate and delivered switchgrass prices in 11 states (AL, FL, GA, IA, M N, MO, ND, NE, SC, SD, and TN). Because the potential for energy crop production can be considered from several perspectives, and is evolving as policies, economics and our basic understanding of energy crop yields and production costs change, this assessment should be viewed as a snapshot in time.

  10. Potential producers and their attitudes toward adoption of biomass crops in central Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahmani, M.; Hodges, A.W.; Stricker, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    A recent study by the University of Florida, Center for Biomass Programs (1996) showed that biomass crops have potential as a new agricultural commodity in central Florida. Both herbaceous and woody biomass crops have high yields, and weather and soil conditions are favorable. In the Polk County area over 40,371 ha (100,000 A) of phosphate-mined land and about 161,486 ha (400,000 A) of pastureland may be available for biomass production at low opportunity cost. Phosphate land is owned by a few mining companies while pastureland is owned by or rented to cattlemen. Infrastructure for large-scale crop production, such as in the Midwest United States, does not presently exist in central Florida. Personal interviews were conducted with phosphate company managers and a mail survey was conducted with 940 landowners, with at least 16 ha (40 A) of agricultural land. Data were gathered related to decision making factors in growing biomass and other new crops. Results suggested that economic factors, particularly availability of an established market and an assured high return per acre were considered the most important factors. Lack of familiarity with new crops was an important barrier to their adoption. Potential net returns and production costs were considered the most important information needed to make decisions about growing biomass crops.

  11. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrWoodChips | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformation

  12. Genetic diversity in chestnuts of Kashmir valley Efficient managing practices require an understanding of the root distribution of crop in walnut (Juglans regia)-crop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xi, Weimin

    variation of roots for soybean (Glycine max) and peanut (Arachis hypogaea) grown with walnut trees. Crop. The RLD of intercropped peanut primarily located in the 0-10 cm soil layer, reaching the average of 52 peanut was achieved in the 10-20 cm soil layer. The RLDs of both intercropped soybean and peanut

  13. The effect of various cropping systems upon organic matter, total nitrogen, cation exchange capacity, exchangeable cations, conductivity and reaction†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mannan, Mohammad Abdul

    1958-01-01

    of organic matter, total nitrogen, cation exchange capacity, exchangeable sodium, potassium and magnesium, conductivity and pH were made from the samples of seven different crop- ping systems. These cropping systems were started in January of 1950... significant variation in concentration of exchangeable sodium with depth. Exchan sable Potassium The exchangeable potassium content of the plots under various cropping systems ranged from 0. 96 to 1. 22 m. e. /100 gms in the surface layer, from 0. 57 to 0...

  14. Benefits of supplementing an industrial waste anaerobic digester with energy crops for increased biogas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nges, Ivo Achu, E-mail: Nges.Ivo_Achu@biotek.lu.se [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Escobar, Federico; Fu Xinmei; Bjoernsson, Lovisa [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study demonstrates the feasibility of co-digestion food industrial waste with energy crops. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laboratory batch co-digestion led to improved methane yield and carbon to nitrogen ratio as compared to mono-digestion of industrial waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-digestion was also seen as a means of degrading energy crops with nutrients addition as crops are poor in nutrients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was concluded that co-digestion led an over all economically viable process and ensured a constant supply of feedstock. - Abstract: Currently, there is increasing competition for waste as feedstock for the growing number of biogas plants. This has led to fluctuation in feedstock supply and biogas plants being operated below maximum capacity. The feasibility of supplementing a protein/lipid-rich industrial waste (pig manure, slaughterhouse waste, food processing and poultry waste) mesophilic anaerobic digester with carbohydrate-rich energy crops (hemp, maize and triticale) was therefore studied in laboratory scale batch and continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) with a view to scale-up to a commercial biogas process. Co-digesting industrial waste and crops led to significant improvement in methane yield per ton of feedstock and carbon-to-nitrogen ratio as compared to digestion of the industrial waste alone. Biogas production from crops in combination with industrial waste also avoids the need for micronutrients normally required in crop digestion. The batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. This was done based on the ratio of methane yields observed for laboratory batch and CSTR experiments compared to full scale CSTR digestion of industrial waste. The economy of crop-based biogas production is limited under Swedish conditions; therefore, adding crops to existing industrial waste digestion could be a viable alternative to ensure a constant/reliable supply of feedstock to the anaerobic digester.

  15. Results from intercropping fast-growing trees and food crops at Morogoro, Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redhead, J.F.

    1992-12-31

    In Morogoro, Tanzania, agroforestry trials were set up to investigate intercropping with primarily eucalypt species. The climate in the region is very similar to Kolar, Karnataka State, India. Three crops-sorghum, bean and maize-were grown annually under Eucalyptus tereticornis at 2.5 m x 2.5 m for three years with a range of weeding practices. Plots that were intercropped with beans showed best results. Shading by the eucalypts after three years resulted in negligible crop yields in all treatments. Three tree spacings of E. camaldulensis (3 m x 3 m, 4 m x 4 m, and 5 m x 5 m) were combined with the intercropping of beans and maize. Beans gave satisfactory yields at all spacings, but the maize showed significantly depressed yields at 3 m x 3 m at 4 m x 4 m, but was similar to pure maize crop at 5 m x 5 m spacing. Overall the extra revenue from a food crop in the first and second year of tree growth increases the return from the land. The short rotation of fast growing trees depleted the soil of nutrients and, as with other crops, the fertility would have to be maintained by applying fertilizer.

  16. Hemicellulolytic organisms in the particle-associated microbiota of the hoatzin crop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godoy-Vitorino, Filipa; Malfatti, Stephanie; Garcia-Amado, Maria A.; Dominguez-Bello, Maria Gloria; Hugenholtz, Phillip; Tringe, Susannah

    2011-05-31

    The hoatzin (Opisthocomus hoazin) is a South American herbivorous bird, that has an enlarged crop analogous to the rumen, where foregut microbes degrade the otherwise indigestible plant materials, providing energy to the host. The crop harbors an impressive array of microorganisms with potentially novel cellulolytic enzymes. Thie study describes the composition ofthe particle-associated microbiota in the hoatzin crop, combining a survey of 16S rRNA genes in 7 adult birds and metagenome sequencing of two animals. The pyrotag survey demonstrates that Prevotellaceae, are the most abundant and ubiquitous taxa, suggesting that the degradation of hemicellulose is an important activity in the crop. Nonetheless, preliminary results from the metagnome of the particle-associated microbiota of two adult birds show that the crop microbiome contains a high number of genes encoding cellulases (such as GH5) more abundant than those of the termite gut, as well as genes encoding hemicellulases. These preliminary results show that the carbohydate-active enzyme genes in the cropmetagenome could be a source of biochemical catalysts able to deconstruct plant biomass.

  17. Global Simulation of Bioenergy Crop Productivity: Analytical framework and Case Study for Switchgrass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, S. Surendran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nichols, Jeff A. {Cyber Sciences} [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL] [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL] [ORNL; Singh, Nagendra [ORNL] [ORNL; Kang, Shujiang [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary global assessments of the deployment potential and sustainability aspects of biofuel crops lack quantitative details. This paper describes an analytical framework capable of meeting the challenges associated with global scale agro-ecosystem modeling. We designed a modeling platform for bioenergy crops, consisting of five major components: (i) standardized global natural resources and management data sets, (ii) global simulation unit and management scenarios, (iii) model calibration and validation, (iv) high-performance computing (HPC) modeling, and (v) simulation output processing and analysis. A case study with the HPC- Environmental Policy Integrated Climate model (HPC-EPIC) to simulate a perennial bioenergy crop, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and global biomass feedstock analysis on grassland demonstrates the application of this platform. The results illustrate biomass feedstock variability of switchgrass and provide insights on how the modeling platform can be expanded to better assess sustainable production criteria and other biomass crops. Feedstock potentials on global grasslands and within different countries are also shown. Future efforts involve developing databases of productivity, implementing global simulations for other bioenergy crops (e.g. miscanthus, energycane and agave), and assessing environmental impacts under various management regimes. We anticipated this platform will provide an exemplary tool and assessment data for international communities to conduct global analysis of biofuel biomass feedstocks and sustainability.

  18. Using a Decision Support System to Optimize Production of Agricultural Crop Residue Biofeedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed L. Hoskinson; Ronald C. Rope; Raymond K. Fink

    2007-04-01

    For several years the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing a Decision Support System for Agriculture (DSS4Ag) which determines the economically optimum recipe of various fertilizers to apply at each site in a field to produce a crop, based on the existing soil fertility at each site, as well as historic production information and current prices of fertilizers and the forecast market price of the crop at harvest, for growing a crop such as wheat, potatoes, corn, or cotton. In support of the growing interest in agricultural crop residues as a bioenergy feedstock, we have extended the capability of the DSS4Ag to develop a variable-rate fertilizer recipe for the simultaneous economically optimum production of both grain and straw, and have been conducting field research to test this new DSS4Ag. In this paper we report the results of two years of field research testing and enhancing the DSS4Agís ability to economically optimize the fertilization for the simultaneous production of both grain and its straw, where the straw is an agricultural crop residue that can be used as a biofeedstock.

  19. Efficacy and Timing of Fungicides, Bactericides, and Biologicals for Decidous Tree Fruit, Nut, Strawberry, and Vine Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adaskaveg, Jim; Gubler, Doug; Michailides, Themis; Holtz, Brent

    2008-01-01

    Tables for Fruit, Nut, Strawberry, and Vine Cropsó2008Phomopsis sp. Host(s) Pistachio Almond Strawberry Almond,peach, strawberry Grapevine Grapevine Strawberry Grapevine

  20. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01

    orchard, IGR irrigated grain crops, IRF irrigated row and field crops, IRH irrigated hayfield, PAS pasture, RIC rice, URB urban,orchard, IGR irrigated grain crops, IRF irrigated row and field crops, IRH irrigated hayfield, PAS pasture, RIC rice, URB urban,

  1. Tuberous legumes: preliminary evaluation of tropical Australian and introduced species as fuel crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saxon, E.C.

    1981-04-01

    The evaluation of native and introduced legumes with starch-storing roots or tubers was undertaken to test whether plants traditionally collected as food by Australian aborigines might have a role in the development of crops for liquid fuel production (by fermentation of carbohydrates to ethanol). Tuberous-rooted legumes from overseas were planted at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, division of Tropical Crops and Pastures, Kimberley Research Station, Western Australia (15/sup 0/39'S, 128/sup 0/42'E) in December 1974, March 1978 and February 1979. Roots from the latter plantings were harvested in June 1979. Native plant material was collected during visits to aboriginal communities in the Kimberleys between April and June 1979. The native and introduced specimens were analyzed for fermentable carbohydrate and protein content. Several native plants appear more promising than introduced species as liquid fuel crops.

  2. A second row Parking Paradox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. Fleurke; C. Kuelske

    2008-11-28

    We consider two variations of the discrete car parking problem where at every vertex of the integers a car arrives with rate one, now allowing for parking in two lines. a) The car parks in the first line whenever the vertex and all of its nearest neighbors are not occupied yet. It can reach the first line if it is not obstructed by cars already parked in the second line (screening). b) The car parks according to the same rules, but parking in the first line can not be obstructed by parked cars in the second line (no screening). In both models, a car that can not park in the first line will attempt to park in the second line. If it is obstructed in the second line as well, the attempt is discarded. We show that both models are solvable in terms of finite-dimensional ODEs. We compare numerically the limits of first and second line densities, with time going to infinity. While it is not surprising that model a) exhibits an increase of the density in the second line from the first line, more remarkably this is also true for model b), albeit in a less pronounced way.

  3. Katherine Rowe September 29, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radcliffe, David

    . The site is over 20 years old, has not needed repaving, and has staved off sinkholes in an area prone

  4. Influence of rainfall on the retention of sludge trace metals by the leaves of forage crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Stephen Grady

    1977-01-01

    INFLUENCE OF RAINFALL ON THE RETENTION OF SLUDGE TRACE METALS BY THE LEAVES OF FORAGE CROPS A Thesis STEPHEN GRADY JONES Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Soil Science INFLUENCE OF RAINFALL ON THE RETENTION OF SLUDGE TRACE MFTALS BY THE LEAVES OF FORAGE CROPS A Thesis by STEPHEN GRADY JONES Approved a to style and content by: 1 (Chairman of Committee...

  5. Effect of coppicing on hybrid poplar fine root dynamics M. Bdneau D. Auclair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    spacing and the 3 following treatments were applied, to 800 m2 plots: 11: intensive cultivation (plastic mulch, weeding between rows, fertiliza- tion) 1 yr rotation coppice; 13: intensive cultiva- tion 3 yr

  6. Biodiesel is produced from a wide variety of oilseed crops. In Europe, canola is the major biodiesel crop while in the U.S. soybeans dominate. Montana State University researchers have developed a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Technology Biodiesel is produced from a wide variety of oilseed crops. In Europe, canola is the major biodiesel crop while in the U.S. soybeans dominate. Montana State University researchers have plants used for biodiesel. Seed oil content increases are induced by puroindoline genes which promote

  7. Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Through Energy Crops in the U.S. With Implications for Asian-Pacific Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Through Energy Crops in the U.S. With Implications for Asian&M University Seniority of authorship is shared November 2001 #12;Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Through Energy Crops in greenhouse gas (GHG) emission mitigation efforts has increased in recent years. While the original text

  8. Part 4: Conclusion "Growing biofuel crops is a considerably long-term investment. We need to frame the food vs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ." and the following outcomes - "(1) Strategic partnerships for the research, development, testing, and deployment of renewable biofuels technologies and production of biomass crops; (2) Evaluation of Hawaii's potential/or crops, conversion of biomass to useable fuels, distribution infrastructure, and end user markets. Each

  9. Metal contamination of soils and crops affected by the Chenzhou lead/zinc mine spill (Hunan, China)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    Metal contamination of soils and crops affected by the Chenzhou lead/zinc mine spill (Hunan, China polluted with As, Cd, Zn, Pb and Cu. The contamination levels were in the order of GYBNSZYNJTC showing heavily contaminated than seeds or fruits. Ipomoea was the most severely contaminated crop

  10. Industrial Crops and Products 43 (2013) 802811 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Saad A.

    2013-01-01

    and environmental and waste management concerns due to non-biodegradability of conventional plastics have thusIndustrial Crops and Products 43 (2013) 802≠811 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect Industrial Crops and Products journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/indcrop Production

  11. Application of food and feed safety assessment principles to evaluate transgenic approaches to gene modulation in crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Wayne

    Article history: Received 18 August 2009 Accepted 12 April 2010 Keywords: Genetically modified crop (GM such as transcription factors (TF) that modify the expression of endogenous plant genes. To date, the food and feed safety of genetically modified (GM) crops has been assessed by the application of a set

  12. Biernbaum, Production Costs, HRT 322, 1998, pg 1 Greenhouse Crop Production: Counting the Costs and Making Cents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Biernbaum, Production Costs, HRT 322, 1998, pg 1 Greenhouse Crop Production: Counting the Costs are the cost of production and the profitability of a crop calculated? What are variable and fixed costs? What of production and the income generated from sales meets your personal goal. A financial prospectus or estimate

  13. Improving Crop Yield and Water Productivity by Ecological Sanitation and Water Harvesting in South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Improving Crop Yield and Water Productivity by Ecological Sanitation and Water Harvesting in South and fertility constraints in rain- fed smallholder agriculture in South Africa, namely in situ water harvesting, is to use water harvesting and conservation technologies (WH).9 The principal hydrological functions of WH

  14. CROPS AND SOILS RESEARCH PAPER The effects of treatments with selected pesticides on viability and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CROPS AND SOILS RESEARCH PAPER The effects of treatments with selected pesticides on viability of the present study was to evaluate the effect of pesticidal seed treatments of maize (Zea mays L.) on seed consisted of water-treated seeds. None of the pesticides reduced the standard germination under laboratory

  15. Robotics in Crop Production Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Illinois at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robotics in Crop Production Tony Grift Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering such as harvesting of citrus fruits, grapes, and raisins. An important part of Automation is the use of robots. Robotics in agriculture is not a new concept; in controlled environments (green houses), it has a his- tory

  16. Predicting and mitigating the net greenhouse gas emissions of crop rotations in Western Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    balance; Agro-ecosystem model; CERES-EGC; Bayesian calibration; Green- house gases; Nitrous oxidePredicting and mitigating the net greenhouse gas emissions of crop rotations in Western Europe gases (GHG) con- tributing to net greenhouse gas balance of agro-ecosystems. Evaluating the impact

  17. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 AQUATIC WEED CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 301 AQUATIC WEED CONTROL Cory Heaton and the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES). Aquatic pesticide applicators may be required to submit a Notice of Intent (NOI), practice Integrated Pest Management (IPM), and develop a Pesticide

  18. 2 SPRAY OILS--BEYOND 2000 Modern use of petroleum-derived oils as agricultural crop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnello, Arthur M.

    2 SPRAY OILS--BEYOND 2000 Abstract Modern use of petroleum-derived oils as agricultural crop,buttheseweretoophytotoxic.Eventually, researchersconcentratedondistillatesintherangebetween kerosene and lubricating oils.Three basic classes of carbon structures present in petroleum oils (aromatics and other un- saturated components) in oils that were removable with sulfuric acid; the remainder

  19. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2014 TOBACCO HARVEST MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2014 278 TOBACCO HARVEST MANAGEMENT occurring process that must occur before the tobacco is harvested. Tobacco should be harvested in three ahead to determine if chemical will cause yellowing. Mix in 40-60 gal water/A and apply at 40-60 psi

  20. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 TOBACCO HARVEST MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 282 TOBACCO HARVEST MANAGEMENT occurring process that must occur before the tobacco is harvested. Tobacco should be harvested in three ahead to determine if chemical will cause yellowing. Mix in 40-60 gal water/A and apply at 40-60 psi

  1. Cropping Sequence Effect of Pea and Pea Management on Spring Wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    and harvest timing affected both soil N and PASW; a drought from 2 June to 5 July made water the key limiting harvest management on soil N contribution in no-till systems. For example, pea forage could provide crops in no-till systems. Specifically, the goal was to measure the effects of pea harvest timing

  2. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 COTTON INSECT MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 97 COTTON INSECT MANAGEMENT Jeremy K in South Carolina. Hundreds of species of insects may be found in cotton, but only a limited number growers in South Carolina have planted cotton varieties protected from tobacco budworm and bollworm

  3. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 PEANUT NEMATODE CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 197 PEANUT NEMATODE CONTROL Jay W nematodes have been a relatively minor problem on peanuts in South Carolina. Peanut root-knot (race 1. Sting nematode is rarely found in peanut fields in South Carolina but when observed damage can be severe

  4. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 SOYBEAN DISEASE CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 259 SOYBEAN DISEASE CONTROL John D years. Soybean Rust is active in South Carolina primarily after mid-August in most years. Soybean South Carolina Soybean Production Guide for information on accurate identification of diseases based

  5. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 CORN INSECT CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 48 CORN INSECT CONTROL Francis in each field where corn is to be planted. Major insect pests of corn in South Carolina. Insect and Bt11, vip protein Vip3A and cry protein Cry1Ab). #12;South Carolina Pest Management Handbook

  6. CROPS AND SOILS RESEARCH PAPER Improved weather-based late blight risk management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    CROPS AND SOILS RESEARCH PAPER Improved weather-based late blight risk management: comparing models of weather data. Although many new digital weather and forecast datasets are gridded data, the current improvements made to an artificial neuralnetwork for forecasting weather-based potato late blight (Phytophthora

  7. Modeling Field-level Irrigation Demands with Changing Weather and Crop Choices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MardanDoost, Babak

    2015-05-31

    . The presented water budget model is capable of estimate daily water demand over space and time under predicted climate and land-use change. The model-predicted irrigation demand was developed based on crop-specific evapotranspiration, weather data, and with 2007...

  8. Simulation of the long-term accumulation of radiocontaminants in crop plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreckhise, R.G.

    1980-03-01

    Most radiological dose assessment models ignore the long-term buildup of radiocontaminants in the soil. When they estimate levels in crop plants from root uptake, these models account only for the annual input from the source into the soil. Almost all of the models ignore the build-up of contaminants in the soil profile due to the accumulation in the roots and the build-up from the above-ground plant material that is buried by plowing. The model described in this report simulates the entire system involved in the cycling and accumulation of radionuclides in cultivated land. The model, named CROPRE, was developed to predict both the long-term accumulation of radionuclides and the resulting concentrations of radionuclides in vegetation. This model was designed to include: (1) the chronic input of contaminated irrigation water into both the soil compartment and directly onto the surface of the vegetation; (2) the incorporation of radiocontaminants in the soil organic matter pool and their eventual release for re-uptake by subsequent crops; (3) the removal of contaminants from the system when the crops are harvested; and (4) the downward movement of radionuclides and their loss from the system by percolation. The CROPRE model more realistically simulates the cycling of radiocontaminants in crop plants over long periods of time than does the other models. It is recommended that it be incorporated into existing radiation dose commitment models.

  9. Communication by Plant Growth Regulators in Roots and Shoots of Horticultural Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Jacqueline K.

    Communication by Plant Growth Regulators in Roots and Shoots of Horticultural Crops Anish Malladi, and distribution of PGRs communicate developmental, stress-related, or environmental cues that alter growth. Short-distance communication involves changes in biosynthesis or metabolic conversion, whereas longer-distance communication

  10. Applications of Copulas to Analysis of Efficiency of Weather Derivatives as Primary Crop Insurance Instruments†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filonov, Vitaly

    2012-10-19

    insurance. It is also a matter of common knowledge that weather is an important production factor and at the same time one of the greatest sources of risk in agriculture. Hence introduction of crop insurance contracts, based on weather indexes, might be a...

  11. Winter crop sensitivity to inter-annual climate variability in central India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeFries, Ruth S.

    Winter crop sensitivity to inter-annual climate variability in central India Pinki Mondal & Meha Dordrecht 2014 Abstract India is predicted to be one of the most vulnerable agricultural regions to future variability in a local market and subsistence-based agricultural system in central India, a data

  12. Crop rotation and soil temperature influence the community structure of Aspergillus flavus in soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotty, Peter J.

    June 2010 Available online 14 July 2010 Keywords: Maize Cottonseed Biocontrol Population structure a b the strain L isolates. The S strain has been implicated as the primary causal agent of several contamination, the main causal agent of aflatoxin contami- nation, frequently infects several agricultural crops

  13. Linkages among climate change, crop yields and MexicoUS cross-border migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oppenheimer, Michael

    Linkages among climate change, crop yields and Mexico≠US cross-border migration Shuaizhang Fenga change is expected to cause mass human migration, in- cluding immigration across international borders, and people's migration responses by using an instrumental variables approach. Our method allows us

  14. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 SOYBEAN NEMATODE CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 264 SOYBEAN NEMATODE CONTROL John D for more in-depth information on nematode management. NEMATICIDES AVAILABLE FOR CONTROLLING SOYBEAN Pesticide & Temik Brand 15G Lock'n Load Aldicarb Pesticide Aldicarb 3.0 - 5.0 lbs. Apply granules in a 6 ≠ 8

  15. Evaluation of Flax and Other Cool-Season Oilseed Crops for Yield and Adaptation in Texas†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darapuneni, Murali

    2012-10-19

    of study. Thanks also go to my friends and colleagues and the department faculty and staff for making my time at Texas A&M University a great experience. I also want to extend my gratitude to the Chevron Technology Ventures for providing funding... ................................................................................................... ix LIST OF TABLES .................................................................................................... x CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION AND LITERATURE REVIEWÖÖÖÖÖÖ.. 1 1.1 Important biodiesel crops...

  16. Effect of a Legume Cover Crop on Carbon Storage and Erosion in an Ultisol under Maize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    143 CHAPTER 10 Effect of a Legume Cover Crop on Carbon Storage and Erosion in an Ultisol under...........................................................................................145 10.2.3 Carbon and Nitrogen Determination, and Other Analyses......................................145 10.2.4 Determinations of Runoff, Soil Losses, and Eroded Carbon

  17. Predicting the net carbon exchanges of crop rotations in Europe with an agro-ecosystem model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Predicting the net carbon exchanges of crop rotations in Europe with an agro-ecosystem model S.Lehuger@art.admin.ch. Fax: (+41) 44 377 72 01. Phone: (+41) 44 377 75 13. hal-00414342,version2-1Sep2010 #12;Abstract Carbon and measuring land-atmosphere carbon exchanges from arable lands are important tasks to predict the influence

  18. Predicting Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Predicting Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop biogeochemical cycles and global greenhouse gas budgets. Energy cane (Saccharum officinarum L.) is a sugarcane changing land from grazed pasture to energy cane would affect greenhouse gas (CO2, CH4 and N2O) fluxes

  19. Bioenergy crop greenhouse gas mitigation potential under a range of management practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Bioenergy crop greenhouse gas mitigation potential under a range of management practices T A R A W on marginal lands annually without displacing food and to contribute to greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction an important renewable energy source for replacement of fossil fuels, but is of questionable greenhouse gas

  20. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 PEANUT INSECT MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 178 PEANUT INSECT MANAGEMENT J. W. Chapin, Extension Peanut Specialist Emeritus See the following tables for insect control recommendations and yield loss from both direct feeding and virus transmission (tomato spotted wilt). All commercial peanuts

  1. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 PEANUT DISEASE MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 184 PEANUT DISEASE MANAGEMENT Jay W. Chapin, Extension Peanut Specialist Emeritus Seedling Diseases: All peanut seed should be treated to peanuts by thrips, primarily tobacco thrips. TSWV reduces yield and causes shriveled, misshapen pods. All

  2. A System Dynamics Study of Carbon Cycling and Electricity Generation from Energy Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    Energy Information Administration GHG Green House Gasses GORCAM Graz-Oak Ridge Carbon Accounting Model1 A System Dynamics Study of Carbon Cycling and Electricity Generation from Energy Crops Hilary calling for a cap-and- trade program, was reintroduced in the United States Senate this year. The Energy

  3. On the regulation of spatial externalities: coexistence between GM and conventional crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -mediated gene flow is one of the main concerns associated with the introduc- tion of genetically modified (GM of genetically modified (GM) and conventional crops in the EU is permitted by the principle that farmers should in conventional food and feed. As GM material can mix with conventional material (through pollen dispersal

  4. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 TOBACCO DISEASE MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 293 TOBACCO DISEASE MANAGEMENT Bruce and potentially devastating diseases of tobacco can best be managed through a combination of control methods. It is urged that growers identify disease problems in their fields and follow disease management suggestions

  5. Simulating crop phenology in the Community Land Model and its impact on energy and carbon fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    , regional, and global scales. However, the evaluation of crop models that can be coupled to Earth system al., 2012; Levis et al., 2012]. Since CLM is part of the Earth system model framework management are required. The Community Land Model (CLM) is the land surface scheme of the Community Earth

  6. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2014 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2014 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn. They include the annual Iowa Farm Busi- ness Association record summaries, production and costs data from, and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These cost

  7. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2007 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2007 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn sources. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Asso- ciation record summaries, production and costs the state. These costs estimates are representative of average costs for farms in Iowa. Very large or small

  8. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2011 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2011 File A1-20 T heestimatedcostsofcorn the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from the Departments of selected agricultural coop- eratives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs estimates

  9. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2012 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2012 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Asso- ciation record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs

  10. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2010 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2010 File A1-20 T heestimatedcostsofcorn Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from the De- partments. Thesecostsestimatesarerepresentativeofaveragecosts for farms in Iowa. Very large or small farms may have lower or higher fixed costs per acre. Due

  11. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2009 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2009 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn sources. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Asso- ciation record summaries, production and costs the state. These costs estimates are representative of average costs for farms in Iowa. Very large or small

  12. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2013 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2013 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn. They include the annual Iowa Farm Busi- ness Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These cost

  13. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2008 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2008 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn sources. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Asso- ciation record summaries, production and costs the state. These costs estimates are representative of average costs for farms in Iowa. Very large or small

  14. Morphology and fitness components of wild 3 crop F1 hybrids of Sorghum bicolor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snow, Allison A.

    : implications for survival and introgression of crop genes in the wild pool Asfaw Adugna* and Endashaw Bekele and Huckabay, 1967) and in many cases, both occur in overlapping regions (Hooftman et al., 2007; Adugna and Burke, 2006). Wild and weedy sorghum populations exhibit great diversity (Adugna et al., 2012) and may

  15. Water and energy footprints of bioenergy crop production on marginal lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    of Zoology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA Abstract Water and energy demandsWater and energy footprints of bioenergy crop production on marginal lands A . K . B H A R D WA J and S . K . H A M I LT O N *w} *Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Michigan State University, East

  16. Aspects of Applied Biology 112, 2011 Biomass and Energy Crops IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Aspects of Applied Biology 112, 2011 Biomass and Energy Crops IV 147 By JACOB M JUNGERS, JARED J Program (CRP), may provide acreage and economic incentives for cellulosic energy production. Improving, biomass yields, bioenergy Introduction The United States'Energy Independence and SecurityAct of 2007 (EISA

  17. EFFICACY AND TIMING OF FUNGICIDES,BACTERICIDES, AND BIOLOGICALS for DECIDUOUS TREE FRUIT, NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS 2010 (rev. April 1, 2010)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adaskaveg, J E; Gubler, W D; Michailides, Themis J.; Holtz, Brent A.

    2010-01-01

    Apricot, plum, prune, peach Strawberry Apricot, peach,nectarine, plum StrawberryStrawberry Pome and stone fruit crops including almond;

  18. Copyright 2014 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison, exchangeable, nonexchangeable, and mineral. It has often been observed that crops do not respond, coupled with, lack of increases in crop yield. This presentation will present an historical perspective

  19. Influence of Cropping Systems On Cotton and Corn Yields on the Gulf Coast Prairie.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeter, B. E.; Smith, J. C.; Whiteley, E. L.

    1962-01-01

    and better stands of cotton were obtained. The main disadvantage of this system was that two planting operations a year were re- quired. Cropping systems containing Dallisgrass and White clover are more highly recommended than all other systems tested... clover can cause bloat in cattle; (3) 2 years are needed to obtain high forage yields and (4) it is difficult to obtain a good seedbed for corn or cotton when the land goes out of forage production. Dallisgrass and White clover produced higher...

  20. Global Economic Effects of Changes in Crops, Pasture, and Forests due to Changing Climate, Carbon Dioxide, and Ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John M.

    Multiple environmental changes will have consequences for global vegetation. To the extent that crop yields and pasture and forest productivity are affected there can be important economic consequences. We examine the ...

  1. 1973 projections of consumption, production, prices and crop values for Texas winter lettuce and early spring onions†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furrh, Samuel Roger

    1970-01-01

    1973 PROJECTIONS OF CONSUMPTION, PRODUCTION, PRICES AND CROP VALUES FOR TEXAS WINTER LETTUCE AND EARLY SPRING ONIONS A Thesis by SAMUEL ROGER FURRH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Augus t, l 9 70 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics 1973 PROJECTIONS OF CONSUMPTION, PRODUCTION, PRICES AND CROP VALUES FOR TEXAS WINTER LETTUCE AND EARLY SPRING ONIONS A Thesis SAMUEL ROGER FURRH Ap...

  2. Development and Deployment of a Short Rotation Woody Crops Harvesting System Based on a Case New Holland Forage Harvester and SRC Woody Crop Header

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenbies, Mark; Volk, Timothy

    2014-10-03

    Demand for bioenergy sourced from woody biomass is projected to increase; however, the expansion and rapid deployment of short rotation woody crop systems in the United States has been constrained by high production costs and sluggish market acceptance due to problems with quality and consistency from first-generation harvesting systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of crop conditions on the performance of a single-pass, cut and chip harvester based on a standard New Holland FR-9000 series forage harvester with a dedicated 130FB short rotation coppice header, and the quality of chipped material. A time motion analysis was conducted to track the movement of machine and chipped material through the system for 153 separate loads over 10 days on a 54-ha harvest. Harvester performance was regulated by either ground conditions, or standing biomass on 153 loads. Material capacities increased linearly with standing biomass up to 40 Mgwet ha-1 and plateaued between 70 and 90 Mgwet hr-1. Moisture contents ranged from 39 to 51% with the majority of samples between 43 and 45%. Loads produced in freezing weather (average temperature over 10 hours preceding load production) had 4% more chips greater than 25.4 mm (P < 0.0119). Over 1.5 Mgdry ha-1 of potentially harvested material (6-9% of a load) was left on site, of which half was commercially undesirable meristematic pieces. The New Holland harvesting system is a reliable and predictable platform for harvesting material over a wide range of standing biomass; performance was consistent overall in 14 willow cultivars.

  3. Pesticide impact on non-target wildlife in irrigated crops: simulated impact of cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides on white-winged doves in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pisani, Jorge Marcelo

    2007-09-17

    crosswind, moves out of the target site. Wind direction Drift = 2 - 8 % of insecticide applied 16 floodable rows. From this point, the amount of insecticide that directly reaches this area decreases over time (Himel et al., 1990) (Fig. 5.); yet...

  4. Forage Crops.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1901-01-01

    Reports of Cooperating Stockmen and Farmers from 71 Counties - Alfalfa - Japan Clover - Crimson Clover - White Clover - Velvet Bean - Beggar Weed - Cow Peas - Rescue Grass - Kaffir Corn - Field Corn - Chufas...

  5. An integrative modeling framework to evaluate the productivity and sustainability of biofuel crop production systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, X [University of Maryland; Izaurralde, R. C. [University of Maryland; Manowitz, D. [University of Maryland; West, T. O. [University of Maryland; Thomson, A. M. [University of Maryland; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL; Nichols, Jeff [ORNL; Williams, J. [AgriLIFE, Temple, TX

    2010-10-01

    The potential expansion of biofuel production raises food, energy, and environmental challenges that require careful assessment of the impact of biofuel production on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, soil erosion, nutrient loading, and water quality. In this study, we describe a spatially explicit integrative modeling framework (SEIMF) to understand and quantify the environmental impacts of different biomass cropping systems. This SEIMF consists of three major components: (1) a geographic information system (GIS)-based data analysis system to define spatial modeling units with resolution of 56 m to address spatial variability, (2) the biophysical and biogeochemical model Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) applied in a spatially-explicit way to predict biomass yield, GHG emissions, and other environmental impacts of different biofuel crops production systems, and (3) an evolutionary multiobjective optimization algorithm for exploring the trade-offs between biofuel energy production and unintended ecosystem-service responses. Simple examples illustrate the major functions of the SEIMF when applied to a nine-county Regional Intensive Modeling Area (RIMA) in SW Michigan to (1) simulate biofuel crop production, (2) compare impacts of management practices and local ecosystem settings, and (3) optimize the spatial configuration of different biofuel production systems by balancing energy production and other ecosystem-service variables. Potential applications of the SEIMF to support life cycle analysis and provide information on biodiversity evaluation and marginal-land identification are also discussed. The SEIMF developed in this study is expected to provide a useful tool for scientists and decision makers to understand sustainability issues associated with the production of biofuels at local, regional, and national scales.

  6. Effects of No-Till on Yields as Influenced by Crop and Environmental Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toliver, Dustin K.; Larson, James A.; Roberts, Roland K.; English, B.C.; De La Torre Ugarte, D. G.; West, Tristram O.

    2012-02-07

    Th is research evaluated diff erences in yields and associated downside risk from using no-till and tillage practices. Yields from 442 paired tillage experiments across the United States were evaluated with respect to six crops and environmental factors including geographic location, annual precipitation, soil texture, and time since conversion from tillage to no-till. Results indicated that mean yields for sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) with no-till were greater than with tillage. In addition, no-till tended to produce similar or greater mean yields than tillage for crops grown on loamy soils in the Southern Seaboard and Mississippi Portal regions. A warmer and more humid climate and warmer soils in these regions relative to the Heartland, Basin and Range, and Fruitful Rim regions appear to favor no-till on loamy soils. With the exception of corn (Zea mays L.) and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) in the Southern Seaboard region, no-till performed poorly on sandy soils. Crops grown in the Southern Seaboard were less likely to have lower no-till yields than tillage yields on loamy soils and thus had lower downside yield risk than other farm resource regions. Consistent with mean yield results, soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] and wheat grown on sandy soils in the Southern Seaboard region using no-till had larger downside yield risks than when produced with no-till on loamy soils. Th e key fi ndings of this study support the hypothesis that soil and climate factors impact no-till yields relative to tillage yields and may be an important factor infl uencing risk and expected return and the adoption of the practice by farmers.

  7. An Integrative Modeling Framework to Evaluate the Productivity and Sustainability of Biofuel Crop Production Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; West, T. O.; Post, W. M.; Thomson, Allison M.; Bandaru, V. P.; Nichols, J.; Williams, J.R.

    2010-09-08

    The potential expansion of biofuel production raises food, energy, and environmental challenges that require careful assessment of the impact of biofuel production on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, soil erosion, nutrient loading, and water quality. In this study, we describe a spatially-explicit integrative modeling framework (SEIMF) to understand and quantify the environmental impacts of different biomass cropping systems. This SEIMF consists of three major components: 1) a geographic information system (GIS)-based data analysis system to define spatial modeling units with resolution of 56 m to address spatial variability, 2) the biophysical and biogeochemical model EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) applied in a spatially-explicit way to predict biomass yield, GHG emissions, and other environmental impacts of different biofuel crops production systems, and 3) an evolutionary multi-objective optimization algorithm for exploring the trade-offs between biofuel energy production and unintended ecosystem-service responses. Simple examples illustrate the major functions of the SEIMF when applied to a 9-county Regional Intensive Modeling Area (RIMA) in SW Michigan to 1) simulate biofuel crop production, 2) compare impacts of management practices and local ecosystem settings, and 3) optimize the spatial configuration of different biofuel production systems by balancing energy production and other ecosystem-service variables. Potential applications of the SEIMF to support life cycle analysis and provide information on biodiversity evaluation and marginal-land identification are also discussed. The SEIMF developed in this study is expected to provide a useful tool for scientists and decision makers to understand sustainability issues associated with the production of biofuels at local, regional, and national scales.

  8. Determine metrics and set targets for soil quality on agriculture residue and energy crop pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Bonner; David Muth

    2013-09-01

    There are three objectives for this project: 1) support OBP in meeting MYPP stated performance goals for the Sustainability Platform, 2) develop integrated feedstock production system designs that increase total productivity of the land, decrease delivered feedstock cost to the conversion facilities, and increase environmental performance of the production system, and 3) deliver to the bioenergy community robust datasets and flexible analysis tools for establishing sustainable and viable use of agricultural residues and dedicated energy crops. The key project outcome to date has been the development and deployment of a sustainable agricultural residue removal decision support framework. The modeling framework has been used to produce a revised national assessment of sustainable residue removal potential. The national assessment datasets are being used to update national resource assessment supply curves using POLYSIS. The residue removal modeling framework has also been enhanced to support high fidelity sub-field scale sustainable removal analyses. The framework has been deployed through a web application and a mobile application. The mobile application is being used extensively in the field with industry, research, and USDA NRCS partners to support and validate sustainable residue removal decisions. The results detailed in this report have set targets for increasing soil sustainability by focusing on primary soil quality indicators (total organic carbon and erosion) in two agricultural residue management pathways and a dedicated energy crop pathway. The two residue pathway targets were set to, 1) increase residue removal by 50% while maintaining soil quality, and 2) increase soil quality by 5% as measured by Soil Management Assessment Framework indicators. The energy crop pathway was set to increase soil quality by 10% using these same indicators. To demonstrate the feasibility and impact of each of these targets, seven case studies spanning the US are presented. The analysis has shown that the feedstock production systems are capable of simultaneously increasing productivity and soil sustainability.

  9. Cotton Crop Mortgage Credit: The Banks, All-Cotton-Credit and Periodical Financial Distress -- A Remedy.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, R. L.

    sufficient reproach to Southern people? Should credit and community good-will be extended to continue a system of such calamitous possibilities? Not a Safe Credit Risk,óThe all-cotton farmer is an un- safe credit risk, and the credit merchant dependent...-cotton system, one-crop farming, and its periodi- cal distress to all business and community welfare, that it would be a reproach to any farmer, landlord or any one who did not grow or who prevented the growing of a full supply of food and feed for the family...

  10. Respornse of Irrigated Crops to Micronutrients In the Lower Rio Grande Valley.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burleson, C. A. (Charles Albertis); Gerard, C. J. (Cleveland Joseph); Cowley, W. R. (Walter Raymond)

    1964-01-01

    loam was screened for response to soil applications of zinc, iron, copper and manganese (Tables 1 and 3). Corn res~onded to all treatments both in 1959 and in 1963. Further tests are needed to deter- mine the best micronutrient combinations, source... of Irrigated Crops to Micronutrients IN the lower Eiu Gra~de Valley C. A. Burleson, C. J. Gerard and W. R. ~owley* THE ROLE of the micronutrients zinc, iron, mangirallese, boron, copper and molybdenum in plant nutrition has been reviewed in recent years...

  11. The Impact of Tenure Arrangements and Crop Rotations on Upper Gulf Coast Rice Farms.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Gregory M.; Rister, M. Edward; Richardson, James W.; Grant, Warren R.; Sij, John W. Jr

    1986-01-01

    , lenders, and landowners, among others. Throughout the study, emphasis was directed towards highlighting differences in the effect on a farm's economic viability among combi nations of two principal crop rota tions (soybeans-rice (SR) and soy beans..., the highest expected earnings being $- 23,183 for the SSR 1/7 strategy. The SSR 1/7 strategy was preferred to the other strategies (SR 1/7, SR 1/2, and SSR 1/2) for most categories of risk pref erences. Results of the sensitivity anal yses, based...

  12. UNCORRECTEDPROOF AGEE 3057 119

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for a row-crop field in Iowa Neda Farahbakhshazad a,*, Dana L. Dinnes b , Changsheng Li a , Dan B. Jaynes b

  13. Mulching as a countermeasure for crop contamination within the 30 km zone of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yera, T.S.; Vallejo, R.; Tent, J.; Rauret, G. [Univ. de Barcelona (Spain); Omelyanenko, N.; Ivanov, Y. [Ukrainian Inst. of Agricultural Radiology, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1999-03-15

    The effect of mulch soil cover on crop contamination by {sup 137}Cs was studied within the 30 km zone of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Experiments were performed with oats (Avena sativa) over a three year period. In 1992 soil surface was covered by a plastic net. In 1993 two straw mulch treatments were applied at a dose rate of 200 g m{sup {minus}2} using {sup 137}Cs contaminated and clean straw, respectively. A similar mulch treatment was applied in 1994, and two mulch doses of clean straw were tested. Protection of the soil with a plastic net significantly increased crop yield and reduced crop contamination. When clean straw was used as a mulch layer, a significant decrease of about 30--40% in {sup 137}Cs activity concentration was observed. Mulching with {sup 137}Cs contaminated straw did not reduce crop contamination, probably due to an increase in soil available {sup 137}Cs released from the contaminated mulch. Mulching has been shown to be an effective treatment both for reducing {sup 137}Cs plant contamination and improving crop yield. Therefore, it can be considered as a potential countermeasure in a post-accident situation.

  14. Copyright 2014 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    © Copyright 2014 - Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison

  15. Smallholder farmer welfare in a time of changing climate: the role of cropping decisions in local food security in the Nainital District of Uttarakhand, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Marena

    2013-01-01

    increased drainage, rainwater harvesting, soil management,recharge and for rainwater harvesting for the dry cropping11% had implemented rainwater harvesting. Only 5% said that

  16. EFFICACY AND TIMING OF FUNGICIDES, BACTERICIDES, AND BIOLOGICALS for DECIDUOUS TREE FRUIT, NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS 2010 (updated 5/1/10)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adaskaveg, James E; Gubler, W D; Michailides, Themis J.; Holtz, Brent A.

    2010-01-01

    on Deciduous Tree Fruit, Nut, Strawberry, and Vine Crops inPhomopsis sp. Host(s) Pistachio Almond Strawberry Almond,peach, strawberry Grapevine Grapevine Strawberry Grapevine

  17. Copyright 2014 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison Sciences, National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY Coastal wetlands

  18. Microsoft Word - 5yr08_ch00_index.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Code. Technical Report Montreal Canada, IAEA TCM Advances in Simulation and Modeling of Thermonuclear Plasmas, 1992. 28 P.T. Bonoli et al., Nucl. Fusion (2000). 29 E. F....

  19. A 10-15 -Yr Modulation Cycle of ENSO Intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Fengpeng; Yu, Jin-Yi

    2009-01-01

    on the time- mean thermal stratification of the equatoriallate the time-mean thermal stratification in the upper-

  20. Lab ID Site Lat Long C age (yr BP) calibrated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beta-135082 V-39 61.09 79.38 9580 + 90 10925 + 245 Beta-135083 V-40 61.20 77.84 7050 + 60 7850 + 120

  1. Microsoft Word - CRT 50 yr News Release with logos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ecological uses of the Columbia River. As a direct result of the Treaty, four storage dams were built: Mica, Arrow and Duncan dams in British Columbia, Canada; and Libby Dam in...

  2. Microsoft Word - S07406_5YrRev

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbinsMonumentThird6010 Task U.S.Surface Geophysics10United

  3. Property:Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 Jump to: navigation, search This is a

  4. Microsoft Word - CRT 50 yr News Release with logos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OF PAGESpersonal March 3, 2015CM The CMCleanroomMarch

  5. Microsoft Word - Letter - 17-yr agreement with Alcoa.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OF PAGESpersonal CERTIFIEDPUB-3140

  6. City of Las Vegas 5yr CIP 2010-2014

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. Geographic Available for saleCHAPTER iCITY OF

  7. Microsoft Word - S07406_5YrRev

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M PGroundwaterReview of the

  8. Microsoft Word - S07406_5YrRev

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M PGroundwaterReview of

  9. Microsoft Word - S07406_5YrRev

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M PGroundwaterReview ofResponse

  10. Microsoft Word - S07406_5YrRev

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M PGroundwaterReview

  11. Using Animal Manure and Wastewater for Crops and Pastures: Know and Take Credit for your N, P, and K†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    2000-09-12

    impoundments is often applied to field crops and pastures using big gun nozzles and sprinkler systems. This effluent contains nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), potassium (K) and micronutrients essential for plant growth. When managed properly, irrigation of crops...://agpublications.tamu.edu/catalog/. Table 1 lists the number of gallons of effluent that are applied by big gun nozzles or sprinkler systems, based on various wetted areas (acres) and at depths of 1/4 inch to 2 inches. To estimate the depth of the application, use a plastic rain gauge or a...

  12. While soil-applied herbicides can be quite valuable in weed control, misuse can cause crop injury or failure to control weeds. This guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    While soil-applied herbicides can be quite valuable in weed control, misuse can cause crop injury and persistence of soil-applied herbicides. MT200405 AG issued 5/04 D-4 Getting the Most from Soil or cultivation. However, miscalculations in the use of soil- applied herbicides could cause crop injury or fail

  13. Farmers' knowledge of soils in relation to cropping practices: A case study of farmers in upland rice based slash-and-burn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Kessel, Chris

    Farmers' knowledge of soils in relation to cropping practices: A case study of farmers in upland Understanding indigenous knowledge of soils has come to be seen as essential in understanding the local in relation to soil quality and cropping practices. Most farmers interviewed distinguished two or more soils

  14. Vegetable Oil from Leaves and Stems: Vegetative Production of Oil in a C4 Crop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    PETRO Project: Arcadia Biosciences, in collaboration with the University of California-Davis, is developing plants that produce vegetable oil in their leaves and stems. Ordinarily, these oils are produced in seeds, but Arcadia Biosciences is turning parts of the plant that are not usually harvested into a source of concentrated energy. Vegetable oil is a concentrated source of energy that plants naturally produce and is easily separated after harvest. Arcadia Biosciences will isolate traits that control oil production in seeds and transfer them into leaves and stems so that all parts of the plants are oil-rich at harvest time. After demonstrating these traits in a fast-growing model plant, Arcadia Biosciences will incorporate them into a variety of dedicated biofuel crops that can be grown on land not typically suited for food production

  15. Hyperspectral remote sensing analysis of short rotation woody crops grown with controlled nutrient and irrigation treatments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Im, Jungho; Jensen, John R.; Coleman, Mark; Nelson, Eric

    2009-04-01

    Abstract - Hyperspectral remote sensing research was conducted to document the biophysical and biochemical characteristics of controlled forest plots subjected to various nutrient and irrigation treatments. The experimental plots were located on the Savannah River Site near Aiken, SC. AISA hyperspectral imagery were analysed using three approaches, including: (1) normalized difference vegetation index based simple linear regression (NSLR), (2) partial least squares regression (PLSR) and (3) machine-learning regression trees (MLRT) to predict the biophysical and biochemical characteristics of the crops (leaf area index, stem biomass and five leaf nutrients concentrations). The calibration and cross-validation results were compared between the three techniques. The PLSR approach generally resulted in good predictive performance. The MLRT approach appeared to be a useful method to predict characteristics in a complex environment (i.e. many tree species and numerous fertilization and/or irrigation treatments) due to its powerful adaptability.

  16. Boy's Agricultural Club Work: Suggestions To Club Members Concerning Crop Growing.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, H. H.

    1916-01-01

    in Agr i cu l ture and H o m e E c o n o m i c s , Agr i cu l tura l and Mechanical Col lege o f Texas and U. S. Dept . o f Agr i cu l ture Co-operat ing . January , 1916. Bulletin No . B16. Agricultural Club Work BLANK PAGE IN ORIGINAL... SUGGESTIONS TO CLUB MEMBERS CON- CERNING CROP G R O W I N G . H . H. W i l l i a m s o n , Ass i s tant State A g e n t in C h a r g e o f B o y s ' A g r i c u l t u r a l C lub W o r k . S u g g e s t i o n s have b e e n p r e v i o u s l y g i v e n c...

  17. Enhanced Carbon Concentration in Camelina: Development of a Dedicated, High-value Biofuels Crop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    PETRO Project: UMass is developing an enhanced, biofuels-producing variant of Camelina, a drought-resistant, cold-tolerant oilseed crop that can be grown in many places other plants cannot. The team is working to incorporate several genetic traits into Camelina that increases its natural ability to produce oils and add the production of energy-dense terpene molecules that can be easily converted into liquid fuels. UMass is also experimenting with translating a component common in algae to Camelina that should allow the plants to absorb higher levels of carbon dioxide (CO2), which aids in enhancing photosynthesis and fuel conversion. The process will first be demonstrated in tobacco before being applied in Camelina.

  18. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 2: Impact assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Lindner, Jan P.; Stoms, David M.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01

    a Agricultural and urban habitats DORóDeciduous orchard EORóorchard IGRóIrrigated grain crops IRFóIrrigated row and field crops IRHóIrrigated hayfield PASóPasture RICóRice URBóUrban

  19. 2014 UF/IFAS PSREU Production Cost Reimbursements Vegetables Charges/acre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    . Open Beds $1,200.00 (on beds or flat, not grown on plastic mulch or drip irrigation) 9. Drip Irrigated Crops $2,200.00 (grown with drip irrigation and no plastic mulch, excluding staked tomatoes) Row Crops 1

  20. Production and fuel characteristics of vegetable oil from oilseed crops in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auld, D.L.; Bettis, B.L.; Peterson, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the potential yield and fuel quality of various oilseed crops adapted to the Pacific Northwest as a source of liquid fuel for diesel engines. The seed yield and oil production of three cultivars of winter rape (Brassica napus L.), two cultivars of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) and two cultivars of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) were evaluated in replicated plots at Moscow. Additional trials were conducted at several locations in Idaho, Oregon and Washington. Sunflower, oleic and linoleic safflower, and low and high erucic acid rapeseed were evaluated for fatty acid composition, energy content, viscosity and engine performance in short term tests. During 20 minute engine tests power output, fuel economy and thermal efficiency were compared to diesel fuel. Winter rape produced over twice as much farm extractable oil as either safflower or sunflower. The winter rape cultivars, Norde and Jet Neuf had oil yields which averaged 1740 and 1540 L/ha, respectively. Vegetable oils contained 94 to 95% of the KJ/L of diesel fuel, but were 11.1 to 17.6 times more viscous. Viscosity of the vegetable oils was closely related to fatty acid chain length and number of unsaturated bonds (R/sup 2/=.99). During short term engine tests all vegetable oils produced power outputs equivalent to diesel, and had thermal efficiencies 1.8 to 2.8% higher than diesel. Based on these results it appears that species and cultivars of oilseed crops to be utilized as a source of fuel should be selected on the basis of oil yield. 1 figure, 5 tables.

  1. Floriculture and Greenhouse Crops Utilization of ultraviolet-C (UV-C) irradiation on ornamental plants for disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Floriculture and Greenhouse Crops Utilization of ultraviolet-C (UV-C) irradiation on ornamental the effects of ultraviolet-C irradiation (UV-C) on commercially-valuable greenhouse ornamental plants UV lamps (Osram HNS OFR) have been suspended in the LIHREC greenhouses over greenhouse benches. Each

  2. Loss of phosphorus from soil in semi-arid northern Tanzania as a result of cropping: evidence from sequential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    Loss of phosphorus from soil in semi-arid northern Tanzania as a result of cropping: evidence from-arid northern Tanzania, the native woodland is being rapidly cleared and replaced by low input agriculture Tanzania, the indigenous tropical woodland is rapidly being replaced by low input agriculture. In addition

  3. The significance of local water resources captured in small reservoirs for crop production A global-scale analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Ellen M.

    modelling Food security Crop yield s u m m a r y Rainwater harvesting, broadly defined as the collection significance, rainwater harvesting in small reser- voirs has previously been overlooked in large data and other physical datasets to explore the potential role of small, localized rainwater harvesting

  4. Department of Crop and Soil Sciences PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Soil Science/Soil Quality/Soil Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    Department of Crop and Soil Sciences PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Soil Science/Soil Quality/Soil Physics Position Summary: Plastic mulches are used in agriculture to conserve water, suppress weeds, and increase soil temperatures. However, plastic mulches need to be disposed off at the end

  5. QWhether and where could a suite of alternative biomass cropping systems be competitive with a continuous corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    With the passage of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, the United States established an aggressive negative impacts on soil and water resources, and their ability to be grown across a wider range of climate crops on soil and water quality. Specific objectives were to: ∑ Establish an experiment to test

  6. Figure 1. Primary research site at Cornell with quadruplicate test strips (each ~1 acre) representing four crop treatments.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for these soils. Unfortunately, the research base on perennial bioenergy grass production and impacts crop yields but also the potential for soil carbon accumulation (sequestration) to take place ≠ nitrous oxide [N O] and 4 2methane [CH ] ≠ which have a strong impact on the overall "emissions footprint

  7. Economic Impact Analysis of Exchange Rate, RFS2, and Farm Program Support Changes on the U.S. Crop Sector†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhew, Chanhee

    2014-05-27

    ............................................................................................... 310 APPENDIX C TABLES ................................................................................................ 454 APPENDIX D FORECAST RESULT FOR THE CROP SECTOR MODEL .............. 525 APPENDIX E SUPPLY AND DEMAND ELASTICITIES... ......................................... 599 APPENDIX F MARKETING YEAR AND CONVERSION FACTORS..................... 605 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Statement of Problem Policy makers need to know about the consequences of alternative policies. The U.S. Congress wrote a new Farm...

  8. Fact Sheet No. 4.723 Crop Series|Irrigation A. A. Andales, Colorado State University, associate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    temperature, and solar radiation for a single day or up to an entire year at a selected station. The Colorado research associate, atmospheric science. 12/2014 days (GDD). Accumulated GDDs from a starting date (planting date for example) can be used to estimate where a crop is in terms of its development. Different

  9. Modeling the profitability of power production from short-rotation woody crops in Sub-Saharan Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    should focus on SRWC productivity and energy life cycle analysis. ™ 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rightsModeling the profitability of power production from short-rotation woody crops in Sub, USA b UNIQUE Forestry and Land Use GmbH, SchnewlinstraŖe 10, 79098 Freiburg, Germany c Centre

  10. Vulnerability of crops and native grasses to summer drying in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Raz-Yaseef, Naama; Billesbach, Dave P.; Fischer, Marc L.; Biraud, Sebastien C.; Gunter, Stacey A.; Bradford, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2015-08-31

    The Southern Great Plains are characterized by a fine-scale mixture of different land-cover types, predominantly winter-wheat and grazed pasture, with relatively small areas of other crops, native prairie, and switchgrass. Recent droughts and predictions of increased drought in the Southern Great Plains, especially during the summer months, raise concern for these ecosystems. We measured ecosystem carbon and water fluxes with eddy-covariance systems over cultivated cropland for 10 years, and over lightly grazed prairie and new switchgrass fields for 2 years each. Growing-season precipitation showed the strongest control over net carbon uptake for all ecosystems, but with a variable effect: grassesmore†Ľ(prairie and switchgrass) needed at least 350 mm of precipitation during the growing season to become net carbon sinks, while crops needed only 100 mm. In summer, high temperatures enhanced evaporation and led to higher likelihood of dry soil conditions. Therefore, summer-growing native prairie species and switchgrass experienced more seasonal droughts than spring-growing crops. For wheat, the net reduction in carbon uptake resulted mostly from a decrease in gross primary production rather than an increase in respiration. Flux measurements suggested that management practices for crops were effective in suppressing evapotranspiration and decomposition (by harvesting and removing secondary growth), and in increasing carbon uptake (by fertilizing and conserving summer soil water). In light of future projections for wetter springs and drier and warmer summers in the Southern Great Plains, our study indicates an increased vulnerability in native ecosystems and summer crops over time.ę†less

  11. Historical Perspective on How and Why Switchgrass was Selected as a "Model" High-Potential Energy Crop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Lynn L

    2007-11-01

    A review of several publications of the Biofuels Feedstock Development Program, and final reports from the herbaceous crop screening trials suggests that there were several technical and non-technical factors that influenced the decision to focus on one herbaceous "model" crop species. The screening trials funded by the U.S. Department of Energy in the late 1980's to early 1990's assessed a wide range of about 34 species with trials being conducted on a wide range of soil types in 31 different sites spread over seven states in crop producing regions of the U.S. While several species, including sorghums, reed canarygrass and other crops, were identified as having merit for further development, the majority of institutions involved in the herbaceous species screening studies identified switchgrass as having high priority for further development. Six of the seven institutions included switchgrass among the species recommended for further development in their region and all institutions recommended that perennial grasses be given high research priority. Reasons for the selection of switchgrass included the demonstration of relatively high, reliable productivity across a wide geographical range, suitability for marginal quality land, low water and nutrient requirements, and positive environmental attributes. Economic and environmental assessments by Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Biofuels Feedstock Development Program staff together with the screening project results, and funding limitations lead to making the decision to further develop only switchgrass as a "model" or "prototype" species in about 1990. This paper describes the conditions under which the herbaceous species were screened, summarizes results from those trials, discusses the various factors which influenced the selection of switchgrass, and provides a brief evaluation of switchgrass with respect to criteria that should be considered when selecting and developing a crop for biofuels and bioproducts.

  12. 7/3/13 3:56 PMHow DNA Finds its Match-Crop Biotech Update ( 2/10/2012 ) | ISAAA.org/KC Page 1 of 2http://www.isaaa.org/kc/cropbiotechupdate/article/default.asp?ID=9148

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    7/3/13 3:56 PMHow DNA Finds its Match- Crop Biotech Update ( 2/10/2012 ) | ISAAA.org/KC Page 1 of 2 | Site Map Go Select Language Powered by Translate ISAAA Knowledge Center Crop Biotech Update February 10, 2012 Articles in the February 10, 2012 Issue of Crop Biotech Update NEWS Global ∑ ISAAA Launches 2011

  13. Modeled Impacts of Cover Crops and Vegetative Barriers on Corn Stover Availability and Soil Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian J. Bonner; David J. Muth Jr.; Joshua B. Koch; Douglas L. Karlen

    2014-06-01

    Environmentally benign, economically viable, and socially acceptable agronomic strategies are needed to launch a sustainable lignocellulosic biofuel industry. Our objective was to demonstrate a landscape planning process that can ensure adequate supplies of corn (Zea mays L.) stover feedstock while protecting and improving soil quality. The Landscape Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) was used to develop land use strategies that were then scaled up for five U.S. Corn Belt states (Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Minnesota) to illustrate the impact that could be achieved. Our results show an annual sustainable stover supply of 194 million Mg without exceeding soil erosion T values or depleting soil organic carbon [i.e., soil conditioning index (SCI)?>?0] when no-till, winter cover crop, and vegetative barriers were incorporated into the landscape. A second, more rigorous conservation target was set to enhance soil quality while sustainably harvesting stover. By requiring erosion to be <1/2 T and the SCI-organic matter (OM) subfactor to be >?0, the annual sustainable quantity of harvestable stover dropped to148 million Mg. Examining removal rates by state and soil resource showed that soil capability class and slope generally determined the effectiveness of the three conservation practices and the resulting sustainable harvest rate. This emphasizes that sustainable biomass harvest must be based on subfield management decisions to ensure soil resources are conserved or enhanced, while providing sufficient biomass feedstock to support the economic growth of bioenergy enterprises.

  14. The global gridded crop model intercomparison: Data and modeling protocols for Phase 1 (v1.0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, J.; MŁller, C.; Deryng, D.; Chryssanthacopoulos, J.; Boote, K. J.; BŁchner, M.; Foster, I.; Glotter, M.; Heinke, J.; Iizumi, T.; Izaurralde, R. C.; Mueller, N. D.; Ray, D. K.; Rosenzweig, C.; Ruane, A. C.; Sheffield, J.

    2015-02-11

    We present protocols and input data for Phase 1 of the Global Gridded Crop Model Intercomparison, a project of the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP). The project consist of global simulations of yields, phenologies, and many land-surface fluxes using 12Ė15 modeling groups for many crops, climate forcing data sets, and scenarios over the historical period from 1948 to 2012. The primary outcomes of the project include (1) a detailed comparison of the major differences and similarities among global models commonly used for large-scale climate impact assessment, (2) an evaluation of model and ensemble hindcasting skill, (3) quantification of key uncertainties from climate input data, model choice, and other sources, and (4) a multi-model analysis of the agricultural impacts of large-scale climate extremes from the historical record.

  15. The global gridded crop model intercomparison: Data and modeling protocols for Phase 1 (v1.0)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Elliott, J.; MŁller, C.; Deryng, D.; Chryssanthacopoulos, J.; Boote, K. J.; BŁchner, M.; Foster, I.; Glotter, M.; Heinke, J.; Iizumi, T.; et al

    2015-02-11

    We present protocols and input data for Phase 1 of the Global Gridded Crop Model Intercomparison, a project of the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP). The project consist of global simulations of yields, phenologies, and many land-surface fluxes using 12Ė15 modeling groups for many crops, climate forcing data sets, and scenarios over the historical period from 1948 to 2012. The primary outcomes of the project include (1) a detailed comparison of the major differences and similarities among global models commonly used for large-scale climate impact assessment, (2) an evaluation of model and ensemble hindcasting skill, (3) quantification ofmore†Ľkey uncertainties from climate input data, model choice, and other sources, and (4) a multi-model analysis of the agricultural impacts of large-scale climate extremes from the historical record.ę†less

  16. Farm Size in Relation to Market Outlets and Forward Contracts for Major Field Crops and Beef Cattle Texas Rollin Plains.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Donald S.; Martin, J. Rod

    1978-01-01

    STATION / Neville P. Clarke, Director The Texas A&M University System 1 College Station, Texas Farm Size in Relation to Market Outlets and Fomd Contracts for Major Field Crops and Beef Cattle, B-1187 Texas Rolling Plains February 1978 Donald S. Moore... and J. Rod Martin* Agricultural producers are continually adjusting to changing marketing channels. Some farmers obviously seek these changes, while others are only later affected by the changing conditions. One example of changing marketing channels...

  17. Plot size and location within a cotton block: their effects on the canopy temperature function and crop water stress index†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaitan, Camilo Alberto

    1988-01-01

    in the cotton block, using the theoretical lower baseline. Table 23. CWSI and linear regression of the CTF for two 0. 6 PET water treatment plots randomly located in the cotton block, using the theoretical lower baseline. . . . . 82 Table 24. Summary... to evaluate the effects of a randomized plot design on the crop water stress index (CWSI) and canopy temperature function (CTF) of cotton. Trickle irrigated cotton at the Agricultural Research Station near Pecos Texas was used to investigate...

  18. Bridging Principles and Practices of Sustainable Cropping Systems -LRES 528.01 Tuesday 3:10 4 PM; 233 Linfield Hall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    of the instructors to emphasize climate change implications for sustainable agriculture, reflecting bio-energy in cropping systems reflect bio-energy and food security. Twice during the semester, each student will lead

  19. Essays on Applied Economics and Econometrics: Decadal Climate Variability Impacts on Cropping and Sugar-sweetened Beverage Demand of Low-income†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jithitikulchai, Theepakorn

    2014-12-10

    This dissertation examines the economic impacts of ocean-related climate variability on U.S. crops and the effect sweetened beverage taxes would have on beverage consumption among low income food assistance program ...

  20. Copyright 2013 Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison, DE (2)Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Newark, DE (3)Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, NY

  1. Copyright 2012 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison AB, Level 1 Dalton B. Abdala, Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, Paul A

  2. Copyright 2012 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, China

  3. Copyright 2012 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison Center, Room 207, Level 2 Dalton B. Abdala, Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE

  4. Copyright 2012 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison. Magdi M. Selim, School of Plant, Environmental and Soil Science, Louisiana State University Agricultural

  5. Gas turbine row #1 steam cooled vane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cunha, Frank J. (Longwood, FL)

    2000-01-01

    A design for a vane segment having a closed-loop steam cooling system is provided. The vane segment comprises an outer shroud, an inner shroud and an airfoil, each component having a target surface on the inside surface of its walls. A plurality of rectangular waffle structures are provided on the target surface to enhance heat transfer between each component and cooling steam. Channel systems are provided in the shrouds to improve the flow of steam through the shrouds. Insert legs located in cavities in the airfoil are also provided. Each insert leg comprises outer channels located on a perimeter of the leg, each outer channel having an outer wall and impingement holes on the outer wall for producing impingement jets of cooling steam to contact the airfoil's target surface. Each insert leg further comprises a plurality of substantially rectangular-shaped ribs located on the outer wall and a plurality of openings located between outer channels of the leg to minimize cross flow degradation.

  6. All row, planar fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian Edward

    2013-07-23

    An apparatus, program product and method for detecting nodal faults may simultaneously cause designated nodes of a cell to communicate with all nodes adjacent to each of the designated nodes. Furthermore, all nodes along the axes of the designated nodes are made to communicate with their adjacent nodes, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  7. Variable Row Spacing of Irrigated Cotton.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longenecker, D. E.; Thaxton, E. L. Jr.; Hefner, J. J.; Lyerly, P. J.

    1970-01-01

    Rotavirus NSP4, the first described viral enterotoxin, localizes to the plasma membrane of infected cells, possibly through interaction with caveolin-1. A direct interaction between NSP4 and caveolin-1, the structural ...

  8. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of34 End3.

  9. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of34 End3.7

  10. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of34 End3.78

  11. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of34

  12. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of348 End

  13. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of348 End7

  14. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of348 End78

  15. " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End212. Number of

  16. " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End212. Number of2.1.

  17. " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End212. Number

  18. " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End212. Number1

  19. " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End212. Number13

  20. " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End212. Number139.1

  1. " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End212.

  2. " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612.9 Number of2468143

  3. Update rows? | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) JumpGTZ ClimateFeed JumpAlbertaUniversity

  4. Effects of Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry Brown; Jeffrey Morris; Patrick Richards; Joel Mason

    2010-09-30

    Demonstrating effective treatment technologies and beneficial uses for oil and gas produced water is essential for producers who must meet environmental standards and deal with high costs associated with produced water management. Proven, effective produced-water treatment technologies coupled with comprehensive data regarding blending ratios for productive long-term irrigation will improve the state-of-knowledge surrounding produced-water management. Effective produced-water management scenarios such as cost-effective treatment and irrigation will discourage discharge practices that result in legal battles between stakeholder entities. The goal of this work is to determine the optimal blending ratio required for irrigating crops with CBNG and conventional oil and gas produced water treated by ion exchange (IX), reverse osmosis (RO), or electro-dialysis reversal (EDR) in order to maintain the long term physical integrity of soils and to achieve normal crop production. The soils treated with CBNG produced water were characterized with significantly lower SAR values compared to those impacted with conventional oil and gas produced water. The CBNG produced water treated with RO at the 100% treatment level was significantly different from the untreated produced water, while the 25%, 50% and 75% water treatment levels were not significantly different from the untreated water. Conventional oil and gas produced water treated with EDR and RO showed comparable SAR results for the water treatment technologies. There was no significant difference between the 100% treated produced water and the control (river water). The EDR water treatment resulted with differences at each level of treatment, which were similar to RO treated conventional oil and gas water. The 100% treated water had SAR values significantly lower than the 75% and 50% treatments, which were similar (not significantly different). The results of the greenhouse irrigation study found the differences in biomass production between each soil were significant for Western Wheatgrass and Alfafla. The Sheridan sandy loam soil resulted in the highest production for western wheatgrass and alfalfa while the X-ranch sandy loam had the lowest production rate for both plants. Plant production levels resulting from untreated CBNG produced water were significantly higher compared to untreated conventional oil and gas produced water. However, few differences were found between water treatments. The biomass produced from the greenhouse study was analyzed for elemental composition and for forage value. Elemental composition indentified several interesting findings. Some of the biomass was characterized with seemly high boron and sodium levels. High levels of boron found in some of the biomass was unexpected and may indicate that alfalfa and western wheatgrass plants may have been impacted by either soil or irrigation water containing high boron levels. Plants irrigated with water treated using EDR technology appeared to contain higher levels of boron with increased levels of treatment. Forage evaluations were conducted using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy. The data collected show small differences, generally less than 10%, between produced water treatments including the no treatment and 100% treatment conditions for each plant species studied. The forage value of alfalfa and western wheatgrass did not show significant tendencies dependent on soil, the amount of produced water treatment, or treatment technology.

  5. Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration: Research Needs and Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2008-01-01

    8.1 Lehmann, J. (2007). Bio-energy in the black. Frontiers0.9 Pg C/yr Terrestrial CS Bio-energy crops 0.5-0.8 Pg C/yr

  6. Hairy Vetch, Bur Clover and Oats as Soil-Building Crops for Cotton and Corn in Texas.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, H. F. (Harry Forest); Johnson, P. R. (Paul Rufus); Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner)

    1950-01-01

    stream_source_info Bull0731.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 43509 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Bull0731.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 1 HAIRY VETCH, BUR CLOVER AND OATS...-8-4 fertilizer per acre at Tyler and Nacog- doches. Hairy vetch was a better green-manure crop than oats at Tyler and oats or bur clover at Nacogdoches. The effects of plowing under hairy vetch lasted more than a year. Corn planted on land where vetch had...

  7. DOE Tour of Zero: Row Homes at Perrin's Row by New Town Builders |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i pStateDOE FederalTheof Energy2,408-square-foot

  8. DOE Tour of Zero: Row Homes at Perrin's Row by New Town Builders |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment of Energy Facilities By E-mail:Carly Wilkins(PartCalifornia

  9. 73M.A. Khan et al. (eds.), Sabkha Ecosystems: Volume IV: Cash Crop Halophyte and Biodiversity Conservation, Tasks for Vegetation Science 47, DOI 10.1007/978-94-007-7411-7_5,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Steven E.

    73M.A. Khan et al. (eds.), Sabkha Ecosystems: Volume IV: Cash Crop Halophyte and Biodiversity Conservation, Tasks for Vegetation Science 47, DOI 10.1007/978-94-007-7411-7_5, © Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014 Abstract We discuss the process of domesticating wild halophytes to serve as crop

  10. The virtual absence of refereed information on potential risks of GM crops has been documented by Domingo (2000) for human health and by Wolfenbarger and Phifer (2000) for the environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, E. Ann

    2000-01-01

    1 The virtual absence of refereed information on potential risks of GM crops has been documented for Advanced Studies in Systems Research, Baden Baden, Germany August 2001 Abstract Genetic modification (GM) is a technology which has been released prematurely into the marketplace. As a result, GM crops are vulnerable

  11. Can Organic Crop Production Feed the World? Holger Kirchmann1, Lars Bergstrm1, Thomas Ktterer1, Olof Andrn1 and Rune Andersson2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This chapter examines the question of whether organic agriculture can produce enough food to meet future demand1 Chapter 3 Can Organic Crop Production Feed the World? Holger Kirchmann1, Lars BergstrŲm1, Thomas of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7014, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden 2 Department of Food Science, Swedish University

  12. Technical reports and extension papers and presentations (last 10 years only) 162. Clark, E. Ann. 2009. GM crops: 12 years is long enough. Presented to the Kootenay Local

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, E. Ann

    shapes our attitudes? Genetically Modified Language. A discourse of arguments for GM crops and food. 2008 (invited). Grass-based livestock and climate change. Presented to: Reclaiming Our Food System: A Call to Action. Sponsored by Food Secure Canada, Ottawa 7- 10 Nov 08. 157. Clark, E. Ann. 2008 (invited

  13. Copyright 2012 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison Browse by Section/Division of Interest Author Index Share | 86-4 The Role of Critical Zone Science zone science is thus extremely multidisciplinary involving not only soil scientists but also

  14. Copyright 2012 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison & Environmental Quality See more from this Session: Future Frontiers in Soil Science Monday, October 22, 2012: 1 with soil biogeochemistry where the application of molecular environmental science, which employs a multi

  15. Regulation of GM Crops in Canada: Science-Based or...... ? E. Ann Clark, Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, Guelph (eaclark@uoguelph.ca) 2004 E. Ann Clark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, E. Ann

    .....(see below) Most of what government has accepted as evidence of the safety of GM crops is not in the refereed risks. 3 on unscientific criteria, such as ethics, religious concerns, personal preference, power issues approach - in terms of: ∑ which questions to ask, ∑ how to design the study, or ∑ how to interpret

  16. Mapping critical levels of ozone, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide for crops, forests and natural vegetation in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenbaum, B.J.; Strickland, T.C.; McDowell, M.K.

    1994-01-01

    Air pollution abatement strategies for controlling nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and ozone emissions in the United States focus on a 'Standards-based' approach. This approach places limits on air pollution by maintaining a baseline value for air quality, no matter what the ecosystem can or cannot withstand. In the paper, the authors present example critical levels maps for the conterminous U.S. developed using the 'effects-based' mapping approach as defined by the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe's Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution, Task Force on Mapping. The approach emphasizes the pollution level or load capacity an ecosystem can accommodate before degradation occurs, and allows for analysis of cumulative effects. They present the first stage of an analysis that reports the distribution of exceedances of critical levels for NO2, SO3, and O3 in sensitive forest, crop, and natural vegetation ecosystems in the contiguous United States. They conclude that extrapolation to surrounding geographic areas requires the analysis of diverse and compounding factors that preclude simple extrapolation methods. (Copyright (c) 1994 Kluwer Academic Publishers.)

  17. DATA 07 CENS Research Testbeds CENS maintains a number of testbeds to enable and encourage various degrees of "in lab" to "real world"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    500 devices to support urban and participatory sensing. CENS Mobile Personal Sensing Testbed With over 50 m) groundwater wells along a 1 km flow path from orchards, through row crops and a riparian zone

  18. The Cultivar, Spring/Summer 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Martha

    2008-01-01

    crops planted between strawberry rows serve as a trap cropof lygus nymphs in organic strawberries, 2004Ė2007. 2003 isGreenĒ Campus Food Systems Strawberry Study Shows Value of

  19. Irrigation of Forage Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enciso, Juan; Porter, Dana; Fipps, Guy; Colaizzi, Paul

    2004-06-10

    Theportablesystemsareeitherlateralsthat canbemovedmanuallyormechanicallyor singlebigsprinklerscommonlycalledbig guns. Systemswith hand-moved laterals are assembledfrompipesectionsofaluminum tubingconnectedbyquickcouplings.Each pipehasariserpipesupportingasprinkler head... andtokeepthemaligned. Hand-moved big guns aresprinklerswith largediameternozzles( 5 /8inchormore)that dischargeatleast100GPM.Thesesprinklers arerotatedwitharockerarmdriveandcan irrigateanarc.Becausetheyoperateunder highpressure(generallymorethan80psi...

  20. CROP STAGES Keith Mason

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    are at petal fall. WEATHER NOTES Mark Longstroth Michigan State University Extension Complete weather data (from March 1) Base 42 Base 50 Van Buren County 5-26-08 715 387 6-2-08 843 467 Projected for 6-9-08 1062 ∑ Weather notes and degree days ∑ Pest of the week ≠ Virus and virus-like diseases ∑ Insect update ∑ Disease

  1. CROP STAGES Keith Mason

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Extension Complete weather data for your area can be found at enviroweather.msu.edu. Weather has been is ready for the first picking in Holland. WEATHER NOTES Mark Longstroth Michigan State University (from March 1) Base 42 Base 50 Van Buren County 7-28-08 2426 1603 8-4-08 2661 1772 Projected for 8

  2. CROP STAGES Keith Mason

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    weather data for your area can be found at enviroweather.msu.edu. Weather over the past two weeks has been of the second picking in Holland. WEATHER NOTES Mark Longstroth Michigan State University Extension Complete March 1) Base 42 Base 50 Van Buren County 8-11-08 2831 1897 8-18-08 3012 2023 Projected for 8-25-08 3214

  3. CROP STAGES Keith Mason

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Complete weather data for your area can be found at enviroweather.msu.edu. Last week's temperatures were Olive are at early petal fall. WEATHER NOTES Mark Longstroth Michigan State University Extension of rain this weekend. Our GDD totals are about ten days behind normal. DEGREE DAYS GDD (from March 1) Base

  4. CROP STAGES Keith Mason

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    green fruit. WEATHER NOTES Mark Longstroth Michigan State University Extension Complete weather data for your area can be found at enviroweather.msu.edu. Last week's weather was generally dry with highs near are now about 3 or 4 days behind 2007. DEGREE DAYS GDD (from March 1) Base 42 Base 50 Van Buren County 6

  5. CROP STAGES Keith Mason

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Extension Complete weather data for your area can be found at enviroweather.msu.edu. Summer arrived last' and `Bluecrop' in West Olive are at early green fruit. WEATHER NOTES Mark Longstroth Michigan State University average. DEGREE DAYS GDD (from March 1) Base 42 Base 50 Van Buren County 6-2-08 843 467 6-9-08 1070 637

  6. Texas Crop Profile: Potatoes†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Kent D.; Holloway, Rodney L.; Smith, Dudley

    2000-04-12

    broadcast or banded at planting time. Yield losses: Nematodes cause up to 30 percent yield losses if not controlled. Root knot nematode damage can result in rejection of whole potato fields by buyers. Regional differences: Nematodes are a signifi- cant.... Typical Rates Timing # of Appl. (days) (hours) 1,3 Dichloropropene 1 broadcast field 9-12 gals. Apply at least 14 days 1 N.A. 120 (Telone ? II) soil treatment prior to planting. Ethoprop (Mocap ? 10 broadcast field 60-120 lbs. Apply prior to planting. 1 N...

  7. Insects Attacking Vegetable Crops.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newton, Weldon H.; Deer, James A.; Hamman, Philip J.; Wolfenbarger, Dan A.; Harding, James A.; Schuster, Michael F.

    1964-01-01

    Confronting the Unknown: Tejanas in the Transformation of Spanish and Mexican Texas, 1735-1836 sheds light on Tejana legal and social roles in this tumultuous period. Despite great strides in the field of Borderlands history ...

  8. Texas Crop Profile: Spinach†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Kent D.; Holloway, Rodney L.; Smith, Dudley

    2000-04-12

    in IPM Programs: Use in conjunction with resistant varieties, field site selection, sanitation and other fungicides. Resistance Management: Must be used with other management practices to reduce risk of mefenoxam tolerance. Copper 50 air 0.5 to 1.0 lb. a... resistance (partial resistance) is used mostly in the Winter Garden where white rust is the most important disease. Biological control practices: There are none available. Postharvest control practices: Proper field sanitation after each harvest to remove...

  9. Texas Crop Profile: Onions†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Kent D.; Holloway, Rodney L.; Smith, Dudley

    2000-04-12

    the formation of whitish blotches that first appear as dashes on leaves. Severely attacked plants develop a gray or silver appearance and may become distorted. Damage may be found first in the leaf sheaths and stem or on the undersides of a cupped leaf. Spider... flower Pounce ? ) thrips and onion thrips Cypermethrin 100 foliar 2.5 fl. oz. cutworm 1 , onion thrips 2 1 Cutworm and onion thrips (Ammo ? 2.5 EC ) cutworms, 4 fl. oz. thrips Methyl-parathion 65 foliar 1.3 pts. 1 thrips/plant 1st app., 1.3 Onion...

  10. Insects Attacking Forage Crops.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randolph, N. M.; Garner, C. F.

    1961-01-01

    lropean Corn Borer. ~d Clover ! rer ............ ................... ,talk Bore1 ootstock \\ Borer ....... ....................................................... 17 Veevil ............................................. 17... ........................................................ 17 ........................................................ I7 >sser Corns garcane R over Stem ~twortns ..... . - ................... rer.. ............ 3rm.. ........... ........ Seed-Corn Maggot Sweet Clover Root Bo Sou tllern Corn R...

  11. Fuel from Tobacco and Arundo Donax: Synthetic Crop for Direct Drop-in Biofuel Production through Re-routing the Photorespiration Intermediates and Engineering Terpenoid Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-02-15

    PETRO Project: Biofuels offer renewable alternatives to petroleum-based fuels that reduce net greenhouse gas emissions to nearly zero. However, traditional biofuels production is limited not only by the small amount of solar energy that plants convert through photosynthesis into biological materials, but also by inefficient processes for converting these biological materials into fuels. Farm-ready, non-food crops are needed that produce fuels or fuel-like precursors at significantly lower costs with significantly higher productivity. To make biofuels cost-competitive with petroleum-based fuels, biofuels production costs must be cut in half.

  12. Bwlch Nant Yr Arian Visitor Centre At the heart of a popular beauty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    significant energy, waste and water savings. #12;Our advice Before installing a rainwater harvesting system pipes to a water tank for use in the visitor centre. Water A rainwater harvesting system channels water and a sedum roof bear in mind that as the sedum soaks up the water there is less rainwater entering

  13. He II 4686 in eta Carinae and the nature of the 5.538-yr cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teodoro, M; Arias, J I; de Araķjo, F X; BarbŠ, R H; Corcoran, M F; Fernandes, M Borges; FernŠndez-Lajķs, E; Fraga, L; Gamen, R C; GonzŠlez, J F; Groh, J H; Marshall, J L; McGregor, P J; Morrell, N; Nicholls, D C; Parkin, E R; Pereira, C B; Phillips, M M; Solivella, G R; Steiner, J E; Stritzinger, M; Thompson, I; Torres, C A O; Torres, M A P; Zevallos-Herencia, M I

    2011-01-01

    The periodic minima in eta Carinae are now well defined and interpreted as due to periastron passage of two massive stars in a very eccentric orbit. Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the light curve of different spectral features, such as eclipse, shell ejection, accretion and/or collapse of the primary wind onto the secondary star. All of them face difficulties to explain the observations in the full range of wavelengths. To better understand the nature of cyclic events, we performed a dense monitoring of eta Carinae along the 2009 spectroscopic event, focusing on the high-energy He II 4686 emission line. Our results indicate that the intensity curve of He II 4686 peaks at L~310 L_sun, has a phase-locked behaviour and shows a temporal correlation with the X-ray emission, ruling out many proposed sources of energy. The most suitable location for the He II 4686 emission region is the shocked primary wind, about 4-5 AU downstream from the apex. The 'collapse' component seen in light curves of X...

  14. Shut Down Fans, Save $1/4 Million/Yr and Increase Airflow?†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, V.; Ohrt, H.

    1998-01-01

    In 1994, the fume collection system for the Desulphurization Station at Dofasco Inc., Hamilton, Ontario was studied for energy and maintenance optimization. The existing system consisted of two 600 hp fans on a wet scrubber system for two collection...

  15. Neutron Capture Measurements and Resonance Analysis of Dysprosium Y.R. Kang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    for control in nuclear reactor [1]. Dysprosium is also a fission product from the thermal fis- sion of 235 U dysprosium's effect on the neutron population over all energy regions in a nuclear reactor system, where Dysprosium has many uses in the field of nuclear reac- tor system due to a very large thermal neutron absorp

  16. Dow's Energy/WRAP Contest- A 12-Yr Energy and Waste Reduction Success Story†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, K. E.

    1993-01-01

    (Waste Reduction Always Pays) program was added. The Contest has been enormously successful in achieving a continuous improvement attitude. In Part I of this paper, we'll look at the Contest history and summarize some of the results achieved. Part II...

  17. Carina Nebula: star formation region, d ~ 7000 lt yr HST: Carina Nebula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    and return them to the Galaxy via their stellar winds HST: Carina Nebula #12;The massive stars are also their strong X-ray emission? 2. How strong are their stellar winds (what are their mass-loss rates)? Two spectra #12;we make models #12;#12;models make predictions #12;wind mass-loss rate #12;we compare

  18. COURSES -LESSONS & CHAMBER MUSIC: Performance and Concert Requirements -Cont'd YR Instrument/Voice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    /Expectations 6 7 Instructor: Honors Recital: 3 4 5 2 Title: Discipline: Advisor: Group A: 1 8 Group B: Other at Williams; i.e., for eight semesters. Majors are required to participate in departmental ensembles that students elect at least one course from each group. The department reserves the right to refuse

  19. COURSES -LESSONS & CHAMBER MUSIC: Performance and Concert Requirements -Cont'd YR Instrument/Voice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    : 3 4 5 2 Title: Discipline: Advisor: Group A: 1 8 Group B: Other Courses: Music majors are strongly to participate in departmental ensembles throughout their careers at Williams; i.e., for eight semesters. Majors from each group. The department reserves the right to refuse registration in any course for which

  20. Titan ATEP Alum List 2012-13 LAST FIRST YR AFFILIATION SITE E-MAIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Nixa, MO ccbeets@aol.com Belandres Melissa 03 Elk Grove, CA mbelandres@hotmail.com Benitez Evelyn 05 Health Fullerton, CA hlightle@fullerton.edu Callahan-Hill Diane 86 Centinial High School Corona, CA.com Chisar Michael 84 Diablo Valley College Pleasant Hill, CA mchisar@dvc.edu Chu-Coury Cindi 92 Coury

  1. Microsoft Word - S08399_2012 MMTS 5yrRev.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbinsMonumentThird6010 Task11Groundwater Constituents

  2. Microsoft Word - S08400_2012_MVP_5yrRev.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbinsMonumentThird6010 Task11Groundwater

  3. Microsoft Word - S07693_5-yr review rpt.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M PGroundwaterReviewOffice ofThird

  4. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterlyInformationSPElectrtyUsePercTotal Jump to: navigation,

  5. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDstrtColg | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterlyInformationSPElectrtyUsePercTotal Jump to:

  6. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDstrtHeating | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterlyInformationSPElectrtyUsePercTotal Jump to:Information

  7. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrElctrtyTotal | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterlyInformationSPElectrtyUsePercTotal Jump

  8. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrNaturalGas | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterlyInformationSPElectrtyUsePercTotal JumpInformation

  9. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrOil-FiredBoiler | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterlyInformationSPElectrtyUsePercTotal JumpInformationEnergy

  10. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrOther | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterlyInformationSPElectrtyUsePercTotal

  11. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrPellets | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterlyInformationSPElectrtyUsePercTotalInformation

  12. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrTotal | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterlyInformationSPElectrtyUsePercTotalInformationInformation

  13. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrTownGas | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII

  14. Policing Rock Bottom: Regulation, Rehabilitation, and Resistance on Skid Row

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Forrest Daniel

    2012-01-01

    disorder and low level offenses thus signals an effort of what Jonathan Simon (2007) has referred to as ?governing

  15. Row-Reduced Column Generation for Degenerate Master Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-02-06

    Feb 5, 2013 ... node of a search tree, and often produces strong dual bounds. ... In linear algebra terms, we work with a projection ... enter the current basis.

  16. Supplementary Materials Reconnecting Our Waterways (ROW) Collective Impact Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    . Partner organizations and total investment during 2012 for the Fall Creek Honeysuckle Removal Project, Indianapolis, IN. Partner Est. Cash Investment Estimated Services Outcomes Anonymous Donor $100 Qualified crews (as defined by property owner and regulations) applies oil based broad leaf herbicide

  17. A competitive genetic algorithm for single row facility layout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-02-22

    Feb 22, 2012 ... gorithm uses an elite preserving mechanism which ensures that only the ..... our knowledge. ..... Engineering & Management, 3(4):193Ė204.

  18. The phase diagram of the staggered row model for magnetism†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Weimin

    1991-01-01

    (2Hs + A) + 2C sin( ? + Hs) + B sin(2Hp ? ? ) = 0, (3, 1&) 2 2 where the local fields Hc and Brr are given by Bc' = ? 2B o (Hs ? D) ? 4B co (H + ? ), B = ? Ccos(H ? 6) ? 2Ccos(Ho+ ? ) ? 2B os(2H ? ? ) ? qB o (2H aA). (3, 17) 2 2 Near zero... and B can be used to simplified the problem. Thus, we let Hri ? Hc = Ho ? Ha = Hp Sg = Sn = B and Sc' = C. After these simplifications, the mean-field equations become B = R(Offing), C = R(PHc), B sin(2Hp ? ? ) + C sin(Hs ? g) = 0, 2 (3. 14) qB sin...

  19. NMSLO Affidavit of Completion of ROW Construction | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformationOliver,Minnesota:EnergyNARI|Forms12 UndergroundNMSLO

  20. NMSLO Surface Division ROW FAQs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformationOliver,Minnesota:EnergyNARI|Forms12State LandsRight

  1. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.96 Capability3.1.3.13.1.

  2. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.96 Capability3.1.3.13.1.1

  3. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.96

  4. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.961 Electricity: Components

  5. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.961 Electricity:

  6. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.961 Electricity:6 Quantity

  7. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.961 Electricity:6 Quantity6

  8. " Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.961 Electricity:683A6.3.

  9. " Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.961 Electricity:683A6.3.4

  10. " Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.961 Electricity:683A6.3.44

  11. " Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.961 Electricity:683A6.3.444

  12. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.961

  13. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of Fuel

  14. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of Fuel3.

  15. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of Fuel3.4.

  16. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of Fuel3.4.1

  17. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of

  18. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of3 End Uses

  19. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of3 End

  20. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of3 End1 End