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  1. Review: Yellowstone's Wildlife in Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tans, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Yellowstone National Park occupies a special place in the American imagination. Home to mountains, geothermal

  2. Fungi Inventory Endemic Plants of Yellowstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Scott

    Monitoring Yellowstone's Bumble Bees · Microbial Diversity in Non-sulfur and Iron Geothermal Steam VentsFungi Inventory Endemic Plants of Yellowstone Restoration of Native Vegetation in Gardiner Basin v o l u m e 2 0 · i s s u e 1 · 2 0 1 2 Yellowstone Vegetation #12;F or two decades, Yellowstone

  3. Extension of the Yellowstone plateau, eastern Snake River Plain, and Owyhee plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, D.W.; Hackett, W.R.; Ore, H.T. (Idaho State Univ., Pocatello (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Formation of the late Cenozoic volcanic province comprising the Owyhee plateau, eastern Snake River Plain, and Yellowstone plateau has been accompanied by east-northeast-directed crustal extension. A new vector of 45 mm/yr, N56{degree}E for the migration of silicic volcanism across the volcanic province is calculated. If migration of volcanism reflects west-southwest continental drift over a mantle plume, a zone of crustal extension must separate the volcanic province from the more slowly moving North American craton. Space-time relations of basin fill in the adjacent Basin and Range province provide evidence for a zone of extension, about 125 km wide, coincident with and east of coeval silicic volcanism. Since 16 Ma, the zone of extension has migrated along with silicic volcanism, maintaining its position between the province and the unextended craton.

  4. Yellowstone in a Global Context n this issue of Yellowstone Science, Alethea Steingisser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus, W. Andrew

    of Yellowstone (1991, 1995). Donald White, known for his research on geothermal resources and gYellowstone in a Global Context I n this issue of Yellowstone Science, Alethea Steingisser- tion of geysers at the hands of humans, and the tremendous importance of Yellowstone National Park

  5. Clean Cities: Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition The Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce...

  6. Hydrothermal vents of Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplinski, M.A.; Morgan, P. (Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States). Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    Hydrothermal vent systems within Yellowstone Lake are located within the Yellowstone caldera in the northeastern and West Thumb sections of the lake. The vent systems lie within areas of extremely high geothermal gradients (< 1,000 C/km) in the lake sediments and occur as clusters of individual vents that expel both hydrothermal fluids and gas. Regions surrounding the vents are colonized by unique, chemotropic biologic communities and suggest that hydrothermal input plays an important role in the nutrient dynamics of the lake's ecosystem. The main concentration of hydrothermal activity occurs in the northeast region of the main lake body in a number of locations including: (1) along the shoreline from the southern edge of Sedge Bay to the inlet of Pelican Creek; (2) the central portion of the partially submerged Mary Bay phreatic explosion crater, within deep (30--50 m) fissures; (3) along the top of a 3 km long, steep-sided ridge that extends from the southern border of Mary Bay, south-southeast into the main lake basin; and (4) east of Stevenson Island along the lower portion of the slope (50--107 m) into the lake basin, within an anastomosing series of north to northwest trending, narrow troughs or fissures. Hydrothermal vents were also located within, and surrounding the West Thumb of Yellowstone Lake, with the main concentration occurring the offshore of the West Thumb and Potts Geyser Basin. Hydrothermal vents in Yellowstone Lake occur along fractures that have penetrated the lake sediments or along the tops of ridges and near shore areas. Underneath the lake, rising hydrothermal fluids encounter a semi-permeable cap of lake sediments. Upwardly convecting hydrothermal fluid flow may be diverted by the impermeable lake sediments along the buried, pre-existing topography. These fluids may continue to rise along topography until fractures are encountered, or the lake sediment cover is thinned sufficiently to allow egress of the fluids.

  7. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using toughreact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Salah, Sonia; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    fluid flow in the Yellowstone geothermal system, Wyoming.USA ABSTRACT The Yellowstone geothermal system provides anPrevious studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have

  8. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

    2003-01-01

    fluid flow in the Yellowstone geothermal system, Wyoming,ROCK INTERACTION IN THE YELLOWSTONE GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USINGGeyser Basin of the Yellowstone geothermal system, has been

  9. An Overview of Yellowstone Geologic Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and southwestern Montana. Located along the continental divide within the Middle Rocky Mountains, Yellowstone is on a high plateau averaging 8,000 feet in elevation. The mountain ranges that encircle Yellowstone vary from Mountains to the north; the Absaroka Mountains on the eastern border; and the Teton Range, within Grand

  10. Archaeal viruses from Yellowstone’s high temperature environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Young; B. Wiedenheft; J. Snyder; J. Spuhler; F. Roberto; T. Douglas

    2005-01-01

    In general, our understanding of Archaea lags far behind our knowledge of the other two domains of life—Bacteria and Eukarya. Unlike the other domains of life, very few viruses of Archaea have been characterized. Of the approximately 4000 viruses described to date, only 36 are associated with archaeal hosts--many of these from thermophilic Crenarchaeota. In this work we describe the discovery, isolation and preliminary characterization of viruses and novel virus-like particles isolated directly from diverse thermal environments in Yellowstone National Park.

  11. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Yellowstone Region (Chatterjee...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Yellowstone Region (Chatterjee, Et Al., 1985) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  12. Yellowstone Agencies Plan to Reduce Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 10 federal land organizations — including two national parks, six national forests and two national wildlife refuges — in the Greater Yellowstone Area comprise an entire ecosystem of their own. Straddling Wyoming’s borders with Montana and Idaho, the region draws millions of visitors a year, attracted by the dramatic landscapes, geothermal activity and chances to spot wildlife like bison, elk and grizzly bear.

  13. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using toughreact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Salah, Sonia; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    in the Yellowstone geothermal system, Wyoming. Journal ofMuffler, L.J.P (Eds. ), Geothermal Systems: Principles andrhyolite in an active geothermal system: Yellowstone drill

  14. High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    differences in rock composition, types and degree of alteration, and crustal structures that mirror the variable geology of the Yellowstone Plateau. The older, Eocene,...

  15. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Goff ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not...

  16. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Yellowstone Region (Hellman ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near...

  17. Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of magma beneath the Yellowstone caldera. Authors Stephan Husen, Robert B. Smith and Gregory P. Waite Published Journal Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research,...

  18. Yellowstone Valley Electric Cooperative- Residential/Commercial Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Yellowstone Valley Electric Cooperative offers rebates to residential and commercial members for purchasing energy efficient add-on heat pumps, geothermal heat pumps, water heaters, dishwashers...

  19. Exploration And Discovery In Yellowstone Lake- Results From High...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    And Discovery In Yellowstone Lake- Results From High-Resolution Sonar Imaging, Seismic Reflection Profiling, And Submersible Studies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  20. Isotopic dating of Lava Creek B tephra in terrace deposits along the Wind River, Wyoming--Implications for post 0. 6 Ma uplift of the Yellowstone hotspot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izett, G.A.; Pierce, K.L.; Naeser, N.D. (U.S.G.S., Denver, CO (United States)); Jaworowski, C. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1992-01-01

    Along the Wind River near Kinnear (Pavillon quadrangle), a meter-thick tephra layer occurs near the middle of a main-stem gravel deposit about 100 m above the river. On Muddy Ridge 25 km east of Kinnear, a Lava Creek B tephra layer occurs at the base of a terrace deposit about 100 m above Muddy Creek. Another Lava Creek B tephra site 67 km northwest and upstream from Kinnear occurs within main-stem gravels of a terrace deposit 145 m above the river. This upstream increase of 45 m of the tephra horizon raises the concern that the two tephra layers might not be of the same age. All three tephras contain the same assemblage of phenocrysts as that in the Lava Creek Tuff, Member B in Yellowstone National Park and the Lava Creek B volcanic ash bed of the Western U.S., and therefore they are arguably correlatives. The authors confirmed this petrographic correlation by isotopic dating of sanidine crystals recovered from cm-size pumice lapilli in the Kinnear tephra and from coarse-grained tephra at the Muddy Creek site. Laser total-fusion Ar-40-Ar-39 ages of sanidine from the two sites are coeval, 0.66[plus minus]0.01 Ma and 0.67[plus minus]0.01 Ma at Muddy Creek. Conventional K-Ar dating of sanidine from the tephra at the Cl453 site resulted in an age of 0.60[plus minus]0.02 Ma. Glass-mantled zircon crystals from the Cl453 site yielded a fission-track age of 0.67[plus minus]0.16 Ma. These isotopic ages are compatible with conventional K-Ar, Ar-40-Ar-39, and fission-track ages of the Lava Creek Tuff, Member B in Yellowstone National Park and other occurrences of Lava Creek B ash beds. The authors suggest that the terrace deposit that contains the Lava Creek B tephra rises from the Kinnear site northwest up the Wind River as a result of Quaternary uplift in the area of the Yellowstone hotspot.

  1. Hydrogen and bioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Hydrogen and bioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem John R. Spear*, Jeffrey J of organisms of the kinds that derive energy for primary productivity from the oxidation of molecular hydrogen of energy for primary production in the Yellowstone high-temperature ecosys- tem. Hydrogen concentrations

  2. Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton Jump to:Wylie, Texas: EnergyYBR Solar JumpYasudaYellowstone

  3. VOLCANOLOGY The Yellowstone magmatic system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Victor C.

    , University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA. 2 Seismological Laboratory, California Institute the tectonic division of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP). Yellow and thin dotted lines are the border area (red box) and the major tectonic boundaries (green lines) in the western United States. onMay17

  4. Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    against a direct link between the Yellowstone hotspot and the initiation of extension, casting additional doubt on the role of the hotspot in extension across the broader Basin and...

  5. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Kennedy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DOE-funding Unknown References B. M. Kennedy, M. A. Lynch, J. H. Reynolds, S. P. Smith (1985) Intensive Sampling Of Noble Gases In Fluids At Yellowstone- I, Early Overview...

  6. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

    2003-01-01

    borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal

  7. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using toughreact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Salah, Sonia; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal

  8. Origin and deformation of Holocene shoreline terraces, Yellowstone Lake, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, G.A.; Locke, W.W.

    1986-08-01

    Geodetic surveys within the Yellowstone caldera have documented active uplift that is most likely caused by magmatic processes in the upper crust. Along the northeast shore of Yellowstone Lake, maximum relative uplift rates are 10 mm/yr for the period 1923-1975. However, information on deformation prior to historic instrumental records has been lacking. In this study, closely spaced data on elevations of postglacial shoreline terraces around the north end of Yellowstone Lake reveal complex tilting. Though most Holocene deformation is probably magma related, the pattern of shoreline tilting deviates significantly from the historic pattern of roughly symmetric inflation of the caldera. Along the northeast shore, where tilt directions of historic and shoreline deformation are similar, differential uplift of a > 2500-yr-old terrace is roughly 10 m; this gives a maximum uplift rate of 4 mm/yr. These unique Holocene terraces may exist due to episodic deformation because vertical movements affecting the lake outlet directly control lake level.

  9. The objectives for deep scientific drilling in Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The western area of the United Stated contains three young silicic calderas, all of which contain attractive targets for scientific drilling. Of the three, the Yellowstone caldera complex is the largest, has the most intense geothermal anomalies, and is the most seismically active. On the basis of scientific objectives alone. it is easily the first choice for investigating active hydrothermal processes. This report briefly reviews what is known about the geology of Yellowstone National Park and highlights unique information that could be acquired by research drilling only in Yellowstone. However, it is not the purpose of this report to recommend specific drill sites or to put forth a specific drilling proposal. 175 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Mantle transition zone topography and structure beneath the Yellowstone hotspot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dueker, Ken

    Mantle transition zone topography and structure beneath the Yellowstone hotspot David Fee and Ken ± 1.6 km, with 36­40 km of peak to peak topography. This topography is spatially uncorrelated, providing no evidence for a lower mantle plume currently beneath the hotspot. The topography suggests

  11. Portable Emission Measurements of Yellowstone Park Snowcoaches and Snowmobiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    ], and oxides of nitrogen [NOx]). Large emissions variability was still observed despite using a standardized characterized by large emission ranges in CO (5­630 g/mi), HC (1­50 g/mi), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx; 1­49 gPortable Emission Measurements of Yellowstone Park Snowcoaches and Snowmobiles Gary A. Bishop, Ryan

  12. Geothermal Systems of the Yellowstone Caldera Field Trip Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, Duncan; Neilson, Dennis L.; Nichols, Clayton R.

    1980-09-08

    Geothermal studies are proceedings on two fronts in the West Yellowstone area. High-temperature resources for the generation of electricity are being sought in the Island Park area, and lower temperatures resources for direct applications, primarily space heating, are being explored for near the town of West Yellowstone. Potential electric geothermal development in the Island Park area has been the subject of widespread publicity over fears of damage to thermal features in Yellowstone Park. At the time of writing this guide, companies have applied for geothermal leases in the Island Park area, but these leases have not yet been granted by the US Forest Service. The Senate is now discussing a bill that would regulate geothermal development in Island Park; outcome of this debate will determine the course of action on the lease applications. The Island Park area was the site of two cycles of caldera activity, with major eruptions at 2.0 and 1.2 million years ago. The US Geological Survey estimates that 16,850 x 10{sup 18} joules of energy may remain in the system. Geothermal resources suitable for direct applications are being sought in the West Yellowstone vicinity by the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, under funding from the US Department of Energy. West Yellowstone has a mean annual temperature of 1-2 C. Research thus far suggests that basement rocks in the vicinity are at a depth of about 600 m and are probably similar to the rocks exposed north of Hebgen Lake, where Precambrian, Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks have been mapped. A few sites with anomalously warm water have been identified near the town. Work is continuing on this project.

  13. Chemical studies of selected trace elements in hot-spring drainages of Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stauffer, R.E.; Jenne, E.A.; Ball, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    Intensive chemical studies were made of S(-II), O/sub 2/, Al, Fe, Mn, P, As(III), As(V), and Li in waters from two high-Cl, low Ca-Mg hotspring drainages in the Lower Geyser Basin, a warm spring system rich in Ca and Mg in the Yellowstone Canyon area, and the Madison River system above Hebgen Lake. Analyses were also made of other representative thermal waters from the Park.

  14. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

    2003-01-01

    in the Yellowstone geothermal system, Wyoming, Jour. Volcan.engineering, In: Geothermal Systems: Principles and Caserhyolite in an active geothermal system: Yellow- stone drill

  15. Methylmercury enters an aquatic food web through acidophilic microbial mats in Yellowstone National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomberlin, Jeff

    Methylmercury enters an aquatic food web through acidophilic microbial mats in Yellowstone National the extreme environments in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), WY, USA. Little is known of their role in food webs that exist in the Park's geothermal habitats. Eukaryotic green algae associated

  16. Diversity of Life at the Geothermal Subsurface--Surface Interface: The Yellowstone Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diversity of Life at the Geothermal Subsurface--Surface Interface: The Yellowstone Example example of Yellowstone National Park indi- cate that the diversity of microbial life at the geothermal temperatures. The geothermal subsurface-surface interface in the presence of both electron donors and acceptors

  17. The boron isotope systematics of the Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming) hydrothermal system: A reconnaissance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, M.R. (Bristol Univ. (England)); Sturchio, N.C. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Boron concentrations and isotope compositions have been measured in fourteen hot spring waters, two drill hole waters, an unaltered rhyolite flow, and hydrothermally altered rhyolite from the geothermal system in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The samples are representative of the major thermal areas within the park and span the range of fluid types. For the fluids, the B concentrations range from 0.043-2.69 mM/kg, and the {delta}{sup 11}B values range from {minus}9.3 to +4.4{per thousand}. There is no relationship between the dissolved B concentrations or isotope compositions with the concentration of any major element (other than Cl) or physical property. Each basin is characterized by a restricted range in B/Cl ratios and {delta}{sup 11}B values. Hot spring waters from the Norris Basin, Upper Geyser Basin, Calcite Springs, and Clearwater have {delta}{sup 11}B values close to that of unaltered rhyolite ({minus}5.2{per thousand}) and are interpreted to have derived their B from this source. Waters from Mammoth Hot Springs, Sheepeater, and Rainbow Springs have lower {delta}{sup 11}B values close to {minus}8{per thousand}. These lower values may reflect leaching of B from sedimentary rocks outside the Yellowstone caldera, but they are similar to the {delta}{sup 11}B value of hydrothermally altered rhyolite ({minus}9.7{per thousand}). Hence, the light boron isotope compositions recorded in these hot spring waters may reflect leaching of previously deposited hydrothermal minerals. Cooler springs along the Yellowstone River just outside the park boundary have lower B concentrations and higher {delta}{sup 11}B values that may reflect mixing with shallow meteoric water.

  18. An analysis of public testimonies on the reintroduction of wolves to the greater Yellowstone ecosystem 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wicker, Kristy Joann

    1996-01-01

    Public participation in review of draft environmental impact statements (DEIS) has been problematic. This study focused on public hearings regarding the DEIS for the reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park and central Idaho...

  19. Fungi from geothermal soils in Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redman, R.S.; Litvintseva, A.; Sheehan, K.B.; Henson, J.M.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    1999-12-01

    Geothermal soils near Amphitheater Springs in Yellowstone National Park were characterized by high temperatures (up to 70 C), high heavy metal content, low pH values (down to pH 2.7), sparse vegetation, and limited organic carbon. From these soils the authors cultured 16 fungal species. Two of these species were thermophilic, and six were thermotolerant. They cultured only three of these species from nearby cool (0 to 22 C) soils. Transect studies revealed that higher numbers of CFUs occurred in and below the root zone of the perennial plant Dichanthelium lanuginosum (hot springs panic grass). The dynamics of fungal CFUs in geothermal soil and nearby nongeothermal soil were investigated for 12 months by examining soil cores and in situ mesocosms. For all of the fungal species studied, the temperature of the soil from which the organisms were cultured corresponded with their optimum axenic growth temperature.

  20. Aquificales in Yellowstone National Park Anna-Louise Reysenbach1* | Amy Banta1 | Sara Civello2 | Jim Daly2 | Kendra Mitchel3 | Stefan Lalonde4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    spring ecosystems. Key Words 130 GEOTHERMAL BIOLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY IN YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARKAquificales in Yellowstone National Park Anna-Louise Reysenbach1* | Amy Banta1 | Sara Civello2 in Geomicrobiology, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton 5Yellowstone Center

  1. Analysis of hot springs and associated deposits in Yellowstone National Park using ASTER and AVIRIS remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Michael

    Analysis of hot springs and associated deposits in Yellowstone National Park using ASTER and AVIRIS of Yellowstone National Park from the visible/near infrared (VNIR) to thermal infrared (TIR) wavelengths. Field and techniques; geothermal systems; Mars 1. Introduction There are thousands of known thermal springs on Earth

  2. Cryogenic opal-A deposition from Yellowstone hot springs Alan Channing a,, Ian B. Butler b,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cryogenic opal-A deposition from Yellowstone hot springs Alan Channing a,, Ian B. Butler b,1 Sub-zero winter temperatures on the Yellowstone Plateau alter the opal-A precipitation pathway, contains abundant opal-A particles, comprising sheet and filament- like aggregations of opal-A microspheres

  3. Boundary Creek thermal areas of Yellowstone National Park: II, thermal water analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, J.M. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA); Hutchinson, R.A.

    1980-09-01

    Water samples from 28 thermal springs, 2 non-thermal springs, and 2 creeks from the Boundary Creek Thermal Areas (BCTA) in the southwestern corner of Yellowstone National Park were analyzed to help establish a chemical water-quality base line prior to possible geothermal exploitation of the Island Park Geothermal Area (IPGA). The springs, situated at the southwestern end of the Madison Plateau, are the Yellowstone Park thermal waters nearest to the IPGA and might respond to geothermal exploitation in the IPGA. Water temperatures ranging from 50/sup 0/ to 90/sup 0/C and low Cl concentrations (< 110 mgL/sup -1/) characterize spring waters in the BCTA. They are chemically distinct from the major geysers and hot springs in Yellowstone Park. The Na-K-Ca and silica geothermometers are in general agreement, usually within 10/sup 0/C, and indicate reservoir temperatures of 150 to 170/sup 0/C.

  4. Introduction Yellowstone National Park with its thermal features and abundant wildlife draws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Introduction Yellowstone National Park with its thermal features and abundant wildlife draws about pollution. Measurements of air quality at the West Entrance found CO concentrations comparable to highly by percentages Snowmobile Snowmobile Snowmobil e Snowcoach Snowcoach Pollutant average 2-stroke average 4-stroke

  5. Bark beetles, fuels and future fire hazard in contrasting conifer forests of Greater Yellowstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    1 Bark beetles, fuels and future fire hazard in contrasting conifer forests of Greater Yellowstone. Insects and fire have tremendous ecological and economic effects in western forests, yet surprisingly fire hazard in two widespread but contrasting forest types, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and Douglas

  6. Yellowstone National Park as an opportunity for deep continental drilling in thermal regions. [Abstract only

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, R.O.

    1983-03-01

    The Yellowstone caldera represnets the most intense magnatic and thermal anomaly within the conterminous United States. Voluminous rhyolite ash flows, accompanied by formation of huge calderas, occurred approximately 2.0, 1.3, and 0.6 My B.P. Although the last lava flow was about 70,000 B.P., much evidence suggests that magma may still be present at relatively shallow depth. The evidence from gravity and magnetic lows, magnetotelluric soundings, seismic wave velocities, maximum depths of earthquake foci, significant recent uplift of the caldera floor, and exceptionally high heat flux suggest that magmatic temperatures may be attained 5 to 10 km beneath much of the caldera. Most of the hot-spring and geyser activity occurs within the caldera and along a fault zone that trends north from the caldera rim through Norris Geyser Basin and Mammoth Hot Springs. The thermal waters and gases have been extensively sampled and analyzed over a period of 100 years. The chemical, isotopic, and hydrologic data obtained from natural discharges and from shallow wells drilled in thermal areas, enable formulation of models of the hydrothermal system. No previous intermediate-depth drilling has been conducted at Yellowstone to help select the best location for a deep drill hole, and because Yellowstone is a National Park, no commercial drilling will be available for add-on experiments. Also, a deep drill hole in Yellowstone would have to be sited with great regard to environmental and ecological considerations. Nevertheless, the large amount of existing data is sufficient to formulate testable models. The Yellowstone thermal anomaly is so extensive and scientifically interesting that almost any suitable drilling site there may be superior to the best drilling site in any other silicic caldera complex in the United States.

  7. Helium isotopes: Lower geyser basin, Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, B.M.; Reynolds, J.H.; Smith, S.P.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1987-11-10

    High /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratios associated with the Yellowstone caldera reflect the presence of a magmatic helium component. This component is ultimately derived from a mantle plume capped by a cooling batholith underlying the caldera. In surface hot springs, fumaroles, etc., the /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio varies from approx.1 to 16 tims the air ratio. The variations are produced by varying degrees of dilution of the magmatic component with radiogenic helium. The radiogenic helium is crustal-derived and is thought to be scavenged from aquifers in which the hydrothermal fluids circulate. We determined the helium iosotopic composition in 12 different springs from the Lower Geyser Basin, a large hydrothermal basin with the caldera. The /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio was found to vary from approx.2.7 to 7.7 times the air ratio. The variations correlate with variations in water chemistry. Specifically, the /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio increased with total bicarbonate concentration. The dissolved bicarbonate is from gas-water-rock interactions involving CO/sub 2/ and Na silicates. The concentration of bicarbonate is a function of the availability of dissolved CO/sub 2/, which, in turn, is a function of deep boiling with phase separation prior to CO/sub 2/-bicarbonate conversion. The correlation of high /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratios with high bicarbonate is interpreted as the result of deep dilution of a single thermal fluid with cooler water during ascent to the surface. The dilution and cooling deters deep boiling, and therefore both CO/sub 2/ and /sup 3/He are retained in the rising fluid. Fluids that are not diluted with boil to a greater extent, losing a large proportion of /sup 3/He, as well as CO/sub 2/, leaving a helium-poor residual fluid in which the isotopic composition of helium will be strongly affected by the addition of radiogenic helium.

  8. The geology and remarkable thermal activity of Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, D.E.; Keith, T.E.C. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (USA)); Hutchinson, R.A. (US National Park Service (US))

    1988-01-01

    Norris Geyser Basin is adjacent to the north rim of the Yellowstone Caldera, one of the largest volcanic features of its type in the world. Hydrothermal activity may have been continuous for {gt}100,000 years B.P. Norris Basin includes the highest erupting geyser of recent water types, colors of organisms and inorganic precipitates, frequent changes in activity and chemistry, and very high subsurface temperatures ({gt}240{degrees}C). Norris Basin is only a part of the Norris-Mammoth Corridor that strikes north from the caldera rim to Mammoth Hot Springs. Norris Basin has a heat flow roughly 10 percent of that of the Yellowstone Caldera and requires an estimated 0.01 km{sup 3} of rhyolitic magma per year-a quantity far greater than the corridor's rate of eruption.

  9. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Salah, Sonia; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric L.

    2003-04-28

    The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to simulate the chemical and hydrological effects of water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to simulate the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

  10. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

    2003-04-28

    The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to accurately simulate water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to determine if TOUGHREACT could accurately predict the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

  11. Origin of the northeastern basin and range seismic parabola: Thermal and mechanical effects of the Yellowstone hotspot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, M.H. (Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Centered about the track of the Yellowstone hotspot is a parabolic pattern of seismicity encompassing a region of aseismicity. Recent studies have shown that this pattern has migrated in tandem with the hotspot. A one dimensional finite-difference thermomechanical model is developed which successfully accounts for the observed patterns of seismicity. The volume, chemistry and timing of magma intrusion used in the model are contained by several geophysical, geochemical and geochronological studies of the eastern Snake River Plain. In this model, mafic magmas are intruded into a lithosphere that is already extending. The intrusions heat the surrounding rock resulting in locally increased strain rates. As the intruded magmas solidify, the length of time required to return strain rates to their pre-intrusion level is then determined. The model assumes constant horizontal tectonic forces and maps strain rate as a function of yield strength and time since intrusion. Model parameters such as crustal thickness, initial geothermal gradient, and amount of magma intruded, are varied in order to assess how they affect turnaround time for strain rates. Off-axis seismicity (seismicity within the seismic parabola exclusive of Yellowstone) is accounted for by lower crustal flow. The lower crustal flow under the seismic parabola is driven by buoyancy forces generated by a sublithospheric plume. The shape of the seismic parabola is controlled by the combination of two irrotational fields; a radial flow field due to the plume and a constant velocity field corresponding to plate motion. In summation the author discusses several other models that have recently been proposed to explain the observed patterns of seismicity and late Cenozoic tectonism of the northeastern Basin and Range province.

  12. Beyond the Inventory: An Interagency Collaboration to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Greater Yellowstone Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Fiebig, M.

    2010-10-01

    As one of the largest, intact ecosystems in the continental United States, land managers within the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) have recognized the importance of compiling and understanding agency greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The 10 Federal units within the GYA have taken an active role in compiling GHG inventories on a unit- and ecosystem-wide level, setting goals for GHG mitigation, and identifying mitigation strategies for achieving those goals. This paper details the processes, methodologies, challenges, solutions, and lessons learned by the 10 Federal units within the GYA throughout this ongoing effort.

  13. Core Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Dobson, Et Al., 2003) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures JumpCommercialRenewableGlobal LInformation Yellowstone

  14. Stratigraphic Record Of The Yellowstone Hotspot Track, Neogene...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hotspot track from 17 Ma to 2 Ma. The Ruby, Beaverhead, Big Hole, Deer Lodge, Medicine Lodge-Grasshopper, Three Forks, Canyon Ferry, Jefferson, Melrose, Wise River, and...

  15. Paths of recovery: landscape variability in forest structure, function and fuels 25 years after the 1988 Yellowstone fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    is essential for good stewardship of these rapidly changing landscapes. Stand-replacing forest fires trigger one of the most notorious fires of the 20th Century. Yellowstone's postfire forests may be effective1 Paths of recovery: landscape variability in forest structure, function and fuels 25 years after

  16. Yellowstone as an Analog for Thermal-Hydrological-Chemical Processes at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. F. Dobson; T. J. Kneafsey; A. Simmons; J. Hulen

    2001-05-29

    Enhanced water-rock interaction resulting from the emplacement of heat-generating nuclear waste in the potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, may result in changes to fluid flow (resulting from mineral dissolution and precipitation in condensation and boiling zones, respectively). Studies of water-rock interaction in active and fossil geothermal systems (natural analogs) provide evidence for changes in permeability and porosity resulting from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes. The objective of this research is to document the effects of coupled THC processes at Yellowstone and then examine how differences in scale could influence the impact that these processes may have on the Yucca Mountain system. Subsurface samples from Yellowstone National Park, one of the largest active geothermal systems in the world, contain some the best examples of hydrothermal self-sealing found in geothermal systems. We selected core samples from two USGS research drill holes from the transition zone between conductive and convective portions of the geothermal system (where sealing was reported to occur). We analyzed the core, measuring the permeability, porosity, and grain density of selected samples to evaluate how lithology, texture, and degree of hydrothermal alteration influence matrix and fracture permeability.

  17. Hydrothermal changes related to earthquake activity at Mud Volcano, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitt, A.M.; Hutchinson, R.A.

    1982-04-10

    The Mud Volcano hydrothermal area in Yellowstone National Park is near the intersection of a 20-km-long zone of northeast trending normal faults with the eastern resurgent dome within the 600,000-year-odd Yellowstone caldera. Recent crustal uplift along the northeast trending axis of the caldera is at a maximum (700 mm since 1923) near the Mud Volcano area. From 1973 through April 1978, less than 10 earthquakes (largest M 2.4) were located within 3 km of the Mud Volcano area. In May 1978, earthquakes began occurring beneath the hydrothermal area at depths of 1 to 5 km. The seismic activity continued until the end of November with intense swarms (100 events per hour) occurring on October 23 and November 7. The largest event (M 3.1) occured on November 14 and at least 8 events were M 2.5 or larger. In December 1978, heat flux in the Mud Volcano hydrothermal features began increasing along a 2-km-long northeast trending zone. Existing mud cauldrons became more active, new mud cauldrons and fumeroles were formed, and vegetation (primarily lodgepole pine) was killed by increased soil temperature. The increase in heat flux continued through July 1979 then gradually declined, reaching the early 1978 level by June 1980. The spatial and temporal association of earthquakes and increased hydrothermal activity at Mud Volcano suggests that the seismic activity expanded preexisting fracture systems, premitting increased fluid flow from depths of several kilometers.

  18. Boundary Creek Thermal areas of Yellowstone National Park I: thermal activity and geologic setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchinson, R.A.

    1980-09-01

    Proposed geothermal leasing in the Island Park Geothermal Area (IPGA) in national forest and public lands adjacent to Yellowstone National Park has called attention to the moderate to high temperature springs of the Boundary Creek Thermal Areas. Up until late 1977 no description or geochemical inventory studies had been conducted in these areas. The thermal springs are scattered in four major groups along the Boundary Creek drainage with three to six km. of the IPGA - park border. Observations and analyses of physical and chemical indicators suggest that the source is under the Madison Plateau and that the waters are generally similar in the lower three thermal units. These hot springs should be monitored so as to provide early warning of change in the event that geothermal development in the IPGA causes withdrawal of groundwater from Yellow Stone National Park.

  19. Anomalous shear wave delays and surface wave velocities at Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, R.G.; Boore, D.M.

    1982-04-10

    To investigate the effects of a geothermal area on the propagation of intermediate-period (1--30 s) teleseismic body waves and surface waves, a specially designed portable seismograph system was operated in Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming. Travel time residuals, relative to a station outside the caldera, of up to 2 s for compressional phases are in agreement with short-period residuals for P phases measured by other investigators. Travel time delays for shear arrivals in the intermediate-period band range from 2 to 9 s and decrease with increasing dT/d..delta... Measured Rayleigh wave phase velocities are extremely low, ranging from 3.2 km/s at 27-s period to 2.0 km/s at 7-s period; the estimated uncertainty associated with these values is 15%. We propose a model for compressional and shear velocities and Poisson's ratio beneath the Yellowstone caldera which fits the teleseismic body and surface wave data: it consists of a highly anomalous crust with an average shear velocity of 3.0 km/s overlying an upper mantle with average velocity of 4.1 km/s. The high average value of Poisson's ratio in the crust (0.34) suggests the presence of fluids there; Poisson's ratio in the mantle between 40 and approximately 200 km is more nearly normal (0.29) than in the crust. A discrepancy between normal values of Poisson's ratio in the crust calculated from short-period data and high values calculated from teleseismic data can be resolved by postulating a viscoelastic crustal model with frequency-dependent shear velocity and attenuation.

  20. Porosity, permeability and fluid flow in the YellowstoneGeothermal System, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Hulen, Jeffrey; Simmons, Ardyth

    2002-03-29

    Cores from two of 13 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research holes at Yellowstone National Park (Y-5 and Y-8) were evaluated to characterize lithology, texture, alteration, and the degree and nature of fracturing and veining. Porosity and matrix permeability measurements and petrographic examination of the cores were used to evaluate the effects of lithology and hydrothermal alteration on porosity and permeability. The intervals studied in these two core holes span the conductive zone and the upper portion of the convective geothermal reservoir. Variations in porosity and matrix permeability observed in the Y-5 and Y-8 cores are primarily controlled by lithology. Y-8 intersects three distinct lithologies: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous ash-flow tuff. The sandstone typically has high permeability and porosity, and the tuff has very high porosity and moderate permeability, while the perlitic lava has very low porosity and is essentially impermeable. Hydrothermal self-sealing appears to have generated localized permeability barriers within the reservoir. Changes in pressure and temperature in Y-8 correspond to a zone of silicification in the volcaniclastic sandstone just above the contact with the perlitic rhyolite; this silicification has significantly reduced porosity and permeability. In rocks with inherently low matrix permeability (such as densely welded ash-flow tuff), fluid flow is controlled by the fracture network. The Y-5 core hole penetrates a thick intracaldera section of the0.6 Ma Lava Creek ash-flow tuff. In this core, the degree of welding appears to be responsible for most of the variations in porosity, matrix permeability, and the frequency of fractures and veins. Fractures are most abundant within the more densely welded sections of the tuff. However, the most prominent zones of fracturing and mineralization are associated with hydrothermal breccias within densely welded portions of the tuff. These breccia zones represent transient conduits of high fluid flow that formed by the explosive release of overpressure in the underlying geothermal reservoir and that were subsequently sealed by supersaturated geothermal fluids. In addition to this fracture sealing, hydrothermal alteration at Yellowstone appears generally to reduce matrix permeability and focus flow along fractures, where multiple pulses of fluid flow and self-sealing have occurred.

  1. Inversion for sources of crustal deformation and gravity change at the Yellowstone caldera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasco, D.W.; Taylor, C.L. (Geophysics Lab., Hanscom AFB, MA (USA)); Smith, R.B. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City (USA))

    1990-11-10

    The Yellowstone caldera was formed in the latest of three explosive eruptions of rhyolites and ash flow tuffs totaling 3,700 km{sup 3} at 2, 1.2, and 0.6 m.y. before present. Its youthful volcanic history, widespread hydrothermal activity, intense seismicity, and extremely high heat flow, in excess of 30 times the continental average, marks the Yellowstone volcanic system as a giant caldera at unrest. Orthometric height increases of the caldera of up to 76 cm, measured from precise leveling surveys from 1923 to 1975-1977, were inverted to determine volume expansion source models for the caldera-wide deformation. For the 1923 to 1977 uplift episode, two regions of expansion were found: (1) in the northern part of the caldera near the Sour Creek resurgent dome of {approximately}0.37 km{sub 3}, and (2) in the southern part of the caldera, near the Mallard Lake resurgent dome of {approximately}0.41 km{sub 3}. Both bodies occur in the upper crust from near-surface depths to 6.0 km, but the largest volume expansions were found in the 3.0-6.0 km depth range. The southern caldera source volume, near the Mallard Lake dome, may extend down to 9.0 km. From 1976 to 1987, nearly simultaneous measurements of elevation and gravity changes were made on a profile across the northern caldera during a period of net uplift. Models of the temporal gravity variation infer that the volume increase for the northern caldera source must lie above 9.0 km and involved a density perturbation greater than +0.002 g/cm{sup 3}. The modeled volumetric sources are in the same general locations as bodies of low P wave velocities, high seismic attenuation, and large negative Bouguer gravity anomalies. It is likely that the modeled volumetric increases were caused by migration of magmas and/or the introduction of large volumes of hydrothermal fluids into the upper crust.

  2. Geology and remarkable thermal activity of Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, D.E.; Hutchinson, R.A.; Keith, T.E.C.

    1988-01-01

    Norris Geyser Basin is adjacent to the north rim of the Yellowstone caldera at the common intersection of the caldera rim and the Norris-Mammoth Corridor, a zone of faults, volcanic vents, and thermal activity that strikes north from the caldera rim to Mammoth Hot Springs. The dominant quartz sand is hydrothermally cemented by chalcedony and is extremely hard, thereby justifying the term hydrothermal quartzite. The fundamental water type in Norris Basin is nearly neutral in pH and high in Cl and SiO/sub 2/. Another common type of water in Norris Basin is high in SO/sub 4/ and moderately high in Cl, with Cl/SO/sub 4/ ratios differing considerably. This study provides no new conclusive data on an old problem, the source or sources of rare dissolved constitutents. An important part of this paper consists of examples of numerous changes in behavior and chemical composition of most springs and geysers, to extents not known elsewhere in the park and perhaps in the world. Hydrothermal mineralogy in core samples from three research holes drilled entirely in Lava Creek Tuff to a maximum depth of -331.6 m permits an interpretation of the hydrothermal alteration history. A model for large, long-lived, volcanic-hydrothermal activity is also suggested, involving all of the crust and upper mantle and using much recent geophysical data bearing on crust-mantle interrelations.

  3. Thorium-uranium disequilibrium in a geothermal discharge zone at Yellowstone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Binz, C.M.; Lewis C.H. III

    1987-07-01

    Whole rock samples of hydrothermally-altered Biscuit Basin rhyolite from Yellowstone drill cores Y-7 and Y-8 were analyzed for /sup 230/Th, /sup 234/U, /sup 238/U, and /sup 232/Th. Extreme disequilibrium was found, with (/sup 230/Th//sup 234/U) ranging from 0.30 to 1.27. Values of (/sup 230/Th//sup 232/Th) and (/sup 234/U//sup 232/Th) define a linear correlation with a slope of 0.16 +/- 0.01, which corresponds to a (/sup 230/Th//sup 234/) age of approximately 19 ka. The (/sup 230/Th//sup 234/U) disequilibrium was apparently caused by U redistribution which occurred mostly at about 19 ka, and is not related simply to the relative degree of hydrothermal alteration and self-sealing of the rhyolite. Mass balance of U requires a large flux of U-bearing ground water through the rhyolite at the time of U redistribution; rough estimates of minimum water/rock ratio range from 10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 4/, for a range of possible ground water U concentrations. Conservative hydraulic calculations indicate that the required ground water flux could have occurred within a period of hundreds of years prior to self-sealing. The disequilibrium data are consistent with a model involving U redistribution during the initial stages of development of a geothermal discharge zone that formed in response to the hydrogeologic effects of glacial melting and unloading during the decline of the Pinedale Glaciation.

  4. Hydrothermal alteration in research drill hole Y-2, Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bargar, K.E.; Beeson, M.H.

    1981-05-01

    Y-2, a US Geological Survey research diamond-drill hole in Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, was drilled to a depth of 157.4 meters. The hole penetrated interbedded siliceous sinter and travertine to 10.2 m, glacial sediments of the Pinedale Glaciation interlayered with pumiceous tuff from 10.2 to 31.7 m, and rhyolitic lavas of the Elephant Back flow of the Central Plateau Member and the Mallard Lake Member of the Pleistocene Plateau Rhyolite from 31.7 to 157.4 m. Hydrothermal alteration is pervasive in most of the nearly continuous drill core. Rhyolitic glass has been extensively altered to clay and zeolite minerals (intermediate heulandite, clinoptilolite, mordenite, montmorillonite, mixed-layer illite-montmorillonite, and illite) in addition to quartz and adularia. Numerous veins, vugs, and fractures in the core contain these and other minerals: silica minerals (opal, ..beta..-cristobalite, ..cap alpha..-cristobalite, and chalcedony), zeolites (analcime, wairakite, dachiardite, laumontite, and yugawaralite), carbonates (calcite and siderite), clay (kaolinite and chlorite), oxides (hematite, goethite, manganite, cryptomelane, pyrolusite, and groutite), and sulfides (pyrhotite and pyrite) along with minor aegirine, fluorite, truscottite, and portlandite. Interbedded travertine and siliceous sinter in the upper part of the drill core indicate that two distinct types of thermal water are responsible for precipitation of the surficial deposits, and further that the water regime has alternated between the two thermal waters more than once since the end of the Pinedale Glaciation (approx. 10,000 years B.P.). Alternation of zones of calcium-rich and sodium- and potassium-rich hydrothermal minerals also suggests that the calcium-rich and sodium- and potassium-rich hydrothermal minerals also suggests that the water chemistry in this drill hole varies with depth.

  5. Coupled variations in helium isotopes and fluid chemistry: Shoshone Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hearn, E.H.; Kennedy, B.M. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA)); Truesdell, A.H. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Early studies of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He variations in geothermal systems have generally attributed these fluctuations to either differences in the source of the magmatic {sup 3}He-rich helium or to local differences in the deep flux of magmatic {sup 3}He-rich helium. Kennedy et al, however, show that near-surface processes such as boiling and dilution may also drastically affect {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios of geothermal vapors. Helium isotope ratios were determined for several hot springs at Shoshone Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park for this study, along with other noble gas data. Stable isotope data and water and gas chemistry data for each spring were also compiled. The water chemistry indicates that there is one deep, hot thermal water in the area which is mixing with dilute meteoric water that has entered the system at depth. Spring HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} concentrations correlate with {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He values, as in nearby Lower Geyser Basin. This correlation is attributed to variable amounts of deep dilution of thermal waters with a relatively cool water that inhibits boiling at depth, thus preventing the loss of CO{sub 2} and magmatic He in the most diluted samples. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope data also support a boiling and dilution model, but to produce the observed fractionations, the boiling event would have to be extensive, with steam loss at the surface, whereas the boiling that affected the helium isotope ratios was probably a small scale event with steam loss at depth. It is possible that deep boiling occurred in the basin and that small amounts of steam escaped along fractures at about 500 m below the surface while all subsequently produced steam was lost near or at the surface.

  6. Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development - An Application on Alternative Fuels in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shropshire, D.E.; Cobb, D.A.; Worhach, P.; Jacobson, J.J.; Berrett, S.

    2000-12-30

    The Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development project integrated the Bechtel/Nexant Industrial Materials Exchange Planner and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory System Dynamic models, demonstrating their capabilities on alternative fuel applications in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Park system. The combined model, called the Dynamic Industrial Material Exchange, was used on selected test cases in the Greater Yellow Teton Parks region to evaluate economic, environmental, and social implications of alternative fuel applications, and identifying primary and secondary industries. The test cases included looking at compressed natural gas applications in Teton National Park and Jackson, Wyoming, and studying ethanol use in Yellowstone National Park and gateway cities in Montana. With further development, the system could be used to assist decision-makers (local government, planners, vehicle purchasers, and fuel suppliers) in selecting alternative fuels, vehicles, and developing AF infrastructures. The system could become a regional AF market assessment tool that could help decision-makers understand the behavior of the AF market and conditions in which the market would grow. Based on this high level market assessment, investors and decision-makers would become more knowledgeable of the AF market opportunity before developing detailed plans and preparing financial analysis.

  7. Novel Thermo-Acidophilic Bacteria Isolated from Geothermal Sites in Yellowstone National Park: Physiological and Phylogenetic Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. B. Johnson; N. Okibe; F. F. Roberto

    2003-07-01

    Moderately thermophilic acidophilic bacteria were isolated from geothermal (30–83 °C) acidic (pH 2.7– 3.7) sites in Yellowstone National Park. The temperature maxima and pH minima of the isolates ranged from 50 to 65 °C, and pH 1.0–1.9. Eight of the bacteria were able to catalyze the dissimilatory oxidation of ferrous iron, and eleven could reduce ferric iron to ferrous iron in anaerobic cultures. Several of the isolates could also oxidize tetrathionate. Six of the iron-oxidizing isolates, and one obligate heterotroph, were low G+C gram-positive bacteria (Firmicutes). The former included three Sulfobacillus-like isolates (two closely related to a previously isolated Yellowstone strain, and the third to a mesophilic bacterium isolated from Montserrat), while the other three appeared to belong to a different genus. The other two iron-oxidizers were an Actinobacterium (related to Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans) and a Methylobacterium-like isolate (a genus within the a-Proteobacteria that has not previously been found to contain either iron-oxidizers or acidophiles). The other three (heterotrophic) isolates were also a-Proteobacteria and appeared be a novel thermophilic Acidisphaera sp. An ARDREA protocol was developed to discriminate between the iron-oxidizing isolates. Digestion of amplified rRNA genes with two restriction enzymes (SnaBI and BsaAI) separated these bacteria into five distinct groups; this result was confirmed by analysis of sequenced rRNA genes.

  8. Radium-thorium disequilibrium and zeolite-water ion exchange in a Yellowstone hydrothermal environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Bohlke, J.K. (Argonne National Laboratory, IL (USA)); Binz, C.M. (Loras College, Dubuque, IA (USA))

    1989-05-01

    Whole rock samples of hydrothermally altered Biscuit Basin rhyolite from Yellowstone drill cores Y-7 and Y-8 were analyzed for {sup 226}Ra and {sup 230}Th to determine the extent of radioactive disequilibrium and its relation to the rates and mechanisms of element transport in the shallow portion of an active hydrothermal system. The ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) activity ratios range from 0.73 to 1.46 and are generally correlated with Th-normalized Ba concentrations (Ba{sub N}). Compositions of clinoptilolite and mordenite in these samples are consistent with ion exchange equilibrium between zeolites and coexisting thermal waters. Average K{sup Ba}{sub d mineral-water} values are 1.0 {center dot} 10{sup 5} mL/g for clinoptilolite and 1.4 {center dot} 10{sup 4} mL/g for mordenite. Apparent diffusivities through matrix porosity estimated for R and Ba range from {approximately}10{sup {minus}12} to {approximately}10{sup {minus}10} cm{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1} in thoroughly zeolitic rhyolite; these rates of diffusion are too low to account for the observed distance scale of ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) disequilibrium. The correlated values of ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) disequilibrium and Ba{sub N} represent zeolite-water ion exchange equilibrium that is caused by porous flow of water through the rock matrix and by the relatively rapid diffusion of cations within the zeolite lattices. A water flux of at least {approximately}2.5 (cm{sup 3}{sub water}/cm{sup 3}{sub rock}) yr{sup {minus}1} is required to produce measurable ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) disequilibrium, whereas at least {approximately}23 (cm{sup 3}{sub water}/cm{sup 3}{sub rock}) yr{sup {minus}1} is required for the sample exhibiting the most extreme ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) disequilibrium; these fluxes are much higher than those that can be inferred from net mass transfers of stable species.

  9. Effects of glacial ice on subsurface temperatures of hydrothermal systems in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming: Fluid-inclusion evidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bargar, K.E.; Fournier, R.O. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1988-12-01

    Hydrothermal quartz and fluorite crystals containing liquid-rich fluid inclusions (coexisting vapor-rich fluid inclusions were not observed) were found in drill cores from eight relatively shallow research holes drilled by the US Geological Survey in and near major geyser basins of Yellowstone National Park. Homogenization temperatures (T{sub h}) for mostly secondary fluid inclusions show variations in temperature that have occurred at give depths since precipitation of the host minerals. Within major hydrothermal upflow zones, fluid-inclusion T{sub h} values all were found to be equal to or higher (commonly 20-50 C and up to 155 C higher) than present temperatures at the depths sampled. During periods when thick glacial ice covered the Yellowstone National Park region, pore-fluid pressures in the underlying rock were increased in proportion to the weight of the overlying column of ice. Accordingly, theoretical reference boiling-point curves that reflect the maximum temperature attainable in a hot-water geothermal system at a given depth were elevated, and temperatures within zones of major hydrothermal upflow (drill holes Y-2, Y-3, Y-6, Y-11, Y-13, and upper part of Y-5) increased. The thicknesses of ice required to elevate boiling-point curves sufficiently to account for the observed fluid-inclusion T{sub h} values are within the ranges estimated by glacial geologic studies. At the margins of major hydrothermal upflow zones (drill holes Y-4 and Y-9), fluid-inclusion T{sub h} values at given depths range from 57 C lower to about the same as the current temperature measurements because of a previous decrease in the rate of discharge of warm water and/or an increase in the rate of recharge of cold water into the hydrothermal system.

  10. The fate of the Juan de Fuca plate: Implications for a Yellowstone plume head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Mei; Allen, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Columbia Plateau and Snake River Plain - Deflection of thevolcanism along the Eastern Snake River Plain ending at the

  11. Geoarchaeota: a new candidate phylum in the Archaea from high-temperature acidic iron mats in Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozubal, Mark; Romine, Margaret F.; Jennings, Ryan; Jay, Z.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Rusch, Douglas B.; Beam, Jake; McCue, Lee Ann; Inskeep, William P.

    2013-03-01

    Geothermal systems in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an outstanding opportunity to understand the origin and evolution of metabolic processes necessary for life in extreme environments including low pH, high temperature, low oxygen and elevated concentrations of reduced iron. Previous phylogenetic studies of acidic ferric iron mats from YNP have revealed considerable diversity of uncultivated and undescribed archaea. The goal of this study was to obtain replicate de novo genome assemblies for a dominant archaeal population inhabiting acidic iron oxide mats in YNP. Detailed analysis of conserved ribosomal and informational processing genes indicate that the replicate assemblies represent a new phylum-level lineage referred to here as 'novel archaeal group 1 (NAG1)'. The NAG1 organisms contain pathways necessary for the catabolism of peptides and complex carbohydrates as well as a bacterial-like Form I CO dehydrogenase complex likely used for energy conservation. Moreover, this novel population contains genes involved in metabolism of oxygen including a Type A heme copper oxidase, a bd-type terminal oxidase and a putative oxygen sensing protoglobin. NAG1 has a variety of unique bacterial-like cofactor biosynthesis and transport genes and a Type3-like CRISPR system. Discovery of NAG1 is critical to our understanding of microbial community structure and function in extant thermophilic iron mats of YNP, and will provide insight regarding the evolution of Archaea in early Earth environments that may have important analogues active in YNP today.

  12. Identification of Novel Positive-Strand RNA Viruses by Metagenomic Analysis of Archaea-Dominated Yellowstone Hot Springs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin Bolduc; Daniel P. Shaughnessy; Yuri I. Wolf; Eugene V. Koonin; Francisco F. Roberto; Mark Young

    2012-05-01

    There are no known RNA viruses that infect Archaea. Filling this gap in our knowledge of viruses will enhance our understanding of the relationships between RNA viruses from the three domains of cellular life and, in particular, could shed light on the origin of the enormous diversity of RNA viruses infecting eukaryotes. We describe here the identification of novel RNA viral genome segments from high-temperature acidic hot springs in Yellowstone National Park in the United States. These hot springs harbor low-complexity cellular communities dominated by several species of hyperthermophilic Archaea. A viral metagenomics approach was taken to assemble segments of these RNA virus genomes from viral populations isolated directly from hot spring samples. Analysis of these RNA metagenomes demonstrated unique gene content that is not generally related to known RNA viruses of Bacteria and Eukarya. However, genes for RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), a hallmark of positive-strand RNA viruses, were identified in two contigs. One of these contigs is approximately 5,600 nucleotides in length and encodes a polyprotein that also contains a region homologous to the capsid protein of nodaviruses, tetraviruses, and birnaviruses. Phylogenetic analyses of the RdRps encoded in these contigs indicate that the putative archaeal viruses form a unique group that is distinct from the RdRps of RNA viruses of Eukarya and Bacteria. Collectively, our findings suggest the existence of novel positive-strand RNA viruses that probably replicate in hyperthermophilic archaeal hosts and are highly divergent from RNA viruses that infect eukaryotes and even more distant from known bacterial RNA viruses. These positive-strand RNA viruses might be direct ancestors of RNA viruses of eukaryotes.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus strain Y4.12MC10, a Novel Paenibacillus lautus strain Isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring in Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mead, David [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Zhang, Xiaojing [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Brumm, Catherine [United States Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute; Hochstein, Rebecca [Lucigen Corporation, Middleton, Wisconsin; Schoenfeld, Thomas [Lucigen Corporation, Middleton, Wisconsin; Brumm, Phillip [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2012-01-01

    Paenibacillus speciesY412MC10 was one of a number of organisms initially isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA. The isolate Y412MC10 was initially classified as a Geobacillus sp. based on its isolation conditions and similarity to other organisms isolated from hot springs at Yellowstone National Park. Comparison of 16 S rRNA sequences within the Bacillales indicated that Geobacillus sp.Y412MC10 clustered with Paenibacillus species and not Geobacillus; the 16S rRNA analysis indicated the organism was a strain of Paenibacillus lautus. Lucigen Corp. prepared genomic DNA and the genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. The genome of Paenibacillus lautus strain Y412MC10 consists of one circular chromosome of 7,121,665 bp with an average G+C content of 51.2%. The Paenibacillus sp.Y412MC10 genome sequence was deposited at the NCBI in October 2009 (NC{_}013406). Comparison to other Paenibacillus species shows the organism lacks nitrogen fixation, antibiotic production and social interaction genes reported in other Paenibacilli. Over 25% of the proteins predicted by the Y412MC10 genome share no identity with the closest sequenced Paenibacillus species; most of these are predicted hypothetical proteins and their specific function in the environment is unknown.

  14. Sulfur geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in Yellowstone National Park. 1: The origin of thiosulfate in hot spring waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Y.; Schoonen, M.A.A. [SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Geosciences] [SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Geosciences; Nordstrom, D.K.; Cunningham, K.M.; Ball, J.W. [Geological Survey, Boulder, CO (United States). Water Resources Div.] [Geological Survey, Boulder, CO (United States). Water Resources Div.

    1998-12-01

    Thiosulfate (S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}), polythionate (S{sub x}O{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}}), dissolved sulfide (H{sub 2}S), and sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) concentrations in thirty-nine alkaline and acidic springs in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) were determined. The analyses were conducted on site, using ion chromatography for thiosulfate, polythionate, and sulfate, and using colorimetry for dissolved sulfide. Thiosulfate was detected at concentrations typically less than 2 {micro}mol/L in neutral and alkaline chloride springs with low sulfate concentrations (Cl{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} > 25). The thiosulfate concentration levels are about one to two orders of magnitude lower than the concentration of dissolved sulfide in these springs. In most acid sulfate and acid sulfate-chloride springs (Cl{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} < 10), thiosulfate concentrations were also typically lower than 2 {micro}mol/L. However, in some chloride springs enriched with sulfate (Cl{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} between 10 and 25), thiosulfate was found at concentrations ranging from 9 to 95 {micro}mol/L, higher than the concentrations of dissolved sulfide in these waters. Polythionate was detected only in Cinder Pool, Norris Geyser basin, at concentrations up to 8 {micro}mol/L, with an average S-chain-length from 4.1 to 4.9 sulfur atoms. The results indicate that no thiosulfate occurs in the deeper parts of the hydrothermal system. Thiosulfate may form, however, from (1) hydrolysis of native sulfur by hydrothermal solutions in the shallower parts (<50 m) of the system, (2) oxidation of dissolved sulfide upon mixing of a deep hydrothermal water with aerated shallow groundwater, and (3) the oxidation of dissolved sulfide by dissolved oxygen upon discharge of the hot spring. Upon discharge of a sulfide-containing hydrothermal water, oxidation proceeds rapidly as atmospheric oxygen enters the water. The transfer of oxygen is particularly effective if the hydrothermal discharge is turbulent and has a large surface area.

  15. The Separation of Thermal and Chemical Effects in Evaluating Geothermal Influences on Aquatic Biota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resh, Vincent H; Lamberti, Gary A; McElravy, Eric P; Wood, John R

    1983-01-01

    River (Yellowstone Park) below geothermal effluents.geothermal habitats been most intensively studied in Yellowstone

  16. Effects of potential geothermal development in the Corwin Springs Known Geothermal Resources Area, Montana, on the thermal features of Yellowstone National Park. Water Resources Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    A two-year study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with the National Park Service, Argonne National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory was initiated in 1988 to determine the effects of potential geothermal development in the Corwin Springs Known Geothermal Resources Area (KGRA), Montana, on the thermal features of Yellowstone National Park. The study addressed three principal issues: (1) the sources of thermal water in the hot springs at Mammoth, La Duke, and Bear Creek; (2) the degree of subsurface connection between these areas; and (3) the effects of geothermal development in the Corwin Springs KGRA on the Park's thermal features. The authors investigations included, but were not limited to, geologic mapping, electrical geophysical surveys, chemical sampling and analyses of waters and rocks, determinations of the rates of discharge of various thermal springs, and hydrologic tracer tests.

  17. Correlation of gold in siliceous sinters with {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He in hot spring waters of Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, R.O.; Thompson, J.M. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)] [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kennedy, B.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Aoki, Masahiro [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)] [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    Opaline sinter samples collected at Yellowstone National Park (YNP) were analyzed for gold by neutron activation and for other trace elements by the inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) method. No correlation was found between Au and As, Sb, or total Fe in the sinters, although the sample containing the highest Au also contains the highest Sb. There also was no correlation of Au in the sinter with the H{sub 2}S concentration in the discharged hot spring water or with the estimated temperature of last equilibration of the water with the surrounding rock. The Au in rhyolitic tuffs and lavas at YNP found within the Yellowstone caldera show the same range in Au as do those outside the caldera, while thermal waters from within this caldera all have been found to contain relatively low dissolved Au and to deposit sinters that contain relatively little Au. Therefore, it is not likely that variations in Au concentrations among these sinters simply reflect differences in leachable Au in the rocks through which the hydrothermal fluids have passed. Rather, variations in [H{sub 2}S], the concentration of total dissolved sulfide, that result from different physical and chemical processes that occur in different parts of the hydrothermal system appear to exert the main control on the abundance of Au in these sinters. Hydrothermal fluids at YNP convect upward through a series of successively shallower and cooler reservoirs where water-rock chemical and isotopic reactions occur in response to changing temperature and pressure. In some parts of the system the fluids undergo decompressional boiling, and in other parts they cool conductively without boiling. Mixing of ascending water from deep in the system with shallow groundwaters is common. All three processes generally result in a decrease in [H{sub 2}S] and destabilize dissolved gold bisulfide complexes in reservoir waters in the YNP system.

  18. High-K alkali basalts of the Western Snake River Plain: Abrupt transition from tholeiitic to mildly alkaline plume-derived basalts, Western Snake River Plain, Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shervais, John W.

    High-K alkali basalts of the Western Snake River Plain: Abrupt transition from tholeiitic to mildly alkaline plume-derived basalts, Western Snake River Plain, Idaho John W. Shervais a, , Scott K. Vetter b Snake River Plain SRP Yellowstone plume hotspots Basaltic volcanism in the western Snake River Plain

  19. LETTER doi:10.1038/nature10749 Origin of Columbia River flood basalt controlled by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Lijun

    Yellowstone hotspot track along the eastern Snake River plain (Fig. 1). Recent models trying to explainLETTER doi:10.1038/nature10749 Origin of Columbia River flood basalt controlled by propagating rupture of the Farallon slab Lijun Liu1 & Dave R. Stegman1 The origin of the Steens­Columbia River (SCR

  20. Distinctive upper mantle anisotropy beneath the High Lava Plains and Eastern Snake River Plain,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distinctive upper mantle anisotropy beneath the High Lava Plains and Eastern Snake River Plain and continuing with the still- ongoing volcanism in the High Lava Plains (HLP) and eastern Snake River Plain (SRP waves; shear wave splitting; high lava plains; Snake River Plain; Yellowstone. Index Terms: 8137

  1. Rare earth element geochemistry of acid-sulphate and acid-sulphate-chloride geothermal systems from Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, A.J.; Palmer, M.R.; Kemp, A.J. [Bristol Univ. (United Kingdom)] [Bristol Univ. (United Kingdom); Sturchio, N.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Rare earth element (REE) concentrations have been determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) in acid-sulphate and acid-sulphate-chloride waters and the associated sinters and volcanic rocks from the Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming, USA, geothermal system. REE concentrations in the volcanic rocks range from 222 to 347 ppm: their chondrite-normalised REE patterns are typical of upper continental crust, with LREE > HREE and negative Eu anomalies. Total REE concentrations in the fluids range from 3 to 1133 nmol kg{sup -1} ({ge}162 ppm), and {Sigma}REE concentrations in sinter are {ge}181 ppm. REE abundances and patterns in drill core material from YNP indicate some REE mobility. Relative to the host rocks the REE patterns of the fluids are variably depleted in HREEs and LREEs, and usually have a pronounced positive Eu anomaly. This decoupling of Eu from the REE suite suggests that (1) Eu has been preferentially removed either from the host rock glass or from the host rock minerals, or (2) the waters are from a high temperature or reducing environment where Eu{sup 2+} is more soluble than the trivalent REEs. Since the latter is inconsistent with production of acid-sulphate springs in a low temperature, oxidising near-surface environment, we suggest that the positive Eu anomalies in the fluids result from preferential dissolution of a Eu-rich phase in the host rock. Spatial and temporal variations in major element chemistry and pH of the springs sampled from Norris Geyser Basin and Crater Hills accompany variations in REE concentrations and patterns of individual geothermal springs. These are possibly related to changes in subsurface plumbing, which results in variations in mixing and dilution of the geothermal fluids and may have lead to changes in the extent and nature of REE complexing. 37 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. P and S wave velocity and VP///VS in the wake of the Yellowstone hot spot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphreys, Eugene

    magmatism occurred at the eastern Snake River Plain $6­10 m.y. B.P. Data are teleseismic P and S travel time. The dominant structure is a zone which extends beneath the Snake River Plain to a depth of $190 km that is high to density. Specifically, we infer that the low-velocity mantle beneath the Snake River Plain is partially

  3. Depositional facies and aqueous-solid geochemistry of travertine-depositing hot springs (Angel Terrace, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, USA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouke, B.W.; Farmer, J.D.; Des Marais, D.J.; Pratt, L.; Sturchio, N.C.; Burns, P.C.; Discipulo, M.K.

    2000-05-01

    Petrographic and geochemical analyses of travertine-depositing hot springs at Angel Terrace, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, have been used to define five depositional facies along the spring drainage system. Spring waters are expelled in the vent facies at 71 to 73 C and precipitate mounded travertine composed of aragonite needle botryoids. The apron and channel facies (43--72 C) is floored by hollow tubes composed of aragonite needle botryoids that encrust sulfide-oxidizing Aquificales bacteria. The travertine of the pond facies (30--62 C) varies in composition from aragonite needle shrubs formed at higher temperatures to ridged networks of calcite and aragonite at lower temperatures. Calcite ice sheets, calcified bubbles, and aggregates of aragonite needles (fuzzy dumbbells) precipitate at the air-water interface and settle to pond floors. The proximal-slope facies (28--54 C), which forms the margins of terracette pools, is composed of arcuate aragonite needle shrubs that create small microterracettes on the steep slope face. Finally, the distal-slope facies (28--30 C) is composed of calcite spherules and calcite feather crystals. Despite the presence of abundant microbial mat communities and their observed role in providing substrates for mineralization, the compositions of spring-water and travertine predominantly reflect abiotic physical and chemical processes. Vigorous CO{sub 2} degassing causes a +2 unit increase in spring water pH, as well as Rayleigh-type covariations between the concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon and corresponding {delta}{sup 13}C. Travertine {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O are nearly equivalent to aragonite and calcite equilibrium values calculated from spring water in the higher-temperature ({approximately}50--73 C) depositional facies. Conversely, travertine precipitating in the lower-temperature (<{approximately}50 C) depositional facies exhibits {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O values that are as much as 4% less than predicted equilibrium values. This isotopic shift may record microbial respiration as well as downstream transport of travertine crystals. Despite the production of H{sub 2}S and the abundance of sulfide-oxidizing microbes, preliminary {delta}{sub 34}S data do not uniquely define the microbial metabolic pathways present in the spring system. This suggests that the high extent of CO{sub 2} degassing and large open-system solute reservoir in these thermal systems overwhelm biological controls on travertine crystal chemistry.

  4. Managing the Yellowstone River System with Place-based Cultural Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Damon M.

    2011-10-21

    This project aims to create new research tools within the human dimensions (HD) of the natural resources field to improve environmental policy decision making. It addresses problems that arise from the recent trend towards decentralized natural...

  5. Yellowstone National Park folio, Wyoming 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hague, Arnold, 1840-1917.

    1896-01-01

    exposures in Lozier Canyon, Texas. Two conflicting hypotheses were proposed: 1) Sedimentary structures in Facies A are hummocky cross-stratification (HCS) and swaley cross-stratification (SCS), which indicates a shelfal depositional environment above...

  6. Yellowstone Capital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan) Jump to: Name:XinjiangPupingYanyuanValley ElecCapital

  7. 2/15/11 2:17 PMFormat Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Richard M.

    calderas along the Yellowstone Snake River Plain in Idaho -- could be the work of a column of hot rock-mantle plume beneath the Yellowstone Snake River Plain. Underground column of molten rock found at Yellowstone

  8. Ecology of the Riffle Insects of the Firehole River, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armitage, Kenneth

    1958-10-01

    . The Hellige Colorimetric Comparator was used to determine pH in the field. Alkalinity and oxygen were de- termined by the procedures presented in a mimeo- graphed outline from the Department of Civil Engineering, University of Wisconsin, which are only... situation similar to that of the Firehole River. Located in north- western Yellowstone National Park, it drains Terrace Mountain, a travertine formation built through hot spring-activity (Bauer 1948). This mountain serves as one alkalinity source...

  9. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of Older Hot Spring Alteration In Sevenmile Hole, Grand Canyon Of The Yellowstone River, Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  10. Publications of the Volcano Hazards Program 2009 U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Density and lithospheric strength models of the Yellowstone­Snake River Plain volcanic system from gravity

  11. Geothermal features of Snake River plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackwell, D.D.

    1987-08-01

    The Snake River plain is the track of a hot spot beneath the continental lithosphere. The track has passed through southern Idaho as the continental plate has moved over the hot spot at a rate of about 3.5 cm/yr. The present site of the hot spot is Yellowstone Park. As a consequence of the passage, a systematic sequence of geologic and tectonic events illustrates the response of the continental lithosphere to this hotspot event. The three areas that represent various time slices in the evolution are the Yellowstone Plateau, the Eastern Snake River plain downwarp, and the Western Snake River plain basin/Owhyee Plateau. In addition to the age of silicic volcanic activity, the topographic profile of the Snake River plain shows a systematic variation from the high elevations in the east to lowest elevations on the west. The change in elevation follows the form of an oceanic lithosphere cooling curve, suggesting that temperature change is the dominant effect on the elevation.

  12. Contributions to Mineralogy and ISSN 0010-7999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen R.

    of the Snake River Plain hotspot track, which terminates at the Yellowstone Plateau. Hence, the low-d18 O

  13. West Yellowstone, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: Energy ResourcesTurin, New York: EnergyWareham,(BLM)

  14. Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    section of the 0.6-Ma Lava Creek ash-flow tuff. In this core, the degree of welding appears to be responsible for most of the variations in porosity, matrix...

  15. 1714(1) Winter 2006 Yellowstone Science NY ECOSYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    things (plants, animals, etc.)andnon-livingthings (rocks, soil, water, etc.) in a given geographic area at this time. Once photosynthesis converts light energy into biomass, many other organisms, including animals in any of these ecosystems. One of the most important of these exchanged materials is energy. When we

  16. GSATODAY|2012SEPTEMBER Future volcanism at Yellowstone caldera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    intracaldera rhyolitic magmas using quartz petrography, geochemistry, and geobarometry. We propose that magma

  17. ORIGINAL ARTICLE [FeFe]-hydrogenase in Yellowstone National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is an important source of energy for the maintenance and growth of microbial populations (Wolin, 1982; Morita and is the basis for many syntrophic interactions that commonly occur in microbial communities. Little is known diversity of organisms which produce H2 in microbial communities. In this study, we examined the [Fe

  18. Analysis Of Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    analysis, and VNIR spectroscopy. Samples of hot spring deposits, geyser deposits, and soil were also collected. Analysis of ASTER data provided broad scale characteristics of the...

  19. Intensive Sampling Of Noble Gases In Fluids At Yellowstone- I...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    < 3 times the air value. Authors B. M. Kennedy, M. A. Lynch, J. H. Reynolds and S. P. Smith Published Journal Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 1985 DOI 10.1016...

  20. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Kennedy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References B. M. Kennedy, J. H. Reynolds, S. P. Smith (1988) Noble Gas Geochemistry In Thermal Springs Additional References Retrieved from...

  1. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    October 2001 - 30 September 2004). These solutes were chosen because they are likely derived in part, from the magmatic volatiles CO2, SO2, H2S, HCl, HF (Symonds et al., 2001)....

  2. Stratigraphic Record Of The Yellowstone Hotspot Track, Neogene Sixmile

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) JumpandStereoNewCreek Formation Grabens, Southwest Montana

  3. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Yellowstone Region (Chatterjee, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) | Open Energy Information DixieGeothermal Area1985) | Open

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellowstone National Park Commits to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropane Texas LawCase

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellowstone Park Recycles Vehicle Batteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropane Texas LawCasefor Solar Power

  6. Hyperspectral Imaging At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas:Hydrothermally Deposited Rock JumpEnergy

  7. High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources Jump to:Hershey, Pennsylvania:HiddenTemperature

  8. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Sturchio, Et Al., 1990) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport JumpFlowood, Mississippi:Open(Sasada, 1988) |

  9. Geodetic Survey At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: EnergyGateway EditOpenTechniques Jump2004)2005) |

  10. Geothermal Literature Review At Yellowstone Region (Sears, Et Al., 2009) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:Bore Technologies IncEnergy2002)Open Energy Information

  11. Geothermometry At Yellowstone Region (Fournier, 1979) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:BoreOpen Energy InformationOpen EnergyRocher, 2005)

  12. Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH JumpEllenville,PowerEvaporative Coolers Jump to:WindEverguard

  13. Mid-Yellowstone Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPRO isMickeyWest Energy Jump to: navigation,Elec

  14. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Yellowstone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec(Pritchett, 2004) | Open Energy Information

  15. Multispectral Imaging At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformationOliver, Pennsylvania:(CTI PFAN)OpenEnergyEnergyEnergy

  16. Isotopic Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Sturchio, Et Al., 1990) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8,Open Energy Information Laney, 2005) JumpEnergy

  17. Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8,Open Energy Information1996)Al.,EnergyOpen Energy

  18. Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program | OpenWisconsin:NewOver CoreOxford SolarOhio:

  19. Reflection Survey At Yellowstone Region (Morgan, Et Al., 2003) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎WindRecycleBank|JemezLaney,SodaEnergy

  20. Yellowstone County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton Jump to:Wylie, Texas: EnergyYBR Solar

  1. Microsoft Word - LBNL-52550 Jart Yellowstone,Dobson.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street LightingFrom Structural analysisSIMULATION OF

  2. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open(Evans, Et Al., 2002) || Open Energy

  3. Lamar Buffalo Ranch, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safety StandardsLabor Relations Act

  4. Lower Yellowstone R E A, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 Jump to: navigation, search ToolWells andLowerIncInc

  5. Aeromagnetic Survey At Yellowstone Region (Finn & Morgan, 2002) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: Energy Resources JumpAdelan1986) | OpenEnergy Information

  6. Analysis Of Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYork Jump to:Hempsteadtemporal momentAnadarkoPark Using

  7. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Kennedy, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures JumpCommercial Jump(Thompson, 1985)(Laney, 2005) | Open

  8. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Kennedy, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures JumpCommercial Jump(Thompson, 1985)(Laney, 2005) | Open1988) |

  9. Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9)ask queries TypeDeveloper|Winds Wind Farm

  10. Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, Blue MountainSchoolPrairiePonder, Texas:I

  11. Ecological and Geochemical Aspects of Terrestrial Hydrothermal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Matthew James

    Yellowstone Ecosystem, A. boreas breed predominantly in geothermalYellowstone Ecosystem, A. boreas breed predominantly in geothermalYellowstone Ecosystem, A. boreas breed predominantly in geothermal

  12. 'Taking in the waters' at LaDuke Hot Springs Resort: Early 20th century medical tourism in Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Benjamin W.; Porter, Athna May

    2008-01-01

    would have on Yellowstone’s geothermal system, introduced aYellowstone National Park are only one small part of a complex geothermal

  13. FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analysis: Volume 1, Scientific Bases and Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Dobson, David

    2001-01-01

    Fluid Flow in the Yellowstone Geothermal System, Wyoming. ”examination of the Yellowstone geothermal system and a tuffSelf-Sealing at the Yellowstone Geothermal System Mineral

  14. Endolithic Microbial Ecosystems: Molecular Phylogenetic Composition,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Norman

    in Yellowstone geothermal environments. Electron microscopic analysis indicated Yellowstone communities three distinct areas: the Rocky Mountain region and Yellowstone National Park of the USA, and Shark Bay

  15. Natural analogue synthesis report, TDR-NBS-GS-000027 rev00 icn 02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01

    Fluid Flow in the Yellowstone Geothermal System, Wyoming."11-26 11.3.2 Introduction to the Yellowstone Geothermalidentified the Yellowstone geothermal system as particularly

  16. Application of natural analogues in the Yucca Mountain project - overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Ardyth M.

    2003-01-01

    Processes Yellowstone and other geothermal systems in weldedat Yellowstone (WY) and Wairakei (NZ) geothermal fields;Yellowstone (WY), Otake (Japan), and various New Zealand geothermal

  17. A Korarchael Genome Reveals Insights into the Evolution of the Archaea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkins, James G.

    2008-01-01

    bioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem. Procbioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem. Proc2005) in Geothermal Biology and Geochemstry in Yellowstone

  18. Slab plume interaction beneath the Pacific Northwest Mathias Obrebski,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Richard M.

    the Yellowstone Snake River Plain (YSRP) and second, that the subducting Juan de Fuca (JdF) slab is fragmented- canic outpouring that occurred 17 Ma. The Yellowstone Snake River Plain (YSRP) hosts a bimodal volcanic volcanic provinces. The Columbia River Basalts (CRB, Figure 1) is the product of a phase of massive vol

  19. 00083 page 272 of 10 For permission to copy, contact editing@geosociety.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pazzaglia, Frank J.

    : filtered topography, drainage divides, synthetic drainage divides, Snake River Plain, Yellowstone hotspot that eastward migration of the Snake River drainage divide lags behind the continued northeastward propagation of the Snake River watershed divide as an indicator of geodynamic processes in the greaterYellowstone region

  20. Complete genome sequence of Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans type strain (ICPT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clum, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    isolated from geothermal sites in Yellowstone National Park:Y00168 from a geothermal site in Yellowstone National Park [

  1. Rapid Classification of NifH Protein Sequences using Classification and Regression Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Ildiko E.

    2014-01-01

    of nifH in the Yellowstone Geothermal Complex. MicrobialMicrobial mat, Yellowstone Park geothermal springs Table 2.

  2. Molecular Ecology (2008) doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2008.03671.x 2008 The Authors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadly, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    and maintained by the Snake River Plain; (ii) demographic expansion in two lineages corresponding to the time squirrels, Lava Creek Caldera, phylogeography, postglacial recolon- ization, Snake River Plain, Yellowstone

  3. For permission to copy, contact editing@geosociety.org 2002 Geological Society of America 1245

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    Snake River Plain. The high helium isotope ratios observed at Yellowstone and other hotspots the path of the eastern Snake River Plain since at least the middle Miocene. The volcanic field has been

  4. Volume 13, Number 1 21 August 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Steens/Columbia River flood basalts (CRB) and the striking spatiotemporal trends of the Yellowstone/Snake River Plain (Y/SRP) and High Lava Plains (HLP) regions. Several different models have been proposed

  5. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) |InformationThe2009) | Open Energy2008) || Open Energy

  6. The fate of the Juan de Fuca plate: Implications for a Yellowstone plume head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Mei; Allen, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    for a mantle plume head is the unusual low velocity layerthe plume head material is expected to have a low velocitylow velocity anomaly is comparable with that expected for plume head

  7. Cesium in rock-water interaction, Yellowstone National Park. [Abstract only

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, J.M.; Keith, T.E.C.

    1983-03-01

    Chemical analyses of thermal waters from research drill holes and nearby hot springs and geysers in Upper and Lower Geyser Basins indicate that Cs may be a reactive ion. A nearly constant Cs:Cl is found for four wells drilled in Lower Geyser Basin and for some hot spring and geysers. It is inferred from this plot that points falling below the trend indicate Cs depleted waters. A plot of Cs:CHO/sub 3//Cl, another measure of rock-water interaction, also indicates Cs removal from the waters. These data correlate well with a parallel study of chemistry and mineralogy of hydrothermally altered rocks from the drill holes which show that the rocks involved in hydrothermal rock-water reactions are vitrophyric rhyolite lava flows and pumiceous tuff overlain by obsidian-rich sands and gravels. Nearly 55 m of such a section from well Y-8 has been hydrothermally altered into alternating intervals consisting of analcime - quartz - clay (smectite, celadonite) or clinoptilolite - ..cap alpha..-cristobalite - smectite. Whole rock analyses of randomly selected samples of these intervals from several wells have Cs contents somewhat higher than those of the unaltered host rhyolite. However, the Cs content of the analcime - quartz - clay intervals is as much as 700 times higher than that of the host rock. Analyses of mineral separates show that analcime, containing as much as 4700 ppM Cs, is more enriched in Cs than any other mineral. Examination of experimental data suggests that Cs is incorporated into the analcime structure during crystallization. Clinoptilolite, which has been shown to readily exchange Cs, is only slightly enriched in this system.

  8. Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station, Yellowstone National Park (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    The mobile PV/generator hybrid system deployed at Bechler Meadows provides a number of advantages. It reduces on-site air emissions from the generator. Batteries allow the generator to operate only at its rated power, reducing run-time and fuel consumption. Energy provided by the solar array reduces fuel consumption and run-time of the generator. The generator is off for most hours providing peace and quiet at the site. Maintenance trips from Mammoth Hot Springs to the remote site are reduced. The frequency of intrusive fuel deliveries to the pristine site is reduced. And the system gives rangers a chance to interpret Green Park values to the visiting public. As an added bonus, the system provides all these benefits at a lower cost than the basecase of using only a propane-fueled generator, reducing life cycle cost by about 26%.

  9. Spatiotemporal Relationships between Climate and Whitebark Pine Mortality in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    : mountain pine beetle, climate change, grizzly bears, Landsat, enhanced wetness difference index, regression food for wildlife. Mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) is an ideal bioindicator of climate the largest outbreak of mountain pine beetle on record, and evidence suggests that a changing climate has

  10. Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station, Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andy Walker

    2014-03-05

    The mobile PV/generator hybrid system deployed at Bechler Meadows provides a number of advantages. It reduces on-site air emissions from the generator. Batteries allow the generator to operate only at its rated power, reducing run-time and fuel consumption. Energy provided by the solar array reduces fuel consumption and run-time of the generator. The generator is off for most hours providing peace and quiet at the site. Maintenance trips from Mammoth Hot Springs to the remote site are reduced. The frequency of intrusive fuel deliveries to the pristine site is reduced. And the system gives rangers a chance to interpret Green Park values to the visiting public. As an added bonus, the system provides all these benefits at a lower cost than the basecase of using only a propane-fueled generator, reducing life cycle cost by about 26%.

  11. Forecas(ng ash-fall Impacts from a Yellowstone Supererup(on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    ) magma Tephra deposit1 1Scollo et al., 2007, JVGR, 160:147-164 a 1 km A sphere a normal ver(cal erup(on (9 AM-6 PM) Plume height of 13-17 km 9 hour dura and Mud, Univ. Washington Press, Searle, pp 1089-1116 1:40 PM 2:40 PM 3:40 PM

  12. ORNL researchers are studying how bacteria found in Yellowstone hot springs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the development of a cheaper biofuel production process. (Image: Jennifer Morrell-Falvey/ORNL) SCIENCE ORNL deconstruction--a major roadblock to the production of advanced biofuels," Giannone said. --Morgan Mc environment, and scientists hope to transfer this capability to biofuel production tanks. In a paper featured

  13. Surface Gas Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Goff & Janik, 2002) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)Model for theSunLanSuperDrive IncCity, NewMclaren,|Energy

  14. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Yellowstone Region (Husen, Et Al., 2004)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) | Open Energy Information DixieGeothermal Area1985) | Open|

  15. Exploration And Discovery In Yellowstone Lake- Results From High-Resolution

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH JumpEllenville,PowerEvaporative CoolersExosun Sas JumpSolar

  16. Rock Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources JumpMt RanierInformation

  17. Soil Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity forSilicium deEnergy Information North| Open Energy1981) |

  18. Isotopic Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Goff & Janik, 2002) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8,Open Energy Information Laney, 2005) Jump

  19. Water Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al., 2007) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw, Poland:Energy Information Area (Rao,

  20. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Goff & Janik, 2002)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open(Evans, Et Al., 2002) || Open Energy Information

  1. Intensive Sampling Of Noble Gases In Fluids At Yellowstone- I, Early

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:on OpeneiAlbanian CentreHoldings Jump to:Overview Of The

  2. Lower Yellowstone R E A, Inc (North Dakota) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 Jump to: navigation, search ToolWells andLowerInc

  3. Core Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Sturchio, Et Al., 1990) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures JumpCommercialRenewableGlobal LInformation

  4. Identifying and Mitigating Potential Nutrient and Sediment Hot Spots under a Future Scenario in the Missouri River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, May; Zhang, Zhonglong

    2015-09-01

    Using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) for large-scale watershed modeling could be useful for evaluating the quality of the water in regions that are dominated by nonpoint sources in order to identify potential “hot spots” for which mitigating strategies could be further developed. An analysis of water quality under future scenarios in which changes in land use would be made to accommodate increased biofuel production was developed for the Missouri River Basin (MoRB) based on a SWAT model application. The analysis covered major agricultural crops and biofuel feedstock in the MoRB, including pasture land, hay, corn, soybeans, wheat, and switchgrass. The analysis examined, at multiple temporal and spatial scales, how nitrate, organic nitrogen, and total nitrogen; phosphorus, organic phosphorus, inorganic phosphorus, and total phosphorus; suspended sediments; and water flow (water yield) would respond to the shifts in land use that would occur under proposed future scenarios. The analysis was conducted at three geospatial scales: (1) large tributary basin scale (two: Upper MoRB and Lower MoRB); (2) regional watershed scale (seven: Upper Missouri River, Middle Missouri River, Middle Lower Missouri River, Lower Missouri River, Yellowstone River, Platte River, and Kansas River); and (3) eight-digit hydrologic unit (HUC-8) subbasin scale (307 subbasins). Results showed that subbasin-level variations were substantial. Nitrogen loadings decreased across the entire Upper MoRB, and they increased in several subbasins in the Lower MoRB. Most nitrate reductions occurred in lateral flow. Also at the subbasin level, phosphorus in organic, sediment, and soluble forms was reduced by 35%, 45%, and 65%, respectively. Suspended sediments increased in 68% of the subbasins. The water yield decreased in 62% of the subbasins. In the Kansas River watershed, the water quality improved significantly with regard to every nitrogen and phosphorus compound. The improvement was clearly attributable to the conversion of a large amount of land to switchgrass. The Middle Lower Missouri River and Lower Missouri River were identified as hot regions. Further analysis identified four subbasins (10240002, 10230007, 10290402, and 10300200) as being the most vulnerable in terms of sediment, nitrogen, and phosphorus loadings. Overall, results suggest that increasing the amount of switchgrass acreage in the hot spots should be considered to mitigate the nutrient loads. The study provides an analytical method to support stakeholders in making informed decisions that balance biofuel production and water sustainability.

  5. Possible regional tectonic controls on mammalian evolution in western North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnosky, Anthony D.

    sedimentary deposits to characterize the topographic evolution of the southern Columbia Plateau/Snake River Plain and northern Rocky Mountain regions during the Yellowstone hotspot passage, with the ultimate goal

  6. inSightstheEarthScope newsletter Participants in the EarthScope San Andreas interpretive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Konter, Bridget

    River Plain-Teton region September 9-12 in Jackson, WY. Information and an online application form.earthscope.org/workshops/ fault_slip10). Attend the EarthScope workshop for interpretive professionals in theYellowstone-Snake

  7. n this paper, we use obsidian source data as a method for identifying prehistoric and historic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    Basin and northern California. The Snake River and Greater Yellowstone volcanic regionproduceshighCentralRockyMountainsandnorthernHigh Plains and neighboring Plains farmers to the east. People also participated in extensive prehistoric

  8. Geophys. J. Int. (2011) 185, 10031021 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2011.04990.x GJISeismology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    features such as the Colorado Plateau and the Yellowstone Snake River Plains are linked to their deep body that encompasses the stable Great Plains and a large portion of the Northern and Central Rocky

  9. A new interpretation of deformation rates in the Snake River Plain and adjacent basin and range regions based on GPS measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.J. Payne; R. McCaffrey; R.W. King; S.A. Kattenhorn

    2012-04-01

    We evaluate horizontal Global Positioning System (GPS) velocities together with geologic, volcanic, and seismic data to interpret extension, shear, and contraction within the Snake River Plain and the Northern Basin and Range Province, U.S.A. We estimate horizontal surface velocities using GPS data collected at 385 sites from 1994 to 2009 and present an updated velocity field within the Stable North American Reference Frame (SNARF). Our results show an ENE-oriented extensional strain rate of 5.9 {+-} 0.7 x 10{sup -9} yr{sup -1} in the Centennial Tectonic belt and an E-oriented extensional strain rate of 6.2 {+-} 0.3 x 10{sup -9} yr{sup -1} in the Intermountain Seismic belt combined with the northern Great Basin. These extensional strain rates contrast with the regional north-south contraction of -2.6 {+-} 1.1 x 10{sup -9} yr{sup -1} calculated in the Snake River Plain and Owyhee-Oregon Plateau over a 125 x 650 km region. Tests that include dike-opening reveal that rapid extension by dike intrusion in volcanic rift zones does not occur in the Snake River Plain at present. This slow internal deformation in the Snake River Plain is in contrast to the rapidly-extending adjacent Basin and Range provinces and implies shear along boundaries of the Snake River Plain. We estimate right-lateral shear with slip rates of 0.5-1.5 mm/yr along the northwestern boundary adjacent to the Centennial Tectonic belt and left-lateral oblique extension with slip rates of <0.5 to 1.7 mm/yr along the southeastern boundary adjacent to the Intermountain Seismic belt. The fastest lateral shearing occurs near the Yellowstone Plateau where strike-slip focal mechanisms and faults with observed strike-slip components of motion are documented. The regional GPS velocity gradients are best fit by nearby poles of rotation for the Centennial Tectonic belt, Idaho batholith, Snake River Plain, Owyhee-Oregon Plateau, and central Oregon, indicating that clockwise rotation is driven by extension to the south in the Great Basin and not localized extension in the Basin and Range or Yellowstone hotspot volcanism. We propose that the GPS velocity field reflects the regional deformation pattern since at least 15-12 Ma, with clockwise rotation over the Northern Basin and Range Province consistent with Basin and Range extension initiating 16 Ma. The region modified by hotspot volcanism has a low-strain rate. If we assume the low rate of deformation is reflected in the length of time between eruptions on the order of 10{sup 4} to >10{sup 6} yrs, the low-strain field in the Snake River Plain and Owyhee-Oregon Plateau would extend through the Quaternary.

  10. Wyoming/Geothermal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region Huckleberry Hot Springs Geothermal Area Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Seven Mile Hole Geothermal Area Yellowstone Caldera...

  11. Heat flow and seismicity patterns in the vicinity of the eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackwell, D.D. Kelley, S.A.; Steele, J.L. (Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    New heat flow data and thermal modeling are used to calculate crustal temperatures in and adjacent to the eastern Snake River Plain (SRP). The estimated crustal temperature are then used to investigate the relationship between crustal strength and the observed parabolic pattern of seismicity around the SRP. Heat flow below the SRP aquifer in deep wells on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site near the northern margin of the SRP is 107 [plus minus] 15 mWm[sup [minus]2]. Heat flow values from deep wells on both the northern and southern margins of the eastern SRP average 100 [plus minus] 15 mWm[sup [minus]2]. 2-D finite-difference thermal models were developed to fit seismic and heat flow data in the vicinity of the SRP. The models have a shallow silicic magma chamber that is as wide as the SRP. The silicic chamber is underlain by mafic heat sources in the middle to lower crust and in the upper mantle. The heat flow data are best fit by models with deep heat sources that are wider than the SRP. These results are consistent with the presence of young basaltic centers that have been observed outside the SRP. The temperature from the authors thermal models were used to calculate strength envelopes for the crust in the SRP/Basin and Range region. The weakest part of the crust is along the edge of the Basin and Range, where it is heated by the SRP; thus the boundary to the two provinces may be a zone of weak coupling. Their modeling indicates that it is difficult to explain the earthquake pattern in the vicinity of the SRP as a thermomechanical effect related to the passage of the Yellowstone hot spot.

  12. A new look at geothermal energy potential of the eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.P.; Faulder, D.D.; Jackson, S.M. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls (USA)); Hackett, W.R. (Idaho State Univ., Pocatello (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Passage of the Yellowstone plume beneath the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) left a wake of silicic batholiths and associated 4 to 6 Ma rhyolitic tuffs, a 1 km thick sequence of post 4 Ma basalt lava flows, and high heat flow comparable to that of the Basin-and-Range province. U.S.G.S. (United States Geological Survey) Circular 790 estimates that accessible resources are one-third larger than those of the Cascades, but geothermal exploration and research activities on the ESRP have quietly perished. The authors believe that the ESRP merits further attention as a geothermal exploration target. In this article, the first of several by their group, they identify relevant geological and geophysical features of the ESRP, the first step toward a meaningful exploration strategy. Although exploration is hindered by the heat-sapping effects of the overlying SRP aquifer, several geological features of the ESRP suggest that viable exploration targets exist beneath the aquifer: (1) the fracture zones of buried, Neogene silicic calderas; (2) Quaternary basaltic rift zones (several NW-trending ones and an axial one), which have been persistent zones of fissuring, minor faulting, and magma transport; (3) high-angle faults and fractures around the margin of the downwarped ESRP, including NW-trending basin-and-range faults and NE-trending marginal faults; and (4) fractured or brecciated zones near Pleistocene rhyolite domes and silicic intrusions. Existing geophysical data also constrain exploration targets. Aeromagnetic surveys show NW-trending highs that intersect a NE-trending axial high; rhyolite domes and youthful basaltic volcanism are localized along the highs and at intersections. Although the ESRP is remarkably aseismic, recently installed local seismic networks have identified contemporary microearthquakes that could preserve fracture permeability to depths of several kilometers.

  13. Pure appl. geophys. 151 (1998) 443462 00334553/98/04044320 $ 1.50+0.20/0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphreys, Eugene

    1998-01-01

    of the Yellowstone Hot Spot Wake, Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho DEREK SCHUTT,1 EUGENE D. HUMPHREYS1 and KEN DUEKER Snake River Plain, both magmatically modifying the Snake River Plain crust and creating a wider, wake centered about 80 km southeast of the axis of the Snake River Plain. Assuming the degree of anisotropy

  14. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Vol. 94, No. 6B, pp. S310S316, December 2004 Seismicity in Idaho and Montana Triggered by the Denali Fault Earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodsky, Emily

    - tholomew, 1987) with the Snake River Plain and Yellow- stone cutting through the basin and range structure. The Western Snake River Plain is an extensional rift that acti- vated when the Eastern Snake River Plain was formed by the migrating Yellowstone hotspot (Wood and Clemens, 2002). The Eastern Snake River Plain

  15. Mapping the spatial and temporal distributions of woody debris in streams of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus, W. Andrew

    of large woody debris (LWD) at watershed scales and investigate some of the controlling processes; and (2) to judge the potential for mapping LWD accumulations with airborne multispectral imagery. Field surveys

  16. Behavior of nuclear waste elements during hydrothermal alteration of glassy rhyolite in an active geothermal system: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Seitz, M.G.

    1984-12-31

    The behavior of a group of nuclear waste elements (U, Th, Sr, Zr, Sb, Cs, Ba, and Sm) during hydrothermal alteration of glassy rhyolite is investigated through detailed geochemical analyses of whole rocks, glass and mineral separates, and thermal waters. Significant mobility of U, Sr, Sb, Cs, and Ba is found, and the role of sorption processes in their observed behavior is identified. Th, Zr, and Sm are relatively immobile, except on a microscopic scale. 9 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  17. The dynamics of silica deposition in fractures: Oxygen isotope ratios in hydrothermal silica from Yellowstone drill core Y-13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Keith, T.E.C.; Muehlenbachs, K.

    1988-01-01

    The delta/sup 18/O values of 22 samples of hydrothermal chalcedony and quartz from Y-13 drill core range from /minus/7.5 to /minus/1.3/per thousand/. Most samples could not be in mineral-water isotopic equilibrium under present conditions. Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures in quartz indicate precipitation at or above temperatures measured during drilling. Most silica appears to have precipitated from water enriched in /sup 18/O relative to present thermal water. Inferred /sup 18/O enrichments are too large in many cases to be explained by boiling and steam separation. The apparent /sup 18/O enrichment in thermal water may represent a transient dynamic effect that occurs when new fractures open, as disequilibrium increases and the local system is temporarily perturbed. This interpretation is consistent with the observed sequence of mineral deposition and delta/sup 18/O within individual fractures. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Hot-spring Systems Geobiology: abiotic and biotic influences on travertine formation at Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ha, Taekjip

    ) is being propelled by Sedimentology (2011) 58, 170­219 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-3091.2010.01209.x 170 Ó 2010 developed for optical, mineralogical, structural, chemical, hydrological and sedimentological analyses at

  19. Homesite attendance as a measure of alloparental and parental care by gray wolves (Canis lupus) in northern Yellowstone National Park 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thurston, Linda Michelle

    2002-01-01

    the sources of this variation it will be necessary to develop approaches for meta-analysis to compare cases across groups, populations, and species. Factors to consider in a meta-analysis should include: age, multiple litters in a pack (polygamy), number...

  20. Thermal Biology in Yellowstone National Park 6-8Photosynthesis and Respiration of Microscopic Life -Student Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    their energy from the sun or chemicals within their environment. Primary producers do not obtain energy by storing energy from the sun into sugars. The process of photosynthesis involves the use of light energy their energy 1 by eating other organisms (plants or animals). Photosynthetic organisms make chemical energy

  1. Carbon dioxide fixation by Metallosphaera yellowstonensis and acidothermophilic iron-oxidizing microbial communities from Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, Ryan; Whitmore, Laura M.; Moran, James J.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Inskeep, William P.

    2014-05-01

    The fixation of inorganic carbon (as carbon dioxide) has been documented in all three domains of life and results in the biosynthesis of a diverse suite of organic compounds that support the growth of heterotrophic organisms. The primary aim of this study was to assess the importance of carbon dioxide fixation in high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat communities and in pure cultures of one of the dominant Fe(II)-oxidizing organisms (Metallosphaera yellowstonensis strain MK1) present in situ. Protein-encoding genes of the complete 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate (3-HP/4-HB) carbon fixation pathway were identified in pure-cultures of M. yellowstonensis strain MK1. Metagenome sequencing from the same environments also revealed genes for the 3-HP/4-HB pathway belonging to M. yellowstonensis populations, as well as genes for a complete reductive TCA cycle from Hydrogenobaculum spp. (Aquificales). Stable isotope (13CO2) labeling was used to measure the fixation of CO2 by M. yellowstonensis strain MK1, and in ex situ assays containing live Fe(III)-oxide microbial mats. Results showed that M. yellowstonensis strain MK1 fixes CO2 via the 3-HP/4-HB pathway with a fractionation factor of ~ 2.5 ‰. Direct analysis of the 13C composition of dissolved inorganic C (DIC), dissolved organic C (DOC), landscape C and microbial mat C showed that mat C is comprised of both DIC and non-DIC sources. The estimated contribution of DIC carbon to biomass C (> ~ 35%) is reasonably consistent with the relative abundance of known chemolithoautotrophs and corresponding CO2 fixation pathways detected in metagenome sequence. The significance of DIC as a major source of carbon for Fe-oxide mat communities provides a foundation for examining microbial interactions in these systems that are dependent on the activity of autotrophic organisms such as Hydrogenobaculum and Metallosphaera spp.

  2. Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station, Yellowstone National Park (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels| Departmentof5.4.407.Cascade reactionsUsing anCase Study:Mobile

  3. MINORITY EDUCATION THROUGH TRAVELING AND LEARNING IN THE SCIENCES (METALS) "Montana Dinosaur Trail Summer Field Trip"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    in Earth Science. The itinerary will include: A day in Yellowstone National Park exploring the geothermal

  4. Field Trip is sponsored by San Francisco State University and U.C. Berkley MINORITY EDUCATION THROUGH TRAVELING AND LEARNING IN THE SCIENCES (METALS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    in Earth Science. The itinerary will include: A day in Yellowstone National Park exploring the geothermal

  5. ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE published: 15 May 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -mail: binskeep@montana.edu Geothermal habitats in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an unparalleled opportu

  6. Lithosphere doi: 10.1130/L308.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min, Kyoungwon

    Carmenate, David A. Foster and Antonios Marsellos the Snake River Plain: Evidence from apatite (U-elevation ridges or "arms" that flank the eastern Snake River plain (ESRP, Fig. 1) and was termed the Yellowstone contains a drainage divide that par- allels the eastern Snake River Plain, an ~90-km- wide trough largely

  7. doi:10.1130/B26300.1 2009;121;837-856Geological Society of America Bulletin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemming, Sidney R

    ;ABSTRACT The explosive rhyolitic eruptions that define the track of the Snake River Plain­ Yellowstone that the rate of Snake River Plain explosive volcanism has decreased by a factor of 2 or 3 since emplacement from its earliest known location, where the Columbia River Plateau Flood Basalt Province initiated

  8. Mantle source provinces beneath the Northwestern USA delimited by helium isotopes in young basalts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, David W.

    phenocrysts in basalts from the eastern Snake River Plain (SRP), the Owyhee Plateau (OP) and the Oregon High: Received 17 April 2008 Accepted 11 December 2008 Available online 31 December 2008 Keywords: Snake River Plain High Lava Plains Yellowstone helium isotopes mantle plume We report new He, Nd and Sr isotope

  9. Individual animals species can alter ecosystem function-ing, such as nutrient cycling and storage, both directly, by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /detritivore that invaded rivers in Yellowstone National Park in 1994, and has rapidly spread within and near the park since densities of 20 000­ 500 000 snails/m2 (Hall RO unpublished) in all geothermal spring streams in and around streams. Our study site, Polecat Creek, is a geothermal spring stream that flows through the southern area

  10. Contact Information Office of International Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barge, Marcy

    .montana.edu/international/training Bozeman, Montana Bozeman, Montana is a safe, friendly community located in the northern Rocky Mountains beauty, Bozeman is surrounded by mountain ranges and rivers, clean air and starry skies. The area Geyser, Yellowstone Falls (100 meter waterfall), beautiful mountain scenery and lots of wildlife

  11. Workshop Preliminary Full New Revised Addendum Please tick or fill out information in all gray boxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shervais, John W.

    minimize costs and maximize scientific return. We propose drilling three new core holes to complete River Scientific Drilling Project - Tracking the Yellowstone Plume Through Space and Time. JW Shervais, the complete record of volcanic activity can only be sampled by drilling. This proposal seeks funding

  12. Causes and consequences of unsteady crustal magma transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlstrom, Leif

    2011-01-01

    yellowstone hotspot and mantle plume: Seismic and gps imaging, kinematics, and mantle flow. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal

  13. Aspects of earthquake triggering and seismicity clustering /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xiaowei

    2013-01-01

    yellowstone volcano- tectonic system, Journal of Volcanology and Geothermalyellowstone volcano-tectonic system, Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal

  14. GIScience & Remote Sensing, 2012, 49, No. 3, p. 317345. http://dx.doi.org/10.2747/1548-1603.49.3.317 Copyright 2012 by Bellwether Publishing, Ltd. All rights reserved.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    . INTRODUCTION Geothermal features are one of the main reasons that Yellowstone National Park (YNP of geothermal features. The GHF in the Yellowstone region is approximately 2 Wm­2 , which is roughly 40 times.2747/1548-1603.49.3.317 Copyright © 2012 by Bellwether Publishing, Ltd. All rights reserved. Analyzing Change in Yellowstone

  15. Aquificales Synechococcus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konhauser, Kurt

    ;132 GEOTHERMAL BIOLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY IN YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK132 GEOTHERMAL BIOLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY) was noted by the California phycologist, W.A. Setchell. In Setchell's unpublished manuscript on YellowstoneRNA tree of the domain Bacteria, showing the position of the order Aquificales. Aquificales in Yellowstone

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY Phototrophic Phylotypes Dominate Mesothermal Microbial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    survey of Yellowstone microbial mats. Introduction Geothermal features in Yellowstone National Park (YNP with Hot Springs in Yellowstone National Park Kimberly A. Ross & Leah M. Feazel & Charles E. Robertson+Business Media, LLC 2012 Abstract The mesothermal outflow zones (50­65°C) of geothermal springs often support

  17. What is Minimum Impact Research? John R. Spear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    minimum impact Yellowstone National Park 2 GEOTHERMAL BIOLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY IN YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL.735.1808 Fax: 303.492.7744 Email: spearj@colorado.edu 1 #12;Key Words conservation geothermal leave no trace Yellowstone National Park, for example. Other impacts--grazing, logging, mining, drilling and loss

  18. Publications of the Volcano Hazards Program 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hydrothermal vent fluids on the geochemistry of Yellowstone, in Morgan, L.A., ed., Integrated geoscience studies in the greater Yellowstone area--Volcanic, tectonic, and hydrothermal processes in the Yellowstone St. Helens determined by self-potential measurements: Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research

  19. Montana State University College of Arts and Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    and Architecture School of Architecture Outreach and Engagement 2012 Folding Fun With Bucky's Dymaxion Map! www Integrated Design Lab Yellowstone National Park Design Charrettes Sustaining Kukaiau Ranch: Architectural

  20. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Additional References Retrieved from...

  1. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Jemez Springs Area (Goff ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Additional References Retrieved from...

  2. Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  3. FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analysis: Volume 1, Scientific Bases and Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Dobson, David

    2001-01-01

    geothermal system through detailed studies of continuously cored research boreholes (geothermal system at Yellowstone. Changes in pressure and temperature in the Y-8 borehole

  4. Publications | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Renewable Energy in Federal Construction Renewable Energy Document Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station, Yellowstone National Park Renewable...

  5. Marti Ayers From: Sent: To: Subject:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    underneath Yellowstone National Park ever had another massive eruption, it could spew ash for thousands of miles across the United States, damaging buildings, smothering crops,...

  6. Geophysical Setting of the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, North...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geophysical Setting of the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, North-Central Nevada and Its Relationship to a Crustal-Scale Fracture Associated with the Inception of the Yellowstone...

  7. Mountain Home Well - Photos

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shervais, John

    2012-01-11

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  8. Mountain Home Well - Borehole Geophysics Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shervais, John

    2012-11-11

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  9. Mountain Home Well - Borehole Geophysics Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shervais, John

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  10. Mountain Home Well - Photos

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shervais, John

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  11. Vol. 10, No. 12 December 2000 GSA TODAYA Publication of the Geological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dornbos, Stephen Q.

    , Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-1183, USA INSIDE. Volcanic-tectonic setting of Yellowstone-Newberry hotspot system. Volcanic elements are shown in gold and yellow (current locations of Yellowstone [Y] and Newberry [N] calderas in yellow), and tectonic elements

  12. A Test for Airborne Dispersal of Thermophilic Bacteria from Hot Springs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fouke, Bruce W.

    colonization Mammoth Hot Springs thermophile 2 GEOTHERMAL BIOLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY IN YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK Hot Springs complex of Yellowstone National Park. The trapped steam was analyzed for the presence exist between hot springs in close proximity to each other, even springs within a particular geothermal

  13. Ecology, 92(6), 2011, pp. 12921302 2011 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohr, Jason

    of dispersal and thermal environment for mycorrhizal communities: lessons from Yellowstone National Park YLVA of the root-symbiont arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) by sampling roots from geothermal and nonthermal grasslands in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), followed by sequencing and RFLP of AMF ribosomal DNA

  14. Metagenomes from High-Temperature Chemotrophic Systems Reveal Geochemical Controls on Microbial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ha, Taekjip

    The Yellowstone caldera contains the most numerous and diverse geothermal systems on Earth, yielding an extensiveC) chemotrophic microbial communities sampled from geothermal springs (or pools) in Yellowstone National Park (YNP in geothermal environments often results in considerably less microbial diversity than other terrestrial

  15. ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE published: 06 May 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    project: environmental parameters responsible for microbial distribution in theYellowstone geothermal contributions are listed in Table S1 in Supplementary Material. The Yellowstone geothermal complex contains over 10,000 diverse geothermal features that host numerous phylogenetically deeply rooted and poorly

  16. RESEARCH ARTICLE Pre-eruptive storage conditions and eruption dynamics of a small

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    : Douglas Knob, Yellowstone volcanic field, USA Kenneth S. Befus & Robert W. Zinke & Jacob S. Jordan in the Yellowstone volcanic system. To determine pre-eruptive stor- age conditions, we analyzed compositions.7 mm-3 . Using the magma ascent model of Toramaru et al. (J Volcanol Geotherm Res 175:156­157, 2008

  17. Real-time Remote Sensing of Snowmobiles Emissions at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Real-time Remote Sensing of Snowmobiles Emissions at Yellowstone National Park: An Oxygenated Fuel 68509 #12;Real-time Remote Sensing of Snowmobile Emissions at Yellowstone National Park 2 Executive emissions from snowmobiles. Ratios of CO, HC and toluene to CO2 were measured and used to calculate %CO, %HC

  18. doi:10.1038/nature04507 Uplift, Thermal Unrest, and Magma Intrusion at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    doi:10.1038/nature04507 1 Uplift, Thermal Unrest, and Magma Intrusion at Yellowstone Caldera the last eruption, Yellowstone has remained restless, with high seismicity, continuing uplift infer that the observed pattern of uplift and subsidence results from variations in the movement

  19. West Virginia University Geology 404, Geology Field Camp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammer, Thomas

    .geo.wvu.edu/~kammer/geol404.htm Format: Five weeks of geologic field work in the Northern Rocky Mountains. Field areas, Wyoming, Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park, and Southwest will include the Black Hills, Big Horn Mountains, Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park

  20. Book Review Geothermal Biology and Geochemis-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Book Review Geothermal Biology and Geochemis- try in Yellowstone National Park. (eds WP Inskeep of life. The legacy of chemical and biologi- cal research in geothermal regimes, while short in duration geothermal areas, including Yellowstone, are largely confined to the specialty literature of geochemical

  1. A Novel Kingdom of Parasitic Archaea Karl O. Stetter1,2* | Michael J. Hohn1 | Harald Huber1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    ;250 GEOTHERMAL BIOLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY IN YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK Key Words ABSTRACT A nano-sized obligate parasite phylogeny 16S rDNA #12;A Novel Kingdom of Parasitic Archaea 251 1.0 INTRODUCTION More than 30 years ago, in his pioneering work in Yellowstone National Park, Tom Brock discovered Sulfolobus

  2. River Basin Commissions (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

  3. River Corridor Achievements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington Closure Hanford and previous contractors have completed much of the cleanup work in the River Corridor, shown here.

  4. d Onion River Review d river run by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    d Onion River Review d 2009 d river run by Eireann Aspell Jamie Gorton Heidi Lynch Matt Serron #12 lives. #12;BLANK Editors' Note There were portents hinting at the Onion River Review's future as early

  5. TVA's Integrated River System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and controlling floods. So far as may be consistent with such purposes, ...for the generation of electric energy... TVA Power Service Area TVA'S INTEGRATED RIVER SYSTEM | 3...

  6. Large River Floodplains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunne, T; Aalto, RE

    2013-01-01

    River, California. Sedimentology 57, 389–407. http://J. (Eds. ), Fluvial Sedimentology VI. Special PublicationsAnatomy of an avulsion. Sedimentology 36, 1–24. Stallard,

  7. Quantifying Relationships Between Bird And Butterfly Community Shifts And Environmental Change.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.; VanNimwegen, Ron E.; Jakubauskas, Mark E.

    2006-01-01

    in remotely sensed data with analyses of bird and butterfly community changes in montane meadow communities of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Landsat satellite imagery was used to classify these meadows into six types along a hydrological gradient...

  8. A COMPILATION OF DATA ON FLUIDS FROM GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosner, S.R.

    2010-01-01

    Yellowstone National Park, however, was omitted because exploitation of the geothermalGEOTHERMAL FIELD. FENNER ::6 TITLE- BORE-HOLE INVESTIGATIONS IN YELLOWSTONEYELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS. REFERENCE- SELECTED DATA ON WATER WEllS, GEOTHERMAL

  9. DOI: 10.1126/science.1136237 , 513 (2007);315Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    to extreme environments (1). A plant-fungal symbiosis between a tropical panic grass from geothermal soils temperatures in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) (2). Field and laboratory experiments have shown that when root

  10. H.R. 1137: An Act to amend the Geothermal Steam Act of 1970 (30 U.S.C. 1001-1027), and for other purposes. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, November 16, 1993 and November 17, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    The report H.R. 1137 is an Act to amend the Geothermal Steam Act of 1970 to protect the Yellowstone National Park. The proposed legislative text is included.

  11. DOI: 10.1126/science.1156630 , 1067 (2008);320Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    2008-01-01

    . Park, Y. H. Jeong, J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 82, 927 (1999). 31. W. P. Inskeep, T. R. McDermott, Geothermal Biology and Geochemistry in Yellowstone National Park (Thermal Biology Institute, Bozeman, MT, 2003). 32

  12. Estimation of microbial cover distributions at Mammoth Hot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldenfeld, Nigel

    library information from travertine-forming hot springs in Yellowstone Na- tional Park to provide to be obtained in a va- riety of environments ranging from geothermal hot springs to the oral cav- ity. Clone

  13. Life Sciences MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITYBOZEMAN MOUNTAINS & MINDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    of Yellowstone National Park, one of the world's most complex and diverse geothermal areas and its estimated 10,000 geothermal features. Their work also benefits NASA, the TBI funding agency, as it plans missions to other

  14. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SYSTEMATIC BACTERIOLOGY, 0020-7713/97/$04.00 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    ), was isolated from hot springs in Yellowstone National Park and New Zealand. The gram-positive-staining cells- organisms from different geothermal areas (30, 31). Thermo- philic Fe(III) reducers available in pure

  15. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Feb. 2004, p. 845849 Vol. 70, No. 2 0099-2240/04/$08.00 0 DOI: 10.1128/AEM.70.2.845849.2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Scott

    molecular surveys is the division OP11, first encountered in the Yellowstone hot spring Obsid- ian Pool (11. Am. Soc. Micro- biology, abstr. N-23, 1997) geothermal pools (12; Hugenholtz et al., 97th Gen. Meet

  16. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, July 1979, p. 166-168 Vol. 38, No. 1 0099-2240/79/07-0166/03$02.00/0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    created by nuclear reactors in South Carolina (man-made) and geothermal ac- tivity in Yellowstone National) and thermal maxima (450C) when measured along thermal gradients created by geothermal and nuclear reactor

  17. to the Midwest Regional Center of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Disease Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    to extreme environments (1). A plant-fungal symbiosis between a tropical panic grass from geothermal soils temperatures in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) (2). Field and laboratory experiments have shown that when root

  18. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Apr. 2007, p. 26122623 Vol. 73, No. 8 0099-2240/07/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/AEM.02567-06

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Scott

    comparative analysis of acidic thermal springs in Yellowstone National Park to determine how abiotic factors and a smaller fraction attributable to temperature. Molecular studies of geothermal ecosystems have provided

  19. THE LOMA PRIETA, CALIFORNIA, EARTHQUAKEOF OCTOBER 17,1989: EARTHQUAKEOCCURRENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Paul

    variations in geothermal wells (Silver and Valette-Silver, 1987) or changes in the interval between eruption of earthquakes is, nevertheless, well known. For example, Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo

  20. Complex Modulus Prediction of Asphalt Concrete Pavement Cores 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Meng

    2013-12-02

    . For field cores complex modulus measuring methods, except some expensive pavement field testers, empirical and semiempirical models are widely used, but an accurate mechanical test method is more desired. In this research, Arizona, Yellowstone National Park...

  1. The buffalo wars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nasr, Susan L

    2006-01-01

    The wandering buffalo of Yellowstone National Park are the subject of a heated debate in the western United States. The animals carry a disease called brucellosis, which infects both buffalo and cattle and has economic ...

  2. Miwok villages Miwok-Paiute , 1872 Site of Yosemite Lodge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callender, Craig

    concessionaires, oil and mining companies in...? #12;Then ordered to leave, and later, "whites only" Yellowstone, Shell Oil, AES Energy Corp., among many others. · WWF's "conservation partners" include: Exxon Mobil top pr

  3. Interagency Pilot of Greenhouse Gas Accounting Tools: Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Kandt, A.

    2013-02-01

    The Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) and Tongass National Forest (Tongass) partnered with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to conduct a pilot study of three greenhouse gas (GHG) inventorying tools.

  4. For additional information, contact: Department of Mathematical Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    successful careers in industry, government and academia. OPPORTUNITIES IN MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES Study abroad in Yellowstone National Park 4 Interdisciplinary opportunities include analysis of glaciated valleys 5 Dr. Megan SCIENCES? Aerospace industry: Companies such as Aerospace Corporation, Boeing, Goodyear Aerospace, Lockheed

  5. INL Researchers Advance Detection of Brucellosis

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Roberto, Frank; Newby, Deborah

    2010-01-08

    What do cattle ranchers in the greater Yellowstone region have in common with British soldiers garrisoned on the island of Malta in the late 1800s? Hint: it's a pathogen that starts with the letter B. It's Brucella Abortus.

  6. Onion River OnionRiverReview2011dd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    2011 d river run by Lauren Fish Heather Lessard Jenna McCarthy Philip Noonan Erica Sabelawski #12;TheOnion River Review OnionRiverReview2011dd 2011 Our Lives in Dance Alex Dugas We were born with bare. Then we tap-danced on our graves, and back through the womb again, shoeless. #12;d Onion River Review d

  7. d Onion River Review d river run by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    d Onion River Review d 2013 d river run by Alex Dugas Sarah Fraser Bryan Hickey Nick Lemon Diana Marchessault Mickey O'Neill Amy Wilson #12;#12;Editors' Note For this edition of the Onion River Review, we are finally able to present to you this year's edition of the Onion River Review: our love child, our shining

  8. Kimama Well - Borehole Geophysics Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shervais, John

    2011-07-04

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Kimama drill site was set up to acquire a continuous record of basaltic volcanism along the central volcanic axis and to test the extent of geothermal resources beneath the Snake River aquifer. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  9. Kimama Well - Photos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shervais, John

    2011-01-16

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Kimama drill site was set up to acquire a continuous record of basaltic volcanism along the central volcanic axis and to test the extent of geothermal resources beneath the Snake River aquifer. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  10. Rules of the River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1980-01-01

    't overexert. Be careful of sunburn, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. ? Leave car keys hidden at launch point or take-out (with shuttle cars), or firmly attach them to an article of clothing on your person with a strong safety pin. Don't leave valuables... are organized into four parts: ? Planning Your River Trip ? Selecting Your Equipment ? Rules of Safety ? Rules of Conduct When put into practice, these "Rules of the River" may turn an uncomfortable river trip into a lasting and special experience. Read...

  11. On tropospheric rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yuanlong, 1964-

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigate atmospheric water vapor transport through a distinct synoptic phenomenon, namely, the Tropospheric River (TR), which is a local filamentary structure on a daily map of vertically integrated ...

  12. Savannah River Site Waste Disposition Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Terrel J. Spears Assistant Manager Waste Disposition Project DOE Savannah River Operations Office Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Waste Disposition Project Waste...

  13. Ecology of the river dolphin, Inia geoffrensis, in the Cinaruco River, Venezuela 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuire, Tamara Lee

    1995-01-01

    The Cinaruco River is a tributary of the Orinoco River, and forms the southern boundary of Venezuela's newest national park, Santos Luzardo. Like other rivers of this region, the Cinaruco River undergoes an extreme seasonal flood cycle. River...

  14. d Onion River Review d river run by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    d Onion River Review d 2012 d river run by Alex Dugas Lauren Fish Heather Lessard Jenna Mc jokes. Together these things helped shape the 2012 edition of the Onion River Review. A worthwhile departing on an adventure, you simply have no idea what will happen or who you will meet. You may run

  15. Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

  16. Rio Grande River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hills Photo Shop

    2011-09-05

    FORKS BIRDBEAR-NISKU JEFFERSON GROUP DUPEROW O (IJ o BEAVER HILL LAKE GR UP ELK POINT GROUP SOURIS RIVER Ist. RED BED DAWSON BAY 2ll(IRED BED PRAIRIE EVAP WI NI ASHERN INTERLAKE STONY MOUNTAIN RED RIVER WINN IP EG Figure 3... and is bounded by the Sioux Arch, the Black Hills Uplift, the Miles City Arch, and the Bowdoin Dome. The structural trends within the basin parallel the major structural trends of the Rocky Mountain Belt. The Williston Basin is characterized by gently...

  17. VOLUNTEER-BASED SALMON RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute Environment Canada VOLUNTEER-BASED MONITORING PROGRAM FOR THE SALMON RIVER BASIN: USING BENTHICVOLUNTEER-BASED MONITORING PROGRAM FOR THE SALMON RIVER BASIN: USING BENTHIC INDICATORS TO ASSESS INDICATORS TO ASSESS STREAM ECOSYSTEM HEALTH #12;Volunteer-Based Monitoring Program for the Salmon River

  18. UPPER SACRAMENTO RIVER SPORT FISHERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UPPER SACRAMENTO RIVER SPORT FISHERY Marine Biological Laborato«y L I B R. A. R "ST OCT 2 31950 significant changes in the environmental conditions which affect fisheries in Sacramento River have resulted number of sportsmen who are turning to the Upper Sacramento River is indicative of the magnitude

  19. Kimberly Well - Photos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shervais, John

    2011-06-16

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Kimberly drill hole was selected to document continuous volcanism when analysed in conjunction with the Kimama and is located near the margin of the plain. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  20. Kimberly Well - Borehole Geophysics Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shervais, John

    2011-07-04

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Kimberly drill hole was selected to document continuous volcanism when analysed in conjunction with the Kimama and is located near the margin of the plain. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  1. Savannah River Site Robotics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14

    Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

  2. An Analysis of Texas Waterways: A Report on the Physical Characteristics of Rivers, Streams, and Bayous in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belisle, Harold J.; Josselet, Ron

    1977-01-01

    Cree k San Jacinto River, East Fork Spring Creek Taylor Bayou Turkey Creek V. CENTRAL TEXAS WATE RWAYS A. Major Waterways Blanco River Bosque River Brazos River Colorado River Concho River . Frio River Guadalupe River Lampasas River... MAJOR CENTRAL TEXAS WATERWAYS 13. Blanco River 14. Bosque River 15. Brazos River 16. Colorado River 17. Concho River 18. Frio River 19. Guadal upe River 20. Lampasas River 21. Lavaca River 22. Leon River 23. Little River 24. Llano River 25...

  3. CONFLICTS IN RIVER MANAGEMENT: A CONSERVATIONIST'S PERSPECTIVE ON SACRAMENTO RIVER RIPARIAN HABITATS--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONFLICTS IN RIVER MANAGEMENT: A CONSERVATIONIST'S PERSPECTIVE ON SACRAMENTO RIVER RIPARIAN, Defenders of Wildlife, Sacramento, California. Abstract: The Sacramento River's historic riparian habi- tats on this conference's plenary session panel, I will provide a conservationist perspective on Sacramento River riparian

  4. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, D.

    2013-03-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  5. d Onion River Review d OnionRiverReview2010dd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    ://www.smcvt.edu/onionriver/. #12;d Onion River Review d 2010 d river run by Eireann Aspell Lauren Fish Jamie Gorton Heidi Lynchd Onion River Review d 2010 d OnionRiverReview2010dd #12;The Onion River Review is the literary Matt Serron #12;BLANK Editors' Note The only certainty of the Onion River Review is the editors' un

  6. RiverHeath Appleton, WI

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The goal of the project is to produce a closed loop neighborhood-wide geothermal exchange system using the river as the source of heat exchange.

  7. Florida Nuclear Profile - Crystal River

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crystal River1" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  8. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - River Bend

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    River Bend" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  9. Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the...

  10. Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

  11. Spatial design principles for sustainable hydropower development in river basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jager, Henriette I.

    : Freshwater reserve design Hydroelectric power Network theory Optimization Regulated rivers River portfolio

  12. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    March 6, 2000 Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company, related to Procurement Quality Assurance and Quality Improvement Deficiencies at the Savannah River Site. On March 6,...

  13. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA 98-09 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River Company - EA 98-09 September 21, 1998 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Westinghouse Savannah River...

  14. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic...

  15. Project Management Institute Highlights Savannah River Nuclear...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Management Institute Highlights Savannah River Nuclear Solutions in Publication Project Management Institute Highlights Savannah River Nuclear Solutions in Publication February 6,...

  16. Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 July 2013 Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the...

  17. Flambeau River Biofuels Demonstration-Scale Biorefinery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Wisconsin (NewPage Corporation in Wisconsin Rapids and Flambeau River Papers, LLC in Park Falls). NewPage and Flambeau River have demonstrated successful collaboration on...

  18. River Corridor - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultiday ProductionDesigningResourcesfeed-image Digg:RisingRiver

  19. GOLF COURSES FRASER RIVER BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Fraser Pollution Abatement Office Fraser River Action Plan Environment Canada North Vancouver, B judgement in light of the knowledge and information available to UMA at the time of preparation. UMA denies by Environment Canada under the Fraser River Action Plan through the Fraser Pollution Abatement Office. The views

  20. Aquatic Supplement Hood River Subbasin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Table 4. Out-of-subbasin production for three Hood River steelhead populations. Table 5. Life cycle river mile 6 13 Dee ID seepage 13 cold springs 2 city of HR overflow? riverside drive reservoir? 2 stone springs 4 city of HR riverside drive reservoir? 4 middle fork coe branch 15 MFID 15 clear branch 19 MFID

  1. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  2. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, David

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  3. Assessment of Native Salmonids Above Hells Canyon Dam, Idaho, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Kevin A.; Lamansky, Jr., James A.

    2004-08-01

    Despite the substantial declines in distribution and abundance that the Yellowstone cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri has experienced over the past century, quantitative evaluations of existing population sizes over broad portions of its historical range have not been made. In this study, we estimate trout abundance throughout the Upper Snake River basin in Idaho (and portions of adjacent states), based on stratified sample extrapolations of electrofishing surveys conducted at 961 study sites, the vast majority of which (84%) were selected randomly. Yellowstone cutthroat trout were the most widely distributed species of trout (caught at 457 study sites), followed by brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis (242 sites), rainbow trout O. mykiss and rainbow x cutthroat hybrids (136 sites), and brown trout Salmo trutta (70 sites). Of the sites that contained cutthroat trout, more than half did not contain any other species of trout. Where nonnative trout were sympatric with cutthroat trout, brook trout were most commonly present. In the 11 Geographic Management Units (GMUs) where sample size permitted abundance estimates, there were about 2.2 million trout {ge}100 mm, and of these, about one-half were cutthroat trout. Similarly, we estimated that about 2.0 million trout <100 mm were present, of which about 1.2 million were cutthroat trout. The latter estimate is biased low because our inability to estimate abundance of trout <100 mm in larger-order rivers negated our ability to account for them at all. Cutthroat trout were divided into approximately 70 subpopulations but estimates could be made for only 55 subpopulations; of these, 44 subpopulations contained more than 1,000 cutthroat trout and 28 contained more than 2,500 cutthroat trout. Using a logistic regression model to predict the number of spawning cutthroat trout at a given study site, we estimate that an average of about 30% of the cutthroat trout {ge}100 mm are spawners. We compared visually-based phenotypic assessments of hybridization with subsequent genetic analyses from 55 of the study sites and found that: (1) genetic analysis corroborated our visual determination that hybridization was absent at 37 of 55 sites; (2) at the seven sites where we visually failed to discern genetically-detected hybridization, the percent of rainbow trout alleles in the population was low (<1 %) at all but two locations; and (3) where we detected hybridization both visually and genetically (11 sites), levels of introgression were positively correlated between methods (r{sub 2} = 0.65). Based on this strong agreement, we phenotypically classified cutthroat trout as ''pure'' and ''{ge}90% pure'' at 81% and 90%, respectively, of the study sites within these GMUs. Our results suggest that, despite the presence of nonnative threats (genetic and competitive) in much of their current range in Idaho, Yellowstone cutthroat trout populations remain widely distributed and appear healthy in several river drainages in the Upper Snake River basin. Nevertheless, ongoing efforts to secure core cutthroat trout populations, protect areas from further nonnative invasions, and restore disturbed habitat are recommended for further protection of Yellowstone cutthroat trout in Idaho.

  4. Savannah River Site Environmental Data for 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, M.

    1999-06-09

    This document presents data from Savannah River Site routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs.

  5. Wood River Levee Reconstruction, Madison County, IL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Wood River Levee Reconstruction, Madison County, IL 25 October 2006 Abstract: The recommended plan provides for flood damage reduction and restores the original degree of protection of the Wood River Levee-federal sponsor is the Wood River Drainage and Levee District. The Wood River Levee System was authorized

  6. The Columbia River Estuary the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    " fish and wildlife in the Columbia River as affected by development and operation of the hydroelectric modified in terms of physical and biological processes. The development and operation of the hydroelectric

  7. Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao River Basin Hydro...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao River Basin Hydro electricity Development Co Ltd in Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao...

  8. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Mary FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Information · Flood Warnings and Bulletins · Interpreting Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood RiskBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Mary FLOOD

  9. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Nerang FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Nerang River catchment is locatedBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Nerang FLOOD

  10. The River Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zusman, Eric

    2000-01-01

    in Transition Zusman/The River Runs Dry Wang Liurong.YRCC’sin Transition Zusman/The River Runs Dry not just importantin Transition Zusman/The River Runs Dry emerging market

  11. Raft River Idaho Magnetotelluric Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gregory Nash

    2015-05-13

    Raw magnetotelluric (MT) data covering the geothermal system at Raft River, Idaho. The data was acquired by Quantec Geoscience. This is a zipped file containing .edi raw MT data files.

  12. Exhibit D: Mirant Potomac River Schedule of Unit Operations:...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Operating Plan of Mirant Potomac River, LLC Exhibit D: Mirant Potomac River Schedule of Unit Operations More Documents & Publications Exhibit D: Mirant Potomac River Schedule of...

  13. Sacramento River Steelhead: Hatchery vs. Natural Smolt Outmigration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandstrom, Phil

    2012-01-01

    DELTA SCIENCE PROGRAM Sacramento River Steelhead: HatcheryUC Davis BACKGROUND The Sacramento River steelhead trout (a tributary of the upper Sacramento River. Smolts are young,

  14. EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing Facility, Red River Parish, LA EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing...

  15. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    8, 2000 Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company, related to Unplanned Exposures and Radioactive Material Intakes at the Savannah River Site (EA-2000-08) On July 18, 2000, the...

  16. BITTERROOT RIVER SUBBASIN INVENTORY FOR FISH AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Columbia River hydropower system. Nothing in this Plan, or the participation in its development, or related to, the development and operation of the Columbia River hydropower system. Nothing in this Plan

  17. BITTERROOT RIVER SUBBASIN MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the development and operation of the Columbia River hydropower system. Nothing in this Plan and exclusively resulting from, or related to, the development and operation of the Columbia River hydropower

  18. WAMweisman art museum 333 east river road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    WAMweisman art museum press release 333 east river road minneapolis, MN 55455 www government that allowed tax-supported institutions (like the University of Minnesota) to acquire these works: The Weisman is located at 333 E. River Road in

  19. INTEGRATED RIVER QUALITY MANAGEMENT USING INTERNET TECHNOLOGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED RIVER QUALITY MANAGEMENT USING INTERNET TECHNOLOGIES P. Cianchi*, S. Marsili such a computing architecture can be implemented using current internet technologies. Based on the "intelligent a normal web browser. KEYWORDS River water quality, Environmental management, Internet computing, Systems

  20. Bureau Home > Australia> Queensland> Rainfall& River Conditions > River Brochures> Barron FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Warning and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Barron River has a catchmentBureau Home > Australia> Queensland> Rainfall& River Conditions > River Brochures> Barron FLOOD

  1. Effect of spill on adult salmon passage delay at Columbia River and Snake River dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Effect of spill on adult salmon passage delay at Columbia River and Snake River dams W. Nicholas dams in the Columbia/Snake River hydrosystem may delay the upstream passage of the adults. To evaluate-to-day variations of spill and upstream fish passage at the eight dams of the Columbia/Snake river hydrosystem

  2. In-River Backwards Run Reconstruction of Fraser River Sockeye Fisheries from 2002 -2009 and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In-River Backwards Run Reconstruction of Fraser River Sockeye Fisheries from 2002 - 2009: Master of Resource Management Title of Research Project: In-River Backwards Run Reconstruction of Fraser managers I develop an in-river backwards run reconstruction to provide Conservation Unit (CU) specific

  3. Hydropower production and river rehabilitation: A case study on an alpine river

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction For centuries, man has modified running waters [51]. In alpine rivers, production of hydropower of power plants are commonly in use: (1) run-of-river power plants that continuously pro- cessHydropower production and river rehabilitation: A case study on an alpine river M. Fette & C. Weber

  4. Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.

    2005-04-30

    This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: 􀂃 The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network 􀂃 The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed 􀂃 The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 􀂃 The past and future implications for salmon habi

  5. Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System)- River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System) - River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)

  6. Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.S. Cearlock

    2006-08-02

    The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

  7. Amending the Geothermal Steam Act of 1970. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Public Lands and Reserved Water of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session on S. 669; S. 1516

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The subcommittee met in Casper, Wyoming to hear testimony on geothermal resources in Yellowstone National Park and other park systems and to consider S. 1516 and S. 669, which would help to expedite geothermal development. The lack of information on potential environmental damage, the quality of monitoring, and the poor record of damage from geothermal operations were of major concern. The testimony of 12 witnesses includes that of private and government geologists, environmental groups, and the Park Superintendent, who described the unique features of Yellowstone's Old Faithful Geyser and the importance of incorporating provisions into geothermal-leasing arrangements to protect the park. (DCK)

  8. H. R. 3359: This Act may be cited as the Old Faithful Protection Act of 1991, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, November 25, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bill would amend the Geothermal Steam Act of 1970 to prohibit the use of, production from, exploration for, or development of geothermal resources on lands and waters within a 15-mile radius of the boundary of Yellowstone National Park, except with respect to the Island Park Geothermal Area. The bill directs the National Park Service, in cooperation with the Forest Service and the US Geological Survey, to conduct a study on the impact of potential geothermal development on the thermal features of Yellowstone National Park, to be submitted to Congress within four years.

  9. Diets of the Arkansas River Shiner and Peppered Chub in the Canadian River, New Mexico and Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, Gene

    Diets of the Arkansas River Shiner and Peppered Chub in the Canadian River, New Mexico and Texas)collectedfrom the Canadian River in New Mexico andTexasfrom September1996to August 1998. Both the Ark~n~~ River streamsand rivers of the Arkansas River drainage systemof Arkansas,Colorado, Kansas,New Mexico, Kansas

  10. River System Hydrology in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, R.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    and databases maintained by the Texas Water Development Board and the U.S. Geological Survey. River basin volume budgets and trend and frequency metrics for simulated naturalized and regulated stream flows and reservoir storage are developed using the WAM System...

  11. Historical Shoreline Evolution as a Response to Dam Placement on the Elwha River, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagid, Bethany Marie

    2015-01-01

    of the Elwha River, Washington- Biological and physicalthe Elwha River, Washington, U.S. , Fisheries Management &on the Elwha River, Washington, USA: River channel and

  12. Savannah River Plant/Savannah River Laboratory radiation exposure report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, C.D.; Hyman, S.D.; Keisler, L.L. and Co., Aiken, SC . Savannah River Plant); Reeder, D.F.; Jolly, L.; Spoerner, M.T.; Schramm, G.R. and Co., Aiken, SC . Savannah River Lab.)

    1989-01-01

    The protection of worker health and safety is of paramount concern at the Savannah River Site. Since the site is one of the largest nuclear sites in the nation, radiation safety is a key element in the protection program. This report is a compendium of the results in 1988 of the programs at the Savannah River Plant and the Savannah River Laboratory to protect the radiological health of employees. By any measure, the radiation protection performance at this site in 1988 was the best since the beginning of operations. This accomplishment was made possible by the commitment and support at all levels of the organizations to reduce radiation exposures to ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable). The report provides detailed information about the radiation doses received by departments and work groups within these organizations. It also includes exposure data for recent years to allow Plant and Laboratory units to track the effectiveness of their ALARA efforts. Many of the successful practices and methods that reduced radiation exposure are described. A new goal for personnel contamination cases has been established for 1989. Only through continual and innovative efforts to minimize exposures can the goals be met. The radiation protection goals for 1989 and previous years are included in the report. 27 figs., 58 tabs.

  13. Savannah River Laboratory Decontamination Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rankin, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has had a Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Technology program since 1981. The objective of this program is to provide state-of-the-art technology for use in D D operations that will enable our customers to minimize waste generated and personal exposure, increase productivity and safety, and to minimize the potential for release and uptake of radioactive material. The program identifies and evaluates existing technology, develops new technology, and provides technical assistance to implement its use onsite. This program has impacted not only the Savannah River Site (SRS), but the entire Department of Energy (DOE) complex. To document and communicate the technology generated by this program, 28 papers have been presented at National and International meetings in the United States and Foreign Countries.

  14. Savannah River Laboratory Decontamination Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rankin, W.N.

    1991-12-31

    Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has had a Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Technology program since 1981. The objective of this program is to provide state-of-the-art technology for use in D&D operations that will enable our customers to minimize waste generated and personal exposure, increase productivity and safety, and to minimize the potential for release and uptake of radioactive material. The program identifies and evaluates existing technology, develops new technology, and provides technical assistance to implement its use onsite. This program has impacted not only the Savannah River Site (SRS), but the entire Department of Energy (DOE) complex. To document and communicate the technology generated by this program, 28 papers have been presented at National and International meetings in the United States and Foreign Countries.

  15. Two-dimensional river modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, James Cameron

    1988-01-01

    heavily vegetated flood plain. It is found that the two-dimensional model can determine the flow more completely and more accurately than a corresponding one- dimensional model. Two-dimensional models are best applied where the flow conditions... committee, W. P. James, R. A. Wurbs, and R. 0. Reid, for their support and interest in this research. Dr. James, in particular, has shown great foresight in supporting broader use of two-dimensional river modeling. Dave Froehlich deserves much...

  16. Savannah River | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-AA-1 SECTION JSTEM-ing theSummarySavannah River Site

  17. Raft River geoscience case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolenc, M.R.; Hull, L.C.; Mizell, S.A.; Russell, B.F.; Skiba, P.A.; Strawn, J.A.; Tullis, J.A.

    1981-11-01

    The Raft River Geothermal Site has been evaluated over the past eight years by the United States Geological Survey and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory as a moderate-temperature geothermal resource. The geoscience data gathered in the drilling and testing of seven geothermal wells suggest that the Raft River thermal reservoir is: (a) produced from fractures found at the contact metamorphic zone, apparently the base of detached normal faulting from the Bridge and Horse Well Fault zones of the Jim Sage Mountains; (b) anisotropic, with the major axis of hydraulic conductivity coincident to the Bridge Fault Zone; (c) hydraulically connected to the shallow thermal fluid of the Crook and BLM wells based upon both geochemistry and pressure response; (d) controlled by a mixture of diluted meteoric water recharging from the northwest and a saline sodium chloride water entering from the southwest. Although the hydrogeologic environment of the Raft River geothermal area is very complex and unique, it is typical of many Basin and Range systems.

  18. Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report:...

  19. The Columbia River System : the Inside Story.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    The Columbia Ricer is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Northwest-from providing the world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying the clean natural fuel for over 75 percent of the region's electrical generation. Since early in the century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system. And through cooperative efforts, the floods that periodically threaten developments near the river can be controlled. This publication presents a detailed explanation of the planning and operation of the multiple-use dams and reservoirs of the Columbia River system. It describes the river system, those who operate and use it, the agreements and policies that guide system operation, and annual planning for multiple-use operation.

  20. Green River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Green River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky 16 September 2014 ABSTRACT: Green River Locks and Dams 3 through 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 were. The Green River Locks and Dams 5 and 6 ceased operations in 1951 due to a marked decline in navigation

  1. North University Dr. Indian River Street

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marques, Oge

    ) around campus and running path on Indian River Street. Participants MUST run WITH tra c on all roads 39 4 31B 31A 7636 8W 6 80 46 89 92 31E 31 31D 31C 81 49 North University Dr. Indian River Street B-04.LucieAve.South Indian River St. BrevardCt. BrevardCt. Lot 23 Lot 22 Lot 11 Lot 7 Lot 6 Lot 21 LakeFPL Substation Lot 9

  2. The Columbia River System Inside Story

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2001-04-01

    The Columbia River is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Pacific Northwest—from fostering world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying clean natural fuel for 50 to 65 percent of the region’s electrical generation. Since early in the 20th century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system.

  3. New Columbia River Estuary purchases benefit salmon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the mouth of the Columbia River to permanently protect riverside habitat for Northwest fish and wildlife, including threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead. The...

  4. Microsoft Word - CROOKED RIVER VALLEY REHABILITATION PROJECT...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Power Act). Among other things, this Act directs BPA to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of the Federal Columbia River...

  5. River Falls Municipal Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Name Utility Administrator River Falls Municipal Utilities Website http:www.rfmu.orgindex.aspx?nid681 Funding Source Wisconsin Focus on Energy State Wisconsin Program Type...

  6. Lumbee River EMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lumbee River EMC (LREMC) offers rebates to its residential customers who purchase and install qualified energy efficient products or services. Rebates are available for water heaters, refrigerator...

  7. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Washington River...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    February 13, 2014 Evaluation to determine whether Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Hanford is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition. Voluntary...

  8. Cuivre River Electric- Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cuivre River Electric Cooperative, through the Take Control & Save program, offers rebates for cooperative members who purchase efficient geothermal and dual fuel heat pumps, and electric water...

  9. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, October 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separations operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  10. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, October 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separations operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  11. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Environmental Sciences...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (SRNL) Environmental Sciences and Biotechnology Support of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Environmental Sciences and Biotechnology...

  12. Gila River Indian Community- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Gila River Indian Community (GRIC) will conduct feasibility studies of potential renewable energy projects on its lands in south central Arizona.

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    5 audit of SRP radioactive waste Ashley, C. 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; RADIOACTIVE EFFLUENTS; EMISSION; HIGH-LEVEL...

  14. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, November 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  15. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, November 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  16. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  17. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  18. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  19. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  20. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  1. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  2. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Kolan FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Kolan River catchment is located in south east Queensland and coversBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Kolan FLOOD

  3. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Bulloo FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Bulloo River catchment is located in southBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Bulloo FLOOD

  4. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Noosa FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Noosa River has a catchment areaBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Noosa FLOOD

  5. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Burrum and Cherwell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    River at Howard Contained in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Other Links Flood Risk The Burrum River catchment covers an area of about 935 square kilometres which and Cherwell FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BURRUM AND CHERWELL RIVERS This brochure describes the flood warning

  6. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Contained in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Leichhardt River catchment FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the LEICHHARDT RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  7. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Paroo FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    is information about : (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Paroo River catchment is located in south west Queensland and coversBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Paroo FLOOD

  8. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Lower FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Information · Brisbane River ALERT Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Brisbane River catchment covers an area of approximately 15 Brisbane FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BRISBANE RIVER BELOW WIVENHOE DAM TO BRISBANE CITY This brochure

  9. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Moonie FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    is information about : (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Moonie River basin is located in southwest Queensland and drainsBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Moonie FLOOD

  10. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Daintree FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Post Contained in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Daintree River FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the DAINTREE RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  11. Bureau Home > Australia> Queensland> Rainfall& River Conditions > River Brochures> Gilbert FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Gilbert River catchment is located in northBureau Home > Australia> Queensland> Rainfall& River Conditions > River Brochures> Gilbert FLOOD

  12. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Haughton FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Haughton River FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the HAUGHTON RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  13. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Bremer FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Contained in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The BremerBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Bremer FLOOD

  14. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Pine and FLOOD SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    and Caboolture FLOOD SYSTEM for the PINE & CABOOLTURE RIVERS This brochure describes the flood system operated information which will be useful for understanding River Height Bulletins issued by the Bureau's Flood Warning Centre during periods of high rainfall and flooding. Pine River at Murrumba Downs Contained

  15. Microbial risk assessment for recreational use of the Malden River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacques, Margaret (Margaret Rose)

    2015-01-01

    The Malden River is located in the Greater Boston area of Massachusetts. The River has a long history of abuse and neglect stemming from urbanization and industrial activity along the River and in the surrounding areas. ...

  16. Lesson Learned by Savannah River Site Activity-level Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Bonnie Barnes, Savannah River Remediation. Work Planning and Control at Savannah River Remediation.

  17. CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

  18. Letter from Commonwealth to Mirant Potomac River Concerning Serious...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Mirant Potomac River Concerning Serious Violations of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Sulfur Dioxide Letter from Commonwealth to Mirant Potomac River Concerning...

  19. Savannah River Site - Mixed Waste Management Facility Northwest...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    state determination for entire site. Addthis Related Articles Savannah River Site - Mixed Waste Management Facility Northeast Plume Savannah River Site - D-Area Oil Seepage Basin...

  20. Savannah River Site - Mixed Waste Management Facility Northeast...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    state determination for entire site. Addthis Related Articles Savannah River Site - Mixed Waste Management Facility Northwest Plume Savannah River Site - D-Area Oil Seepage Basin...

  1. Columbia River Treaty Review #2 - April 2009.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Columbia River Treaty has provided signifi cant benefi ts to the United States and Canada through coordinated river management by the two countries. It remains the standard...

  2. Lessons Learned and Best Practices in Savannah River Site Saltstone...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Lessons Learned and Best Practices in Savannah River Site Saltstone and Tank Farm Performance Assessments Lessons Learned and Best Practices in Savannah River Site Saltstone and...

  3. Trona Injection Tests: Mirant Potomac River Station, Unit 1,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Trona Injection Tests: Mirant Potomac River Station, Unit 1, November 12 to December 23, 2005, Summary Report Trona Injection Tests: Mirant Potomac River Station, Unit 1, November...

  4. Exhibit D: Mirant Potomac River Schedule of Unit Operations:...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Exhibit D: Mirant Potomac River Schedule of Unit Operations: Supplement 4, January - March 2006 Exhibit D: Mirant Potomac River Schedule of Unit Operations: Supplement 4, January -...

  5. CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix...

  6. Savannah River Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Savannah River Field Office Savannah River Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report...

  7. 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of River Protection...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    River Protection and Richland Operations Office 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of River Protection and Richland Operations Office The ongoing and projected...

  8. LiT Electrolysis Research at Savannah River National Laboratory...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LiT Electrolysis Research at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) LiT Electrolysis Research at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Presentation from the 35th Tritium...

  9. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (SRNS) Human Resource Management System (HRMS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource Management System (HRMS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS)...

  10. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Informatio...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River...

  11. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Badge Request and Site...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Badge Request and Site Personnel Roster Systems PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Badge Request and Site Personnel Roster Systems PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Badge...

  12. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management...

  13. Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation...

  14. EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    73: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho Summary Bonneville Power...

  15. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report, Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building May 2013 Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on...

  16. Raft River Geothermal Area Data Models - Conceptual, Logical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tables, Figures and other Content in Reports from the Raft River Geothermal Project: "Technical Report on the Raft River Geothermal Resource, Cassia County, Idaho," GeothermEx,...

  17. UVA Hydraulic and Transport Engineering Lab for Sustainable River Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    #12;UVA Hydraulic and Transport Engineering Lab for Sustainable River Resources Some Applications: Small and Large Dam Removal River Restoration / Rehabilitation In Stream Flow Calculation Stormwater

  18. Employee of Savannah River Site Contractor Recognized as Exemplary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Employee of Savannah River Site Contractor Recognized as Exemplary in Safety and Health Employee of Savannah River Site Contractor Recognized as Exemplary in Safety and Health...

  19. Hood River Passive House, Hood River, Oregon (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50%" (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  20. Savannah River Site dose control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, L.S.

    1992-06-01

    Health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) visited the Savannah River Site (SRS) as one of 12 facilities operated by the Department of Energy (DOE) contractors with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). Their charter was to review, evaluate and summarize as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) techniques, methods and practices as implemented. This presentation gives an overview of the two selected ALARA practices implemented at the SRS: Administrative Exposure Limits and Goal Setting. These dose control methods are used to assure that individual and collective occupational doses are ALARA and within regulatory limits.

  1. FLOOD RESPONSE PLAN River Flood Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    1 FLOOD RESPONSE PLAN River Flood Guide Effective Date: January 2013 Updated: February 2014 #12 Thames River basin have the potential to cause flooding on Western properties. PURPOSE To establish areas) closing of parking lots and clearing of parked vehicles and other Western property in flood

  2. The State of the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The State of the Columbia River Basin Draft Fiscal Year 2009 ANNUAL REPORT To Congress and fish and wildlife policy in the Columbia River Basin and to inform the public about energy and fish Basin, and a synopsis of the major activities of the Council during the fiscal year ending September 30

  3. BLUE RIVER BASIN (Dodson Industrial District)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    BLUE RIVER BASIN (Dodson Industrial District) Kansas City, Missouri MODIFICATION REQUEST capability to support this request. PROJECT PURPOSE Dodson Industrial District is located along the Blue of a 6,800 foot long levee- floodwall along the north bank of the Blue River from the Bannister Road

  4. 2010 Expenditures Report Columbia River Basin Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tables 27 Table 1A: Total Cost of BPA Fish & Wildlife Actions 29 Table 1B: Cumulative Expenditures 1978 and habitat, of the Columbia River Basin that have been affected by hydroelectric development. This program fish and wildlife affected by hydropower dams in the Columbia River Basin. The Power Act requires

  5. Fast Facts About the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cost and availability, and the effect of the hydropower system on fish and wildlife. columbia River, and fish and wildlife affected by, the columbia River Basin hydropower dams. the council is a unique of the Council under the Act are to: 1. Develop a regional power plan to assure the Northwest an adequate

  6. Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    1 Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers in the US and South Korea Pierre Y. Julien Dept. of Civil and Environ. Eng. Colorado State University Seoul, South Korea August 11, 2009 Climate Change and Large Rivers 1. Climatic changes have been on-going for some time; 2. Climate changes usually predict

  7. Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, M.

    1999-06-09

    The mission at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is focused primarily on support of the national defense, nonproliferation, and environmental cleanup. SRS-through its prime operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company-continues to maintain a comprehensive environmental monitoring program.

  8. Financial Sustainability of International River Basin Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Aaron

    Financial Sustainability of International River Basin Organizations Final Report #12;Published by financing of a sample of African, Asian and European River Basin Organizations (RBOs). Its focus contributions to cov- er their regular run-ning costs. To a degree, the financial challenges some African RBOs

  9. WAMweisman art museum 333 east river road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    WAMweisman art museum press release 333 east river road minneapolis, MN 55455 www per person (current Individual and Dual level members) FREE for members at the Sustainer level: The Weisman is located at 333 E. River Road in Minneapolis. There is no admission fee to the Weisman

  10. Continental ood basalts: episodic magmatism above long-lived hotspots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Stephen T.

    November 1999 Abstract The eruption of continental flood basalt (CFB) may reflect episodic magmatism above long-lived mantle plumes. The Iceland and Yellowstone hotspots have generated successive CFB provinces in subducting oceanic lithosphere led to subsequent breakthrough and eruption of CFB. Since both mantle plume

  11. Hydrology of Hydrothermal Systems in the Long Valley Caldera Hydrothermal activity in the Long Valley Caldera has had many different periods in its history of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    the temperatures of the hydrothermal fluid. The geothermal systems and hydrothermal systems have been documented that the temperatures would be extremely high, akin to Yellowstone. But what they found were temperatures much lower). Hydrothermal Systems Summary Geothermal systems and the hydrothermal systems are an occurrence that happens

  12. H.R. 1137: A Bill to amend the Geothermal Steam Act of 1970 (30 U.S.C. 1001-1027), and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, February 24, 1993 and November 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    H.R. 1137 is a bill to amend the Geothermal Steam Act of 1970. The purpose of this Act is to require the Secretary of the Interior to take the necessary actions to preserve and protect the hydrothermal system associated with, Yellowstone National Park. The proposed legislative text is included.

  13. Genesis of large siliceous stromatolites at Frying Pan Lake, Waimangu geothermal field, North Island, New Zealand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konhauser, Kurt

    Genesis of large siliceous stromatolites at Frying Pan Lake, Waimangu geothermal field, North by various microbes (Riding, 1991), are common in hot-spring systems in the geo- thermal areas of Yellowstone in the geothermal systems of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) on the North Island of New Zealand have been termed

  14. doi:10.1016/S0016-7037(02)00126-1 The Geysers-Cobb Mountain Magma System, California (Part 2): Timescales of pluton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Mark

    for zircons extracted from 24 geothermal wells that penetrate the Geysers Plutonic complex (GPC) allow us. Copyright © 2003 Elsevier Ltd 1. INTRODUCTION The Geysers steam field is the world's largest geothermal Zone: Hochstein, 1995; Yellowstone: White et al., 1989). Since its discovery in the early 1980s

  15. Geothermal pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the recent attention being paid the more than 10,000 geysers, hot springs,mud pots and fumaroles in Yellowstone National Park by biotechnology companies and academic researchers. The federal government has no provisions yet for receiving royalties from the sale of microorganisms, however, it is angling for a share of the potentially immense future profits.

  16. Publications of the Volcano Hazards Program 2008 U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Geothermal Research, v. 170, p. 12-23. Bacon, C.R., 2008, Geologic map of Mount Mazama and Crater Lake.M., 2008, Water-chemistry data for selected springs, geysers, and streams in Yellowstone National Park and prehistoric cultural transitions in Cook Inlet, Alaska: Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, v. 176

  17. 2001 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Clearance Center at www.copyright.com or (978) 750-8400. Geology; April 2001; v. 29; no. 4; p. 355358; 4 figures; 1 table. 355

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus, W. Andrew

    dam failure. N.P.--Na- tional Park. Mine impacts derive primarily from Miller Creek drainage Soda Butte Creek, Yellowstone National Park. A tailings dam failure in 1950 emplaced metal and Meinert, 1994). Mine workings include open-pit and underground excavations, mill sites, waste-rock piles

  18. Winter Motor-Vehicle EMISSIONS in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Winter Motor-Vehicle EMISSIONS in Yellowstone National Park A ir-pollution emissions from off- road recreational vehicles have ris- en in national importance, even as emissions from these vehicles have declined of lawsuits, a new study shows that reductions in snowmobile emissions highlight the need for the snowcoach

  19. Predicting and Explaining Success and Task Duration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    system that fights simulated forest fires. In this paper we describe an experiment with Phoenix in which, which fights simulated forest fires, will contain one fire in a matter of hours but fail to contain that fights simulated forest-fires. The simulation uses terrain, elevation, and feature data from Yellowstone

  20. Path Analysis Models of an Autonomous Agent in a Complex Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    populated by autonomous agents. It is a simulation of forest fires in Yellowstone National Park will present descriptive, predictive and causal models of the behavior of agents that fight simulated forest fires. We will describe the shortcomings of descriptive and predictive models, and summarize path

  1. Is proportion burned severely related to daily area burned?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    burn severity for individual daily areas burned that occurred during 42 large forest fires in central progression, forest fires, infrared perimeter mapping, northern Rockies 1. Introduction Extreme wildfires Yellowstone Fires (Turner et al 1994), the 1997 Indonesian Forest Fires, and the Australian Black Saturday

  2. Gaurang Sethi, Lindsay Sharpe, Anne Shishkovsky, Tyson Timmer,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    University of Michigan April 2012 YellowstoneNationalPark FacilitiesEnergyManagement Auditand, vending machine management, smart power strips, monitoring and benchmarking, and behavioral changes the energy consumed by a building's HVAC system. Many of the vending machines in the park are old and run

  3. Shrinky Dink microbes! icrobes are living organisms smaller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Shrinky Dink microbes! M icrobes are living organisms smaller than your eyes can see in Yellowstone National Park. Scientists at Montana State University (MSU) are researching how microbes from. Some kinds of microbes, called extremophiles, thrive in places that are freezing, super hot, deep

  4. In situ analysis of nitrogen fixation and metabolic switching in unicellular thermophilic cyanobacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    nitrogen (N2) to ammonium. Cya- nobacterial energy generation within microbial mats involves pho cyanobacteria inhabiting hot spring microbial mats Anne-Soisig Steunou* , Devaki Bhaya*, Mary M. Bateson sequences of two Synechococcus ecotypes inhabiting the Octopus Spring microbial mat in Yellowstone National

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus Bacterium Meiothermus ruber Strain A

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thiel, Vera; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E.; Schuster, Stephan C.; Ward, David M.; Bryant, Donald A.

    2015-03-26

    The draft genome sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus group bacterium Meiothermus ruber strain A, isolated from a cyanobacterial enrichment culture obtained from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY), comprises 2,968,099 bp in 170 contigs. It is predicted to contain 2,895 protein-coding genes, 44 tRNA-coding genes, and 2 rRNA operons.

  6. Ecological Applications, 21(6), 2011, pp. 22832296 2011 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Songbird response to increased willow (Salix spp.) growth in Yellowstone's northern range LISA M. BARIL,1, Montana 59717 USA Abstract. After nearly a century of height suppression, willows (Salix spp Mountains, USA; riparian; Salix spp.; songbirds; vegetation structure; willow communities; willow

  7. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Regulation of nif gene expression and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nitrogen fixation, a prokaryotic, O2-inhibited process that reduces N2 gas to biomass, is of paramount importance in biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen. We analyzed the levels of nif transcripts of Synechococcus: Synechococcus; microsensor; gene expression; nitrogen fixation; Yellowstone National Park; in situ Introduction

  8. THERE IS NO PLUME UNDER ICELAND an address to the Royal Astronomical Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    THERE IS NO PLUME UNDER ICELAND an address to the Royal Astronomical Society London, 10th May, 2002 where he suggested that major volcanic areas on Earth such as Iceland, Yellowstone and Hawaii, which talk I am going to challenge the plume hypothesis in the case of Iceland, which is probably the best

  9. inSightstheEarthScope newsletter USArray Reaches the East Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    States. TA stations record seismic waves from earthquakes, as well as mining blasts, meteorite impacts evidence of warm and electrically conductive material trailing west from Yellowstone further supports a hot spot interpretation. The near-circular pattern of upper mantle anisotropy beneath the western US is now

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of the hyperthermophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium Thermodesulfobacterium geofontis OPF15T

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elkins, James G [ORNL; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott [ORNL; Walston Davenport, Karen [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Meincke, Linda [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cottingham, Robert W [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Thermodesulfobacterium geofontis OPF15T was isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park and grows optimally at 83 oC. The OPF15T genome was finished at the Joint Genome Institute and the 1.6 Mb sequence has been annotated and deposited for future genomic studies aimed at understanding microbial processes and nutrient cycles in high-temperature environments.

  11. Running Head: Correlation of Microbial Communities with Caclium Carbonate1 (Travertine) Mineral Precipitation2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldenfeld, Nigel

    Precipitation2 3 4 Correlation of Microbial Communities with Calcium Carbonate (Travertine)5 Mineral Precipitation at Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, USA6 George T. Bonheyo1, 3 , Jorge Frias-Lopez1 of changing environmental conditions and associated calcium carbonate mineral18 precipitation along the spring

  12. Interannual variations of river water storage from a multiple satellite approach: A case study for the Rio Negro River basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frappart, Frédéric; Papa, Fabrice; Famiglietti, James S; Prigent, Catherine; Rossow, William B; Seyler, Frédérique

    2008-01-01

    satellite track runs along the river. As T/P cross track (orthe T/P tracks run parallel to the river. In these cases,

  13. River 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    ............................................................ 29 14 Alluvial fans along the Guadalupe Mountains in Big Dog Canyon........ 31 15 Alluvial fans along the Brokeoff Mountains in Big Dog Canyon........... 35 16 View of alluvial fans from their drainage basins.................................. 75 27 Salt Basin-Brokeoff Mountains alluvial fan group ................................. 76 28 Big Dog Canyon-Brokeoff Mountains alluvial fan group....................... 77 29 Big Dog Canyon-Guadalupe Mountains alluvial fan group...

  14. Geochemistry Sampling for Traditional and Multicomponent Equilibrium Geothermometry in Southeast Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannon, Cody; Wood, Thomas; Neupane, Ghanashyam; McLing, Travis; Mattson, Earl; Dobson, Patrick; Conrad, Mark

    2014-10-01

    The Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) is an area of high regional heat flux due the movement of the North American Plate over the Yellowstone Hotspot beginning ca.16 Ma. Temperature gradients between 45-60 °C/km (up to double the global average) have been calculated from deep wells that penetrate the upper aquifer system (Blackwell 1989). Despite the high geothermal potential, thermal signatures from hot springs and wells are effectively masked by the rapid flow of cold groundwater through the highly permeable basalts of the Eastern Snake River Plain aquifer (ESRPA) (up to 500+ m thick). This preliminary study is part of an effort to more accurately predict temperatures of the ESRP deep thermal reservoir while accounting for the effects of the prolific cold water aquifer system above. This study combines the use of traditional geothermometry, mixing models, and a multicomponent equilibrium geothermometry (MEG) tool to investigate the geothermal potential of the ESRP. In March, 2014, a collaborative team including members of the University of Idaho, the Idaho National Laboratory, and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory collected 14 thermal water samples from and adjacent to the Eastern Snake River Plain. The preliminary results of chemical analyses and geothermometry applied to these samples are presented herein.

  15. Neuse River Basin, North Carolina Ecosystem Restoration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Neuse River Basin, North Carolina Ecosystem Restoration Project 5 October 2012 ABSTRACT: The study area encompasses the Neuse River Basin, the third-largest river basin in North Carolina. The Basin, upstream of the city of New Bern, North Carolina. At New Bern the river broadens dramatically and changes

  16. Willamette River Transit Bridge PSU CTS Seminar January 16, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Willamette River Transit Bridge PSU CTS Seminar January 16, 2009 Dave Unsworth, TriMet Guenevere River Transit Bridge · Portland-Milwaukie Light Rail Project · Plans for a new Willamette River Bridge · Public Process Today's Agenda #12;Willamette River Transit BridgePortland-Milwaukie Light Rail Project

  17. Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site- December 2009

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Inspection of Reinforced Concrete Construction at the Savannah River Site Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility

  18. Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site, Summary Report- February 2004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management and Emergency Management at the Savannah River Site

  19. River Data Package for Hanford Assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Patton, Gregory W.

    2006-08-01

    This data package documents the technical basis for selecting physical and hydraulic parameters and input values that will be used in river modeling for Hanford assessments. This work was originally conducted as part of the Characterization of Systems Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc. and revised as part of the Characterization of Systems Project managed by PNNL for DOE. The river data package provides calculations of flow and transport in the Columbia River system. The module is based on the legacy code for the Modular Aquatic Simulation System II (MASS2), which is a two-dimensional, depth-averaged model that provides the capability to simulate the lateral (bank-to-bank) variation of flow and contaminants. It simulates river hydrodynamics (water velocities and surface elevations), sediment transport, contaminant transport, biotic transport, and sediment-contaminant interaction, including both suspended sediments and bed sediments. This document presents the data assembled to run the river module components for the section of the Columbia River from Vernita Bridge to the confluence with the Yakima River. MASS2 requires data on the river flow rate, downstream water surface elevation, groundwater influx and contaminants flux, background concentrations of contaminants, channel bathymetry, and the bed and suspended sediment properties. Stochastic variability for some input parameters such as partition coefficient (kd) values and background radionuclide concentrations is generated by the Environmental Stochastic Preprocessor. River flow is randomized on a yearly basis. At this time, the conceptual model does not incorporate extreme flooding (for example, 50 to 100 years) or dam removal scenarios.

  20. Low-(18)O Silicic Magmas: Why Are They So Rare?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balsley, S.D.; Gregory, R.T.

    1998-10-15

    LOW-180 silicic magmas are reported from only a small number of localities (e.g., Yellowstone and Iceland), yet petrologic evidence points to upper crustal assimilation coupled with fractional crystallization (AFC) during magma genesis for nearly all silicic magmas. The rarity of 10W-l `O magmas in intracontinental caldera settings is remarkable given the evidence of intense 10W-l*O meteoric hydrothermal alteration in the subvolcanic remnants of larger caldera systems. In the Platoro caldera complex, regional ignimbrites (150-1000 km3) have plagioclase 6180 values of 6.8 + 0.1%., whereas the Middle Tuff, a small-volume (est. 50-100 km3) post-caldera collapse pyroclastic sequence, has plagioclase 8]80 values between 5.5 and 6.8%o. On average, the plagioclase phenocrysts from the Middle Tuff are depleted by only 0.3%0 relative to those in the regional tuffs. At Yellowstone, small-volume post-caldera collapse intracaldera rhyolites are up to 5.5%o depleted relative to the regional ignimbrites. Two important differences between the Middle Tuff and the Yellowstone 10W-180 rhyolites elucidate the problem. Middle Tuff magmas reached water saturation and erupted explosively, whereas most of the 10W-l 80 Yellowstone rhyolites erupted effusively as domes or flows, and are nearly devoid of hydrous phenocrysts. Comparing the two eruptive types indicates that assimilation of 10W-180 material, combined with fractional crystallization, drives silicic melts to water oversaturation. Water saturated magmas either erupt explosively or quench as subsurface porphyrins bejiire the magmatic 180 can be dramatically lowered. Partial melting of low- 180 subvolcanic rocks by near-anhydrous magmas at Yellowstone produced small- volume, 10W-180 magmas directly, thereby circumventing the water saturation barrier encountered through normal AFC processes.

  1. Modeling the influence of river rehabilitation scenarios on bed material sediment flux in a large river over decadal timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Michael

    Modeling the influence of river rehabilitation scenarios on bed material sediment flux in a large and calibrated sediment transport formulae were used to assess the decadal impact of major river rehabilitation the implementation of three major river rehabilitation strategies being considered in the Sacramento River Valley

  2. The influence of sediment cover variability on longterm river incision rates: An example from the Peikang River,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Karl

    The influence of sediment cover variability on longterm river incision rates: An example from reach of the Peikang River. Sediment from these landslides produced widespread aggradation the spatial and temporal variability of sediment cover for the Peikang River. Because the river is undergoing

  3. EA-1981: Bonneville-Hood River Transmission Line Rebuild, Multnomah and Hood River Counties, Oregon

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild its 24-mile long, 115 kilovolt Bonneville-Hood River transmission line. The existing line runs between the Bonneville Powerhouse at Bonneville Dam in Multnomah County, Oregon, and BPA's existing Hood River Substation in Hood River County, Oregon. The project would include replacing structures and conductor wires, improving access roads, and constructing new access roads or trails where needed.

  4. River Data Package for the 2004 Composite Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Patton, Gregory W.

    2004-08-01

    Beginning in fiscal year 2003, the DOE Richland Operations Office initiated activities, including the development of data packages, to support the 2004 Composite Analysis. The river data package provides calculations of flow and transport in the Columbia River system. This document presents the data assembled to run the river module components for the section of the Columbia River from Vernita Bridge to the confluence with the Yakima River.

  5. BITTERROOT RIVER SUBBASIN ASSESSMENT FOR FISH AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that respond to impacts from the development and operation of the Columbia River hydropower system. Nothing hydropower system. Nothing in this Plan or the participation in its development is intended to, and shall

  6. Think water : reconditioning the Malden River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oda, Kazuyo, 1969-

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to link water, history and culture through architectural and urban design by researching the potential for the rejuvenation of a neglected industrial site at the edge of a river. The Malden ...

  7. Lumbee River EMC- Residential Weatherization Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lumbee River Electric Membership Corporation (LREMC) offers low interest loans to help residential members increase the energy efficiency of homes. Loans up to $17,000 are available for the...

  8. BPA research aids Columbia River white sturgeon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research aids Columbia River white sturgeon 8142015 12:00 AM Tweet Page Content BPA fish biologist Scott Bettin (left) and Brad Cady of the Washington Dept. of Fish and...

  9. Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, M.W.; Mamatey, A.R.

    1998-08-01

    The mission at the Savannah River Site has changed from the production of nuclear weapons materials for national defense to the management of waste, restoration of the environment, and the development of industry in and around the site.

  10. Savannah River Site Achieves Waste Transfer First

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – The EM program and its liquid waste contractor at the Savannah River Site (SRS) made history recently by safely transferring radioactive liquid waste from F Tank Farm to H Tank Farm using a central control room.

  11. EIS-0241: Hood River Fisheries Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates a BPA proposal to protect and improve anadromous salmonid populations in the Hood River Basin. These actions are proposed in an attempt to mitigate the losses of fish and...

  12. Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states...

  13. River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Catawba/Wateree and Yadkin/Pee Dee River Basins Advisory Commissions are permanent public bodies jointly established by North and South Carolina. The commissions are responsible for assessing...

  14. Addressing Stakeholder Concerns: Pests and Pest Control in the Sacramento River Conservation Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langridge, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    scale restoration on the Sacramento River. Chapter 17 inriverside forests along the Sacramento River, the source ofand levee construction. The Sacramento River CONTACT Suzanne

  15. Observations on the Review of Archaeological Investigations in the Sacramento River Canyon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raven, Christopher

    1985-01-01

    decision to excavate the Sacramento River Canyon sites wasInvestigations in the Sacramento River Canyon, Vol. I:Investigations in the Sacramento River Canyon CHRISTOPHER

  16. Local diffusion networks act as pathways?to sustainable agriculture in the Sacramento River Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubell, Mark; Fulton, Allan

    2007-01-01

    agriculture in the Sacramento River Valley by Mark Lubellquality management in the Sacramento River Valley. Data fromencourage growers in the Sacramento River Valley to

  17. Historic and Present Distribution of Chinook Salmon and Steelhead in the Calaveras River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, Glenda

    2007-01-01

    2001). Presently, fall run Tuolumne River still occurs inof Calaveras River King Salmon run and proposed contingencyJune and Stanislaus Rivers Fall Run 8 June – December Late

  18. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, Mike

    1991-12-01

    The annual report contains three individual subproject sections detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1990. Subproject I contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject II contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. Subproject III concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho.

  19. RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CERTA PJ

    2008-07-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, the ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of the approximately 57 million gallons of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in September 2003. ORP has approved a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. The ORP has established contracts to implement this strategy to establish a basic capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategy for completion of the mission uses a number of interrelated activities. The ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) for treatment and disposal; (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) and about half of the low-activity waste (LAW) contained in the tank farms, and maximizing its capability and capacity; (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability or a second WTP LAW Facility that can safely treat about half of the LAW contained in the tank farms; (4) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for transuranic (TRU) tank waste for shipment to and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP); (5) Deploying interim storage capacity for the immobilized HLW and shipping that waste to Yucca Mountain for disposal; (6) Operating the Integrated Disposal Facility for the disposal of immobilized LAW, along with the associated secondary waste, (7) Closing the SST and DST tank farms, ancillary facilities, and al1 waste management and treatment facilities, (8) Developing and implementing technical solutions to mitigate the impact from substantial1y increased estimates of Na added during the pretreatment of the tank waste solids, This involves a combination of: (1) refining or modifying the flowsheet to reduce the required amount of additional sodium, (2) increasing the overall LAW vitrification capacity, (3) increasing the incorporation of sodium into the LAW glass, or (4) accepting an increase in mission duration, ORP has made and continues to make modifications to the WTP contract as needed to improve projected plant performance and address known or emerging risks, Key elements of the implementation of this strategy are included within the scope of the Tank Operations Contract, currently in procurement Since 2003, the ORP has conducted over 30 design oversight assessments of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The estimated cost at completion has increased and the schedule for construction and commissioning of the WTP has extended, The DOE, Office of Environmental Management (EM), sanctioned a comprehensive review of the WTP flowsheet, focusing on throughput. In 2005, the TFC completed interim stabilization of the SSTs and as of March 2007, has completed the retrieval of seven selected SSTs. Demonstration of supplemental treatment technologies continues. The ongoing tank waste retrieval experience, progress with supplemental treatment technologies, and changes in WTP schedule led to the FY 2007 TFC baseline submittal in November 2006. The TFC baseline submittal was developed before the WTP schedule was fully understood and approved by ORP, and therefore reflects an earlier start date for the WTP facilities. This System Plan is aligned with the current WTP schedule with hot commissioning beginning in 2018 and full operations beginning in 2019. Major decisions regarding the use of supplemental treatment and the associated technology, the ultimate needed capacity, and its relationship to the WTP have not yet been finalized. This System Plan assumes that the outcome of

  20. RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CERTA PJ; KIRKBRIDE RA; HOHL TM; EMPEY PA; WELLS MN

    2009-09-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of approximately 57 million gallons 1 of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure2 of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in May 2008. ORP has made a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. ORP has contracts in place to implement the strategy for completion of the mission and establish the capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategl involves a number of interrelated activities. ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by the following: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) and delivering the waste to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) fraction contained in the tank farms. About one-third of the low-activity waste (LAW) fraction separated from the HLW fraction in the WTP will be immobilized in the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility. (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability assumed to be a second LAW vitrification facility that can safely treat about two-thirds of the LAW contained in the tank farms. (4) Developing and deploying supplemental pretreatment capability currently assumed to be an Aluminum Removal Facility (ARF) using a lithium hydrotalcite process to mitigate sodium management issues. (5) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) tank waste for possible shipment to and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. (6) Deploying interim storage capacity for the immobilized high-level waste (IHLW) pending determination of the final disposal pathway. (7) Closing the SST and DST tank farms, ancillary facilities, and all associated waste management and treatment facilities. (8) Optimizing the overall mission by resolution of technical and programmatic uncertainties, configuring the tank farms to provide a steady, well-balanced feed to the WTP, and performing trade-offs of the required amount and type of supplemental treatment and of the amount of HLW glass versus LAW glass. ORP has made and continues to make modifications to the WTP contract as needed to improve projected plant performance and address known or emerging risks. Key elements needed to implement the strategy described above are included within the scope of the Tank Operations Contract (TOC). Interim stabilization of the SSTs was completed in March 2004. As of April 2009, retrieval of seven SSTs has been completed and retrieval of four additional SSTs has been completed to the limits of technology. Demonstration of supplemental LAW treatment technologies has stopped temporarily pending revision of mission need requirements. Award of a new contract for tank operations (TOC), the ongoing tank waste retrieval experience, HLW disposal issues, and uncertainties in waste feed delivery and waste treatment led to the revision of the Performance Measurement Baseline (PM B), which is currently under review prior to approval. 6 This System Plan is aligned with the current WTP schedule, with hot commissioning beginning in 2018, and full operations beginning in late 2019. Major decisions regarding the use of supplemental treatment and the associated technology, the ultimate needed capacity, and its relationship to the WTP have not yet been finalized. This System Plan assumes that the outcome of these decisions will be to provide a second LAW vitrification facility. No final implementation decisions regarding supplemental technology can be made until the Tank Closure and

  1. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Georgina and Eyre FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    and Eyre FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the GEORGINA RIVER & EYRE CREEK This brochure describes the flood warning. It includes reference information which will be useful for understanding Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins issued by the Bureau's Flood Warning Centre during periods of high rainfall and flooding. Eyre

  2. E.2. Electronic Appendix -Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Upper River (above rkm 210)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 E.2. Electronic Appendix - Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Basin Upper River (above rkm 210) Food webs: Microbenthic algae (periphyton), detritus from riparian vegetation and littoral insects). Stressors: Water quality and habitat conditions have changed food webs in specific locations in the upper

  3. Developing a broader scientific foundation for river restoration: Columbia River food webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing a broader scientific foundation for river restoration: Columbia River food webs Robert J 31, 2012 (received for review August 6, 2012) Well-functioning food webs are fundamental emphasis on restoring habitat structure--without explicitly considering food webs--has been less successful

  4. Bureau Home > Australia> Queensland> Rainfall& River Conditions > River Brochures> Norman FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Range) 200 kilometres southeast of Croydon and flows in a northwesterly direction. It is joined by its. #12;The record major flood of January 1974 and the floods of February 1991 and early February 2009 The Carpentaria Shire Council for the lower Norman River and the Croydon Shire Council for the upper Norman River

  5. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Proserpine River has a total catchment area FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the PROSERPINE RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  6. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Warrego FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    is information about : (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Warrego River catchment is located in south west Queensland and north FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the WARREGO RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  7. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Burnett FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Burnett River is located on the southern Queensland coast FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BURNETT RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  8. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Tully and FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    at Kareeya Contained in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous · Interpreting Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk and Murray FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the TULLY-MURRAY RIVERS This brochure describes the flood warning system

  9. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Pioneer FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    at Mirani Contained in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous · Interpreting Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the PIONEER RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  10. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Don FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Don River drains occurs in the Queens Beach and Bowen delta areas and dwellings are at risk. Previous Flooding Since

  11. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Nicholson FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Nicholson River catchment is located in north FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the NICHOLSON RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  12. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Herbert FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Information · Flood ALERT System · Flood Warnings Flood Risk The Ross, Bohle and Black River catchments covers an area of 750 square kilometres. Two main FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the ROSS, BOHLE & BLACK RIVERS This brochure describes the flood warning system

  13. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Logan and Albert FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Information · Flood Warnings Flood Risk The Logan River has a catchment area of about 3850 square kilometres and lies in the south and Albert FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the LOGAN & ALBERT RIVERS This brochure describes the flood warning

  14. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Mooloolah FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Mooloolah River. Continuing increases in population have accentuated this potential flood risk to life and property. Previous

  15. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Flinders FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Flinders River catchment is located in north FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the FLINDERS RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  16. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    ) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Information · Johnstone ALERT System · Flood · Other Links Flood Risk The North and South Johnstone Rivers rise in the tablelands of the north tropical FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the JOHNSTONE RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  17. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Balonne and FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Pty Ltd Contained in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · The Flood Risk Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links The Flood Risk and Maranoa FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BALONNE AND MARANOA RIVERS This brochure describes the flood warning

  18. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Mulgrave/Russell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    ) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Warning · Local Information · Mulgrave/Russell ALERT System Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Mulgrave and Russell Rivers drain the mountain country dominated/Russell FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the MULGRAVE AND RUSSELL RIVERS This brochure describes the flood warning

  19. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The vast Diamantina River catchment is located FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the DIAMANTINA RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  20. Bureau Home > Australia> Queensland> Rainfall& River Conditions > River Brochures> Macintyre FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    ) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Warning · Local Information · Flood Warnings and Bulletins · Interpreting Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk and Weir FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the MACINTYRE AND WEIR RIVERS This brochure describes the flood warning

  1. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Condamine to Warwick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    ) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Information · Warwick ALERT System · Flood · Other Links Flood Risk The Condamine River catchment to Warwick covers an area of approximately 1300 to Warwick FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the CONDAMINE RIVER TO WARWICK This brochure describes the flood warning

  2. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Condamine Warwick to Cotswold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Ltd Contained in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · The Flood Risk Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links The Flood Risk Warwick to Cotswold FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the CONDAMINE RIVER WARWICK TO COTSWOLD This brochure

  3. THE MIDDLE SACRAMENTO RIVER: HUMAN IMPACTS ON PHYSICAL AND ECOLOGICAL PROCESSES ALONG A MEANDERING RIVER1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE MIDDLE SACRAMENTO RIVER: HUMAN IMPACTS ON PHYSICAL AND ECOLOGICAL PROCESSES ALONG A MEANDERING, California. Abstract: Native plant and wildlife communities along Northern California's middle Sacramento and eroding terraces. Human-induced changes to the Sacramento River, in- cluding bank protection, gravel

  4. Indian River Hydroelectric Project Grant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebecca Garrett

    2005-04-29

    This Final Technical Report provides a concise retrospective and summary of all facets of the Sheldon Jackson College electrical Infrastructure Renovation portion of the Indian River Hydroelectric Project Grant of the City and Borough of Sitka, Alaska. The Project Overview describes the origins of the project, the original conditions that provided the impetus for the grant funding, how the grant amendment was developed, the conceptual design development, and the actual parameters of the final project as it went out to bid. The Project Overview also describes the ''before and after'' conditions of the project. The Objectives division of this Final Technical Report describes the amendment-funded goals of the project. It also describes the milestones of project development and implementation, as well as, the rationale behind the milestone array. The Description of Activities Performed division of this report provides an in-depth chronological analysis of progressive project implementation. Photographs will provide further illustration of particular functional aspects of the renovation project within project parameters. The Conclusions and Recommendations division of this report provides a comprehensive retrospective analysis of the project.

  5. Coho Salmon Master Plan, Clearwater River Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nez Perce Tribe; FishPro

    2004-10-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe has a desire and a goal to reintroduce and restore coho salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin at levels of abundance and productivity sufficient to support sustainable runs and annual harvest. Consistent with the Clearwater Subbasin Plan (EcoVista 2003), the Nez Perce Tribe envisions developing an annual escapement of 14,000 coho salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin. In 1994, the Nez Perce Tribe began coho reintroduction by securing eggs through U.S. v. Oregon; by 1998 this agreement provided an annual transfer of 550,000 coho salmon smolts from lower Columbia River hatchery facilities for release in the Clearwater River Subbasin. In 1998, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council authorized the Bonneville Power Administration to fund the development of a Master Plan to guide this reintroduction effort. This Master Plan describes the results of experimental releases of coho salmon in the Clearwater River Subbasin, which have been ongoing since 1995. These data are combined with results of recent coho reintroduction efforts by the Yakama Nation, general coho life history information, and historical information regarding the distribution and life history of Snake River coho salmon. This information is used to assess a number of alternative strategies aimed at restoring coho salmon to historical habitats in the Clearwater River subbasin. These data suggest that there is a high probability that coho salmon can be restored to the Clearwater River subbasin. In addition, the data also suggest that the re-establishment of coho salmon could be substantially aided by: (1) the construction of low-tech acclimation facilities; (2) the establishment of a 'localized' stock of coho salmon; and (3) the construction of hatchery facilities to provide a source of juvenile coho salmon for future supplementation activities. The Nez Perce Tribe recognizes that there are factors which may limit the success of coho reintroduction. As a result of these uncertainties, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes to utilize a phased approach for coho reintroductions. This Master Plan seeks authorization and funding to move forward to Step 2 in the Northwest Power and Conservation Council 3-Step review process to further evaluate Phase I of the coho reintroduction program, which would focus on the establishment of a localized coho salmon stock capable of enduring the migration to the Clearwater River subbasin. To achieve this goal, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes to utilize space at existing Clearwater River subbasin hatchery facilities in concert with the construction of two low-tech acclimation facilities, to capitalize on the higher survival observed for acclimated versus direct stream released coho. In addition, Phase I would document the natural productivity of localized coho salmon released in two targeted tributaries within the Clearwater River subbasin. If Phase I is successful at establishing a localized coho salmon stock in an abundance capable of filling existing hatchery space, the rates of natural productivity are promising, and the interspecific interactions between coho and sympatric resident and anadromous salmonids are deemed acceptable, then Phase II would be triggered. Phase II of the coho reintroduction plan would focus on establishing natural production in a number of Clearwater River subbasin tributaries. To accomplish this goal, Phase II would utilize existing Clearwater River subbasin hatchery facilities, and expand facilities at the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Site 1705 facility to rear approximately 687,700 smolts annually for use in a rotating supplementation schedule. In short, this document identifies a proposed alternative (Phase I), complete with estimates of capital, operations and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, and permitting that is anticipated to raise average smolt replacement rates from 0.73 (current) to 1.14 using primarily existing facilities, with a limited capital investment for low-tech acclimation facilities. This increase in survival is expected to provide the opportunity for the establishm

  6. New River Geothermal Exploration (Ram Power Inc.)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Miller, Clay

    2013-11-15

    The New River Geothermal Exploration (DOE Award No. EE0002843) is located approximately 25km south of the Salton Sea, near town of Brawley in Imperial County and approximately 150km east of San Diego, California. A total of 182 MT Logger sites were completed covering the two separate Mesquite and New River grids. The data was collected over a frequency range of 320Hz to 0.001Hz with variable site spacing. A number of different inversion algorithms in 1D, 2D and 3D were used to produce resistivity-depth profiles and maps of subsurface resistivity variations over the survey area. For 2D inversions, a total of eighteen lines were constructed in east-west and north-south orientations crossing the entire survey area. For MT 3D inversion, the New River property was divided in two sub-grids, Mesquite and New River areas. The report comprises of two parts. For the first part, inversions and geophysical interpretation results are presented with some recommendations of the potential targets for future follow up on the property. The second part of the report describes logistics of the survey, survey parameters, methodology and the survey results (data) in digital documents. The report reviews a Spartan MT survey carried out by Quantec Geoscience Limited over the New River Project in California, USA on behalf of Ram Power Inc. Data was acquired over a period of 29 days from 2010/06/26 to 2010/07/24.

  7. Savannah River Site (SRS) environmental overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Rear, M.G. ); Steele, J.L.; Kitchen, B.G. )

    1990-01-01

    The environmental surveillance activities at and in the vicinity of the Savannah River Site (SRS) (formerly the Savannah River Plant (SRP)) comprise one of the most comprehensive and extensive environmental monitoring programs in the United States. This overview contains monitoring data from routine and nonroutine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities, summaries of environmental protection programs in progress, a summary of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) activities, and a listing of environmental permits (Appendix A) issued by regulatory agencies. This overview provides information about the impact of SRS operations on the public and the environment. The SRS occupies a large area of approximately 300 square miles along the Savannah River, principally in Aiken and Barnwell counties of South Carolina. SRS's primary function is the production of tritium, plutonium, and other special nuclear materials for national defense, for other governmental uses, and for some civilian purposes. From August 1950 to March 31, 1989, SRS was operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) by E. I. du Pont de Nemours Co. On April 1, 1989 the Westinghouse Savannah River Company assumed responsibility as the prime contractor for the Savannah River Site.

  8. New River Geothermal Exploration (Ram Power Inc.)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Miller, Clay

    The New River Geothermal Exploration (DOE Award No. EE0002843) is located approximately 25km south of the Salton Sea, near town of Brawley in Imperial County and approximately 150km east of San Diego, California. A total of 182 MT Logger sites were completed covering the two separate Mesquite and New River grids. The data was collected over a frequency range of 320Hz to 0.001Hz with variable site spacing. A number of different inversion algorithms in 1D, 2D and 3D were used to produce resistivity-depth profiles and maps of subsurface resistivity variations over the survey area. For 2D inversions, a total of eighteen lines were constructed in east-west and north-south orientations crossing the entire survey area. For MT 3D inversion, the New River property was divided in two sub-grids, Mesquite and New River areas. The report comprises of two parts. For the first part, inversions and geophysical interpretation results are presented with some recommendations of the potential targets for future follow up on the property. The second part of the report describes logistics of the survey, survey parameters, methodology and the survey results (data) in digital documents. The report reviews a Spartan MT survey carried out by Quantec Geoscience Limited over the New River Project in California, USA on behalf of Ram Power Inc. Data was acquired over a period of 29 days from 2010/06/26 to 2010/07/24.

  9. High Resolution River Hydraulic and Water Quality Characterization Using Rapidly Deployable Networked Infomechanical Systems (NIMS RD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas C. Harmon; Richard F. Ambrose; Robert M. Gilbert; Jason C. Fisher; Michael Stealey; William J. Kaiser

    2006-01-01

    High Resolution River Hydraulic and Water Quality1594. High Resolution River Hydraulic and Water Qualityobserving spatiotemporal hydraulic and chemical properties

  10. Snake River Steelhead Straying Risk To Oregon Mid-C Steelhead Populations and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). · Snake River hatchery strays are considered a primary threat to Deschutes River and John Day River Migration In-River Transport Year # Adults Failed # Adults Failed 1999 51 25% 46 43% 2000 1098-River 22% Migration In-River Transport Year # Adults Failed # Adults Failed 1999 188 27% 187 38% 2000 426

  11. Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River and Salmon River Drainages, Idaho, 2009 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

    2009-05-07

    Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata have received little attention in fishery science until recently, even though abundance has declined significantly along with other anadromous fish species in Idaho. Pacific lamprey in Idaho have to navigate over eight lower Snake River and Columbia River hydroelectric facilities for migration downstream as juveniles to the Pacific Ocean and again as adults migrating upstream to their freshwater spawning grounds in Idaho. The number of adult Pacific lamprey annually entering the Snake River basin at Ice Harbor Dam has declined from an average of over 18,000 during 1962-1969 to fewer than 600 during 1998-2006. Based on potential accessible streams and adult escapement over Lower Granite Dam on the lower Snake River, we estimate that no more than 200 Pacific lamprey adult spawners annually utilize the Clearwater River drainage in Idaho for spawning. We utilized electrofishing in 2000-2006 to capture, enumerate, and obtain biological information regarding rearing Pacific lamprey ammocoetes and macropthalmia to determine the distribution and status of the species in the Clearwater River drainage, Idaho. Present distribution in the Clearwater River drainage is limited to the lower sections of the Lochsa and Selway rivers, the Middle Fork Clearwater River, the mainstem Clearwater River, the South Fork Clearwater River, and the lower 7.5 km of the Red River. In 2006, younger age classes were absent from the Red River.

  12. Environmental Assessment of the Lower Cape Fear River System, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    along Cape Fear Estuary Persistent blue-green Microcystis algal bloom in Cape Fear River, fall 2009 UNCW. These rivers are classified as blackwater systems because of their tea colored water. The Northeast Cape Fear

  13. Environmental Assessment of the Lower Cape Fear River System, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    along Cape Fear Estuary Persistent blue-green Microcystis algal bloom in Cape Fear River, fall 2009 UNCW because of their tea colored water. The Northeast Cape Fear River often seems to be more oxygen stressed

  14. ISE 2012, Vienna USING RIVER RESTORATION OPERATIONS TO TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and hydroelectricity since the 19th century. A restoration program of the river started officially in 1998. It has, the Rhône River has been regulated for navigation, irrigation and hydroelectricity since the 19th century

  15. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory 2004 Annual Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul M. Bertsch

    2004-07-29

    2004 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of The University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina

  16. RETURN OF THE RIVER -2000 Chapter 5 Freshwater Habitats131

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rivers of the world and also one of the most developed with ten major hydroelectric dams on the main the major hydroelectric projects and the owner-operator of each project. #12;RETURN OF THE RIVER - 2000

  17. BITTERROOT RIVER SUBBASIN PLAN FOR FISH AND WILDLIFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the development and operation of the Columbia River hydropower system. Nothing in this Plan and exclusively resulting from, or related to, the development and operation of the Columbia River hydropower

  18. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the Savannah River...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savannah River Site Hand Injury at the Salt Waste Processing Facility on October 6, 2009 Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the Savannah River Site Hand Injury at the...

  19. SAVANNAH RIVER TECHNOLOGY CENTER MONTHLY REPORT AUGUST 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1999-06-21

    'This monthly report summarizes Programs and Accomplishments of the Savannah River Technology Center in support of activities at the Savannah River Site. The following categories are addressed: Reactor, Tritium, Separations, Environmental, Waste Management, General, and Items of Interest.'

  20. Re: Potomac River Generating Station Department of Energy, Case...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2005 ("DOE Potomac River Order") Pepco hereby files this revised notice of the planned outage of the 230 kV circuits serving the Potomac River Substation, and through that station,...

  1. Comparative Evaluation of Generalized River/Reservoir System Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.

    2005-01-01

    modeling systems that simulate the storage, flow, and diversion of water in a system of reservoirs and river reaches. Generalized means that a computer modeling system is designed for application to a range of concerns dealing with river basin systems...

  2. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Savannah River Remediation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the evaluation of Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR), at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina during the period of November 4-13, 2014, and provides the Associate Under...

  3. Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    College intern Spencer Isom recently began her second summer with Savannah River Remediation (SRR), and her fourth year at Savannah River Site (SRS), where she continues a 31-year family legacy on site.

  4. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory FY2006 Annual Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul M. Bertsch

    2006-10-23

    FY2006 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of the University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site in Aiken, County, SC.

  5. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory 2005 Annual Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul M. Bertsch

    2005-07-19

    2005 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of The University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

  6. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC related to a Nitric Acid Spill Event and an Electrical Arc Flash Injury Event at the Savannah River Site On October 7, 2010, the U.S....

  7. Supplemental Recovery Plan Module for Snake River Salmon and Steelhead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    River Hydropower Projects June 2014 Prepared by the: National Marine Fisheries Service West Coast Region............................................................................................................................... 3 2. Hydropower System Overview Hydropower Projects (Hydro Module, dated September 24, 2008) for Snake River anadromous fish species listed

  8. Columbia River Salmon and Steelhead Returns 1999 -2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia River Salmon and Steelhead Returns 1999 - 2008 Peter Hassemer Idaho Department of Fish Upper Columbia Summer Chinook Salmon Coho Salmon Shad Columbia River Salmon and Steelhead Returns 1999

  9. New Hydropower Turbines to Save Snake River Steelhead | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydropower Turbines to Save Snake River Steelhead May 24, 2010 - 1:23pm Addthis Voith Hydro installed machines at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River, located about 40 miles...

  10. Mirant Potomac River, LLC, Monthly Model Evaluation Study Report...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    December 2006 Mirant Potomac River, LLC, Monthly Model Evaluation Study Report, December 2006 Docket No. EO-05-01. Order No. 202-07-02: As you are aware, Mirant Potomac River,...

  11. Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin's (ICPRB) mission is to enhance, protect, and conserve the water and associated land resources of the Potomac River and its tributaries through...

  12. A comparison of hydrocarbon gases from springs and seeps of varied geologic provinces of the northwestern US

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenson, T.D.; Kvenvolden, K.A. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

    1993-04-01

    The northwestern US hosts a remarkable quantity and variety of thermal springs and seeps. Although many studies have dealt with the liquids and non-hydrocarbon gases emanating from these sources, few have focused on hydrocarbon gases. methane in particular is now recognized as an important reactive trace gas in the earth's atmosphere. To understand better the magnitude and occurrence of natural sources of hydrocarbons to the atmosphere, the authors have begun a survey of these gases throughout the northwestern US. This area encompasses a number of different tectonic regimes: the Yellowstone Hot Spot, the northern Basin and Range province, the Cascade volcanic arc, and the Cascadia subduction complex. Methane is present in each area at concentration levels ranging from about 2 ppmv (parts per million by volume) to 99.9% (by volume). Hydrothermal activity in the Yellowstone area produces spring gases containing less than 4% methane, with CO[sub 2] as the balance gas. The Teton area has a wide variety of gas compositions with either methane, carbon dioxide, or nitrogen as the primary gas component. In the northern Great Basin, thermal springs and seeps typically occur along fault zones at the base of mountain ranges. Methane concentrations range from 0.2 to 47%, with HMW HC concentrations from 0 to 3,100 ppmv. Areas covered by the Cenozoic Columbia River basalts and the basalts of the Snake River Plain continue to have high heat flow and produce thermal springs and seeps, usually along fault zones. Gases from the southern Cascade volcanic arc (Mt. Shasta and Mt. Lassen) are composed typically of carbon dioxide, with minor amounts of methane (less than 0.2%); however some fumaroles at Mt. Lassen have minor quantities of HMW HC. Along the Pacific coast, melanges of the Cascadia subduction complex host many seeps and springs. In some seeps the gas consists almost exclusively of methane (94.3 to 99.9%) with amounts of HMW HC ranging from about 5 ppmv to 3.5%.

  13. Snake and Columbia Rivers Sediment Sampling Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinza, M.R.; Word, J.Q; Barrows, E.S.; Mayhew, H.L.; Clark, D.R. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

    1992-12-01

    The disposal of dredged material in water is defined as a discharge under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act and must be evaluated in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency regulation 40 CFR 230. Because contaminant loads in the dredged sediment or resuspended sediment may affect water quality or contaminant loading, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Walla Walla District, has requested Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory to collect and chemically analyze sediment samples from areas that may be dredged near the Port Authority piers on the Snake and Columbia rivers. Sediment samples were also collected at River Mile (RM) stations along the Snake River that may undergo resuspension of sediment as a result of the drawdown. Chemical analysis included grain size, total organic carbon, total volatile solids, ammonia, phosphorus, sulfides, oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons, metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and 21 congeners of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans.

  14. Columbia River Basin Research Plan Northwest Power and Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia River Basin Research Plan By the Northwest Power and Conservation Council February 2006................................................................................................................. 20 (11) Human Development

  15. Deep Challenges for Foundation Performance at Savannah River Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Deep Challenges for Foundation Performance at Savannah River Site Frank H. Syms and Brent Gutierrez October 22, 2014

  16. Microearthquake surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy; Humboldt County Nevada; Idaho; microearthquakes; Nevada; North America; passive systems; Pershing County Nevada; Raft River; reservoir rocks; seismic methods;...

  17. Terrestrial Carbon Inventory at the Savannah River Site, 1951 – 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    US Forest Service - Annonymous,

    2012-02-01

    A Power Point slide presentation/report on the terestrial carbon inventory at the Savannah River Site.

  18. Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the dc resistivity method (Abstract) Abstract GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; ELECTRICAL SURVEYS; IDAHO; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY;...

  19. Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site- August 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Review of Commercial Grade Dedication Plans for the Safety Instrumented System at the Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Project

  20. Radioiodine in the Savannah River Site environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kantelo, M.V.; Bauer, L.R.; Marter, W.L.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Zeigler, C.C.

    1993-01-15

    Radioiodine, which is the collective term for all radioactive isotopes of the element iodine, is formed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) principally as a by-product of nuclear reactor operations. Part of the radioiodine is released to the environment during reactor and reprocessing operations at the site. The purpose of this report is to provide an introduction to radioiodine production and disposition, its status in the environment, and the radiation dose and health risks as a consequence of its release to the environment around the Savannah River Plant. A rigorous dose reconstruction study is to be completed by thee Center for Disease Control during the 1990s.