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Sample records for yellowstone national park

  1. The objectives for deep scientific drilling in Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The western area of the United Stated contains three young silicic calderas, all of which contain attractive targets for scientific drilling. Of the three, the Yellowstone caldera complex is the largest, has the most intense geothermal anomalies, and is the most seismically active. On the basis of scientific objectives alone. it is easily the first choice for investigating active hydrothermal processes. This report briefly reviews what is known about the geology of Yellowstone National Park and highlights unique information that could be acquired by research drilling only in Yellowstone. However, it is not the purpose of this report to recommend specific drill sites or to put forth a specific drilling proposal. 175 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Hydrothermal vents of Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplinski, M.A.; Morgan, P. (Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States). Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    Hydrothermal vent systems within Yellowstone Lake are located within the Yellowstone caldera in the northeastern and West Thumb sections of the lake. The vent systems lie within areas of extremely high geothermal gradients (< 1,000 C/km) in the lake sediments and occur as clusters of individual vents that expel both hydrothermal fluids and gas. Regions surrounding the vents are colonized by unique, chemotropic biologic communities and suggest that hydrothermal input plays an important role in the nutrient dynamics of the lake's ecosystem. The main concentration of hydrothermal activity occurs in the northeast region of the main lake body in a number of locations including: (1) along the shoreline from the southern edge of Sedge Bay to the inlet of Pelican Creek; (2) the central portion of the partially submerged Mary Bay phreatic explosion crater, within deep (30--50 m) fissures; (3) along the top of a 3 km long, steep-sided ridge that extends from the southern border of Mary Bay, south-southeast into the main lake basin; and (4) east of Stevenson Island along the lower portion of the slope (50--107 m) into the lake basin, within an anastomosing series of north to northwest trending, narrow troughs or fissures. Hydrothermal vents were also located within, and surrounding the West Thumb of Yellowstone Lake, with the main concentration occurring the offshore of the West Thumb and Potts Geyser Basin. Hydrothermal vents in Yellowstone Lake occur along fractures that have penetrated the lake sediments or along the tops of ridges and near shore areas. Underneath the lake, rising hydrothermal fluids encounter a semi-permeable cap of lake sediments. Upwardly convecting hydrothermal fluid flow may be diverted by the impermeable lake sediments along the buried, pre-existing topography. These fluids may continue to rise along topography until fractures are encountered, or the lake sediment cover is thinned sufficiently to allow egress of the fluids.

  3. Fungi from geothermal soils in Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redman, R.S.; Litvintseva, A.; Sheehan, K.B.; Henson, J.M.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    1999-12-01

    Geothermal soils near Amphitheater Springs in Yellowstone National Park were characterized by high temperatures (up to 70 C), high heavy metal content, low pH values (down to pH 2.7), sparse vegetation, and limited organic carbon. From these soils the authors cultured 16 fungal species. Two of these species were thermophilic, and six were thermotolerant. They cultured only three of these species from nearby cool (0 to 22 C) soils. Transect studies revealed that higher numbers of CFUs occurred in and below the root zone of the perennial plant Dichanthelium lanuginosum (hot springs panic grass). The dynamics of fungal CFUs in geothermal soil and nearby nongeothermal soil were investigated for 12 months by examining soil cores and in situ mesocosms. For all of the fungal species studied, the temperature of the soil from which the organisms were cultured corresponded with their optimum axenic growth temperature.

  4. Analysis of hot springs and associated deposits in Yellowstone National Park using ASTER and AVIRIS remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Michael

    Analysis of hot springs and associated deposits in Yellowstone National Park using ASTER and AVIRIS of Yellowstone National Park from the visible/near infrared (VNIR) to thermal infrared (TIR) wavelengths. Field and techniques; geothermal systems; Mars 1. Introduction There are thousands of known thermal springs on Earth

  5. Boundary Creek thermal areas of Yellowstone National Park: II, thermal water analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, J.M. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA); Hutchinson, R.A.

    1980-09-01

    Water samples from 28 thermal springs, 2 non-thermal springs, and 2 creeks from the Boundary Creek Thermal Areas (BCTA) in the southwestern corner of Yellowstone National Park were analyzed to help establish a chemical water-quality base line prior to possible geothermal exploitation of the Island Park Geothermal Area (IPGA). The springs, situated at the southwestern end of the Madison Plateau, are the Yellowstone Park thermal waters nearest to the IPGA and might respond to geothermal exploitation in the IPGA. Water temperatures ranging from 50/sup 0/ to 90/sup 0/C and low Cl concentrations (< 110 mgL/sup -1/) characterize spring waters in the BCTA. They are chemically distinct from the major geysers and hot springs in Yellowstone Park. The Na-K-Ca and silica geothermometers are in general agreement, usually within 10/sup 0/C, and indicate reservoir temperatures of 150 to 170/sup 0/C.

  6. Introduction Yellowstone National Park with its thermal features and abundant wildlife draws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Introduction Yellowstone National Park with its thermal features and abundant wildlife draws about pollution. Measurements of air quality at the West Entrance found CO concentrations comparable to highly by percentages Snowmobile Snowmobile Snowmobil e Snowcoach Snowcoach Pollutant average 2-stroke average 4-stroke

  7. Boundary Creek Thermal areas of Yellowstone National Park I: thermal activity and geologic setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchinson, R.A.

    1980-09-01

    Proposed geothermal leasing in the Island Park Geothermal Area (IPGA) in national forest and public lands adjacent to Yellowstone National Park has called attention to the moderate to high temperature springs of the Boundary Creek Thermal Areas. Up until late 1977 no description or geochemical inventory studies had been conducted in these areas. The thermal springs are scattered in four major groups along the Boundary Creek drainage with three to six km. of the IPGA - park border. Observations and analyses of physical and chemical indicators suggest that the source is under the Madison Plateau and that the waters are generally similar in the lower three thermal units. These hot springs should be monitored so as to provide early warning of change in the event that geothermal development in the IPGA causes withdrawal of groundwater from Yellow Stone National Park.

  8. Aquificales in Yellowstone National Park Anna-Louise Reysenbach1* | Amy Banta1 | Sara Civello2 | Jim Daly2 | Kendra Mitchel3 | Stefan Lalonde4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    spring ecosystems. Key Words 130 GEOTHERMAL BIOLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY IN YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARKAquificales in Yellowstone National Park Anna-Louise Reysenbach1* | Amy Banta1 | Sara Civello2 in Geomicrobiology, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton 5Yellowstone Center

  9. Yellowstone National Park as an opportunity for deep continental drilling in thermal regions. [Abstract only

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, R.O.

    1983-03-01

    The Yellowstone caldera represnets the most intense magnatic and thermal anomaly within the conterminous United States. Voluminous rhyolite ash flows, accompanied by formation of huge calderas, occurred approximately 2.0, 1.3, and 0.6 My B.P. Although the last lava flow was about 70,000 B.P., much evidence suggests that magma may still be present at relatively shallow depth. The evidence from gravity and magnetic lows, magnetotelluric soundings, seismic wave velocities, maximum depths of earthquake foci, significant recent uplift of the caldera floor, and exceptionally high heat flux suggest that magmatic temperatures may be attained 5 to 10 km beneath much of the caldera. Most of the hot-spring and geyser activity occurs within the caldera and along a fault zone that trends north from the caldera rim through Norris Geyser Basin and Mammoth Hot Springs. The thermal waters and gases have been extensively sampled and analyzed over a period of 100 years. The chemical, isotopic, and hydrologic data obtained from natural discharges and from shallow wells drilled in thermal areas, enable formulation of models of the hydrothermal system. No previous intermediate-depth drilling has been conducted at Yellowstone to help select the best location for a deep drill hole, and because Yellowstone is a National Park, no commercial drilling will be available for add-on experiments. Also, a deep drill hole in Yellowstone would have to be sited with great regard to environmental and ecological considerations. Nevertheless, the large amount of existing data is sufficient to formulate testable models. The Yellowstone thermal anomaly is so extensive and scientifically interesting that almost any suitable drilling site there may be superior to the best drilling site in any other silicic caldera complex in the United States.

  10. Helium isotopes: Lower geyser basin, Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, B.M.; Reynolds, J.H.; Smith, S.P.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1987-11-10

    High /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratios associated with the Yellowstone caldera reflect the presence of a magmatic helium component. This component is ultimately derived from a mantle plume capped by a cooling batholith underlying the caldera. In surface hot springs, fumaroles, etc., the /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio varies from approx.1 to 16 tims the air ratio. The variations are produced by varying degrees of dilution of the magmatic component with radiogenic helium. The radiogenic helium is crustal-derived and is thought to be scavenged from aquifers in which the hydrothermal fluids circulate. We determined the helium iosotopic composition in 12 different springs from the Lower Geyser Basin, a large hydrothermal basin with the caldera. The /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio was found to vary from approx.2.7 to 7.7 times the air ratio. The variations correlate with variations in water chemistry. Specifically, the /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio increased with total bicarbonate concentration. The dissolved bicarbonate is from gas-water-rock interactions involving CO/sub 2/ and Na silicates. The concentration of bicarbonate is a function of the availability of dissolved CO/sub 2/, which, in turn, is a function of deep boiling with phase separation prior to CO/sub 2/-bicarbonate conversion. The correlation of high /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratios with high bicarbonate is interpreted as the result of deep dilution of a single thermal fluid with cooler water during ascent to the surface. The dilution and cooling deters deep boiling, and therefore both CO/sub 2/ and /sup 3/He are retained in the rising fluid. Fluids that are not diluted with boil to a greater extent, losing a large proportion of /sup 3/He, as well as CO/sub 2/, leaving a helium-poor residual fluid in which the isotopic composition of helium will be strongly affected by the addition of radiogenic helium.

  11. The boron isotope systematics of the Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming) hydrothermal system: A reconnaissance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, M.R. (Bristol Univ. (England)); Sturchio, N.C. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Boron concentrations and isotope compositions have been measured in fourteen hot spring waters, two drill hole waters, an unaltered rhyolite flow, and hydrothermally altered rhyolite from the geothermal system in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The samples are representative of the major thermal areas within the park and span the range of fluid types. For the fluids, the B concentrations range from 0.043-2.69 mM/kg, and the {delta}{sup 11}B values range from {minus}9.3 to +4.4{per thousand}. There is no relationship between the dissolved B concentrations or isotope compositions with the concentration of any major element (other than Cl) or physical property. Each basin is characterized by a restricted range in B/Cl ratios and {delta}{sup 11}B values. Hot spring waters from the Norris Basin, Upper Geyser Basin, Calcite Springs, and Clearwater have {delta}{sup 11}B values close to that of unaltered rhyolite ({minus}5.2{per thousand}) and are interpreted to have derived their B from this source. Waters from Mammoth Hot Springs, Sheepeater, and Rainbow Springs have lower {delta}{sup 11}B values close to {minus}8{per thousand}. These lower values may reflect leaching of B from sedimentary rocks outside the Yellowstone caldera, but they are similar to the {delta}{sup 11}B value of hydrothermally altered rhyolite ({minus}9.7{per thousand}). Hence, the light boron isotope compositions recorded in these hot spring waters may reflect leaching of previously deposited hydrothermal minerals. Cooler springs along the Yellowstone River just outside the park boundary have lower B concentrations and higher {delta}{sup 11}B values that may reflect mixing with shallow meteoric water.

  12. Hydrothermal changes related to earthquake activity at Mud Volcano, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitt, A.M.; Hutchinson, R.A.

    1982-04-10

    The Mud Volcano hydrothermal area in Yellowstone National Park is near the intersection of a 20-km-long zone of northeast trending normal faults with the eastern resurgent dome within the 600,000-year-odd Yellowstone caldera. Recent crustal uplift along the northeast trending axis of the caldera is at a maximum (700 mm since 1923) near the Mud Volcano area. From 1973 through April 1978, less than 10 earthquakes (largest M 2.4) were located within 3 km of the Mud Volcano area. In May 1978, earthquakes began occurring beneath the hydrothermal area at depths of 1 to 5 km. The seismic activity continued until the end of November with intense swarms (100 events per hour) occurring on October 23 and November 7. The largest event (M 3.1) occured on November 14 and at least 8 events were M 2.5 or larger. In December 1978, heat flux in the Mud Volcano hydrothermal features began increasing along a 2-km-long northeast trending zone. Existing mud cauldrons became more active, new mud cauldrons and fumeroles were formed, and vegetation (primarily lodgepole pine) was killed by increased soil temperature. The increase in heat flux continued through July 1979 then gradually declined, reaching the early 1978 level by June 1980. The spatial and temporal association of earthquakes and increased hydrothermal activity at Mud Volcano suggests that the seismic activity expanded preexisting fracture systems, premitting increased fluid flow from depths of several kilometers.

  13. Chemical studies of selected trace elements in hot-spring drainages of Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stauffer, R.E.; Jenne, E.A.; Ball, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    Intensive chemical studies were made of S(-II), O/sub 2/, Al, Fe, Mn, P, As(III), As(V), and Li in waters from two high-Cl, low Ca-Mg hotspring drainages in the Lower Geyser Basin, a warm spring system rich in Ca and Mg in the Yellowstone Canyon area, and the Madison River system above Hebgen Lake. Analyses were also made of other representative thermal waters from the Park.

  14. Hydrothermal alteration in research drill hole Y-2, Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bargar, K.E.; Beeson, M.H.

    1981-05-01

    Y-2, a US Geological Survey research diamond-drill hole in Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, was drilled to a depth of 157.4 meters. The hole penetrated interbedded siliceous sinter and travertine to 10.2 m, glacial sediments of the Pinedale Glaciation interlayered with pumiceous tuff from 10.2 to 31.7 m, and rhyolitic lavas of the Elephant Back flow of the Central Plateau Member and the Mallard Lake Member of the Pleistocene Plateau Rhyolite from 31.7 to 157.4 m. Hydrothermal alteration is pervasive in most of the nearly continuous drill core. Rhyolitic glass has been extensively altered to clay and zeolite minerals (intermediate heulandite, clinoptilolite, mordenite, montmorillonite, mixed-layer illite-montmorillonite, and illite) in addition to quartz and adularia. Numerous veins, vugs, and fractures in the core contain these and other minerals: silica minerals (opal, ..beta..-cristobalite, ..cap alpha..-cristobalite, and chalcedony), zeolites (analcime, wairakite, dachiardite, laumontite, and yugawaralite), carbonates (calcite and siderite), clay (kaolinite and chlorite), oxides (hematite, goethite, manganite, cryptomelane, pyrolusite, and groutite), and sulfides (pyrhotite and pyrite) along with minor aegirine, fluorite, truscottite, and portlandite. Interbedded travertine and siliceous sinter in the upper part of the drill core indicate that two distinct types of thermal water are responsible for precipitation of the surficial deposits, and further that the water regime has alternated between the two thermal waters more than once since the end of the Pinedale Glaciation (approx. 10,000 years B.P.). Alternation of zones of calcium-rich and sodium- and potassium-rich hydrothermal minerals also suggests that the calcium-rich and sodium- and potassium-rich hydrothermal minerals also suggests that the water chemistry in this drill hole varies with depth.

  15. Coupled variations in helium isotopes and fluid chemistry: Shoshone Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hearn, E.H.; Kennedy, B.M. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA)); Truesdell, A.H. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Early studies of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He variations in geothermal systems have generally attributed these fluctuations to either differences in the source of the magmatic {sup 3}He-rich helium or to local differences in the deep flux of magmatic {sup 3}He-rich helium. Kennedy et al, however, show that near-surface processes such as boiling and dilution may also drastically affect {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios of geothermal vapors. Helium isotope ratios were determined for several hot springs at Shoshone Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park for this study, along with other noble gas data. Stable isotope data and water and gas chemistry data for each spring were also compiled. The water chemistry indicates that there is one deep, hot thermal water in the area which is mixing with dilute meteoric water that has entered the system at depth. Spring HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} concentrations correlate with {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He values, as in nearby Lower Geyser Basin. This correlation is attributed to variable amounts of deep dilution of thermal waters with a relatively cool water that inhibits boiling at depth, thus preventing the loss of CO{sub 2} and magmatic He in the most diluted samples. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope data also support a boiling and dilution model, but to produce the observed fractionations, the boiling event would have to be extensive, with steam loss at the surface, whereas the boiling that affected the helium isotope ratios was probably a small scale event with steam loss at depth. It is possible that deep boiling occurred in the basin and that small amounts of steam escaped along fractures at about 500 m below the surface while all subsequently produced steam was lost near or at the surface.

  16. Geology and remarkable thermal activity of Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, D.E.; Hutchinson, R.A.; Keith, T.E.C.

    1988-01-01

    Norris Geyser Basin is adjacent to the north rim of the Yellowstone caldera at the common intersection of the caldera rim and the Norris-Mammoth Corridor, a zone of faults, volcanic vents, and thermal activity that strikes north from the caldera rim to Mammoth Hot Springs. The dominant quartz sand is hydrothermally cemented by chalcedony and is extremely hard, thereby justifying the term hydrothermal quartzite. The fundamental water type in Norris Basin is nearly neutral in pH and high in Cl and SiO/sub 2/. Another common type of water in Norris Basin is high in SO/sub 4/ and moderately high in Cl, with Cl/SO/sub 4/ ratios differing considerably. This study provides no new conclusive data on an old problem, the source or sources of rare dissolved constitutents. An important part of this paper consists of examples of numerous changes in behavior and chemical composition of most springs and geysers, to extents not known elsewhere in the park and perhaps in the world. Hydrothermal mineralogy in core samples from three research holes drilled entirely in Lava Creek Tuff to a maximum depth of -331.6 m permits an interpretation of the hydrothermal alteration history. A model for large, long-lived, volcanic-hydrothermal activity is also suggested, involving all of the crust and upper mantle and using much recent geophysical data bearing on crust-mantle interrelations.

  17. Novel Thermo-Acidophilic Bacteria Isolated from Geothermal Sites in Yellowstone National Park: Physiological and Phylogenetic Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. B. Johnson; N. Okibe; F. F. Roberto

    2003-07-01

    Moderately thermophilic acidophilic bacteria were isolated from geothermal (30–83 °C) acidic (pH 2.7– 3.7) sites in Yellowstone National Park. The temperature maxima and pH minima of the isolates ranged from 50 to 65 °C, and pH 1.0–1.9. Eight of the bacteria were able to catalyze the dissimilatory oxidation of ferrous iron, and eleven could reduce ferric iron to ferrous iron in anaerobic cultures. Several of the isolates could also oxidize tetrathionate. Six of the iron-oxidizing isolates, and one obligate heterotroph, were low G+C gram-positive bacteria (Firmicutes). The former included three Sulfobacillus-like isolates (two closely related to a previously isolated Yellowstone strain, and the third to a mesophilic bacterium isolated from Montserrat), while the other three appeared to belong to a different genus. The other two iron-oxidizers were an Actinobacterium (related to Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans) and a Methylobacterium-like isolate (a genus within the a-Proteobacteria that has not previously been found to contain either iron-oxidizers or acidophiles). The other three (heterotrophic) isolates were also a-Proteobacteria and appeared be a novel thermophilic Acidisphaera sp. An ARDREA protocol was developed to discriminate between the iron-oxidizing isolates. Digestion of amplified rRNA genes with two restriction enzymes (SnaBI and BsaAI) separated these bacteria into five distinct groups; this result was confirmed by analysis of sequenced rRNA genes.

  18. Effects of glacial ice on subsurface temperatures of hydrothermal systems in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming: Fluid-inclusion evidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bargar, K.E.; Fournier, R.O. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1988-12-01

    Hydrothermal quartz and fluorite crystals containing liquid-rich fluid inclusions (coexisting vapor-rich fluid inclusions were not observed) were found in drill cores from eight relatively shallow research holes drilled by the US Geological Survey in and near major geyser basins of Yellowstone National Park. Homogenization temperatures (T{sub h}) for mostly secondary fluid inclusions show variations in temperature that have occurred at give depths since precipitation of the host minerals. Within major hydrothermal upflow zones, fluid-inclusion T{sub h} values all were found to be equal to or higher (commonly 20-50 C and up to 155 C higher) than present temperatures at the depths sampled. During periods when thick glacial ice covered the Yellowstone National Park region, pore-fluid pressures in the underlying rock were increased in proportion to the weight of the overlying column of ice. Accordingly, theoretical reference boiling-point curves that reflect the maximum temperature attainable in a hot-water geothermal system at a given depth were elevated, and temperatures within zones of major hydrothermal upflow (drill holes Y-2, Y-3, Y-6, Y-11, Y-13, and upper part of Y-5) increased. The thicknesses of ice required to elevate boiling-point curves sufficiently to account for the observed fluid-inclusion T{sub h} values are within the ranges estimated by glacial geologic studies. At the margins of major hydrothermal upflow zones (drill holes Y-4 and Y-9), fluid-inclusion T{sub h} values at given depths range from 57 C lower to about the same as the current temperature measurements because of a previous decrease in the rate of discharge of warm water and/or an increase in the rate of recharge of cold water into the hydrothermal system.

  19. The geology and remarkable thermal activity of Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, D.E.; Keith, T.E.C. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (USA)); Hutchinson, R.A. (US National Park Service (US))

    1988-01-01

    Norris Geyser Basin is adjacent to the north rim of the Yellowstone Caldera, one of the largest volcanic features of its type in the world. Hydrothermal activity may have been continuous for {gt}100,000 years B.P. Norris Basin includes the highest erupting geyser of recent water types, colors of organisms and inorganic precipitates, frequent changes in activity and chemistry, and very high subsurface temperatures ({gt}240{degrees}C). Norris Basin is only a part of the Norris-Mammoth Corridor that strikes north from the caldera rim to Mammoth Hot Springs. Norris Basin has a heat flow roughly 10 percent of that of the Yellowstone Caldera and requires an estimated 0.01 km{sup 3} of rhyolitic magma per year-a quantity far greater than the corridor's rate of eruption.

  20. Geoarchaeota: a new candidate phylum in the Archaea from high-temperature acidic iron mats in Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozubal, Mark; Romine, Margaret F.; Jennings, Ryan; Jay, Z.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Rusch, Douglas B.; Beam, Jake; McCue, Lee Ann; Inskeep, William P.

    2013-03-01

    Geothermal systems in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an outstanding opportunity to understand the origin and evolution of metabolic processes necessary for life in extreme environments including low pH, high temperature, low oxygen and elevated concentrations of reduced iron. Previous phylogenetic studies of acidic ferric iron mats from YNP have revealed considerable diversity of uncultivated and undescribed archaea. The goal of this study was to obtain replicate de novo genome assemblies for a dominant archaeal population inhabiting acidic iron oxide mats in YNP. Detailed analysis of conserved ribosomal and informational processing genes indicate that the replicate assemblies represent a new phylum-level lineage referred to here as 'novel archaeal group 1 (NAG1)'. The NAG1 organisms contain pathways necessary for the catabolism of peptides and complex carbohydrates as well as a bacterial-like Form I CO dehydrogenase complex likely used for energy conservation. Moreover, this novel population contains genes involved in metabolism of oxygen including a Type A heme copper oxidase, a bd-type terminal oxidase and a putative oxygen sensing protoglobin. NAG1 has a variety of unique bacterial-like cofactor biosynthesis and transport genes and a Type3-like CRISPR system. Discovery of NAG1 is critical to our understanding of microbial community structure and function in extant thermophilic iron mats of YNP, and will provide insight regarding the evolution of Archaea in early Earth environments that may have important analogues active in YNP today.

  1. Effects of potential geothermal development in the Corwin Springs Known Geothermal Resources Area, Montana, on the thermal features of Yellowstone National Park. Water Resources Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    A two-year study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with the National Park Service, Argonne National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory was initiated in 1988 to determine the effects of potential geothermal development in the Corwin Springs Known Geothermal Resources Area (KGRA), Montana, on the thermal features of Yellowstone National Park. The study addressed three principal issues: (1) the sources of thermal water in the hot springs at Mammoth, La Duke, and Bear Creek; (2) the degree of subsurface connection between these areas; and (3) the effects of geothermal development in the Corwin Springs KGRA on the Park's thermal features. The authors investigations included, but were not limited to, geologic mapping, electrical geophysical surveys, chemical sampling and analyses of waters and rocks, determinations of the rates of discharge of various thermal springs, and hydrologic tracer tests.

  2. Review: Yellowstone's Wildlife in Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tans, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Yellowstone National Park occupies a special place in the American imagination. Home to mountains, geothermal

  3. Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station, Yellowstone National Park (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    The mobile PV/generator hybrid system deployed at Bechler Meadows provides a number of advantages. It reduces on-site air emissions from the generator. Batteries allow the generator to operate only at its rated power, reducing run-time and fuel consumption. Energy provided by the solar array reduces fuel consumption and run-time of the generator. The generator is off for most hours providing peace and quiet at the site. Maintenance trips from Mammoth Hot Springs to the remote site are reduced. The frequency of intrusive fuel deliveries to the pristine site is reduced. And the system gives rangers a chance to interpret Green Park values to the visiting public. As an added bonus, the system provides all these benefits at a lower cost than the basecase of using only a propane-fueled generator, reducing life cycle cost by about 26%.

  4. Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station, Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andy Walker

    2014-03-05

    The mobile PV/generator hybrid system deployed at Bechler Meadows provides a number of advantages. It reduces on-site air emissions from the generator. Batteries allow the generator to operate only at its rated power, reducing run-time and fuel consumption. Energy provided by the solar array reduces fuel consumption and run-time of the generator. The generator is off for most hours providing peace and quiet at the site. Maintenance trips from Mammoth Hot Springs to the remote site are reduced. The frequency of intrusive fuel deliveries to the pristine site is reduced. And the system gives rangers a chance to interpret Green Park values to the visiting public. As an added bonus, the system provides all these benefits at a lower cost than the basecase of using only a propane-fueled generator, reducing life cycle cost by about 26%.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus strain Y4.12MC10, a Novel Paenibacillus lautus strain Isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring in Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mead, David [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Zhang, Xiaojing [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Brumm, Catherine [United States Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute; Hochstein, Rebecca [Lucigen Corporation, Middleton, Wisconsin; Schoenfeld, Thomas [Lucigen Corporation, Middleton, Wisconsin; Brumm, Phillip [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2012-01-01

    Paenibacillus speciesY412MC10 was one of a number of organisms initially isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA. The isolate Y412MC10 was initially classified as a Geobacillus sp. based on its isolation conditions and similarity to other organisms isolated from hot springs at Yellowstone National Park. Comparison of 16 S rRNA sequences within the Bacillales indicated that Geobacillus sp.Y412MC10 clustered with Paenibacillus species and not Geobacillus; the 16S rRNA analysis indicated the organism was a strain of Paenibacillus lautus. Lucigen Corp. prepared genomic DNA and the genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. The genome of Paenibacillus lautus strain Y412MC10 consists of one circular chromosome of 7,121,665 bp with an average G+C content of 51.2%. The Paenibacillus sp.Y412MC10 genome sequence was deposited at the NCBI in October 2009 (NC{_}013406). Comparison to other Paenibacillus species shows the organism lacks nitrogen fixation, antibiotic production and social interaction genes reported in other Paenibacilli. Over 25% of the proteins predicted by the Y412MC10 genome share no identity with the closest sequenced Paenibacillus species; most of these are predicted hypothetical proteins and their specific function in the environment is unknown.

  6. Sulfur geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in Yellowstone National Park. 1: The origin of thiosulfate in hot spring waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Y.; Schoonen, M.A.A. [SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Geosciences] [SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Geosciences; Nordstrom, D.K.; Cunningham, K.M.; Ball, J.W. [Geological Survey, Boulder, CO (United States). Water Resources Div.] [Geological Survey, Boulder, CO (United States). Water Resources Div.

    1998-12-01

    Thiosulfate (S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}), polythionate (S{sub x}O{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}}), dissolved sulfide (H{sub 2}S), and sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) concentrations in thirty-nine alkaline and acidic springs in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) were determined. The analyses were conducted on site, using ion chromatography for thiosulfate, polythionate, and sulfate, and using colorimetry for dissolved sulfide. Thiosulfate was detected at concentrations typically less than 2 {micro}mol/L in neutral and alkaline chloride springs with low sulfate concentrations (Cl{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} > 25). The thiosulfate concentration levels are about one to two orders of magnitude lower than the concentration of dissolved sulfide in these springs. In most acid sulfate and acid sulfate-chloride springs (Cl{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} < 10), thiosulfate concentrations were also typically lower than 2 {micro}mol/L. However, in some chloride springs enriched with sulfate (Cl{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} between 10 and 25), thiosulfate was found at concentrations ranging from 9 to 95 {micro}mol/L, higher than the concentrations of dissolved sulfide in these waters. Polythionate was detected only in Cinder Pool, Norris Geyser basin, at concentrations up to 8 {micro}mol/L, with an average S-chain-length from 4.1 to 4.9 sulfur atoms. The results indicate that no thiosulfate occurs in the deeper parts of the hydrothermal system. Thiosulfate may form, however, from (1) hydrolysis of native sulfur by hydrothermal solutions in the shallower parts (<50 m) of the system, (2) oxidation of dissolved sulfide upon mixing of a deep hydrothermal water with aerated shallow groundwater, and (3) the oxidation of dissolved sulfide by dissolved oxygen upon discharge of the hot spring. Upon discharge of a sulfide-containing hydrothermal water, oxidation proceeds rapidly as atmospheric oxygen enters the water. The transfer of oxygen is particularly effective if the hydrothermal discharge is turbulent and has a large surface area.

  7. Methylmercury enters an aquatic food web through acidophilic microbial mats in Yellowstone National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomberlin, Jeff

    Methylmercury enters an aquatic food web through acidophilic microbial mats in Yellowstone National the extreme environments in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), WY, USA. Little is known of their role in food webs that exist in the Park's geothermal habitats. Eukaryotic green algae associated

  8. Correlation of gold in siliceous sinters with {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He in hot spring waters of Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, R.O.; Thompson, J.M. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)] [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kennedy, B.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Aoki, Masahiro [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)] [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    Opaline sinter samples collected at Yellowstone National Park (YNP) were analyzed for gold by neutron activation and for other trace elements by the inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) method. No correlation was found between Au and As, Sb, or total Fe in the sinters, although the sample containing the highest Au also contains the highest Sb. There also was no correlation of Au in the sinter with the H{sub 2}S concentration in the discharged hot spring water or with the estimated temperature of last equilibration of the water with the surrounding rock. The Au in rhyolitic tuffs and lavas at YNP found within the Yellowstone caldera show the same range in Au as do those outside the caldera, while thermal waters from within this caldera all have been found to contain relatively low dissolved Au and to deposit sinters that contain relatively little Au. Therefore, it is not likely that variations in Au concentrations among these sinters simply reflect differences in leachable Au in the rocks through which the hydrothermal fluids have passed. Rather, variations in [H{sub 2}S], the concentration of total dissolved sulfide, that result from different physical and chemical processes that occur in different parts of the hydrothermal system appear to exert the main control on the abundance of Au in these sinters. Hydrothermal fluids at YNP convect upward through a series of successively shallower and cooler reservoirs where water-rock chemical and isotopic reactions occur in response to changing temperature and pressure. In some parts of the system the fluids undergo decompressional boiling, and in other parts they cool conductively without boiling. Mixing of ascending water from deep in the system with shallow groundwaters is common. All three processes generally result in a decrease in [H{sub 2}S] and destabilize dissolved gold bisulfide complexes in reservoir waters in the YNP system.

  9. Portable Emission Measurements of Yellowstone Park Snowcoaches and Snowmobiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    ], and oxides of nitrogen [NOx]). Large emissions variability was still observed despite using a standardized characterized by large emission ranges in CO (5­630 g/mi), HC (1­50 g/mi), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx; 1­49 gPortable Emission Measurements of Yellowstone Park Snowcoaches and Snowmobiles Gary A. Bishop, Ryan

  10. Rare earth element geochemistry of acid-sulphate and acid-sulphate-chloride geothermal systems from Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, A.J.; Palmer, M.R.; Kemp, A.J. [Bristol Univ. (United Kingdom)] [Bristol Univ. (United Kingdom); Sturchio, N.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Rare earth element (REE) concentrations have been determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) in acid-sulphate and acid-sulphate-chloride waters and the associated sinters and volcanic rocks from the Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming, USA, geothermal system. REE concentrations in the volcanic rocks range from 222 to 347 ppm: their chondrite-normalised REE patterns are typical of upper continental crust, with LREE > HREE and negative Eu anomalies. Total REE concentrations in the fluids range from 3 to 1133 nmol kg{sup -1} ({ge}162 ppm), and {Sigma}REE concentrations in sinter are {ge}181 ppm. REE abundances and patterns in drill core material from YNP indicate some REE mobility. Relative to the host rocks the REE patterns of the fluids are variably depleted in HREEs and LREEs, and usually have a pronounced positive Eu anomaly. This decoupling of Eu from the REE suite suggests that (1) Eu has been preferentially removed either from the host rock glass or from the host rock minerals, or (2) the waters are from a high temperature or reducing environment where Eu{sup 2+} is more soluble than the trivalent REEs. Since the latter is inconsistent with production of acid-sulphate springs in a low temperature, oxidising near-surface environment, we suggest that the positive Eu anomalies in the fluids result from preferential dissolution of a Eu-rich phase in the host rock. Spatial and temporal variations in major element chemistry and pH of the springs sampled from Norris Geyser Basin and Crater Hills accompany variations in REE concentrations and patterns of individual geothermal springs. These are possibly related to changes in subsurface plumbing, which results in variations in mixing and dilution of the geothermal fluids and may have lead to changes in the extent and nature of REE complexing. 37 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Depositional facies and aqueous-solid geochemistry of travertine-depositing hot springs (Angel Terrace, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, USA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouke, B.W.; Farmer, J.D.; Des Marais, D.J.; Pratt, L.; Sturchio, N.C.; Burns, P.C.; Discipulo, M.K.

    2000-05-01

    Petrographic and geochemical analyses of travertine-depositing hot springs at Angel Terrace, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, have been used to define five depositional facies along the spring drainage system. Spring waters are expelled in the vent facies at 71 to 73 C and precipitate mounded travertine composed of aragonite needle botryoids. The apron and channel facies (43--72 C) is floored by hollow tubes composed of aragonite needle botryoids that encrust sulfide-oxidizing Aquificales bacteria. The travertine of the pond facies (30--62 C) varies in composition from aragonite needle shrubs formed at higher temperatures to ridged networks of calcite and aragonite at lower temperatures. Calcite ice sheets, calcified bubbles, and aggregates of aragonite needles (fuzzy dumbbells) precipitate at the air-water interface and settle to pond floors. The proximal-slope facies (28--54 C), which forms the margins of terracette pools, is composed of arcuate aragonite needle shrubs that create small microterracettes on the steep slope face. Finally, the distal-slope facies (28--30 C) is composed of calcite spherules and calcite feather crystals. Despite the presence of abundant microbial mat communities and their observed role in providing substrates for mineralization, the compositions of spring-water and travertine predominantly reflect abiotic physical and chemical processes. Vigorous CO{sub 2} degassing causes a +2 unit increase in spring water pH, as well as Rayleigh-type covariations between the concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon and corresponding {delta}{sup 13}C. Travertine {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O are nearly equivalent to aragonite and calcite equilibrium values calculated from spring water in the higher-temperature ({approximately}50--73 C) depositional facies. Conversely, travertine precipitating in the lower-temperature (<{approximately}50 C) depositional facies exhibits {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O values that are as much as 4% less than predicted equilibrium values. This isotopic shift may record microbial respiration as well as downstream transport of travertine crystals. Despite the production of H{sub 2}S and the abundance of sulfide-oxidizing microbes, preliminary {delta}{sub 34}S data do not uniquely define the microbial metabolic pathways present in the spring system. This suggests that the high extent of CO{sub 2} degassing and large open-system solute reservoir in these thermal systems overwhelm biological controls on travertine crystal chemistry.

  12. Yellowstone National Park folio, Wyoming 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hague, Arnold, 1840-1917.

    1896-01-01

    exposures in Lozier Canyon, Texas. Two conflicting hypotheses were proposed: 1) Sedimentary structures in Facies A are hummocky cross-stratification (HCS) and swaley cross-stratification (SCS), which indicates a shelfal depositional environment above...

  13. National Environmental Research Parks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The National Environmental Research Parks are outdoor laboratories that provide opportunities for environmental studies on protected lands that act as buffers around Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The research parks are used to evaluate the environmental consequences of energy use and development as well as the strategies to mitigate these effects. They are also used to demonstrate possible environmental and land-use options. The seven parks are: Fermilab National Environmental Research Park; Hanford National Environmental Research Park; Idaho National Environmental Research Park; Los Alamos National Environmental Research Park; Nevada National Environmental Research Park; Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park; and Savannah River National Environmental Research Park. This document gives an overview of the events that led to the creation of the research parks. Its main purpose is to summarize key points about each park, including ecological research, geological characteristics, facilities, and available databases.

  14. Yellowstone in a Global Context n this issue of Yellowstone Science, Alethea Steingisser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus, W. Andrew

    of Yellowstone (1991, 1995). Donald White, known for his research on geothermal resources and gYellowstone in a Global Context I n this issue of Yellowstone Science, Alethea Steingisser- tion of geysers at the hands of humans, and the tremendous importance of Yellowstone National Park

  15. Review: Manufacturing National Park Nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Review: Manufacturing National Park Nature: Photography,Canada Cronin, J. Keri. Manufacturing National Park Nature:J. Keri Cronin’s book Manufacturing National Park Nature

  16. Review: Manufacturing National Park Nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Fred

    2012-01-01

    tourist industry photos of Jasper National Park maintainedwilderness industry, how recreational activities in the parkPark Nature: Photography, Ecology and the Wilderness Industry

  17. A study of historical vegetation in Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Gwendolyn Ann

    1986-01-01

    of historic landscapes appears to have begun in the United States in 1872 when Yellowstone National Park, the world's first national park, was established to preserve a natural landscape. This was followed in 1890 by the addition of three more national... as national monuments areas of historic and scientific importance on land owned or controlled by the United States. Using this power, the president could protect historic areas until a national park could be established by an act of Congress. The first...

  18. Kalaupapa National Historical Park National Park Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    , and endangered Hawaiian monk seals. invasive plants Non-native plants like Christmas berry and lantana use water Park established (1980) limited hunting, food imported limited fishing, food imported Hawaiian monk 1794/1795 represent turning points in the rise and fall of the Hawaiian Kingdom. McCoy, Mark D. 2007

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Evaluating National Parks...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Office: AVTA - Evaluating National Parks and Forest Service Fleets for Plug-in Electric Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Evaluating National Parks and Forest...

  20. The Access Almanac: The Parking of Nations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald; Stark, Seth

    2000-01-01

    THE ACCESS ALMANAC The Parking of Nations B Y D O N A L D Spaved paradise and put up a parking lot. — Joni Mitchell V E4.4 billion vehicles. Parking would be a global problem. How

  1. Mojave National Preserve Joshua Tree National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Forest (SBNF) Angeles National Forest (ANF) Cleveland National Forest (CNF) CNF CNF SBNF ANF CACA 049111°0'0"N 34°0'0"N 34°0'0"N 33°0'0"N 33°0'0"N California Desert Conservation Area BLM Solar Energy Project Contingent Corridor Deleted Corridor Land Status BLM National Park Service Forest Service Military USFWS

  2. Yellowstone Agencies Plan to Reduce Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 10 federal land organizations — including two national parks, six national forests and two national wildlife refuges — in the Greater Yellowstone Area comprise an entire ecosystem of their own. Straddling Wyoming’s borders with Montana and Idaho, the region draws millions of visitors a year, attracted by the dramatic landscapes, geothermal activity and chances to spot wildlife like bison, elk and grizzly bear.

  3. Introduction The Bohemian Switzerland National Park and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P r o o f s Fottea Introduction The Bohemian Switzerland National Park and the Elbe Sandstone with the Saxon Switzerland National Park and the Saxon SwitzerlandProtectedLandscapeAreainGermany they comprise of the Bohemian Switzerland National park is poor in water bodies because of high water permeability

  4. Driving the National Parks Forward | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Parks Forward Driving the National Parks Forward June 19, 2012 - 4:02pm Addthis Propane shuttle buses used to transport visitors at Mammoth Cave National Park. | Photo...

  5. An analysis of public testimonies on the reintroduction of wolves to the greater Yellowstone ecosystem 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wicker, Kristy Joann

    1996-01-01

    Public participation in review of draft environmental impact statements (DEIS) has been problematic. This study focused on public hearings regarding the DEIS for the reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park and central Idaho...

  6. Diversity of Life at the Geothermal Subsurface--Surface Interface: The Yellowstone Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diversity of Life at the Geothermal Subsurface--Surface Interface: The Yellowstone Example example of Yellowstone National Park indi- cate that the diversity of microbial life at the geothermal temperatures. The geothermal subsurface-surface interface in the presence of both electron donors and acceptors

  7. ORIGINAL ARTICLE [FeFe]-hydrogenase in Yellowstone National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is an important source of energy for the maintenance and growth of microbial populations (Wolin, 1982; Morita and is the basis for many syntrophic interactions that commonly occur in microbial communities. Little is known diversity of organisms which produce H2 in microbial communities. In this study, we examined the [Fe

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellowstone National Park Commits to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropane Texas LawCase

  9. Lamar Buffalo Ranch, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safety StandardsLabor Relations Act

  10. Introduction The Bohemian Switzerland National Park and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction The Bohemian Switzerland National Park and the Elbe Sandstone Protected Landscape Area are situated in the north of the Czech Republic at the German border. Together with the Saxon Switzerland National Park and the Saxon SwitzerlandProtectedLandscapeAreainGermany they comprise a unique sandstone

  11. Before the Subcommittee on National Parks - Senate Committee...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    National Parks - Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources Before the Subcommittee on National Parks - Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources Testimony of Ingrid...

  12. Before the House Subcommittee on National Parks Committee on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Parks Committee on Energy and Commerce Before the House Subcommittee on National Parks Committee on Energy and Commerce Testimony of Ingrid Kolb, Director Office of...

  13. Analysis Of Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYork Jump to:Hempsteadtemporal momentAnadarkoPark Using

  14. Archaeal viruses from Yellowstone’s high temperature environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Young; B. Wiedenheft; J. Snyder; J. Spuhler; F. Roberto; T. Douglas

    2005-01-01

    In general, our understanding of Archaea lags far behind our knowledge of the other two domains of life—Bacteria and Eukarya. Unlike the other domains of life, very few viruses of Archaea have been characterized. Of the approximately 4000 viruses described to date, only 36 are associated with archaeal hosts--many of these from thermophilic Crenarchaeota. In this work we describe the discovery, isolation and preliminary characterization of viruses and novel virus-like particles isolated directly from diverse thermal environments in Yellowstone National Park.

  15. Geology of the Shenandoah National Park Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eaton, L. Scott

    1 Geology of the Shenandoah National Park Region 39th Annual Virginia Geological Field Conference October 2nd - 3rd, 2009 Scott Southworth U. S. Geological Survey L. Scott Eaton James Madison University Meghan H. Lamoreaux College of William & Mary William C. Burton U. S. Geological Survey Christopher M

  16. Environmental Impacts of Tourism in Khao Yai National Park, Thailand 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phumsathan, Sangsan

    2011-10-21

    Knowledge of visitor impacts is critical for sustainable tourism management in national parks. The focus of past tourism impact research on national parks is either on bio-physical impacts (conducted as recreation ecology research) or on social...

  17. Isle Royale National Park Bibliography of Publications 1 Isle Royale National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). 14:1-63. Armentano, T. V. and O. L. Loucks. 1983. Air pollution threats to US National Parks of the Great Lakes region. Environmental conservation. 10:303-313. Assel, R. A. 1986. Fall and winter thermal

  18. Manhattan Project National Historical Park

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport)Price (Dollars8-2011.AdministrationNationalManhattan

  19. Sustainable Housing for Park Rangers in Big Bend National Park, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrison, M.; Griswold, S.

    1996-01-01

    by the National Park Service, design teams in the joint project have developed permanent sustainable housing responsive to the hot-arid desert climate....

  20. NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PARKS A National Environmental Research Park is an outdoor laboratory where research may be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Energy Reorganization Act, the Department of EnergyCHARTER NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PARKS A National Environmental Research Park is an outdoor laboratory where research may be carried out to achieve national environmental goals, as articulated

  1. Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Traffic and Parking: Current Issues, Future Solutions Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (HAVO) is experiencing increased visitor use and congestion/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Traffic and Parking: Current Issues, Future Solutions Hawaii, and unsafe practices. This project will record and analyze these issues. NPS staff and University of Hawaii

  2. Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas...

  3. MANHATTAN PROJECT NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Secretaries of Energy A Brief History of the Energy Department Historical Resources DOE History Timeline Manhattan Project Manhattan Project National Historical Park The...

  4. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area (1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data...

  5. Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static...

  6. Energy Department and National Park Service Announce Clean Cities...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    And there are multiple benefits - we use less petroleum which saves money and reduces air pollution in America's national parks. Some of these alternative fuel vehicles are...

  7. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. Michael Thompson (1985) Chemistry Of Thermal And Nonthermal Springs In The Vicinity Of Lassen Volcanic National Park...

  8. National Parks Move Forward on Sustainable Transportation in...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    vehicle idling. In partnership with Clean Cities, a number of National Parks are adopting alternative fuel and plug-in electric vehicles. To minimize carbon pollution and other...

  9. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  10. Before the House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on Natural Resources By: Ingrid Kolb, Director Office of Management Subject: Proposed Manhattan Project National Historical Park Microsoft Word - 6.28.12 MA Final Testimony...

  11. Local People, National Parks, and International Conservation Movements: Conflicts over Nature in Southeast Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Steven Martin

    2013-01-01

    tourism industry); special developments around parks, e.g.ecotourism industry in and around the park. Hashim had beenover the timber industry. National parks were created in all

  12. Hot Spring Monitoring at Lassen Volcanic National Park, California 1983-1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, Michael L.

    1986-01-21

    Data collected on several occasions between 1983 and 1985 as part of a hydrologic monitoring program by the U.S. Geological Survey permit preliminary estimation of the natural variability in the discharge characteristics of hydrothermal features in Lassen Volcanic National Park and the Lassen KGRA in northern California. The total rate of discharge of high-chloride hot springs along Mill Creek and Canyon Creek in the Lassen KGRA has averaged 20.9 {+-} 1.7 L/s, based on seven measurements of the flux of chloride in these streams. Measured chloride flux does not appear to increase with streamflow during the spring-summer snowmelt period, as observed at Yellowstone and Long Valley Caldera. The corresponding fluxes of arsenic in Mill Creek and Canyon Creek decrease within distances of about 2 km downstream from the hot springs by approximately 30%, most likely due to chemical absorption on streambed sediments. Within Lassen Volcanic National Park, measurements of sulfate flux in streams draining steam-heated thermal features at Sulphur Works and Bumpass Hell have averaged 7.5 {+-} 1.0 and 4.0 {+-} 1.5 g/s, respectively. Calculated rates of steam upflow containing, dissolved H{sub 2}S to supply these sulfate fluxes are 1.8 kg/s at Sulphur Works and 1.0 kg/s at Bumpass Hell.

  13. Analysis of seasonal and day-of-week traffic patterns at national parks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liggett, Lindsay Elizabeth

    2009-05-15

    The National Park Service (NPS) is currently contemplating the implementation of a system-wide traffic monitoring program. While several of the national parks within this network collect continuous vehicle data at multiple stations within each park...

  14. Photovoltaics and the National Park Service : an institutional analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nutt-Powell, Thomas E.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is one of a series resulting from institutional analysis of photovoltaic (PV) acceptance. The case reported here involves the acceptance of PV by the National Park Service. As part of the Department of the ...

  15. Parking

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-11-02

    To define policies and procedures governing the assignment, use, and management of parking spaces controlled by the Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) in the Forrestal Facility. Cancels HQ O 344.1 Canceled by DOE N 251.92.

  16. Overview | Savannah River National Environmental Park

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams forOrhan Kizilkaya, Ph.D.OurPark Overview The

  17. Management of Giant Sequoia in the National Parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management of Giant Sequoia in the National Parks of the Sierra Nevada, California1 David J. Parsons H. Thomas Nichols2 Abstract: Management of giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum [Lindl, and care ful evaluation. Research includes studying the effects of air pollution. Interpre tation

  18. The epidemiology and etiology of visitor injuries in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heggie, Travis Wade

    2006-04-12

    The U.S. National Park Service has recognized visitor health and safety as an important component of protected area management. Despite this recognition, research investigating visitor health and safety issues in national parks is lacking. In order...

  19. Cesium in rock-water interaction, Yellowstone National Park. [Abstract only

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, J.M.; Keith, T.E.C.

    1983-03-01

    Chemical analyses of thermal waters from research drill holes and nearby hot springs and geysers in Upper and Lower Geyser Basins indicate that Cs may be a reactive ion. A nearly constant Cs:Cl is found for four wells drilled in Lower Geyser Basin and for some hot spring and geysers. It is inferred from this plot that points falling below the trend indicate Cs depleted waters. A plot of Cs:CHO/sub 3//Cl, another measure of rock-water interaction, also indicates Cs removal from the waters. These data correlate well with a parallel study of chemistry and mineralogy of hydrothermally altered rocks from the drill holes which show that the rocks involved in hydrothermal rock-water reactions are vitrophyric rhyolite lava flows and pumiceous tuff overlain by obsidian-rich sands and gravels. Nearly 55 m of such a section from well Y-8 has been hydrothermally altered into alternating intervals consisting of analcime - quartz - clay (smectite, celadonite) or clinoptilolite - ..cap alpha..-cristobalite - smectite. Whole rock analyses of randomly selected samples of these intervals from several wells have Cs contents somewhat higher than those of the unaltered host rhyolite. However, the Cs content of the analcime - quartz - clay intervals is as much as 700 times higher than that of the host rock. Analyses of mineral separates show that analcime, containing as much as 4700 ppM Cs, is more enriched in Cs than any other mineral. Examination of experimental data suggests that Cs is incorporated into the analcime structure during crystallization. Clinoptilolite, which has been shown to readily exchange Cs, is only slightly enriched in this system.

  20. National Parks Move Forward on Sustainable Transportation in Partnership

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -Department ofDepartment ofEnergy NationalNational Parks Clean

  1. National Parks Roll on With Alternative Fuels | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -Department ofDepartment ofEnergy NationalNational Parks

  2. OPEN POSITION: Entomological Taxonomist and Research Associate Improving our understanding of the elevational biodiversity gradient of Rocky Mountain National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    of the elevational biodiversity gradient of Rocky Mountain National Park: arthropod diversity and conservation Range, including from Rocky Mountain National Park. The taxonomic groups of most interest include

  3. NERPs Definition | Savannah River National Environmental Park

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeatMaRIEdioxide capture |GEUtilizingTotalMurrayNational

  4. National Parks Clean Up with Alternative Fuels | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -Department ofDepartment ofEnergy NationalNational Parks Clean Up

  5. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for the National Park Service: Grand Canyon National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort; Ian Nienhueser

    2014-08-01

    This report focuses on the Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of PEVs into the agencies’ fleets. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (collectively PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements.

  6. Health-hazard Evaluation Report Heta 90-179-2172, National Park Service, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hilo, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burr, G.A.; Stephenson, R.L.; Kawamoto, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    In response to a request from the National Park Service, an evaluation was undertaken of possible hazardous exposures to volcanic emissions, both gases and particulates, at the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (SIC-7999) on the island of Hawaii in the State of Hawaii. Concerns included exposures to sulfur-dioxide (7446095) (SO2), asphalt decomposition products from burning pavement, acid mists when lava enters the ocean, volcanic caused smog, and Pele's hair (a fibrous glass like material). Two other related requests for study were also received in regard to civil defense workers in these areas. No detectable levels of SO2 were found during long term colorimetric detector tube sampling used to characterize park workers' personal full shift exposures. Short term detector tube samples collected near a naturally occurring sulfur vent showed SO2 levels of 1.2 parts per million (ppm). Work related symptoms reported by more than 50% of the respondents included headache, eye irritation, throat irritation, cough, and phlegm. Chest tightness or wheezing and shortness of breath were also frequently reported. Samples collected for hydrochloric-acid (7647010) and hydrofluoric-acid (7664393) recorded concentrations of up to 15ppm for the former and 1.0ppm for the latter acid. Airborne particulates in the laze plume were comprised largely of chloride salts. Airborne fibers were detected at a concentration of 0.16 fibers per cubic centimeter. The authors conclude that excessive exposure to SO2 can occur at some locations within the park. The authors recommend that workers and visitors to the park be informed of the potential for exposures.

  7. Exploring Spatial Variations in the Relationship between National Park Visitation and Associated Factors in Texas Counties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kyung Hee

    2013-11-07

    Recreation demand such as national park visitation is influenced by various social, demographic, and economic factors. These key variables are important indicators in predicting future trends and provide beneficial information about potential park...

  8. Political Economy of Compensatory Conservation: A Case Study of proposed Omkareshwar National Park Complex, India 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goel, Abhineety

    2013-08-08

    Proposed Omkareshwar National Park Complex (ONPC), is a planned park in Madhya Pradesh (central India) that is being designed as a compensatory conservation plan to overcome the loss of wildlife and forest by the construction ...

  9. Wide-ranging research programs address issues of local, state and national concern, from immigration reform and Medicaid expansion to national parks management, regional transportation issues,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    immigration reform and Medicaid expansion to national parks management, regional transportation issues

  10. Linking Institutional Characteristics to Communal Natural Resource Conservation in Cumbres de Monterrey National Park 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clifton, Kathryn Marie

    2014-05-08

    National parks in developing countries often have inhabitants that practice communal land management. Potential drivers for sustainable communal land management have been identified in literature, however these drivers ...

  11. National Parks Move Transportation Forward in America’s Great Outdoors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn how the Energy Department's Clean Cities is helping National Parks across the country reduce air pollution and lower fuel costs.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans type strain (ICPT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clum, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    isolated from geothermal sites in Yellowstone National Park:Y00168 from a geothermal site in Yellowstone National Park [

  13. Introduction Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) is located at a high

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Emily V.

    Introduction ·Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) is located at a high elevation with low nitrogen retention in plants and soil. ·Upslope wind events in the region are caused by synoptic scale storms as well, et al. A Seasonal Nitrogen Deposition Budget for Rocky Mountain National Park. In preparation

  14. RURAL-FRONTIER MIGRATION AND DEFORESTATION IN THE SIERRA DE LACANDON NATIONAL PARK, GUATEMALA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    RURAL-FRONTIER MIGRATION AND DEFORESTATION IN THE SIERRA DE LACANDON NATIONAL PARK, GUATEMALA-frontier Migration and Deforestation in the Sierra de Lacandón National Park, Guatemala (Under the direction of Thomas M. Whitmore.) This dissertation explores the primary proximate and underlying causes

  15. GEOL 301 --GEOLOGY OF NATIONAL PARKS AND MONUMENTS Dr. Vic Camp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camp, Vic

    GEOL 301 -- GEOLOGY OF NATIONAL PARKS AND MONUMENTS Dr. Vic Camp Office: CG-225 Office Hours: MWF 11:00-12:00 a.m. E-mail: vcamp@geology.sdsu.edu Text: Harris et al. (1995) Geology of National Parks Course Description: The constantly evolving earth has been shaped by a variety of geologic processes

  16. A PUBLICATION OF DOE'S SAVANNAH RIVER SITE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PARK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    #12;A PUBLICATION OF DOE'S SAVANNAH RIVER SITE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PARK April 1990 COMMUNITY TYPES Sarah W. Workman Kenneth W. McLeod Savannah River Ecology Laboratory A Publication of the Savannah River Site National Environmental Research Park Program 1990 #12;ABSTRACT The eight major plant

  17. Eighty years of change: vegetation in the montane ecoregion of Jasper National Park, Alberta,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Ellen

    Eighty years of change: vegetation in the montane ecoregion of Jasper National Park, Alberta and dis- tribution in the montane ecoregion of Jasper National Park, in the Rocky Mountains of Alberta parc natio- nal de Jasper, situé dans les Montagnes Rocheuses en Alberta, au Canada. Une approche

  18. Organizing from the Middle Out Citizen Science in the National Parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Organizing from the Middle Out Citizen Science in the National Parks $ $ $ Bottom-Up Middle-Out Top virtually to create a regionally-coordinated citizen science project in the National Parks. RQ: What factors influence the way a citizen science project develops? Boston Harbor Islands No dominant stakeholder

  19. Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development - An Application on Alternative Fuels in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shropshire, D.E.; Cobb, D.A.; Worhach, P.; Jacobson, J.J.; Berrett, S.

    2000-12-30

    The Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development project integrated the Bechtel/Nexant Industrial Materials Exchange Planner and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory System Dynamic models, demonstrating their capabilities on alternative fuel applications in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Park system. The combined model, called the Dynamic Industrial Material Exchange, was used on selected test cases in the Greater Yellow Teton Parks region to evaluate economic, environmental, and social implications of alternative fuel applications, and identifying primary and secondary industries. The test cases included looking at compressed natural gas applications in Teton National Park and Jackson, Wyoming, and studying ethanol use in Yellowstone National Park and gateway cities in Montana. With further development, the system could be used to assist decision-makers (local government, planners, vehicle purchasers, and fuel suppliers) in selecting alternative fuels, vehicles, and developing AF infrastructures. The system could become a regional AF market assessment tool that could help decision-makers understand the behavior of the AF market and conditions in which the market would grow. Based on this high level market assessment, investors and decision-makers would become more knowledgeable of the AF market opportunity before developing detailed plans and preparing financial analysis.

  20. Parking

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeatMaRIEdioxideUser Careers/ResearchParking Parking Print

  1. Parking

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-11-02

    The Order defines policies and procedures governing the assignment, use, and management of parking spaces controlled by DOE/NNSA in the Forrestal Facility. Administrative changes have been made to update content. Canceled by DOE N 251.92. Cancels HQ O 344.1.

  2. National Park Service Greens Its Rides with the Help of Clean Cities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The National Park Service is working with the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities Program to provide sustainable travel options, including using more efficient vehicles themselves and encouraging visitors to “green their rides” in the parks to minimize their contribution to climate change and air pollution.

  3. Testing of a hybrid membrane system for groundwater desalination in an Australian national park 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schäfer, Andrea; Richards, Bryce S.

    2005-01-01

    The results of a field trial desalinating brackish bore water in an Australian remote national park site are reported in this paper. Two membranes, operated with varying operation pressures, were tested with regards to ...

  4. Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Understanding seismic design criteria for Japanese nuclear power plants Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H. Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Costello, J.F. US Nuclear...

  5. Marketing the Mountains: An Environmental History of Tourism in Rocky Mountain National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Jerritt

    2008-09-05

    Marketing the Mountains explores the impact of tourism upon the natural world of Rocky Mountain National Park. Moving beyond culutral analysis of the development of tourism in the American West, this dissertation seeks to understand both...

  6. Parking

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access| Department ofStephen PSeptember|March Study2065 UnlimitedParking

  7. Geothermal Systems of the Yellowstone Caldera Field Trip Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, Duncan; Neilson, Dennis L.; Nichols, Clayton R.

    1980-09-08

    Geothermal studies are proceedings on two fronts in the West Yellowstone area. High-temperature resources for the generation of electricity are being sought in the Island Park area, and lower temperatures resources for direct applications, primarily space heating, are being explored for near the town of West Yellowstone. Potential electric geothermal development in the Island Park area has been the subject of widespread publicity over fears of damage to thermal features in Yellowstone Park. At the time of writing this guide, companies have applied for geothermal leases in the Island Park area, but these leases have not yet been granted by the US Forest Service. The Senate is now discussing a bill that would regulate geothermal development in Island Park; outcome of this debate will determine the course of action on the lease applications. The Island Park area was the site of two cycles of caldera activity, with major eruptions at 2.0 and 1.2 million years ago. The US Geological Survey estimates that 16,850 x 10{sup 18} joules of energy may remain in the system. Geothermal resources suitable for direct applications are being sought in the West Yellowstone vicinity by the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, under funding from the US Department of Energy. West Yellowstone has a mean annual temperature of 1-2 C. Research thus far suggests that basement rocks in the vicinity are at a depth of about 600 m and are probably similar to the rocks exposed north of Hebgen Lake, where Precambrian, Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks have been mapped. A few sites with anomalously warm water have been identified near the town. Work is continuing on this project.

  8. Behavior of nuclear waste elements during hydrothermal alteration of glassy rhyolite in an active geothermal system: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Seitz, M.G.

    1984-12-31

    The behavior of a group of nuclear waste elements (U, Th, Sr, Zr, Sb, Cs, Ba, and Sm) during hydrothermal alteration of glassy rhyolite is investigated through detailed geochemical analyses of whole rocks, glass and mineral separates, and thermal waters. Significant mobility of U, Sr, Sb, Cs, and Ba is found, and the role of sorption processes in their observed behavior is identified. Th, Zr, and Sm are relatively immobile, except on a microscopic scale. 9 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Homesite attendance as a measure of alloparental and parental care by gray wolves (Canis lupus) in northern Yellowstone National Park 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thurston, Linda Michelle

    2002-01-01

    the sources of this variation it will be necessary to develop approaches for meta-analysis to compare cases across groups, populations, and species. Factors to consider in a meta-analysis should include: age, multiple litters in a pack (polygamy), number...

  10. Thermal Biology in Yellowstone National Park 6-8Photosynthesis and Respiration of Microscopic Life -Student Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    their energy from the sun or chemicals within their environment. Primary producers do not obtain energy by storing energy from the sun into sugars. The process of photosynthesis involves the use of light energy their energy 1 by eating other organisms (plants or animals). Photosynthetic organisms make chemical energy

  11. Carbon dioxide fixation by Metallosphaera yellowstonensis and acidothermophilic iron-oxidizing microbial communities from Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, Ryan; Whitmore, Laura M.; Moran, James J.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Inskeep, William P.

    2014-05-01

    The fixation of inorganic carbon (as carbon dioxide) has been documented in all three domains of life and results in the biosynthesis of a diverse suite of organic compounds that support the growth of heterotrophic organisms. The primary aim of this study was to assess the importance of carbon dioxide fixation in high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat communities and in pure cultures of one of the dominant Fe(II)-oxidizing organisms (Metallosphaera yellowstonensis strain MK1) present in situ. Protein-encoding genes of the complete 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate (3-HP/4-HB) carbon fixation pathway were identified in pure-cultures of M. yellowstonensis strain MK1. Metagenome sequencing from the same environments also revealed genes for the 3-HP/4-HB pathway belonging to M. yellowstonensis populations, as well as genes for a complete reductive TCA cycle from Hydrogenobaculum spp. (Aquificales). Stable isotope (13CO2) labeling was used to measure the fixation of CO2 by M. yellowstonensis strain MK1, and in ex situ assays containing live Fe(III)-oxide microbial mats. Results showed that M. yellowstonensis strain MK1 fixes CO2 via the 3-HP/4-HB pathway with a fractionation factor of ~ 2.5 ‰. Direct analysis of the 13C composition of dissolved inorganic C (DIC), dissolved organic C (DOC), landscape C and microbial mat C showed that mat C is comprised of both DIC and non-DIC sources. The estimated contribution of DIC carbon to biomass C (> ~ 35%) is reasonably consistent with the relative abundance of known chemolithoautotrophs and corresponding CO2 fixation pathways detected in metagenome sequence. The significance of DIC as a major source of carbon for Fe-oxide mat communities provides a foundation for examining microbial interactions in these systems that are dependent on the activity of autotrophic organisms such as Hydrogenobaculum and Metallosphaera spp.

  12. Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station, Yellowstone National Park (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels| Departmentof5.4.407.Cascade reactionsUsing anCase Study:Mobile

  13. Aspen Ecology in Rocky Mountain National Park: Age Distribution, Genetics, and the Effects of Elk Herbivory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Yin, Tongming [ORNL

    2008-10-01

    Lack of aspen (Populus tremuloides) recruitment and canopy replacement of aspen stands that grow on the edges of grasslands on the low-elevation elk (Cervus elaphus) winter range of Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) in Colorado has been a cause of concern for more than 70 years (Packard, 1942; Olmsted, 1979; Stevens, 1980; Hess, 1993; R.J. Monello, T.L. Johnson, and R.G. Wright, Rocky Mountain National Park, 2006, written commun.). These aspen stands are a significant resource since they are located close to the park's road system and thus are highly visible to park visitors. Aspen communities are integral to the ecological structure of montane and subalpine landscapes because they contain high native species richness of plants, birds, and butterflies (Chong and others, 2001; Simonson and others, 2001; Chong and Stohlgren, 2007). These low-elevation, winter range stands also represent a unique component of the park's plant community diversity since most (more than 95 percent) of the park's aspen stands grow in coniferous forest, often on sheltered slopes and at higher elevations, while these winter range stands are situated on the low-elevation ecotone between the winter range grasslands and some of the park's drier coniferous forests.

  14. U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands assessments of the impacts of climate change. Notably, these include: the report Global Warming and the Free House, Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States. By the way, this last national assessment

  15. Seedling insensitivity to ozone for three conifer species native to Great Smoky Mountains National Park$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, Howard S.

    Seedling insensitivity to ozone for three conifer species native to Great Smoky Mountains National concentrations of ozone had little eect on seedlings of three species of conifers commonly found in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Abstract Field symptoms typical of ozone injury have been observed on several

  16. What is the purpose of our national parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Orlinda D.

    2001-01-01

    apartl by Congress for the masses- particularly the poor-as national healing meccas and public playgrounds. Although the nation's timber supply was in danger of depletion by lumber barons who were rapidly harvesting virgin forests...

  17. Geodetic Studies in the Novarupta Area, Katmai National Park, Alaska, 1990 to 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geodetic Studies in the Novarupta Area, Katmai National Park, Alaska, 1990 to 1995 By Jack W and resurveyed in 1993 and 1995. Both EDM and Global Positioning Sys- tem (GPS) measurements were made in 1993. The 1995 survey was restricted to the more accurate GPS surveying method. Analysis of EDM data in 1993

  18. YushanNet: A Real-World WSN Deployment for Hiker Tracking in Yushan National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Polly

    . Moreover, the collected hiking traces can provide important clues for mountain rescuing if there are hikers lost in the mountains. However, since the full wireless coverage is impossible in wilderness YushanNet, for hiker tracking in Yushan National Park. The Yushan Mountain (3952m) is the highest

  19. Analysis of Search Incidents and Lost Person Behavior in Yosemite National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doke, Jared

    2012-12-31

    -2010) of Search and Rescue case incident reports from Yosemite National Park (2,308 in total) were examined and 213 searches were retained for analysis. It was determined that approximately 62% of incidents involve missing hikers. Nearly two thirds of the searches...

  20. NO gas loss from biologically crusted soils in Canyonlands National Park, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barger, Nichole

    , Colorado Plateau, Nitrogen fixation, Nitrogen gas loss, Nitric oxide Abstract. In this study, we examined N pathways. Nitrogen gas loss as NO and N2O have been shown to increase dramatically in soils where N-1 NO gas loss from biologically crusted soils in Canyonlands National Park, Utah NICHOLE N. BARGER

  1. Lighting Retrofit Workbook: A Practical“How To” Guide for the National Park Service Visitor Centers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Workbook describes ways to maximize lighting energy savings while maintaining, or improving the lighting quality in national parks. It guides people through a lighting audit, assists in determining problem areas, and recommends a course of action. The workbook offers assistance in the development of an overall plan, suggests mechanisms for design and financial assistance, and recommends a routine maintenance program.

  2. Aspen Ecology in Rocky Mountain National Park: Age Distribution, Genetics, and the Effects of Elk Herbivory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    , its natural and living resources, natural hazards, and the environment: World Wide Web: httpAspen Ecology in Rocky Mountain National Park: Age Distribution, Genetics, and the Effects of Elk distribution, genetics, and the effects of elk herbivory: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2008­1337, 52

  3. Organizing from the Middle Out: Citizen Science in the National Parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Organizing from the Middle Out: Citizen Science in the National Parks Andrea Wiggins Syracuse from a dissertation pilot study on a citizen science project involving the public with scientists- ence citizen science project design, and in turn, observing how the design choices contribute

  4. Berg en Dal, Kruger National Park, South Africa 14-18 September 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg en Dal, Kruger National Park, South Africa 14-18 September 2014 Food ­ Fuel Interfaces and biogas from biomass (John Corton, IBERS) Pathway # 2. Bioreactor with fruit industry waste (Sagaran Abboo as a feedstock underpins the Southern African Development Community (SADC) sugar industry Opportunities · Several

  5. Rural groundwater supply for the Volcanoes National Park region, Rwanda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zoghbi, Christiane A. (Christiane Antoine)

    2007-01-01

    Water scarcity is a major issue faced by both developed and developing countries. According to the Millennium Development Goals set by the United Nations, the number of people that do not have access to an improved water ...

  6. MANHATTAN PROJECT NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancialInvesting in Minority BanksMANHATTAN PROJECT NATIONAL

  7. Assessment of Nonnative Invasive Plants in the DOE Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, S.J.

    2002-11-05

    The Department of Energy (DOE) National Environmental Research Park at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is composed of second-growth forest stands characteristic of much of the eastern deciduous forest of the Ridge and Valley Province of Tennessee. Human use of natural ecosystems in this region has facilitated the establishment of at least 167 nonnative, invasive plant species on the Research Park. Our objective was to assess the distribution, abundance, impact, and potential for control of the 18 most abundant invasive species on the Research Park. In 2000, field surveys were conducted of 16 management areas on the Research Park (14 Natural Areas, 1 Reference Area, and Walker Branch Watershed) and the Research Park as a whole to acquire qualitative and quantitative data on the distribution and abundance of these taxa. Data from the surveys were used to rank the relative importance of these species using the ''Alien Plant Ranking System, Version 5.1'' developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. Microstegium (Microstegium vimineum) was ranked highest, or most problematic, for the entire Research Park because of its potential impact on natural systems, its tendency to become a management problem, and how difficult it is to control. Microstegium was present in 12 of the 16 individual sites surveyed; when present, it consistently ranked as the most problematic invasive species, particularly in terms of its potential impact on natural systems. Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica) and Chinese privet (Ligustrum sinense) were the second- and third-most problematic plant species on the Research Park; these two species were present in 12 and 9 of the 16 sites surveyed, respectively, and often ranked second- or third-most problematic. Other nonnative, invasive species, in decreasing rank order, included kudzu (Pueraria montma), multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora), Chinese lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneara), and other species representing a variety of life forms and growth forms. Results of this research can be used to prioritize management and research activities related to these invasive taxa on the Research Park as a whole and for specific Natural or Reference Areas. Additional research on the autecology and synecology of each species surveyed is suggested. In particular, research should focus on assessing the impacts of these species on the invaded plant and animal communities and ecosystems. Finally, this ranking system could be used to similarly rank the many other nonnative, invasive species present on the Research Park not included in this study.

  8. http://www.caymannetnews.com/cgi-script/csArticles/articles/000107/010744.htm Barkers National Park or Dump?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    Quincentennial celebrations, when the park was officially opened by Prince Edward, the Earl of Wessex. As part (politicians, bureaucrats, et al.), Prince Edward officiated in the inauguration of the Barkers National Park Prince Edward, who is planning another visit to Cayman next month. Ivan certainly interrupted just about

  9. Fungi Inventory Endemic Plants of Yellowstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Scott

    Monitoring Yellowstone's Bumble Bees · Microbial Diversity in Non-sulfur and Iron Geothermal Steam VentsFungi Inventory Endemic Plants of Yellowstone Restoration of Native Vegetation in Gardiner Basin v o l u m e 2 0 · i s s u e 1 · 2 0 1 2 Yellowstone Vegetation #12;F or two decades, Yellowstone

  10. Visitors' attitudes toward the maintenance, preservation and development of Ichkeul National Park, Tunisia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Alanna Lee

    1990-01-01

    the actions of other group members. Second, the outdoor recreation activities of Ichkeul National Park visitors are surveyed. Third, the relationship between recreation activities and attitudes about resource preservation or development at Ichkeul...). Cross and Guyer (1980) propose that social dilemmas should be divided into two categories. They call the first a "social fence" and the second a "social trap. " In a social fence the disagreeable, short-term consequences of helpful actions discourage...

  11. Visitor Parking Parking Legend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erway, Jennifer

    Visitor Parking Parking Legend General Parking Faculty/Staff Parking Satellite/Freshman Lot Sophomore Parking Reserved Parking Off-Campus Parking (OC) Visitor/Off Campus Employee Parking Visitor Parking Winston-Salem First Church Vehicle Parking Only WFU-Owned Residential Theme Housing Call Boxes

  12. Yellowstone as an Analog for Thermal-Hydrological-Chemical Processes at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. F. Dobson; T. J. Kneafsey; A. Simmons; J. Hulen

    2001-05-29

    Enhanced water-rock interaction resulting from the emplacement of heat-generating nuclear waste in the potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, may result in changes to fluid flow (resulting from mineral dissolution and precipitation in condensation and boiling zones, respectively). Studies of water-rock interaction in active and fossil geothermal systems (natural analogs) provide evidence for changes in permeability and porosity resulting from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes. The objective of this research is to document the effects of coupled THC processes at Yellowstone and then examine how differences in scale could influence the impact that these processes may have on the Yucca Mountain system. Subsurface samples from Yellowstone National Park, one of the largest active geothermal systems in the world, contain some the best examples of hydrothermal self-sealing found in geothermal systems. We selected core samples from two USGS research drill holes from the transition zone between conductive and convective portions of the geothermal system (where sealing was reported to occur). We analyzed the core, measuring the permeability, porosity, and grain density of selected samples to evaluate how lithology, texture, and degree of hydrothermal alteration influence matrix and fracture permeability.

  13. The Great Smoky Mountains National Park All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory: A Search for Species in Our Own Backyard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Nathan J.

    on a systematic survey of the ant fauna occurring in hard- wood forests in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park stud- ies (see Stiles and Coyle 2001, Van Pelt 1963, Watson et al. 1994) have explored elevational

  14. Estimating Biomass in the Mountain Regions of Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda using Radar and Optical Remote Sensing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedrigo, Melissa

    2009-11-26

    Field measured estimates of aboveground biomass (AGB) for 15 transects in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park (BINP), Uganda were used to generate a number of prediction models for estimating aboveground biomass (AGB) over the full extent of BINP. AGB...

  15. 'Taking in the waters' at LaDuke Hot Springs Resort: Early 20th century medical tourism in Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Benjamin W.; Porter, Athna May

    2008-01-01

    would have on Yellowstone’s geothermal system, introduced aYellowstone National Park are only one small part of a complex geothermal

  16. Endolithic Microbial Ecosystems: Molecular Phylogenetic Composition,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Norman

    in Yellowstone geothermal environments. Electron microscopic analysis indicated Yellowstone communities three distinct areas: the Rocky Mountain region and Yellowstone National Park of the USA, and Shark Bay

  17. Parking Legend General Parking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Paul R.

    Parking Legend General Parking Faculty/Staff Parking Satellite/Freshman Lot Sophomore Parking Reserved Parking Off-Campus Parking (OC) Visitor/Off Campus Employee Parking Visitor Parking Winston-Salem First Church Vehicle Parking Only WFU-Owned Residential Theme Housing Call Boxes (Emergency Phones) Z2

  18. Measuring Gene Flow Across the Trans-Canada Highway and Population-Level Benefits of Road Crossing Structures for Grizzly and Black Bear in Banff National Park, Alberta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sawaya, Michael A.; Clevenger, Anthony P.; Kalinowski, Steven T.

    2007-01-01

    Avenue, Harvie Heights, Alberta, T1W 2W2, Canada. Steven T.Banff National Park, Alberta supports the highest volume of

  19. Climate Change Scenario Planning in Alaska's National Parks: Stakeholder Involvement in the Decision-Making Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernst, Kathleen M; Van Riemsdijk, Dr. Micheline

    2013-01-01

    This article studies the participation of stakeholders in climate change decision-making in Alaska s National Parks. We place stakeholder participation within literatures on environmental and climate change decision-making. We conducted participant observation and interviews in two planning workshops to investigate the decision-making process, and our findings are three-fold. First, the inclusion of diverse stakeholders expanded climate change decision-making beyond National Park Service (NPS) institutional constraints. Second, workshops of the Climate Change Scenario Planning Project (CCSPP) enhanced institutional understandings of participants attitudes towards climate change and climate change decision-making. Third, the geographical context of climate change influences the decision-making process. As the first regional approach to climate change decision-making within the NPS, the CCSPP serves as a model for future climate change planning in public land agencies. This study shows how the participation of stakeholders can contribute to robust decisions, may move climate change decision-making beyond institutional barriers, and can provide information about attitudes towards climate change decision-making.

  20. Climate change scenario planning in Alaska's National Parks: Stakeholder involvement in the decision-making process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernst, Kathleen M; Van Riemsdijk, Dr. Micheline

    2013-01-01

    This article studies the participation of stakeholders in climate change decision-making in Alaska s National Parks. We place stakeholder participation within literatures on environmental and climate change decision-making. We conducted participant observation and interviews in two planning workshops to investigate the decision-making process, and our findings are three-fold. First, the inclusion of diverse stakeholders expanded climate change decision-making beyond National Park Service (NPS) institutional constraints. Second, workshops of the Climate Change Scenario Planning Project (CCSPP) enhanced institutional understandings of participants attitudes towards climate change and climate change decision-making. Third, the geographical context of climate change influences the decisionmaking process. As the first regional approach to climate change decision-making within the NPS, the CCSPP serves as a model for future climate change planning in public land agencies. This study shows how the participation of stakeholders can contribute to robust decisions, may move climate change decision-making beyond institutional barriers, and can provide information about attitudes towards climate change decision-making.

  1. Parking Lot Parking Lot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    RussellLn. Hopkins Parking Structure Regents Road West Parking Lot P703 Regents Road East Parking Lot P704 Regents Road Northeast Parking Lot P705 Parking Gilman Parking Structure La Jolla Farms RoadPinesRd. RegentsRoad GeneseeAvenue Genesee Avenue NorthTorreyPinesRoad Pangea Dr. Pangea Parking Lot Voigt Drive

  2. Visitor Parking Parking Legend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Paul R.

    Only Satellite/Freshman Lot Sophomore Parking Reserved Parking Off-Campus Parking (OC) Visitor to park T1 D E T J H G F Q B C M N P A A portion of lot P will close every Friday at 4 p.m. 24 hourVisitor Parking Parking Legend General Parking Faculty/Staff Parking Employee Off-Campus Parking

  3. Science Park Science Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koolen, Marijn

    Science Park Science Park Science Park Science Park Science Park Kruislaan Kruislaan Science Park SURFsara NLeSC Polder Anna Hoeve Telecity Matrix Innovation Center AUC AMOLF ARCNL UvA Faculty of Science Equinix Universum CWI UvA Oerknal Meet & Eat Maslow Spar ACE Venture Lab IXA ILCA NS Amsterdam Science

  4. Colonization, clear-cutting, and cornfields: Rural migration and deforestation in The Sierra de Lacandn National Park, Petn, Guatemala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    Lacandón National Park, Petén, Guatemala David L. Carr University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The research site is a settlement frontier within a protected area in northern Guatemala. The great expanse-poor colonists from other rural areas in Guatemala. Colonists arrived following the construction of a road

  5. Vegetation patterns of Pine Canyon, Big Bend National Park, Texas, in relation to elevation and slope aspect 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bryan Joseph

    1997-01-01

    Data on the woody vegetation of Pine Canyon, Big Bend National Park, Texas was gathered on an elevational gradient from 1250 m to 2000 m elevation using the point-centered quarter method. Sampling was conducted at 12 sites at 1250 m, 1500 m, 1625 m...

  6. Tenant Guidelines National Park Service and the U.S. Department of Energy, Federal Energy Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond, Richard

    Management Program for Energy-Efficient Renovation of Buildings at the Presidio of San Francisco #12Tenant Guidelines National Park Service and the U.S. Department of Energy, Federal Energy;Guidelines for Energy Efficiency at the Presidio of San Francisco Acknowledgments This document was prepared

  7. Spatial heterogeneity and ecology of algal communities in an ephemeral sandstone stream in the Bohemian Switzerland National Park, Czech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Spatial heterogeneity and ecology of algal communities in an ephemeral sandstone stream Switzerland National Park was established to protect the sandstone landscape formed by the erosion of the sandstone bedrock. These ephemeral streams are unique biotopes on the boundary of aquatic and aerial

  8. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for the National Park Service: Fort Vancouver National Historic Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

    2014-03-01

    Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, managing and operating contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, is the lead laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing. Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC contracted with Intertek Testing Services, North America (ITSNA) to collect data on federal fleet operations as part of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity’s Federal Fleet Vehicle Data Logging and Characterization study. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity study seeks to collect data to validate the use of advanced electric drive vehicle transportation. This report focuses on the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site (FVNHS) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of electric vehicles (EVs) into the agencies’ fleet. Individual observations of the selected vehicles provided the basis for recommendations related to EV adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively plug-in electric vehicles) could fulfill the mission requirements. FVNHS identified three vehicles in its fleet for consideration. While the FVNHS vehicles conduct many different missions, only two (i.e., support and pool missions) were selected by agency management to be part of this fleet evaluation. The logged vehicles included a pickup truck and a minivan. This report will show that BEVs and PHEVs are capable of performing the required missions and providing an alternative vehicle for both mission categories, because each has sufficient range for individual trips and time available each day for charging to accommodate multiple trips per day. These charging events could occur at the vehicle’s home base, high-use work areas, or in intermediate areas along routes that the vehicles frequently travel. Replacement of vehicles in the current fleet would result in significant reductions in emission of greenhouse gases and petroleum use, while also reducing fuel costs. The Vancouver, Washington area and neighboring Portland, Oregon are leaders in adoption of PEVs in the United States1. PEV charging stations, or more appropriately identified as electric vehicle supply equipment, located on the FVNHS facility would be a benefit for both FVNHS fleets and general public use. Fleet drivers and park visitors operating privately owned plug-in electric vehicles benefit by using the charging infrastructure. ITSNA recommends location analysis of the FVNHS site to identify the optimal station placement for electric vehicle supply equipment. ITSNA recognizes the support of Idaho National Laboratory and ICF International for their efforts to initiate communication with the National Parks Service and FVNHS for participation in this study. ITSNA is pleased to provide this report and is encouraged by the high interest and support from the National Park Service and FVNHS personnel

  9. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for the National Park Service: Golden Gate National Recreation Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

    2014-03-01

    Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, managing and operating contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory, is the lead laboratory for U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing. Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC contracted with Intertek Testing Services, North America (ITSNA) to collect data on federal fleet operations as part of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity's Federal Fleet Vehicle Data Logging and Characterization study. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity study seeks to collect data to validate the utilization of advanced electric drive vehicle transportation. This report focuses on the Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) into the agencies' fleets. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements. GGNRA identified 182 vehicles in its fleet, which are under the management of the U.S. General Services Administration. Fleet vehicle mission categories are defined in Section 4, and while the GGNRA vehicles conduct many different missions, only two (i.e., support and law enforcement missions) were selected by agency management to be part of this fleet evaluation. The selected vehicles included sedans, trucks, and sport-utility vehicles. This report will show that battery electric vehicles and/or PHEVs are capable of performing the required missions and providing an alternative vehicle for support vehicles and PHEVs provide the same for law enforcement, because each has a sufficient range for individual trips and time is available each day for charging to accommodate multiple trips per day. These charging events could occur at the vehicle home base, high-use work areas, or intermediately along routes that the vehicles frequently travel. Replacement of vehicles in the current fleet would result in significant reductions in the emission of greenhouse gases and petroleum use, while also reducing fuel costs. The San Francisco Bay Area is a leader in the adoption of PEVs in the United States. PEV charging stations, or more appropriately identified as electric vehicle supply equipment, located on the GGNRA facility would be a benefit for both GGNRA fleets and general public use. Fleet drivers and park visitors operating privately owned PEVs benefit by using the charging infrastructure. ITSNA recommends location analysis of the GGNRA site to identify the optimal placement of the electric vehicle supply equipment station. ITSNA recognizes the support of Idaho National Laboratory and ICF International for their efforts to initiate communication with the National Parks Service and GGNRA for participation in the study. ITSNA is pleased to provide this report and is encouraged by the high interest and support from the National Park Service and GGNRA personnel.

  10. Strategic Plan for Coordinating Rural Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) Transit Development in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truett, L.F.

    2002-12-19

    The Great Smoky Mountains National Park, located along the border between North Carolina and Tennessee, is the most visited national park in the United States. This rugged, mountainous area presents many transportation challenges. The immense popularity of the Smokies and the fact that the primary mode of transportation within the park is the personal vehicle have resulted in congestion, damage to the environment, impacts on safety, and a degraded visitor experience. Access to some of the Smokies historical, cultural, and recreational attractions via a mass transit system could alleviate many of the transportation issues. Although quite a few organizations are proponents of a mass transit system for the Smokies, there is a lack of coordination among all parties. In addition, many local residents are not completely comfortable with the idea of transit in the Smokies. This document provides a brief overview of the current transportation needs and limitations in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, identifies agencies and groups with particular interests in the Smokies, and offers insights into the benefits of using Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) technologies in the Smokies. Recommendations for the use of rural ITS transit to solve two major transportation issues are presented.

  11. MINORITY EDUCATION THROUGH TRAVELING AND LEARNING IN THE SCIENCES (METALS) "Montana Dinosaur Trail Summer Field Trip"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    in Earth Science. The itinerary will include: A day in Yellowstone National Park exploring the geothermal

  12. Field Trip is sponsored by San Francisco State University and U.C. Berkley MINORITY EDUCATION THROUGH TRAVELING AND LEARNING IN THE SCIENCES (METALS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    in Earth Science. The itinerary will include: A day in Yellowstone National Park exploring the geothermal

  13. ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE published: 15 May 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -mail: binskeep@montana.edu Geothermal habitats in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an unparalleled opportu

  14. Accessible Parking Motorcycle Parking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanyes, Ollie

    Hartmann Center Comstock Hall Holmes Main Street Parking Deck Transitional Parking Lot Lovelace JobstNorth Accessible Parking Motorcycle Parking Visitors Commuter Student Resident Student Resident St & Staff University Vehicles © Bradley University · 06/18/14 Emergency Phone Parking Legend FIJI

  15. Orientation Parking Student Parking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Paul R.

    Orientation Parking Student Parking: The Student Parking Lot is located on the corner of Lockland Bridge, take the 1st left turn on to Lockland Avenue. The Student Parking Lot entrance on to Lockland Avenue (before I-40 Bridge). The Student Parking Lot entrance will be on the right. Once you have

  16. Clean Cities: Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition The Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce...

  17. Windshield Wilderness: Cars, Roads, and Nature in Washington’s National Parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Byron

    2006-01-01

    Review: Windshield Wilderness: Cars, Roads, and Nature inLouter. Windshield Wilderness: Cars, Roads, and Nature inpost-consumer waste. “Cars, not people, are the parks

  18. Occurrence and severity of foliar ozone symptoms on sensitive hardwood species in Shenandoah National Park, VA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hildebrand, E.; Skelly, J.M. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States))

    1993-02-01

    To assess the extent of foliar symptoms due to ozone on sensitive hardwoods in the Shenandoah National Park in Virginia, three species were sampled and evaluated at sites of differing elevations adjacent to 3 ozone monitors in 1991 and 1992: black cherry, yellow poplar, and white ash. All foliar samples were evaluated to precent of symptomatic leaves on each branch and average precent leaf area affected. The Horsfall-Barratt rating scale was used to estimate the precent leaf area symptomatic. Ozone symptoms were manifested as stipple on the adazial leaf surface. In the preliminary 1991 sampling, 40, 87, and 7% of black cherry trees sampled were found to be symptomatic at the 3 sites; 63 and 67% of yellow poplar trees sampled were found to be symptomatic at sites 1 and 3, as were 43 and 63% of the white ash at sites 1 and 2 (3 complete sets were not found in 1991). In 1992, the sampling and rating of injury were repeated. Symptoms of ozone injury appeared on 23, 88, and 10% of black cherry, on 17, 7, and 80% of yellow poplar, and 27, 40, and 40% of white ash. Elevation and ozone exposure will be discussed.

  19. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using toughreact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Salah, Sonia; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    fluid flow in the Yellowstone geothermal system, Wyoming.USA ABSTRACT The Yellowstone geothermal system provides anPrevious studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have

  20. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

    2003-01-01

    fluid flow in the Yellowstone geothermal system, Wyoming,ROCK INTERACTION IN THE YELLOWSTONE GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USINGGeyser Basin of the Yellowstone geothermal system, has been

  1. Assessment for National Park Candidate Area Using Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis: A case study from the Argyll Islands and Coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garoufalia, Christina

    2007-01-01

    This thesis outlines an assessment approach for national park designation purpose using Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis. The case study area is ‘Argyll Islands and Coast’ situated in west Scotland. Four different ...

  2. On the Border in Everglades and Dry Tortugas: Identifying Federal Law Enforcement Perspectives on Response to Cuban Immigrant Landings in South Florida's National Parks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentley, Amanda

    2012-10-19

    (ICE), and the National Park Service (NPS). Each agency has its own mission regarding immigration, and conflicts have emerged regarding responsibilities and responses to immigrant landings. The purpose of this study was to identify federal law...

  3. An Overview of Yellowstone Geologic Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and southwestern Montana. Located along the continental divide within the Middle Rocky Mountains, Yellowstone is on a high plateau averaging 8,000 feet in elevation. The mountain ranges that encircle Yellowstone vary from Mountains to the north; the Absaroka Mountains on the eastern border; and the Teton Range, within Grand

  4. Thermal infrared survey of Sunlight Basin, Park County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vice, D.H.; Crowley, J.P.; Vice, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    Thermal infrared surveys were flown over the Sunlight mining region and Sulphur Camp area of the Sunlight Basin to substantiate whether reported fumaroles are indicative of contemporary geothermal activity in the area. Thermal infrared imagery shows areas of warm ground along and warm water discharge into Sunlight Creek and Sulphur Lake. Sulphur deposits are found on north- and south-facing hill slopes associated with a second warm ground anomaly adjacent to Gas Creek. Warming is also manifested in the thermal characteristics of vegetation, and several fumaroles are identifiable. Aeromagnetic data show a 200 gamma low at Sulphur Camp which cannot be explained topographically. Major northeast-trending lineaments provide potential conduits for thermal fluids from the magma plume in Yellowstone National Park, 50 km (30 mi) to the southwest. The floor of the Yellowstone caldera is topographically higher and could provide the necessary hydraulic head to move the fluids outward. Other geothermal resources may exhibit the same characteristics. This example suggests that geothermal resources may occur at considerable distances from a heat source.

  5. Environmental Survey Report for ORNL: Small Mammal Abundance and Distribution Survey Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park 2009 - 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, Neil R; Reasor, R. Scott; Campbell, Claire L.

    2009-12-01

    This report summarizes a 1-year small mammal biodiversity survey conducted on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park (OR Research Park). The task was implemented through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Natural Resources Management Program and included researchers from the ORNL Environmental Sciences Division, interns in the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Higher Education Research Experiences Program, and ORNL Environmental Protection Services staff. Eight sites were surveyed reservation wide. The survey was conducted in an effort to determine species abundance and diversity of small mammal populations throughout the reservation and to continue the historical inventory of small mammal presence for biodiversity records. This data collection effort was in support of the approved Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation, a major goal of which is to maintain and enhance wildlife biodiversity on the Reservation. Three of the sites (Poplar Creek, McNew Hollow, and Deer Check Station Field) were previously surveyed during a major natural resources inventory conducted in 1996. Five new sites were included in this study: Bearden Creek, Rainy Knob (Natural Area 21), Gum Hollow, White Oak Creek and Melton Branch. The 2009-2010 small mammal surveys were conducted from June 2009 to July 2010 on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park (OR Research Park). The survey had two main goals: (1) to determine species abundance and diversity and (2) to update historical records on the OR Research Park. The park is located on the Department of Energy-owned Oak Ridge Reservation, which encompasses 13,580 ha. The primary focus of the study was riparian zones. In addition to small mammal sampling, vegetation and coarse woody debris samples were taken at certain sites to determine any correlations between habitat and species presence. During the survey all specimens were captured and released using live trapping techniques including Sherman and pitfall traps. In total 227 small mammals representing nine species were captured during the course of the study. The most common species found in the study was the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus). The least common species found were the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius), woodland vole (Microtus pinetorum), and northern short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda).

  6. THE REGIONAL INTEGRATION OF PROTECTED AREAS: A STUDY OF CANADA'S NATIONAL PARKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Dan

    of the park region. The second section of the chapter lists and reviews several documents gathered-electric dams, is a major geographical feature of the MR&GNP region. The Revelstoke Dam is located three

  7. Effects of Podcast Tours on Tourists' Experiences in a National Park 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Myung Hwa

    2011-02-22

    This dissertation examines the effect of podcast tours on park visitor experiences. Podcast tours have emerged as a new medium in facilitating the interaction between tourists and destinations. Providing visitors with ...

  8. Smart Parking on Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald C

    2007-01-01

    3 Parking Anxiety . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Parking Cash Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Honest Parking . . . . .

  9. Ecological risk assessment of elemental pollution in sediment from Tunku Abdul Rahman National Park, Sabah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elias, Md Suhaimi; Hamzah, Mohd Suhaimi; Rahman, Shamsiah Ab; Salim, Nazaratul Ashifa Abdullah; Siong, Wee Boon; Sanuri, Ezwiza

    2014-02-12

    Eleven (11) surface sediment samples were collected from Tunku Abdul Rahman National Park, Sabah. The neutron activation analysis (NAA) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) techniques were applied for the determinations metal contents and their distributions in sediment samples. The results shown that Arsenic (As) concentrations are enriched at all sampling stations except for station TAR 09, with enrichment factor (EF) values ranged from 1.1 to 7.2. The elements such as Cd, Cr, Sb and U showed enrichment at a few stations and other elements (Cr, Cu, Pb, Th, Zn) shown as background levels in all stations. Degrees of contamination in this study were calculated base on concentrations of six elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn). TAR 11 station can be categorized as very high degree of contamination with degree of contamination value of 43.2. TAR 07 station can be categorized as a considerable degree of contamination (contamination value of 16.9). Six stations (TAR 01, 03, 04, 05, 06, 08, 10) showed moderate degree of contamination, with contamination values ranging from 8.0 to 16.0. TAR 02 and TAR 09 stations showed low degree of contaminations (< 8.0). TAR 11 showed very high ecological risk index (R{sub I}) with RI value is 916. TAR 07 and TAR 10 showed moderate ecological risk index with R{sub I} value 263 and 213, respectively. Other stations showed low ecological risk with RI values ranging from 42.3 to 117 (< 150). Very high ecological risk index could give an adverse effect to the benthic organism. The data obtained from the enrichment factor, degree of contamination and ecological risk index provided vital information, which can be used for future comparison. Information from the present study will be useful to the relevant government agencies and authorities in preparing preventive action to control direct discharge of heavy metals from industries, agro-base activities and domestic waste to the rivers and the sea.

  10. Isotopic dating of Lava Creek B tephra in terrace deposits along the Wind River, Wyoming--Implications for post 0. 6 Ma uplift of the Yellowstone hotspot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izett, G.A.; Pierce, K.L.; Naeser, N.D. (U.S.G.S., Denver, CO (United States)); Jaworowski, C. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1992-01-01

    Along the Wind River near Kinnear (Pavillon quadrangle), a meter-thick tephra layer occurs near the middle of a main-stem gravel deposit about 100 m above the river. On Muddy Ridge 25 km east of Kinnear, a Lava Creek B tephra layer occurs at the base of a terrace deposit about 100 m above Muddy Creek. Another Lava Creek B tephra site 67 km northwest and upstream from Kinnear occurs within main-stem gravels of a terrace deposit 145 m above the river. This upstream increase of 45 m of the tephra horizon raises the concern that the two tephra layers might not be of the same age. All three tephras contain the same assemblage of phenocrysts as that in the Lava Creek Tuff, Member B in Yellowstone National Park and the Lava Creek B volcanic ash bed of the Western U.S., and therefore they are arguably correlatives. The authors confirmed this petrographic correlation by isotopic dating of sanidine crystals recovered from cm-size pumice lapilli in the Kinnear tephra and from coarse-grained tephra at the Muddy Creek site. Laser total-fusion Ar-40-Ar-39 ages of sanidine from the two sites are coeval, 0.66[plus minus]0.01 Ma and 0.67[plus minus]0.01 Ma at Muddy Creek. Conventional K-Ar dating of sanidine from the tephra at the Cl453 site resulted in an age of 0.60[plus minus]0.02 Ma. Glass-mantled zircon crystals from the Cl453 site yielded a fission-track age of 0.67[plus minus]0.16 Ma. These isotopic ages are compatible with conventional K-Ar, Ar-40-Ar-39, and fission-track ages of the Lava Creek Tuff, Member B in Yellowstone National Park and other occurrences of Lava Creek B ash beds. The authors suggest that the terrace deposit that contains the Lava Creek B tephra rises from the Kinnear site northwest up the Wind River as a result of Quaternary uplift in the area of the Yellowstone hotspot.

  11. Porosity, permeability and fluid flow in the YellowstoneGeothermal System, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Hulen, Jeffrey; Simmons, Ardyth

    2002-03-29

    Cores from two of 13 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research holes at Yellowstone National Park (Y-5 and Y-8) were evaluated to characterize lithology, texture, alteration, and the degree and nature of fracturing and veining. Porosity and matrix permeability measurements and petrographic examination of the cores were used to evaluate the effects of lithology and hydrothermal alteration on porosity and permeability. The intervals studied in these two core holes span the conductive zone and the upper portion of the convective geothermal reservoir. Variations in porosity and matrix permeability observed in the Y-5 and Y-8 cores are primarily controlled by lithology. Y-8 intersects three distinct lithologies: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous ash-flow tuff. The sandstone typically has high permeability and porosity, and the tuff has very high porosity and moderate permeability, while the perlitic lava has very low porosity and is essentially impermeable. Hydrothermal self-sealing appears to have generated localized permeability barriers within the reservoir. Changes in pressure and temperature in Y-8 correspond to a zone of silicification in the volcaniclastic sandstone just above the contact with the perlitic rhyolite; this silicification has significantly reduced porosity and permeability. In rocks with inherently low matrix permeability (such as densely welded ash-flow tuff), fluid flow is controlled by the fracture network. The Y-5 core hole penetrates a thick intracaldera section of the0.6 Ma Lava Creek ash-flow tuff. In this core, the degree of welding appears to be responsible for most of the variations in porosity, matrix permeability, and the frequency of fractures and veins. Fractures are most abundant within the more densely welded sections of the tuff. However, the most prominent zones of fracturing and mineralization are associated with hydrothermal breccias within densely welded portions of the tuff. These breccia zones represent transient conduits of high fluid flow that formed by the explosive release of overpressure in the underlying geothermal reservoir and that were subsequently sealed by supersaturated geothermal fluids. In addition to this fracture sealing, hydrothermal alteration at Yellowstone appears generally to reduce matrix permeability and focus flow along fractures, where multiple pulses of fluid flow and self-sealing have occurred.

  12. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Yellowstone Region (Chatterjee...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Yellowstone Region (Chatterjee, Et Al., 1985) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellowstone Park Recycles Vehicle Batteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropane Texas LawCasefor Solar Power

  14. Commercial Vehicle Parking In California: Exploratory Evaluation of the Problem and Possible Technology-Based Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodier, Caroline J.; Shaheen, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Dealing with Truck Parking Demands. National CooperativeAdequacy of Commercial Truck Parking Facilities – TechnicalAdequacy of Commercial Truck Parking Facilities – Technical

  15. Site design for a neighborhood-scale stormwater detention park in the proposed Los Angeles River National Urban Wildlife Refuge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaffney, Kathryn; Mei, Angie Anchi

    2004-01-01

    March 1993. California Stormwater Best Management PracticeInnovative Solutions for Stormwater and Stream Crossings.for a Neighborhood-Scale Stormwater Detention Park in the

  16. Using geographic information system (GIS) technology to study the impacts of roads on Canada’s national parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seaby, Michael; Rivard, Don

    2003-01-01

    GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM (GIS) TECHNOLOGY TO STUDY THElevel, Parks Canada employs GIS to support reporting on thedevelopment as an indicator. GIS is a critical technology

  17. EA-1975: LINAC Coherent Light Source-Il, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE prepared an EA on the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to upgrade the existing LINAC Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The proposed LCLS-II would extend the photon energy range, increase control over photon pulses, and enable two-color pump-probe experiments. The X-ray laser beams generated by LCLS-II would enable a new class of experiments: the simultaneous investigation of a material’s electronic and structural properties.

  18. Alameda Park 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    ...................................................................................................................................................24 Main Industries and Major Employers ..................................................................................................26 4. Land Use... .......................................................................................................................... 158 Introduction ................................................................................................................................................ 158 Vehicular Parking...

  19. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using toughreact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Salah, Sonia; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    in the Yellowstone geothermal system, Wyoming. Journal ofMuffler, L.J.P (Eds. ), Geothermal Systems: Principles andrhyolite in an active geothermal system: Yellowstone drill

  20. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for the National Park Service: Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

    2014-11-01

    This report focuses on the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (SLBE) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) into the agencies’ fleets. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively plug-in electric vehicles, or PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements.

  1. Free Parking Free Parking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hering, Milena

    Advisory & Counselling Service, FUSION P Car park P P P PP P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P FUSION Centre UK Biochar Research Centre Estates Electrical substation Estates Crew labs Biospace building SAC Biochemistry Fleeming Jenkin Building Electrical Engineering Labs and Workshop Block Alexander Graham Bell

  2. Identification of source contributions to visibility-reducing organic aerosols in the vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park. Interim final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazurek, M.A.; Hallock, K.A.; Leach, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Mason-Jones, M.; Mason-Jones, H.; Salmon, L.G.; Winner, D.A.; Cass, G.R. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Engineering Science

    1993-06-01

    Sulfates and carbonaceous aerosols are the largest contributors to the fine particle burden in the atmosphere near Grand Canyon National Park. While the effects of sulfate particles on visibility at the Grand Canyon has been extensively studied, much less is known about the nature and origin of the carbonaceous aerosols that are present. This disparity in understanding arises from at least two causes: aerosol carbon data for the region are less plentiful and many of the sources that could contribute to that organic aerosol are both diverse and not well characterized. The objective of this present study is to examine the origin of the carbonaceous aerosol at Grand Canyon National Park during the summer season based on molecular tracer techniques applied to source and ambient samples collected specifically for this purpose.

  3. Processes Influencing the Diversity of Middle Permian Brachiopods in the Bell Canyon Formation of the Delaware Basin (West Texas, Guadalupe Mountains National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fall, Leigh Margaret

    2011-10-21

    INFLUENCING THE DIVERSITY OF MIDDLE PERMIAN BRACHIOPODS IN THE BELL CANYON FORMATION OF THE DELAWARE BASIN (WEST TEXAS, GUADALUPE MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK) A Dissertation by LEIGH MARGARET FALL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies... of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2010 Major Subject: Geology PROCESSES INFLUENCING THE DIVERSITY OF MIDDLE PERMIAN BRACHIOPODS IN THE BELL CANYON FORMATION...

  4. High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    differences in rock composition, types and degree of alteration, and crustal structures that mirror the variable geology of the Yellowstone Plateau. The older, Eocene,...

  5. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Goff ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not...

  6. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Yellowstone Region (Hellman ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near...

  7. Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of magma beneath the Yellowstone caldera. Authors Stephan Husen, Robert B. Smith and Gregory P. Waite Published Journal Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research,...

  8. Yellowstone Valley Electric Cooperative- Residential/Commercial Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Yellowstone Valley Electric Cooperative offers rebates to residential and commercial members for purchasing energy efficient add-on heat pumps, geothermal heat pumps, water heaters, dishwashers...

  9. Exploration And Discovery In Yellowstone Lake- Results From High...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    And Discovery In Yellowstone Lake- Results From High-Resolution Sonar Imaging, Seismic Reflection Profiling, And Submersible Studies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  10. Hydrogen and bioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Hydrogen and bioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem John R. Spear*, Jeffrey J of organisms of the kinds that derive energy for primary productivity from the oxidation of molecular hydrogen of energy for primary production in the Yellowstone high-temperature ecosys- tem. Hydrogen concentrations

  11. Identification of Novel Positive-Strand RNA Viruses by Metagenomic Analysis of Archaea-Dominated Yellowstone Hot Springs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin Bolduc; Daniel P. Shaughnessy; Yuri I. Wolf; Eugene V. Koonin; Francisco F. Roberto; Mark Young

    2012-05-01

    There are no known RNA viruses that infect Archaea. Filling this gap in our knowledge of viruses will enhance our understanding of the relationships between RNA viruses from the three domains of cellular life and, in particular, could shed light on the origin of the enormous diversity of RNA viruses infecting eukaryotes. We describe here the identification of novel RNA viral genome segments from high-temperature acidic hot springs in Yellowstone National Park in the United States. These hot springs harbor low-complexity cellular communities dominated by several species of hyperthermophilic Archaea. A viral metagenomics approach was taken to assemble segments of these RNA virus genomes from viral populations isolated directly from hot spring samples. Analysis of these RNA metagenomes demonstrated unique gene content that is not generally related to known RNA viruses of Bacteria and Eukarya. However, genes for RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), a hallmark of positive-strand RNA viruses, were identified in two contigs. One of these contigs is approximately 5,600 nucleotides in length and encodes a polyprotein that also contains a region homologous to the capsid protein of nodaviruses, tetraviruses, and birnaviruses. Phylogenetic analyses of the RdRps encoded in these contigs indicate that the putative archaeal viruses form a unique group that is distinct from the RdRps of RNA viruses of Eukarya and Bacteria. Collectively, our findings suggest the existence of novel positive-strand RNA viruses that probably replicate in hyperthermophilic archaeal hosts and are highly divergent from RNA viruses that infect eukaryotes and even more distant from known bacterial RNA viruses. These positive-strand RNA viruses might be direct ancestors of RNA viruses of eukaryotes.

  12. Parking, People, and Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manville, Michael; Shoup, Donald

    2006-01-01

    are disregarded. The parking lot is where we stop thinkingthe car, however, the parking lot is the destination, anda building and its parking lot separately, but parking

  13. Smart Parking on Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald C

    2007-01-01

    for campus parking. SMART PARKING ON CAJVIPUS ADMINISTEREDSMART PARKING ON CAMPUS Donald Shoup Department of Urban41 SMART PARKING ON CAMPUS Donald Shoup Few institutions are

  14. Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton Jump to:Wylie, Texas: EnergyYBR Solar JumpYasudaYellowstone

  15. ROOST SELECTION BY RAFINESQUE'S BIG-EARED BATS (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) IN CONGAREE NATIONAL PARK A MULTISCALE APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jodice, Patrick

    logistic regression to compare tree, stand, and landscape characteristics of roosts to those of randomly roosts, and 2 that were used by both group types). The logistic regression analysis indicated that tree. In particular, to Bill Hulslander, Theresa Yednock, Theresa Thom, and the park maintenance staff for all

  16. ParkingEducation Week Parking DisabledParking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    PARKING Direct shuttle service from the West Stadium Lot to the WSC and to the Marriott Center between the perimeter parking lots and the main cam- pus at regular intervals . large detailed mapsSAB IPF Education Week ParkingEducation Week Parking Education Week Parking Education Week Parking

  17. West Virginia University Geology 404, Geology Field Camp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammer, Thomas

    .geo.wvu.edu/~kammer/geol404.htm Format: Five weeks of geologic field work in the Northern Rocky Mountains. Field areas, Wyoming, Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park, and Southwest will include the Black Hills, Big Horn Mountains, Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park

  18. Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    against a direct link between the Yellowstone hotspot and the initiation of extension, casting additional doubt on the role of the hotspot in extension across the broader Basin and...

  19. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Kennedy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DOE-funding Unknown References B. M. Kennedy, M. A. Lynch, J. H. Reynolds, S. P. Smith (1985) Intensive Sampling Of Noble Gases In Fluids At Yellowstone- I, Early Overview...

  20. What is Minimum Impact Research? John R. Spear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    minimum impact Yellowstone National Park 2 GEOTHERMAL BIOLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY IN YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL.735.1808 Fax: 303.492.7744 Email: spearj@colorado.edu 1 #12;Key Words conservation geothermal leave no trace Yellowstone National Park, for example. Other impacts--grazing, logging, mining, drilling and loss

  1. Forrestal Garage Parking Guidelines February 2015.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to DOE Federal employees, including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Federal employees, parking at DOE Headquarters in the Forrestal Building. Requirements...

  2. Microsoft Word - Renew the Parks.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cost of PV systems was the biggest concern. To overcome this barrier, the National Park Service will have to form partnerships with other agencies and groups. Potential...

  3. Environmental Assessment for Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico - Final Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1997-10-07

    As part of its initiative to fulfill its responsibilities to provide support for the incorporated County of Los Alamos (the County) as an Atomic Energy Community, while simultaneously fulfilling its obligations to enhance the self-sufficiency of the County under authority of the Atomic Energy Community Act of 1955 and the Defense Authorization Act, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to lease undeveloped land in Los Alamos, New Mexico, to the County for private sector use as a research park. The Proposed Action is intended to accelerate economic development activities within the County by creating regional employment opportunities through offering federal land for private sector lease and use. As a result of the proposed land lease, any government expenditures for providing infrastructure to the property would be somewhat supplemented by tenant purchase of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) expertise in research and development activities. The presence of a research park within LANL boundaries is expected to allow private sector tenants of the park to be able to quickly and efficiently call upon LANL scientific expertise and facility and equipment capabilities as part of their own research operations and LANL research personnel, in turn, would be challenged in areas complementary to their federally funded research. In this way a symbiotic relationship would be enjoyed by both parties while simultaneously promoting economic development for the County through new job opportunities at the Research Park and at LANL, new indirect support opportunities for the community at large, and through payment of the basic building space leases. A ''sliding-scale'' approach (DOE 1993) is the basis for the analysis of effects in this Environmental Assessment (EA). That is, certain aspects of the Proposed Action have a greater potential for creating adverse environmental effects than others; therefore, they are discussed in greater detail in this EA than those aspects of the action that have little potential for effect. The Proposed Action would result in an increase of as many as 1,500 new direct jobs and, as many as 2,565 indirect jobs could be created from the development of a research park. Lease of the tract would not reduce the size of LANL or change its site boundary. However, approximately 30 ac (12 ha) of a 60-ac (24-ha) tract would be changed from an undeveloped to a developed status. Under the No Action Alternative, no transfer or lease of Federal lands would occur. LANL would not have the benefit of its research personnel working on a variety of complementary research efforts beyond their federally funded responsibilities. No new jobs would be created from proposed development activities. Undeveloped lands would remain in their current condition. Two hypothetical accidents were analyzed that evaluated a potential chemical release and radiological doses to the public from hypothetical accidents at the proposed Research Park. Neither accident scenario resulted in potentially serious health effects for workers or the public at the proposed Research Park. The cumulative effects of the Proposed Action as well as reasonably foreseeable related actions could result in potential adverse health effects. Environmental effects would be limited to the loss of a small amount of wildlife habitat. Additional economic development would be expected to occur.

  4. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

    2003-01-01

    borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal

  5. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using toughreact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Salah, Sonia; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY Phototrophic Phylotypes Dominate Mesothermal Microbial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    survey of Yellowstone microbial mats. Introduction Geothermal features in Yellowstone National Park (YNP with Hot Springs in Yellowstone National Park Kimberly A. Ross & Leah M. Feazel & Charles E. Robertson+Business Media, LLC 2012 Abstract The mesothermal outflow zones (50­65°C) of geothermal springs often support

  7. Parking Reform Made Easy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    decide to adopt lower parking requirements, or to eliminateeconomic goals may embrace parking deregulation because itEngineers. 2010. Parking Generation, 4th Edition, Washington

  8. Curbside Parking Time Limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnott, Richard; Rowse, John

    2009-01-01

    J. Rowse. 1999. Modeling parking. Journal of Urban Economicsand J. Rowse. 2009. Downtown parking in auto city. RegionalThe economics of pricing parking. Journal of Urban Economics

  9. Parking by Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin Holliday

    2004-01-01

    to expand Carolyn H. Krasnow, Walker Parking Consultants. “Parking OccupancyStudy Update: Parking District 1, Prepared for the City of

  10. Cruising for Parking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald

    2007-01-01

    cruise. Because its curb parking is underpriced, Westwoodyear. And because its curb parking is value-priced, Redwoodthe right price for curb parking and spend the resulting

  11. People, Parking, and Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manville, Michael; Shoup, Donald

    2004-01-01

    Trouble with Minimum Parking Requirements,” TransportationThe High Cost of Free Parking, forthcoming from The Plannerslimit rather than require parking. Perhaps the simplest and

  12. Curbside Parking Time Limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnott, Richard; Rowse, John

    2011-01-01

    J. Rowse. 1999. Modeling parking. Journal of Urban Economicsand J. Rowse. 2009. Downtown parking in auto city. RegionalThe economics of pricing parking. Journal of Urban Economics

  13. Origin and deformation of Holocene shoreline terraces, Yellowstone Lake, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, G.A.; Locke, W.W.

    1986-08-01

    Geodetic surveys within the Yellowstone caldera have documented active uplift that is most likely caused by magmatic processes in the upper crust. Along the northeast shore of Yellowstone Lake, maximum relative uplift rates are 10 mm/yr for the period 1923-1975. However, information on deformation prior to historic instrumental records has been lacking. In this study, closely spaced data on elevations of postglacial shoreline terraces around the north end of Yellowstone Lake reveal complex tilting. Though most Holocene deformation is probably magma related, the pattern of shoreline tilting deviates significantly from the historic pattern of roughly symmetric inflation of the caldera. Along the northeast shore, where tilt directions of historic and shoreline deformation are similar, differential uplift of a > 2500-yr-old terrace is roughly 10 m; this gives a maximum uplift rate of 4 mm/yr. These unique Holocene terraces may exist due to episodic deformation because vertical movements affecting the lake outlet directly control lake level.

  14. Exploring the impact of a growing market for woodfuel on sustainable forest management in the Cairngorms National Park 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Georgie

    2014-11-27

    of wood as fuel have been enshrined in renewable energy and climate change related policies at European, national and local levels and the benefits of producing woodfuel are being espoused by a raft of organisations within the forestry and land management...

  15. Mantle transition zone topography and structure beneath the Yellowstone hotspot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dueker, Ken

    Mantle transition zone topography and structure beneath the Yellowstone hotspot David Fee and Ken ± 1.6 km, with 36­40 km of peak to peak topography. This topography is spatially uncorrelated, providing no evidence for a lower mantle plume currently beneath the hotspot. The topography suggests

  16. PARKING MAP Sales Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    PARKING MAP BayDr. Main Entrance Parking Sales Office Main Entrance Kiosk East Remote Lot Parking Transit Stop Traffic Signal PARTIAL OR FULL LOT CLOSURE Stevenson Lot 110 Crown Lot 111 Merrill student parking C--close-in parking for undergraduate students (lot-specific) EV--charging for electric

  17. visitor parking rice village

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aazhang, Behnaam

    H West Lot 5 Founder's Court Visitor Lot visitor parking faculty, staff, student, contract parking's court John and Anne Grove visitor parking North Lot N Bike Track MEMORIAL HERMANN AT 6400 FANNIN ST Accessible Parking Parking Lots: APB Alice Pratt Brown Hall Lot B Baker College­Housing & Dining Lot BG

  18. Cruising for Parking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald C.

    2006-01-01

    travel as related to local parking. in: Proceedings of theshort-term on-street parking. Socio-Economic PlanningThe High Cost of Free Parking. Planners Press, Chicago.

  19. Parking, People, and Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manville, Michael; Shoup, Donald

    2006-01-01

    R. ?1998?. “The downtown parking syndrome: Does curing the?1966?. Transportation and parking for to- morrow’s cities;C. ?1940?. “Off-street parking: A city planning problem. ”

  20. Parking Without Paying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manville, Michael; Williams, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Exemption and Market-Priced Parking,” originally publishedParking without Paying MICHAEL MANVILLE AND J O N AT H A N WChicago famously leased its parking meters to a private

  1. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

    2003-01-01

    in the Yellowstone geothermal system, Wyoming, Jour. Volcan.engineering, In: Geothermal Systems: Principles and Caserhyolite in an active geothermal system: Yellow- stone drill

  2. English Country Dance 2015 Parking in Oak Park

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Parking in Oak Park Due to major construction, parking for the Oak Park dances is a bit challenging, so please allow yourself a little more time and patience. Below are parking...

  3. Experiencing the Park: Values, Perceptions and Expectations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bielby, Paul

    2012-08-31

    user groups experience the Cairngorms National Park. With a primary focus on hill walkers that climb the area’s many hills, and using qualitative interviews and ethnographic methods, the study, therefore, investigates the values, experiences...

  4. The Separation of Thermal and Chemical Effects in Evaluating Geothermal Influences on Aquatic Biota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resh, Vincent H; Lamberti, Gary A; McElravy, Eric P; Wood, John R

    1983-01-01

    River (Yellowstone Park) below geothermal effluents.geothermal habitats been most intensively studied in Yellowstone

  5. Montana State University College of Arts and Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    and Architecture School of Architecture Outreach and Engagement 2012 Folding Fun With Bucky's Dymaxion Map! www Integrated Design Lab Yellowstone National Park Design Charrettes Sustaining Kukaiau Ranch: Architectural

  6. Publications | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Renewable Energy in Federal Construction Renewable Energy Document Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station, Yellowstone National Park Renewable...

  7. Marti Ayers From: Sent: To: Subject:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    underneath Yellowstone National Park ever had another massive eruption, it could spew ash for thousands of miles across the United States, damaging buildings, smothering crops,...

  8. Student Parking Faculty/Staff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    A Student Parking LOT K Student Parking LOT B Faculty/Staff Parking LOT C Fac/Staff Parking LOT F Student Parking LOT H Student Parking LOT J Faculty/Staff Parking LOT G Student Parking LOT D Visitor/Staff Parking LOT E Fac/Staff/Visitor Parking U N I V E R S I T Y D R U N I V ER SITY DR S U S Q U E H A N N A B

  9. PARKING MAP Sales Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    PARKING MAP BayDr. Main Entrance Parking Sales Office Main Entrance Kiosk East Remote Lot for details DMV Parking Transit Stop Traffic Signal PARTIAL OR FULL LOT CLOSURE Crown Lot 111 Kresge Lot 147M--close-in parking for undergraduate students (lot-specific) EV--charging for electric vehicles MC

  10. Manhattan Project National Historical Park

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department, as the direct descendent of the Manhattan Engineer District, owns and manages the Federal properties at most of the major Manhattan Project sites, including Oak Ridge, Tennessee;...

  11. CHARTER NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PARKS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &Bradbury Science Museum6 Shares1-0005-000CD ....

  12. Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission...

  13. The Practice of Parking Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald C.

    2006-01-01

    of the developers' desire to provide more parking. 2.Put all their parking underground.3. Reduce parking demand before they are allowed to increase

  14. THE ACCESS ALMANAC - Parking Charity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald

    2014-01-01

    1243–1248. Eric Klein. 2010. “Parking Holiday Approved for8. Brandon Mathis. 2013. “Free Parking Downtown Not Loved byto Offer Free Downtown Parking for Two Weeks before

  15. In Lieu of Required Parking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald C.

    2001-01-01

    1997. Stadium Expansion Parking Plan and TransportationR. , and H . Levinson. 1990. Parking, Westport, Conn. : EnoWillson, R. 1995. Suburban parking requirements: A tacit

  16. Smarter Parking at Transit Stations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Kemmerer, Charlene

    2007-01-01

    The High Cost of Free Parking (Chicago, Illinois: Americanand Amanda Eaken. Smart Parking Management Field Test: A BayTransit (BART) District Parking Demonstration—Phase One

  17. Are TODs Over-Parked?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervero, Robert; Adkins, Arlie; Sullivan, Cathleen

    2009-01-01

    J. and Bianco, M. 1997. Parking Policies and CommutingThe High Cost of Free Parking. Chicago: Planner’s Press.Between the Regulations : Parking Requirements, Planners'

  18. Free Parking or Free Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald

    2011-01-01

    realize that minimum parking requirements were a poisonedchalice, providing ample free parking while hiding the manyThe High Cost of Free Parking, revised edition, Chicago:

  19. A COMPILATION OF DATA ON FLUIDS FROM GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosner, S.R.

    2010-01-01

    Yellowstone National Park, however, was omitted because exploitation of the geothermalGEOTHERMAL FIELD. FENNER ::6 TITLE- BORE-HOLE INVESTIGATIONS IN YELLOWSTONEYELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS. REFERENCE- SELECTED DATA ON WATER WEllS, GEOTHERMAL

  20. Selected Parking Types Resident Parking,Permit Required

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Lot Night/Weekend Restricted Permit Area 10 Minute Parking,No Permit Required Parkmobile Pay-by-Cell Parking Lot North Campus B Lot Sage Hall Campus-to-Campus Stops A B C ©2013This map replaces previous Selected Parking Types Resident Parking,Permit Required Commuter Parking,Permit Required Metered Parking

  1. University Parking & Transportation Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portman, Douglas

    for that day. #12;3-D (Three Deep) parking in Lot 1 accommodates approximately 1/3 more vehicles in a parking. There will be Parking Attendants overseeing Lot 1 Monday through Friday, to assist parkers into the lot, move Row 1 vehicles when necessary and monitor the lot. What Is 3-D Parking? Row 2 & 3 ParkersRow 1 Parkers Row 2

  2. PARKING AND BACKING BASICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    PARKING AND BACKING BASICS BACK TO BASICS: YOUR KEYS TO SAFE DRIVING DRIVE SAFELY WORK WEEK in parking lots. Safe parking and backing is an important basic for all driver groups to master. GET BASICS GOT KIDS OR GRANDKIDS? ·It is estimated that backing over pedestrians causes 45% of non- traffic

  3. GIScience & Remote Sensing, 2012, 49, No. 3, p. 317345. http://dx.doi.org/10.2747/1548-1603.49.3.317 Copyright 2012 by Bellwether Publishing, Ltd. All rights reserved.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    . INTRODUCTION Geothermal features are one of the main reasons that Yellowstone National Park (YNP of geothermal features. The GHF in the Yellowstone region is approximately 2 Wm­2 , which is roughly 40 times.2747/1548-1603.49.3.317 Copyright © 2012 by Bellwether Publishing, Ltd. All rights reserved. Analyzing Change in Yellowstone

  4. Aquificales Synechococcus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konhauser, Kurt

    ;132 GEOTHERMAL BIOLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY IN YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK132 GEOTHERMAL BIOLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY) was noted by the California phycologist, W.A. Setchell. In Setchell's unpublished manuscript on YellowstoneRNA tree of the domain Bacteria, showing the position of the order Aquificales. Aquificales in Yellowstone

  5. Recording the Nation: Folk Music and the Government in Roosevelt’s New Deal, 1936–1941

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Val-Kill Industries” National Park Service website, http://National Park Services website for Val-Kill Industries, Val-National Park Service website about Val-Kill Industries, “At

  6. A Test for Airborne Dispersal of Thermophilic Bacteria from Hot Springs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fouke, Bruce W.

    colonization Mammoth Hot Springs thermophile 2 GEOTHERMAL BIOLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY IN YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK Hot Springs complex of Yellowstone National Park. The trapped steam was analyzed for the presence exist between hot springs in close proximity to each other, even springs within a particular geothermal

  7. Ecology, 92(6), 2011, pp. 12921302 2011 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohr, Jason

    of dispersal and thermal environment for mycorrhizal communities: lessons from Yellowstone National Park YLVA of the root-symbiont arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) by sampling roots from geothermal and nonthermal grasslands in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), followed by sequencing and RFLP of AMF ribosomal DNA

  8. Real-time Remote Sensing of Snowmobiles Emissions at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Real-time Remote Sensing of Snowmobiles Emissions at Yellowstone National Park: An Oxygenated Fuel 68509 #12;Real-time Remote Sensing of Snowmobile Emissions at Yellowstone National Park 2 Executive emissions from snowmobiles. Ratios of CO, HC and toluene to CO2 were measured and used to calculate %CO, %HC

  9. A Novel Kingdom of Parasitic Archaea Karl O. Stetter1,2* | Michael J. Hohn1 | Harald Huber1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    ;250 GEOTHERMAL BIOLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY IN YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK Key Words ABSTRACT A nano-sized obligate parasite phylogeny 16S rDNA #12;A Novel Kingdom of Parasitic Archaea 251 1.0 INTRODUCTION More than 30 years ago, in his pioneering work in Yellowstone National Park, Tom Brock discovered Sulfolobus

  10. Urban Parks: Constraints on Park Visitation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, David

    2006-12-19

    Research shows that women, older people, members of some ethnic groups, and people with low educational and income levels are less likely than others to participate in leisure activities or visit parks. This publication explores the constraints...

  11. OVERFLOWLOTPublicParking Savannah Visitor Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    OVERFLOWLOTPublicParking Savannah Visitor Information Center Parking Lot PARKING FEES APPLY UPPERLOT ParkingParking for patrons in the Coastal Georgia Center Parking lots is free, and a parking pass is not needed. If the upper and lower Coastal Georgia Center parking lots are full, free parking is available

  12. DOI: 10.1126/science.1156630 , 1067 (2008);320Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    2008-01-01

    . Park, Y. H. Jeong, J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 82, 927 (1999). 31. W. P. Inskeep, T. R. McDermott, Geothermal Biology and Geochemistry in Yellowstone National Park (Thermal Biology Institute, Bozeman, MT, 2003). 32

  13. Handicapped Parking Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Headquarters Handicapped Parking Procedures It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) that its parking facility be operated in a manner responsive to the needs of the Department, and for the maximum benefit of its employees. Individuals with temporary or permanent mobility impairment who, because of their condition, have a need to request a handicapped parking permit for the Forrestal or Germantown facilities, should use the following procedures

  14. Moongyu Park's Recent Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... S. Yoo and M.Park) "Analyzing the Propagation of Network Multi-Malwares Worm attack considering security countermeasure", Cyber Security and Information ...

  15. The Practice of Parking Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald C.

    2006-01-01

    for churches and parking lots that replaced buildings onceThe full cost of the parking lot is incurred to serve a fewbuilt have supersize parking lots that are asphalt eyesores,

  16. SFpark: Pricing Parking by Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Gregory; Shoup, Donald

    2013-01-01

    to think about the price of parking just as they now thinkrepairs, and car purchases. Parking will become a part ofthe right occupancy for curb parking, almost everyone will

  17. The Price of Unwanted Parking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manville, Michael; Shoup, Donald

    2010-01-01

    02.pdf. The full report, “Parking requirements as a barrier02 The Price of Unwanted Parking Michael Manville and Donalda city requires on-site parking for all new housing, housing

  18. Parking Infrastructure and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Aprad; Madanat, Samer

    2011-01-01

    understand the full cost of parking. ? Nicholas Santero andLY L I T T L E A B O U T how parking infrastructure affectsBecause abundant free parking encourages solo driving and

  19. SUSTAINABLE PARKS, RECREATION and TOURISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUSTAINABLE PARKS, RECREATION and TOURISM A bachelor's degree program in Sustainable Parks · Convention and visitors bureaus · Amusement parks · Cruise ships · Marina management Study Abroad in educational and social activities related to sustainability, food and environmental stewardship. Visit rise

  20. EA-1212: Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to lease undeveloped land that is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, to...

  1. ConstitutionAve. CityParkAve.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yongcheng

    ConstitutionAve. CityParkAve. SkylineDr. West Plum St. West Elizabeth St. International House 1400 Environmental Research Center Greenhouse Animal Sciences Morgan Library Natural Resources Lagoon Arthur Ditch Center A College Avenue Gym Field House National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation Alder Hall

  2. Cryogenic opal-A deposition from Yellowstone hot springs Alan Channing a,, Ian B. Butler b,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cryogenic opal-A deposition from Yellowstone hot springs Alan Channing a,, Ian B. Butler b,1 Sub-zero winter temperatures on the Yellowstone Plateau alter the opal-A precipitation pathway, contains abundant opal-A particles, comprising sheet and filament- like aggregations of opal-A microspheres

  3. (405) 325-3311 PARKING FACTSOU Parking Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    Facility. · If your class begins between 10 a.m. and noon, plan to park in one of the parking lots further out. With 847 spaces, the Duck Pond parking lot south of Brooks Street is always a good choice to familiarize yourself with available lots before arriving on campus. · OU Parking Services is a self

  4. Hye-Sook Park

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    physicist Dr. Youichi Sakawa (left), Hye-Sook Park, and alignment operator Daren Hart prepare for an experiment in the NIF Control Room. The experiment was in support of an...

  5. Landscaping and Parking Renovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Renovations to Federal facility landscaping and parking areas can provide opportunities for several renewable energy options, including geothermal heat pumps (GHP), solar water heating, photovoltaics (PV), and energy efficiency technologies.

  6. dnn | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (DOENNSA) and the U.K. Department of Energy and Climate Change concluded a workshop at Wilton Park, Shaping the future of nuclear...

  7. Informal Parking: Turning Problems into Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald

    2015-01-01

    Shoup. 2014. “Informal Parking Markets: Turning ProblemsShoup. 2014. “Informal Parking on Sidewalks: The BrokenYears’ War over free curb parking, and the revenue will

  8. The Access Almanac: Graduated Parking Fines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald

    2010-01-01

    THE ACCESS ALMANAC Graduated Parking Fines BY DONALD SHOUPC ITIES OFTEN INCREASE THEIR PARKING FINESWHEN overtime parking in a calendar year is $35, the second

  9. The Price of Parking on Great Streets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald

    2011-01-01

    UCTC-FR-20II-26 The Price of Parking on Great Streets Donaldare enacted. With performance-based parking prices, localrevenue return, and parking increment finance, everybody

  10. Seeking Urbane Parking Solutions [The Transect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Looney, Brian; Payton, Neal

    2006-01-01

    town-center shared- parking solutions resulting from hardfamily residential setting, parking normally takes the formmultistory precast parking decks cost any- where from $10-$

  11. Bark beetles, fuels and future fire hazard in contrasting conifer forests of Greater Yellowstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    1 Bark beetles, fuels and future fire hazard in contrasting conifer forests of Greater Yellowstone. Insects and fire have tremendous ecological and economic effects in western forests, yet surprisingly fire hazard in two widespread but contrasting forest types, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and Douglas

  12. Rapid Classification of NifH Protein Sequences using Classification and Regression Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Ildiko E.

    2014-01-01

    of nifH in the Yellowstone Geothermal Complex. MicrobialMicrobial mat, Yellowstone Park geothermal springs Table 2.

  13. Parking Map 201415 Parking and ID Card Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Mitchell

    lots may not be available for use on game days. Please see game day parking maps/notices. Airline Center (63) Level 1 F/S (H lot) Level 2 Visitor Level 3 AUP Level 4 AUP Level 5 AUP Daniel Parking Center (2) All Levels L Meadows Parking Center (70) Level 1 (P1) F/S (G lot) and Museum visitors (street

  14. Parking and Transport Policy Page 1 Parking and Transport Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mucina, Ladislav

    Parking and Transport Policy Page 1 Parking and Transport Policy Category: Facilities, Campus Life 1. PURPOSE To standardise and manage parking and transport on the Curtin Bentley campus including that support both State Government and University objectives in a manner that encourages public transport use

  15. UH Parking Access & Mid-Pacific Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Art Building Kuykendall Hall Campus Center CORREA RO A D VISITO R PARKING Jakuan Tea House Sinclair Campus, please park in green Pay-to-Park stalls. Get ticket from automated Pay-to-Park machines. Maximum

  16. Carbon Park Environmental Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of offsetting the University's carbon footprint, promoting biodiversity and establishing easily maintained Carbon Park Environmental Impact Assessment A B.E.S.T. Project By, Adam Bond 2011 #12; Bishop's University Carbon Park

  17. The Access Almanac: Solar Parking Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald

    2012-01-01

    the city. In California, one solar-covered parking space canway. (Covering one parking space with solar panels will

  18. Toilet Theme Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2013-02-27

    of the world's first toilet culture park centered around a toilet-shaped building that was once the home of Sim Jae-duck, founder of the World Toilet Association, a group dedicated to bringing hygienic bathrooms to all world citizens. Famously born in his poor...

  19. KALELE ROAD Parking Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FREEWAY H1 KALELE ROAD Parking Office on ground floor Bike Rack Locations Bike Lockers BICYCLE RACK Hale Kahawai Environmental Protection Services Federal Credit Union Energy House & Safety Office Bus Shelter Bus Shelter Art Building Sustainability Courtyard Kuykendall Hall Campus Center Jakuan Tea

  20. Campus Parking Map University of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    Campus Parking Map University of California BERKELEY #12;Campus Building Locations Parking Lots Campus parking lots are located around and near campus and in the hill areas east of campus. Parking lot/Weekend parking permits are valid weekdays after 5pm and on weekends in , , and designated lots. Parking on campus

  1. PARKING COMMISSION MINUTES March 5, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Anecdotally, we know that the primary purpose of the Park & Ride parking lots is no longer as a remote parking lot; many people are parking cheaply and walking to nearby research buildings. Hultine suggested considering several options, including rezoning the parking lots to yellow, increasing the cost of the Park

  2. UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA MILTON CAMPUS PARKING REGULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    of the vehicle must be visible from parking lot throughways at all times. 2. Student parking decals allow parkingUNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA MILTON CAMPUS PARKING REGULATIONS PARKING REGULATIONS 1. Backing into or pulling through a campus parking space is prohibited. The vehicle decal displayed on the rear

  3. TigerTransit Routes & Parking Map

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Jaswinder Pal

    PARKING ZONE & LOT ASSIGNMENTS Parking in Princeton University parking lots is by permit only. To obtain in the assigned lot and zone indicated on the vehicle hangtag. Parking in an unassigned lot within a designated2014­2015 TigerTransit Routes & Parking Map Contact Us Transportation & Parking Services New South

  4. Smart Parking Management Pilot Project: A Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) District Parking Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Rodier, Caroline; Eaken, Amanda M.

    2005-01-01

    201. Ferguson, E. (2000). Parking management and commuterand Okuda, T. (1996). Smart parking in Toyota’s Motown. ITS:development of an advanced parking information system plan.

  5. Employer-Paid parking: A Nationwide Survey of Employers' Parking Subsidy Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald C.; Breinholt, Mary Jane

    2001-01-01

    Cashing Out Employer-Pard Parking, Report No FTA- CA-11-Opportunity to Reduce Mlntmum Parking Requirements," JournalPickrell (1980) Free Parking as a Transportation Problem,

  6. Sustainable Transportation and National Parks Initiative Featured...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    low-emission cars and trucks on the road. You can also learn more about: How fuel-cell electric vehicles are paving the way to commercial success Meeting important...

  7. Power Parks System Simulation Sandia National Laboratories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a simulation tool will be very useful in evaluating the systems, and optimizing their performance with respect to efficiency and cost. 1 Proceedings of the 2002 U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Review NREL/CP-610-32405 #12. Simulink performs dynamic simulation by integrating the system in time using a collection of ordinary

  8. Biodiversity | Savannah River National Environmental Park

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & InspectionsBeryllium andSampler As AnEl biodiésel es unNatural

  9. National Park Service | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation,MeregNIFESpinning MillsNass WindInformationService

  10. Research | Savannah River National Environmental Park

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultiday Production of SOA inResearchResearch questionsResearchResearch

  11. Publications | Savannah River National Environmental Park

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProton Delivery and Removal inPublications Zhang,Savannah

  12. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Salah, Sonia; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric L.

    2003-04-28

    The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to simulate the chemical and hydrological effects of water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to simulate the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

  13. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

    2003-04-28

    The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to accurately simulate water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to determine if TOUGHREACT could accurately predict the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

  14. Smart Parking Management Pilot Project: A Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) District Parking Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Rodier, Caroline J.; Eaken, Amanda M.

    2005-01-01

    and Okuda, T. (1996). Smart parking in Toyota’s Motown. ITS:development of an advanced parking information system plan.Ideal Mates For University Parking Programs. The Parking

  15. EXTENDED PARKING REQUEST COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Parking Services and vehicle must be parked in Lot A. T This option is not available for visitorsEXTENDED PARKING REQUEST COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES FACILITIES MANAGEMENT DEPT PARKING SERVICES to Parking Services allows a CSM student or employee to leave his/her vehicle within the campus boundaries

  16. Terrein / car park: Inleveren bij / submit to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Procedure: Terrein / car park: Inleveren bij / submit to: Info: Vul a.u.b. uw gegevens in / please terrein, voor de duur van: Requests access to the car park(s) mentioned above for the period of voorbehoud kan van toepassing zijn. You can request access rights for the local car park(s) on one campus

  17. Parking Cash Out: Chapters 1 and 22-28 from the manuscript of The High Cost of Free-Parking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald C.

    2001-01-01

    carriages nowcreate a parking problem, but newsolutions willone promising solution: parking cash out. After all, weFranceor Spain to put up a parking lot. FREE PARKING FIGURE

  18. A second row Parking Paradox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. Fleurke; C. Kuelske

    2008-11-28

    We consider two variations of the discrete car parking problem where at every vertex of the integers a car arrives with rate one, now allowing for parking in two lines. a) The car parks in the first line whenever the vertex and all of its nearest neighbors are not occupied yet. It can reach the first line if it is not obstructed by cars already parked in the second line (screening). b) The car parks according to the same rules, but parking in the first line can not be obstructed by parked cars in the second line (no screening). In both models, a car that can not park in the first line will attempt to park in the second line. If it is obstructed in the second line as well, the attempt is discarded. We show that both models are solvable in terms of finite-dimensional ODEs. We compare numerically the limits of first and second line densities, with time going to infinity. While it is not surprising that model a) exhibits an increase of the density in the second line from the first line, more remarkably this is also true for model b), albeit in a less pronounced way.

  19. Report: EM Energy Park Initiative

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    To further aid the Assistant Secretary in her efforts to implement the Energy Park Initiative, the EPI Subcommittee offers the following recommendations: Recommendation...

  20. radiation detection | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (DOENNSA) and the U.K. Department of Energy and Climate Change concluded a workshop at Wilton Park, NNSA, Argentina Transition Radiation...

  1. DOI: 10.1126/science.1136237 , 513 (2007);315Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    to extreme environments (1). A plant-fungal symbiosis between a tropical panic grass from geothermal soils temperatures in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) (2). Field and laboratory experiments have shown that when root

  2. H.R. 1137: An Act to amend the Geothermal Steam Act of 1970 (30 U.S.C. 1001-1027), and for other purposes. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, November 16, 1993 and November 17, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    The report H.R. 1137 is an Act to amend the Geothermal Steam Act of 1970 to protect the Yellowstone National Park. The proposed legislative text is included.

  3. Life Sciences MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITYBOZEMAN MOUNTAINS & MINDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    of Yellowstone National Park, one of the world's most complex and diverse geothermal areas and its estimated 10,000 geothermal features. Their work also benefits NASA, the TBI funding agency, as it plans missions to other

  4. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SYSTEMATIC BACTERIOLOGY, 0020-7713/97/$04.00 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    ), was isolated from hot springs in Yellowstone National Park and New Zealand. The gram-positive-staining cells- organisms from different geothermal areas (30, 31). Thermo- philic Fe(III) reducers available in pure

  5. to the Midwest Regional Center of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Disease Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    to extreme environments (1). A plant-fungal symbiosis between a tropical panic grass from geothermal soils temperatures in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) (2). Field and laboratory experiments have shown that when root

  6. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Apr. 2007, p. 26122623 Vol. 73, No. 8 0099-2240/07/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/AEM.02567-06

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Scott

    comparative analysis of acidic thermal springs in Yellowstone National Park to determine how abiotic factors and a smaller fraction attributable to temperature. Molecular studies of geothermal ecosystems have provided

  7. THE LOMA PRIETA, CALIFORNIA, EARTHQUAKEOF OCTOBER 17,1989: EARTHQUAKEOCCURRENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Paul

    variations in geothermal wells (Silver and Valette-Silver, 1987) or changes in the interval between eruption of earthquakes is, nevertheless, well known. For example, Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo

  8. Complex Modulus Prediction of Asphalt Concrete Pavement Cores 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Meng

    2013-12-02

    . For field cores complex modulus measuring methods, except some expensive pavement field testers, empirical and semiempirical models are widely used, but an accurate mechanical test method is more desired. In this research, Arizona, Yellowstone National Park...

  9. The buffalo wars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nasr, Susan L

    2006-01-01

    The wandering buffalo of Yellowstone National Park are the subject of a heated debate in the western United States. The animals carry a disease called brucellosis, which infects both buffalo and cattle and has economic ...

  10. For additional information, contact: Department of Mathematical Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    successful careers in industry, government and academia. OPPORTUNITIES IN MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES Study abroad in Yellowstone National Park 4 Interdisciplinary opportunities include analysis of glaciated valleys 5 Dr. Megan SCIENCES? Aerospace industry: Companies such as Aerospace Corporation, Boeing, Goodyear Aerospace, Lockheed

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- U S Steel Co National Tube...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Steel Co National Tube Div Christy Park Works - PA 35 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: U. S. STEEL CO., NATIONAL TUBE DIV., CHRISTY PARK WORKS (PA.35) Eliminated from further...

  12. Princeton University Parking Rules & Regulations Transportation & Parking Services at Princeton University is committed to providing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torquato, Salvatore

    for a vehicle to be legally parked on campus. The hangtag indicates parking zone and lot assignments and must will be issued. II. Parking Zone and lot assignments FacUlty/StaFF PaRkIng Each UniversiPrinceton University Parking Rules & Regulations Transportation & Parking Services at Princeton

  13. Metagenomes from High-Temperature Chemotrophic Systems Reveal Geochemical Controls on Microbial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ha, Taekjip

    The Yellowstone caldera contains the most numerous and diverse geothermal systems on Earth, yielding an extensiveC) chemotrophic microbial communities sampled from geothermal springs (or pools) in Yellowstone National Park (YNP in geothermal environments often results in considerably less microbial diversity than other terrestrial

  14. Book Review Geothermal Biology and Geochemis-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Book Review Geothermal Biology and Geochemis- try in Yellowstone National Park. (eds WP Inskeep of life. The legacy of chemical and biologi- cal research in geothermal regimes, while short in duration geothermal areas, including Yellowstone, are largely confined to the specialty literature of geochemical

  15. The Access Almanac: Solar Parking Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald

    2012-01-01

    getting solar power from our parking lots. ? A C C E S STHE ACCESS ALMANAC Solar Parking Requirements DONALD SHOUP SC E I N T H E S U N — on parking lots surrounding commercial

  16. THE ACCESS ALMANAC - Making Parking Meters Popular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald

    2014-01-01

    market prices for curb parking, spend the revenue to improvechanging the politics of parking, cities can meter more ofair, and a cooler planet. Parking meters can then do a world

  17. The trouble with minimum parking requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald C.

    2001-01-01

    1996 Local junsd~ctlon parking requirements" a survey ofG.E. , 1972 Zoning, Parking, and Traffic. EnoFoundationforAn Approach to Determining Parking Demand, Planmng Service

  18. Designing for ecology : the ecological park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power, Andres M

    2006-01-01

    This thesis aims to define a) what an ecological park is, and b) whether it is a new model in park design. Reference to the literature on landscape ecology is used to analyze the natural ecological merit of these parks, ...

  19. University Park Data Dashboard | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    data dashboard for University Park, Maryland, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. University Park Data Dashboard More Documents & Publications Massachusetts --...

  20. SSL Demonstration: Parking Garage Lighting, Washington, DC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-06-01

    GATEWAY program report brief summarizing an SSL parking garage demonstration at the Dept. of Labor headquarters parking garage in Washington, DC.

  1. Sandia Energy - Sandia Science & Technology Park: Acquisition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science & Technology Park: Acquisition of Companies Reflects Growth of Industry in Park Home Partnership Research & Capabilities Customers & Partners Sandia Science & Technology...

  2. A Systematic Approach to Carbon Footprint Reduction Strategies in Industrial Parks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Mohannadi, Dhabia

    2014-09-30

    per capita carbon emitter, stationary emission sources are responsible for the majority of the country’s footprint. Concentrated in industrial parks or clusters emissions cuts would be more significant and efficient to achieve as part of a national...

  3. Department of Earth Sciences South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3AN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Department of Earth Sciences South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3AN If you are new to the Department offers two schemes which help parents save tax and national insurance on their childcare costs: Salary

  4. Address Lot Description 981 MADISON DR A PARKING LOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Elizabeth A.

    Address Lot Description 981 MADISON DR A PARKING LOT 156 BLUESTONE DR A PARKING LOT EXTENDED 810 MADISON DR B PARKING LOT 897 UNIVERSITY BLVD C PARKING LOT 1170 HARRISON ST C1 PARKING LOT 1161 HARRISON ST C2 PARKING LOT 761 DUKE DRIVE C3 PARKING LOT 441 MARTIN LUTHER KING JR WAY C4 PARKING LOT 650 DUKE

  5. Beyond the Inventory: An Interagency Collaboration to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Greater Yellowstone Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Fiebig, M.

    2010-10-01

    As one of the largest, intact ecosystems in the continental United States, land managers within the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) have recognized the importance of compiling and understanding agency greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The 10 Federal units within the GYA have taken an active role in compiling GHG inventories on a unit- and ecosystem-wide level, setting goals for GHG mitigation, and identifying mitigation strategies for achieving those goals. This paper details the processes, methodologies, challenges, solutions, and lessons learned by the 10 Federal units within the GYA throughout this ongoing effort.

  6. Core Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Dobson, Et Al., 2003) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures JumpCommercialRenewableGlobal LInformation Yellowstone

  7. Park and chill : redesign parking garage in Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ting, Sze Ngai

    2011-01-01

    What are the aesthetics of urban infrastructure? Urban infrastructure has remained isolated to human activities. We all share memory and experience with urban infrastructure, e.g. we drive on the same roads and park our ...

  8. H. R. 3359: This Act may be cited as the Old Faithful Protection Act of 1991, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, November 25, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bill would amend the Geothermal Steam Act of 1970 to prohibit the use of, production from, exploration for, or development of geothermal resources on lands and waters within a 15-mile radius of the boundary of Yellowstone National Park, except with respect to the Island Park Geothermal Area. The bill directs the National Park Service, in cooperation with the Forest Service and the US Geological Survey, to conduct a study on the impact of potential geothermal development on the thermal features of Yellowstone National Park, to be submitted to Congress within four years.

  9. FaradayRoad National College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    FaradayRoad Southwell Hall Newark Hall National College for Teaching and Leadership Melton Hall Wollaton Road A609 Ilkeston Road A609 To University Park Campus (0.5 miles) To city centre Pedestrian/cycle route to campus To city centre To University Park Campus (0.5 mile) TriumphRoad FaradayRoad Derby Road A

  10. National Park Service Statue of Liberty National Monument | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOEDepartment ofProgram |(Upstate NewDepartment of EnergyEnergy

  11. UC Berkeley 1 Bancroft Center Parking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    PP UC Berkeley 2 2 3 3 4 4 1 1 Bancroft Center Parking Inkstone Parking Garage Anna Head West Lot. Please prepay for parking at the vending machine located in the center of the lot. The west lot is for permit parking only. Located below Copy Central, this underground lot is the closest to the Visitor

  12. CAMP PARKING PERMIT VALID LOT G ONLY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burg, Theresa

    PERMIT No. SUMMER CAMP PARKING PERMIT VALID LOT G ONLY (REFER TO SIGNS IN PARKING LOT TO ENSURE RD. Aperture Lake LOT F LOT FS LOT J LOT N LOT C University Day Care The Quad Summer Camp Parking Lot PROPER USE) VALID FROM: JUNE 29, 2015 TO: AUG 28, 2015 VALID ONLY DURING TIMES BELOW PARKING ANYWHERE

  13. Where Innovation Is Tradition Parking & Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Discounted daily passes/deck validations · Carpool Programs · Preferred Parking · Rebate Program for Reserved

  14. KALELE ROAD PARKING PERMIT ZONESPARKING PERMIT ZONES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenhouses Institute for Astronomy University of Hawai`i Press Federal Credit Union Energy House & SafetyFREEWAY H1 KALELE ROAD PARKING PERMIT ZONESPARKING PERMIT ZONES 2010 - 20112010 - 2011 Parking Services Office · 2600 Campus Road, Room 014 · Honolulu, HI 96822 · www.hawaii.edu/parking · parking

  15. Accessibility Application Blue Badge Car Park UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    i Accessibility Application Blue Badge Car Park UK Konstantinos Grassos H00113751 August 2012. In this project, Blue Badge Car Park (BBCP) is presented which is actually a mobile-based park finder application. It specifically focuses on finding parking spaces for wheelchair users, which are indicated by the blue badge

  16. Transportation & Parking Services Projected Long Range Operating Plan/Budget Parking Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,580) $588 $2,016 $3,284 $4,825 $4,019 Parking Lot Maint/Construction ($423,051) ($442,481) ($864,785) ($224Transportation & Parking Services Projected Long Range Operating Plan/Budget Parking Operations/UCOP Assessment ($256) ($128) ($80) ($80) Parking Structure Feasibility Study Debt Service - Parking Structures $0

  17. Parking Citation Appeal UVA Parking and Transportation, P.O. Box 400000, Charlottesville, Va. 229044000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    UNACCEPTABLE GROUNDS FOR APPEAL ARE: Parking for SHORT periods, parking in a nearly empty lot, not knowing Parking Citation Appeal UVA Parking and Transportation, P.O. Box 400000, Charlottesville, Va. 229044000 (434)9247231 Office: 1101 Millmont Street, Charlottesville, Va. 22904 www.virginia.edu/parking

  18. Park Profiler/Jump Analyzer Practical method for determining terrain park jump performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Terrain Park jump safety as a rider/resort partnership II. USTPC criteria: Quantifying best practices in terrain park jump design III. "Park Profiler" - practical tool to measure TP jump IV. "Jump Analyzer of flying ... but, as Icarus leaned the hard way, there are risks. #12;Terrain Park Jump Safety Terrain park

  19. An analysis of Utah State Park visitors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Dennis C.

    1988-01-01

    the summer of 1987 (June 13 through September 11) . The questions were asked concurrent with a visitation study being conducted in the parks. Statewide, occupants of 1589 vehicles were surveyed from 12 representative parks, which represents 7, 649 park... phases of the survey. A series of questions were asked in order to profile the visitor to Utah State Parks. Information was compiled on type of use, activities in the parks, and state or country of residence. Further questions dealt with how often...

  20. Paths of recovery: landscape variability in forest structure, function and fuels 25 years after the 1988 Yellowstone fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    is essential for good stewardship of these rapidly changing landscapes. Stand-replacing forest fires trigger one of the most notorious fires of the 20th Century. Yellowstone's postfire forests may be effective1 Paths of recovery: landscape variability in forest structure, function and fuels 25 years after

  1. Yosemite National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LeTourneau, Peter M.

    and distribution of lichens tell us a great deal about air quality and the level of certain types of pollution discriminate between nutrients and pollutants. As a result, both pollutants and nutrients are absorbed. When pollutants accumulate above certain levels, lichen growth and health are impaired. Since individual species

  2. Smart Parking Management Field Test: A Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) District Parking Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Suzuki, T. and Yamomoto, S. Parking system for highways inA feasibility study of a parking information system in NYC.1997). Drivers’ response to parking guidance and information

  3. Urban Parks: The Value of Small Urban Parks, Plazas and Other Outdoor Spaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shafer, Carl Scott; Jacob, John

    2006-11-27

    People need parks. Great urban parks are places where communities come together, people interact, and social capital develops. Learn the characteristics of great urban parks and how they are created....

  4. containers | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (DOENNSA) and the U.K. Department of Energy and Climate Change concluded a workshop at Wilton Park, About This Site Budget IG Web Policy...

  5. NSDD | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (DOENNSA) and the U.K. Department of Energy and Climate Change concluded a workshop at Wilton Park, About This Site Budget IG Web Policy...

  6. Smart Parking Mangement Field Test: A Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) District Parking Demonstration Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodier, Caroline J.; Shaheen, Susan; Kemmerer, Charlene

    2008-01-01

    infrastructure (e.g. , lanes, parking). On the basis of aat bicycle and e-bike parking lots along the main travel

  7. Envisioning Parking Strategies for the Post-Automobile City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Circella, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    dictionary definition, a parking lot is simply “an area usedright location and design of parking lots allows the properallows creating surface parking lots close to the locations

  8. Forrestal Garage Parking Procedures, Revised February 1, 2015...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Forrestal Garage Parking Procedures, Revised February 1, 2015 Forrestal Garage Parking Procedures, Revised February 1, 2015 Forrestal Garage Parking Procedures - The Forrestal...

  9. Quantity versus Quality in Off-Street Parking Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhija, Vinit; Shoup, Donald

    2006-01-01

    Circle Centre: How parking helped make urban retail/entertainment development work. Parking, 25–33. State of NewInstitute. (1983). Shared parking. Washington, DC: Author.

  10. The Politics and Economics of Parking on Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald

    2011-01-01

    W. (1956). 'University Campus Parking." Traffic Quarterlyincome tax return. Campus parking scandals even break intoCoppi died at age 40. 31 'Parking Nightmares and other

  11. Parking on a Smart Campus: Lessons for Universities and Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald C.

    2005-01-01

    1997. “The High Cost of Free Parking,” Journal of PlanningTrouble with Minimum Parking Requirements,” TransportationThe High Cost of Free Parking, Chicago: Planners Press.

  12. On-Street Parking Spaces for Shared Cars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osgood, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Reducing the on-street parking available to privately ownedof carsharing. Each on- street parking space dedicated to a2010. “Carsharing and Parking Policy: A Review of North

  13. Parking on a Smart Campus: Lessons For Universities and Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald

    2005-01-01

    1997. “The High Cost of Free Parking,” Journal of PlanningTrouble with Minimum Parking Requirements,” TransportationThe High Cost of Free Parking, Chicago: Planners Press.

  14. The Access Almanac: Ending the Abuse of Disabled Parking Placards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Ending the Abuse of Disabled Parking Placards DONALD SHOUP Aattention for repeatedly parking illegally in spaceshandicappedfraud.org. Making curb parking accessible to

  15. Parking on a Random Tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Dehling; S. R. Fleurke; C. Kuelske

    2007-11-26

    Consider an infinite tree with random degrees, i.i.d. over the sites, with a prescribed probability distribution with generating function G(s). We consider the following variation of Renyi's parking problem, alternatively called blocking RSA: at every vertex of the tree a particle (or car) arrives with rate one. The particle sticks to the vertex whenever the vertex and all of its nearest neighbors are not occupied yet. We provide an explicit expression for the so-called parking constant in terms of the generating function.

  16. Solar Parking Structure in California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This photograph features the photovoltaic (PV) system at the Cal Expo in Sacramento, California, that was "made for the shade," but it does much more. Installed in September 2000, the 540-kilowatt PV system produces enough energy to power about 180 homes. In addition, the solar arrays serve as an oasis of shaded parking for 1,000 cars in a desert of scorching blacktop. The project was designed and built by Kyocera Solar/Utility Power Group for the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD). At the time, this was the largest parking lot solar system in the world today. Cal Expo is the site of many events, including the California State Fair.

  17. NorthParkLoop Park AvenueGetwellRoad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Memphis, University of

    Field Football Practice Fields Track and Field Golf Driving Golf Green FedEx Park A B C D E F G H I J K Building 53 - Gas Pump I-4 126 4162-4168 Buford Ellington Dr South L-9 532 Building 104 - Maintenance 134 Student Family Housing - Community L-7 543 Building 23 - Catfish Research Center F-2 135 4211

  18. Extension of the Yellowstone plateau, eastern Snake River Plain, and Owyhee plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, D.W.; Hackett, W.R.; Ore, H.T. (Idaho State Univ., Pocatello (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Formation of the late Cenozoic volcanic province comprising the Owyhee plateau, eastern Snake River Plain, and Yellowstone plateau has been accompanied by east-northeast-directed crustal extension. A new vector of 45 mm/yr, N56{degree}E for the migration of silicic volcanism across the volcanic province is calculated. If migration of volcanism reflects west-southwest continental drift over a mantle plume, a zone of crustal extension must separate the volcanic province from the more slowly moving North American craton. Space-time relations of basin fill in the adjacent Basin and Range province provide evidence for a zone of extension, about 125 km wide, coincident with and east of coeval silicic volcanism. Since 16 Ma, the zone of extension has migrated along with silicic volcanism, maintaining its position between the province and the unextended craton.

  19. Pedestrian Only Area University visitors' car parks (limited access)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Campus Map Pedestrian Only Area Car Parks University visitors' car parks (limited access) Other university car parks Public multi-storey car park Lawns Free City Bus Stop ST. GEORGE'S FIELD WOODHOUSE LAN E

  20. Table of Contents Free Patient Parking 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    southeast of the first floor entrance. "The Smart Park meters will be covered in our patient parking area has been a series of "best days ever!" Whether the upbeat, energetic Fremont bridge group leader

  1. The Access Almanac: Solar Parking Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald

    2012-01-01

    spaces be covered with solar panels to meet the increasedone parking space with solar panels will produce about 2who prefer not to install solar panels on their parking lots

  2. Anomalous shear wave delays and surface wave velocities at Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, R.G.; Boore, D.M.

    1982-04-10

    To investigate the effects of a geothermal area on the propagation of intermediate-period (1--30 s) teleseismic body waves and surface waves, a specially designed portable seismograph system was operated in Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming. Travel time residuals, relative to a station outside the caldera, of up to 2 s for compressional phases are in agreement with short-period residuals for P phases measured by other investigators. Travel time delays for shear arrivals in the intermediate-period band range from 2 to 9 s and decrease with increasing dT/d..delta... Measured Rayleigh wave phase velocities are extremely low, ranging from 3.2 km/s at 27-s period to 2.0 km/s at 7-s period; the estimated uncertainty associated with these values is 15%. We propose a model for compressional and shear velocities and Poisson's ratio beneath the Yellowstone caldera which fits the teleseismic body and surface wave data: it consists of a highly anomalous crust with an average shear velocity of 3.0 km/s overlying an upper mantle with average velocity of 4.1 km/s. The high average value of Poisson's ratio in the crust (0.34) suggests the presence of fluids there; Poisson's ratio in the mantle between 40 and approximately 200 km is more nearly normal (0.29) than in the crust. A discrepancy between normal values of Poisson's ratio in the crust calculated from short-period data and high values calculated from teleseismic data can be resolved by postulating a viscoelastic crustal model with frequency-dependent shear velocity and attenuation.

  3. SSL Demonstration: Central Park, New York City

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-11-01

    GATEWAY program report brief summarizing an SSL pathway lighting demonstration in Central Park in New York City.

  4. The Access Almanac: Solar Parking Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald

    2012-01-01

    rich cities have great solar potential because the panelsper space. ) Because the solar potential of a parking lot

  5. For 24 hour parking information call 1-855-535-1100 Public Parking Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMillan, Andrew

    .) Emergency Lot: (entrance off 112 Street) Pay for parking upon arrival (Pay & Display machines) · Rates: $2For 24 hour parking information call 1-855-535-1100 Public Parking Information University of Alberta Hospital, Stollery Children's Hospital and Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute Parking Office Room

  6. University of Aberdeen Car Parking Policy -v2 0.docx University of Aberdeen Car Parking Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neri, Peter

    University of Aberdeen Car Parking Policy - v2 0.docx University of Aberdeen Car Parking Policy 1.0 Why have a car parking policy? The University of Aberdeen is aware of the importance of corporate. The University has developed to such an extent that its current car park capacity is not sufficient to provide

  7. Quantity versus Quality in Off-Street Parking Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhija, Vinit; Shoup, Donald

    2006-01-01

    In Southern California, solar collectors cover some parking72, No. 3 Figure 6. Solar collectors over a parking lot, Los

  8. PARKING COMMISSION MINUTES April 2, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the parking lot, and clarified that 90-120 cars were in the lot every day. She added projects, but to balance urgent needs in parking lot repairs, and other commitments, 2% is what we need about the high number of reserved parking spaces in lot 3. Munoz made a motion to change westernmost

  9. PARKING COMMISSION MINUTES March 3, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the impact of 400 new students parking in this area for the School of Pharmacy, with lot 211 being the next closest parking lot where yellow spaces are available. There are enough staff at KGS that would change in the parking lot. There was discussion about signage, and that color zone rules would go into effect in August

  10. GATOR GROWL PARKING IMPACTS AND LOT CLOSURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Peter

    GATOR GROWL PARKING IMPACTS AND LOT CLOSURES In support of staging and celebrating Gator Growl, the following parking lots adjacent to Flavet Field will be closed. These lots will re-open on Saturday October parkers. * A vehicle parked in a Red 1 space in this lot will not be relocated; however, the vehicle

  11. SWOPE PARK INDUSTRIAL AREA Kansas City, Missouri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SWOPE PARK INDUSTRIAL AREA Kansas City, Missouri MODIFICATION REQUEST Modification to support this request. PROJECT PURPOSE Swope Park Industrial Area is located in the south-central portion safe ingress/egress during flooding. The Swope Park Industrial Area has limited access, one

  12. Searching for a parking space 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurier, Eric

    2005-01-01

    If you drive a car, it’s a classic problem on the busy city streets, the search for a parking space. Merely driving in the inner city is a challenging and frustrating affair because it is full of one way streets, dead ...

  13. VISITOR PARKING Visitors to the UCF campus must purchase a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    and Parking Information Center. Daily permits are valid in all of the "D" parking lots and unreserved garages are located at the Visitor and Parking Information Center in parking lot B-6. Coin Meter Parking: Coin metersP P PERSEUS LO O P VISITOR PARKING Visitors to the UCF campus must purchase a daily or hourly

  14. Amending the Geothermal Steam Act of 1970. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Public Lands and Reserved Water of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session on S. 669; S. 1516

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The subcommittee met in Casper, Wyoming to hear testimony on geothermal resources in Yellowstone National Park and other park systems and to consider S. 1516 and S. 669, which would help to expedite geothermal development. The lack of information on potential environmental damage, the quality of monitoring, and the poor record of damage from geothermal operations were of major concern. The testimony of 12 witnesses includes that of private and government geologists, environmental groups, and the Park Superintendent, who described the unique features of Yellowstone's Old Faithful Geyser and the importance of incorporating provisions into geothermal-leasing arrangements to protect the park. (DCK)

  15. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R N Manchester

    2006-04-13

    Given sufficient sensitivity, pulsar timing observations can make a direct detection of gravitational waves passing over the Earth. Pulsar timing is most sensitive to gravitational waves with frequencies in the nanoHertz region, with the most likely astronomical sources being binary super-massive black holes in galaxy cores. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array project uses the Parkes 64-m radio telescope to make precision timing observations of a sample of about 20 millisecond pulsars with a principal goal of making a direct detection of gravitational waves. Observations commenced about one year ago and so far sub-microsecond timing residuals have been achieved for more than half of these pulsars. New receiver and software systems are being developed with the aim of reducing these residuals to the level believed necessary for a positive detection of gravitational waves.

  16. The Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. H. Stairs; A. G. Lyne; F. Camilo; N. P. F. McKay; D. C. Sheppard; D. J. Morris; R. N. Manchester; J. F. Bell; V. M. Kaspi; F. Crawford; N. D'Amico

    1999-03-18

    The Parkes multibeam pulsar survey is a high-frequency, fast-sampled survey of the Galactic Plane, expected to discover at least 500 new pulsars. To date, over 200 pulsars have been found, including several young pulsars and at least one with a very high magnetic field. Seven of the new stars are in binary systems; this number includes one probable double-neutron-star system, and one pulsar with an extremely massive companion.

  17. Inversion for sources of crustal deformation and gravity change at the Yellowstone caldera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasco, D.W.; Taylor, C.L. (Geophysics Lab., Hanscom AFB, MA (USA)); Smith, R.B. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City (USA))

    1990-11-10

    The Yellowstone caldera was formed in the latest of three explosive eruptions of rhyolites and ash flow tuffs totaling 3,700 km{sup 3} at 2, 1.2, and 0.6 m.y. before present. Its youthful volcanic history, widespread hydrothermal activity, intense seismicity, and extremely high heat flow, in excess of 30 times the continental average, marks the Yellowstone volcanic system as a giant caldera at unrest. Orthometric height increases of the caldera of up to 76 cm, measured from precise leveling surveys from 1923 to 1975-1977, were inverted to determine volume expansion source models for the caldera-wide deformation. For the 1923 to 1977 uplift episode, two regions of expansion were found: (1) in the northern part of the caldera near the Sour Creek resurgent dome of {approximately}0.37 km{sub 3}, and (2) in the southern part of the caldera, near the Mallard Lake resurgent dome of {approximately}0.41 km{sub 3}. Both bodies occur in the upper crust from near-surface depths to 6.0 km, but the largest volume expansions were found in the 3.0-6.0 km depth range. The southern caldera source volume, near the Mallard Lake dome, may extend down to 9.0 km. From 1976 to 1987, nearly simultaneous measurements of elevation and gravity changes were made on a profile across the northern caldera during a period of net uplift. Models of the temporal gravity variation infer that the volume increase for the northern caldera source must lie above 9.0 km and involved a density perturbation greater than +0.002 g/cm{sup 3}. The modeled volumetric sources are in the same general locations as bodies of low P wave velocities, high seismic attenuation, and large negative Bouguer gravity anomalies. It is likely that the modeled volumetric increases were caused by migration of magmas and/or the introduction of large volumes of hydrothermal fluids into the upper crust.

  18. Imperial Reservoir KOFA NATIONAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    National Park El Centro Naval Auxiliary Air Station Yuma Proving Ground Yuma Marine Corps Air Station Twentynine Palms Marine Corps Base Fort Irwin Chocolate Mountain Naval Aerial Gunnery Range Barstow Marine 247 79 79 7 115 62 72 78 79 86 115 163 18 72 74 78 115 18 62 95 371 95 94 247 Solar Energy Study Areas

  19. UT OAK RIDGE FACILITY To Y-12 National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5 UT ­ OAK RIDGE FACILITY To Y-12 National Security Complex To East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP To Oak Ridge National Laboratory 9 3 2 4 1 9 7 6 8 TU LANE TU LANE NEWYORK UT OUTREACH CENTER UT

  20. Parking Management and Downtown Land Development: The Case of Downtown Berkeley, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deakin, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Parking to deter spillover parking in neighborhoods TRB 2004Parking Management and Downtown Land Development: The Casefrom a study of land use, parking, mode choice, and housing

  1. Parke Panda Corporation aka Parke Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program |View NewParatek Microwave IncParke County, Indiana:

  2. Appendix `A' to Traffic Management and Parking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    . Introduction 3 2. Procedures: 3 - 6 2.1 Vehicle Insurance 3 2.2 Road Tax 3 2.3 Edinburgh Campus ­ Car Parks on campus must be insured for at least third party fire and theft. 2.2 Road Tax All private vehicles parked.8 Mobility Parking 4 2.9 Liability 4 2.10 Compliance 4 2.11 Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN) 4 2

  3. Individual animals species can alter ecosystem function-ing, such as nutrient cycling and storage, both directly, by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /detritivore that invaded rivers in Yellowstone National Park in 1994, and has rapidly spread within and near the park since densities of 20 000­ 500 000 snails/m2 (Hall RO unpublished) in all geothermal spring streams in and around streams. Our study site, Polecat Creek, is a geothermal spring stream that flows through the southern area

  4. 2001 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Clearance Center at www.copyright.com or (978) 750-8400. Geology; April 2001; v. 29; no. 4; p. 355358; 4 figures; 1 table. 355

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus, W. Andrew

    dam failure. N.P.--Na- tional Park. Mine impacts derive primarily from Miller Creek drainage Soda Butte Creek, Yellowstone National Park. A tailings dam failure in 1950 emplaced metal and Meinert, 1994). Mine workings include open-pit and underground excavations, mill sites, waste-rock piles

  5. Gaurang Sethi, Lindsay Sharpe, Anne Shishkovsky, Tyson Timmer,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    University of Michigan April 2012 YellowstoneNationalPark FacilitiesEnergyManagement Auditand, vending machine management, smart power strips, monitoring and benchmarking, and behavioral changes the energy consumed by a building's HVAC system. Many of the vending machines in the park are old and run

  6. DESIGNING AN ENVIRONMENTAL SHOWCASE: THE SAN FRANCISCO Dale Sartor, Rick Diamond, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond, Richard

    have conducted energy audits, reviewed retrofit design strategies and renovation plans and recommended, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Andy Walker, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Michael Giller, National Park Service Karl Brown, California Institute for Energy Efficiency Anne Sprunt Crawley, US

  7. Galvez Lot Event Parking Guidelines Effective: December 1, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurafsky, Daniel

    Galvez Lot Event Parking Guidelines Effective: December 1, 2012 Event parking at the improved Galvez Lot The Galvez Lot (L-96) will remain an "event" parking lot, with a maximum parking capacity to be free of charge. Event sponsors arrange for use of the Galvez Lot through Parking & Transportation

  8. Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (DOENNSA) and the U.K. Department of Energy and Climate Change concluded a workshop at Wilton Park, About This Site Budget IG Web Policy...

  9. maritime supply chain | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (DOENNSA) and the U.K. Department of Energy and Climate Change concluded a workshop at Wilton Park, About This Site Budget IG Web Policy...

  10. Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence Program | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (DOENNSA) and the U.K. Department of Energy and Climate Change concluded a workshop at Wilton Park, About This Site Budget IG Web Policy...

  11. City of Ellensburg Renewable Energy Park

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This presentation was given at the March 19, 2013, CommRE webinar on Renewable Energy Parks by Robert Titus, City of Ellensburg, Washington special projects manager.

  12. WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Parking Lot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Parking Lot May 1, 2003 ­ July 15, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 7 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 7 Wind Speed Distributions

  13. University Park “STEP-UP” Proposal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    University Park “STEP-UP” Proposal: DE-FOA-0000148, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  14. UH Parking Access & Mid-Pacific Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacific Ocean Science & Technology Kuykendall Annex Information Technology Center Krauss Hall Holmes HallStairs Pond UH Parking Access & Mid-Pacific Institute Exit Dole Street Offices Multipurpose

  15. Office for UMore Park Academic Initiatives-Summer Research 2010 UMore Park and Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    .4% The University of Minnesota's vision for UMore Park consists of education, health and energy efficien- cies

  16. Car-Park Management using Wireless Sensor J. P. Benson, T. O'Donovan, P. O'Sullivan, U. Roedig, C. Sreenan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sreenan, Cormac J.

    Car-Park Management using Wireless Sensor Networks J. P. Benson, T. O'Donovan, P. O'Sullivan, U'Flynn Tyndall National Institute, Cork, Ireland Abstract-- A complete wireless sensor network solution for car performance are then discussed. The analysis of link characteristics in the car-park scenario shows unexpected

  17. East Tennessee Technology Park 3-1 3. East Tennessee Technology Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    1 East Tennessee Technology Park 3-1 3. East Tennessee Technology Park ETTP was originally built to the "East Tennessee Technology Park." Environmental management and remediation operations consist by the private sector) also became a major mission at ETTP. Reindustrialization allows private industry to lease

  18. The Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Camilo; A. G. Lyne; R. N. Manchester; J. F. Bell; V. M. Kaspi; N. D'Amico; N. P. F. McKay; F. Crawford; I. H. Stairs; D. J. Morris; D. C. Sheppard; A. Possenti

    1999-11-10

    The Parkes multibeam pulsar survey uses a 13-element receiver operating at a wavelength of 20 cm to survey the inner Galactic plane with remarkable sensitivity. To date we have collected and analyzed data from 45% of the survey region (|b| < 5 deg.; 260 deg. < l < 50 deg.), and have discovered 440 pulsars, in addition to re-detecting 190 previously known ones. Most of the newly discovered pulsars are at great distances, as inferred from a median dispersion measure (DM) of 400 pc/cm^3.

  19. Timing the Parkes Multibeam Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. N. Manchester; A. G. Lyne; F. Camilo; V. M. Kaspi; I. H. Stairs; F. Crawford; D. J. Morris; J. F. Bell; N. D'Amico

    1999-11-17

    Measurement of accurate positions, pulse periods and period derivatives is an essential follow-up to any pulsar survey. The procedures being used to obtain timing parameters for the pulsars discovered in the Parkes multibeam pulsar survey are described. Completed solutions have been obtained so far for about 80 pulsars. They show that the survey is preferentially finding pulsars with higher than average surface dipole magnetic fields. Eight pulsars have been shown to be members of binary systems and some of the more interesting results relating to these are presented.

  20. Effective 8/1/14 Page 1 Transportation Services Parking Administrator Guide to South Campus Parking Points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrajt, Graciela

    License For: Name: Hank Scorpio * EID: 812990234 License: Parking Card Lot: S01 -[Business Unit ParkingEffective 8/1/14 Page 1 Transportation Services Parking Administrator Guide to South Campus Parking have evolved over time, so have the parking needs for employees, patients, and visitors in the area

  1. TIPS FOR THE PARKING LOT When you approach your parked vehicle, visually check the area around the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    TIPS FOR THE PARKING LOT When you approach your parked vehicle, visually check the area around Always try to park in visible, well lit areas Try to avoid parking next to a larger pickup truck or van." Exercise extra caution when using underground and enclosed parking garages. Try not to go alone. Use

  2. Parking Information Sheet 1. Salary sacrificing for on-campus parking permits is available to all full-time continuing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parking Information Sheet 1. Salary sacrificing for on-campus parking permits is available to all. 4. The application for salary sacrificing does not include an application for a parking permit. Staff members who wish to salary sacrifice their parking permit fee must first apply to Parking

  3. Parking

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams forOrhanTheoreticalSecurityParallel I/OAParking Print

  4. Transit-Based Smart Parking: Early Field Test Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodier, Caroline J.; Shaheen, Susan

    2005-01-01

    and J.C. Kopp. Real-time parking management systems forA. and J. Polak. Effect of parking information on travelers’T. and Okuda, T. Smart parking in Toyota’s Motown. ITS:

  5. Downtown Parking and Traffic Congestion: A Diagrammatic Exposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnott, Richard; Inci, Eren; Rowse, John

    2011-01-01

    An integrated model of downtown parking and tra¢ c conges-The stability of downtown parking and tra¢ c congestion.Rowse, J. 1999. Modeling parking. Journal of Urban Economics

  6. Envisioning Parking Strategies for the Post-Automobile City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Circella, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Press. potential integration of parking policies into moreTeMA SP.09 Researches The Role of Parking in a Framework forrights reserved Envisioning Parking Strategies for the Post-

  7. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. N. Manchester

    2007-11-12

    Detection and study of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources is a major goal of current astrophysics. Ground-based laser-interferometer systems such as LIGO and VIRGO are sensitive to gravitational waves with frequencies of order 100 Hz, whereas space-based systems such as LISA are sensitive in the millihertz regime. Precise timing observations of a sample of millisecond pulsars widely distributed on the sky have the potential to detect gravitational waves at nanohertz frequencies. Potential sources of such waves include binary super-massive black holes in the cores of galaxies, relic radiation from the inflationary era and oscillations of cosmic strings. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) is an implementation of such a system in which 20 millisecond pulsars have been observed using the Parkes radio telescope at three frequencies at intervals of two -- three weeks for more than two years. Analysis of these data has been used to limit the gravitational wave background in our Galaxy and to constrain some models for its generation. The data have also been used to investigate fluctuations in the interstellar and Solar-wind electron density and have the potential to investigate the stability of terrestrial time standards and the accuracy of solar-system ephemerides.

  8. Planning to park on campus? Please remember that a parking permit is required and all UNT parking lots are enforced for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lots are located near your residence hall. Buy a permit online at www.unt.edu/transit P Pay and Park permit in the mail. + Look for the parking signs and be sure you are in the correct lot + Contact the Parking & Transportation office if you have any questions + All visitor parking is in Lot 20 (Fouts

  9. Mission Center Building 1855 Folsom parking lot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soloveichik, David

    LIME MCB Mission Center Building 1855 Folsom parking lot 100 BUCHANAN (NW Corner of Hermann 1855 Folsom parking lot 6:05 AM 6:11 AM 6:28 AM 6:41 AM 6:50 AM 6:20 AM 6:26 AM 6:43 AM 6:56 AM 7:05 AM

  10. Handicap Parking Tulsa Transit Bus Stop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    Handicap Parking N S W E Bike Rack Tulsa Transit Bus Stop Building Entrance Parking Founders Hall..........Tulsa Graduate College C Wing Floor 1..........Security Office/Police Dispatch Floor 1..........Center of Applied Research for Non-Profit Organizations Floor 1..........OU-Tulsa Enrollment & Student Financial

  11. Discovery Park Impact Network for Photovoltaic Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    Discovery Park Impact Network for Photovoltaic Technology NEED Discovery Park provides for Photovoltaic Technology (NPT). The NPT is designed to be a unique venue for industry-directed, university aims to become an international center of gravity for photovoltaic research that connects islands

  12. Burning cars in a parking Jean Bertoin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Knuth parking scheme, forest fire, phase transition. 1 Introduction The purpose of this work is to point in statistical physics and computer science, namely forest fires and parking schemes. Its motivation partly stems from an interesting paper by R´ath and T´oth [16] in which the authors introduce forest fires

  13. Burning cars in parkings Jean Bertoin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Knuth parking scheme, forest fire, phase transition. 1 Introduction The purpose of this work is to point in statistical physics and computer science, namely forest fires and parking schemes. Its motivation partly stems from an interesting paper by R´ath and T´oth [15] in which the authors introduce forest fires

  14. International Development Office Marketing Department, Singleton Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    Marketing Department Singleton Park Swansea Wales, UK SA2 8PP Scholarships 2 Research and Industry Links 3CB Contact Us International Development Office Marketing Department, Singleton Park Swansea, Wales achievement since 1920. Our long history of working closely with industry ensures that our degrees meet

  15. Yes, Parking Reform Is Possible: A progress report from the author of 'The High Cost of Free Parking'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald

    2011-01-01

    The High Cost of Free Parking, was updated and published ll\\Center UCTC-FR-20| I-2| Yes, Parking Reform Is Possible: Aof The High Cost of Free Parking Donald Shoup University of

  16. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode Parking Structure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Parking Structure Lighting at U.S. Department of Labor Headquarters Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael solid-state lighting; LEDs; occupancy sensor controls; parking facility lighting...

  17. Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

  18. RISK ANALYSIS REPORT FOR THE BAY PARK SEWAGE TREATMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Minghua

    RISK ANALYSIS REPORT FOR THE BAY PARK SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT (STP) TR-0 analyzes the flooding risks of the Bay Park Sewage Treatment Plant (STP

  19. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode Parking Structure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Parking Structure Lighting at U.S. Department of Labor Headquarters Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode Parking Structure...

  20. Marine Corps Base Quantico Achieves 85% Savings in Parking Lighting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Marine Corps Base Quantico Achieves 85% Savings in Parking Lighting Marine Corps Base Quantico Achieves 85% Savings in Parking Lighting Marine Corps Base Quantico (MCBQ) in...

  1. Enhanced Teleoperation for D&D Young S. Park, Hyosig Kang, Thomas F. Ewing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amaral, Luis A.N.

    Enhanced Teleoperation for D&D Young S. Park, Hyosig Kang, Thomas F. Ewing Nuclear Engineering-based control architecture and cobot control technology. Keywords ­ teleoperation, teleautonomy Platform (DAWP) system for dismantling the CP-5 reactor internals at Argonne National Laboratory. Despite

  2. Thorium-uranium disequilibrium in a geothermal discharge zone at Yellowstone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Binz, C.M.; Lewis C.H. III

    1987-07-01

    Whole rock samples of hydrothermally-altered Biscuit Basin rhyolite from Yellowstone drill cores Y-7 and Y-8 were analyzed for /sup 230/Th, /sup 234/U, /sup 238/U, and /sup 232/Th. Extreme disequilibrium was found, with (/sup 230/Th//sup 234/U) ranging from 0.30 to 1.27. Values of (/sup 230/Th//sup 232/Th) and (/sup 234/U//sup 232/Th) define a linear correlation with a slope of 0.16 +/- 0.01, which corresponds to a (/sup 230/Th//sup 234/) age of approximately 19 ka. The (/sup 230/Th//sup 234/U) disequilibrium was apparently caused by U redistribution which occurred mostly at about 19 ka, and is not related simply to the relative degree of hydrothermal alteration and self-sealing of the rhyolite. Mass balance of U requires a large flux of U-bearing ground water through the rhyolite at the time of U redistribution; rough estimates of minimum water/rock ratio range from 10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 4/, for a range of possible ground water U concentrations. Conservative hydraulic calculations indicate that the required ground water flux could have occurred within a period of hundreds of years prior to self-sealing. The disequilibrium data are consistent with a model involving U redistribution during the initial stages of development of a geothermal discharge zone that formed in response to the hydrogeologic effects of glacial melting and unloading during the decline of the Pinedale Glaciation.

  3. ‘Neighborhood in a park’ harnesses the sun

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Minneapolis neighborhood of Bryn Mawr is already a “green” neighborhood in a sense. Called a “neighborhood within a park,” the diverse, middle-class enclave borders on four parks, including the city’s 759-acre flagship Theodore Wirth Park. Over the summer, however, the Bryn Mawr Neighborhood Association (BMNA) launched a program intended to add more metaphorical greenness. Through its Bryn Mawr Solar Program, it’s granting $1,000 to $3,000 to residents and businesses installing solar photovoltaic panels or hot water heaters.

  4. Texas A&M University Parking Garage Master Plan and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000 parking spaces in surface lots and five (5) structured parking facilities. The University recognizes of this study was to evaluate the existing Lot 47 / Lot 51 area's ability to accommodate an above grade parking parking structure at Lot 47 is feasible. If the associated costs and impacts are deemed acceptable

  5. Parking Lot Symbols S AN PAS QUAL S T.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heaton, Thomas H.

    C Parking Lot Symbols LIGO S AN PAS QUAL S T. HOLLISTONAVE. HILLAVE. CALIFORNIA BLVD. DEL MAR BLVD. Caltech Campus Parking Map A B C D E 1 2 3 4 5 MOORE PAS ADENA FIRE S TATION # 34 IMS S BECKMAN AUD PARKING ATHENAEUM PARKING PARKINGPARKING YOUNG HEALTH CENTER RECYCLING CENTER Olive Walk Throop Memorial

  6. The UO Baker Downtown Center Getting Here and Parking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). Parking is in the lot on your left. · Fromtheeast: If on I-105 westbound, take Exit #2 and follow signs the UO Baker Downtown Center (on the corner of 10th and High). Parking is in the lot on your left Baker Downtown Center (on the corner of 10th and High). Parking is in the lot on your left. PARKING

  7. May 4, 2015 Summer parking permits are now available.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairfax Resident Lite permit: $110 *Fairfax Lot M/P: $60 Mason Pond & Shenandoah reserved parking deckContent May 4, 2015 Summer parking permits are now available. Arlington General permit permit: $185 *Rappahannock River reserved parking deck/garage permit: $145 Founders Hall reserved parking

  8. OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BPWorkshop-2005 - LRB OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY presented by L.R. Baylor in collaboration with P.B. Parks*, S

  9. Radium-thorium disequilibrium and zeolite-water ion exchange in a Yellowstone hydrothermal environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Bohlke, J.K. (Argonne National Laboratory, IL (USA)); Binz, C.M. (Loras College, Dubuque, IA (USA))

    1989-05-01

    Whole rock samples of hydrothermally altered Biscuit Basin rhyolite from Yellowstone drill cores Y-7 and Y-8 were analyzed for {sup 226}Ra and {sup 230}Th to determine the extent of radioactive disequilibrium and its relation to the rates and mechanisms of element transport in the shallow portion of an active hydrothermal system. The ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) activity ratios range from 0.73 to 1.46 and are generally correlated with Th-normalized Ba concentrations (Ba{sub N}). Compositions of clinoptilolite and mordenite in these samples are consistent with ion exchange equilibrium between zeolites and coexisting thermal waters. Average K{sup Ba}{sub d mineral-water} values are 1.0 {center dot} 10{sup 5} mL/g for clinoptilolite and 1.4 {center dot} 10{sup 4} mL/g for mordenite. Apparent diffusivities through matrix porosity estimated for R and Ba range from {approximately}10{sup {minus}12} to {approximately}10{sup {minus}10} cm{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1} in thoroughly zeolitic rhyolite; these rates of diffusion are too low to account for the observed distance scale of ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) disequilibrium. The correlated values of ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) disequilibrium and Ba{sub N} represent zeolite-water ion exchange equilibrium that is caused by porous flow of water through the rock matrix and by the relatively rapid diffusion of cations within the zeolite lattices. A water flux of at least {approximately}2.5 (cm{sup 3}{sub water}/cm{sup 3}{sub rock}) yr{sup {minus}1} is required to produce measurable ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) disequilibrium, whereas at least {approximately}23 (cm{sup 3}{sub water}/cm{sup 3}{sub rock}) yr{sup {minus}1} is required for the sample exhibiting the most extreme ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) disequilibrium; these fluxes are much higher than those that can be inferred from net mass transfers of stable species.

  10. UH Parking Access & Mid-Pacific Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¯noa Bilger Addition Art Building Kuykendall Hall Campus Center CORREA RO A D VISITO R PARKING Jakuan Tea/2 hour in green stalls Weekdays after 4pm, Saturdays, and special events: · $6 flat rate Entrance Kiosk

  11. UH Parking Access & Mid-Pacific Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Building Kuykendall Hall Campus Center CORREA RO A D VISITO R PARKING Jakuan Tea House Sinclair Circle before 4pm: · Lower campus - $5 at rate · Upper campus - $2 per 1/2 hour in green stalls Weekdays after 4

  12. The Access Almanac: Solar Parking Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald

    2012-01-01

    to think about getting solar power from our parking lots. ?the sun shines brightest, solar power accounts for less thanlots? They can incorporate solar power into their off-street

  13. March 19, 2013 Webinar: Renewable Energy Parks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This webinar was held March 19, 2013, and provided information on how two cities in Washington and New York integrated multiple renewable energy technologies to create renewable energy parks in...

  14. Microsoft Word - OakParkECDList.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Park ECD Dance List (most recent at top) 1 6-15-15 Callers: Tammy Bretscher, Mady Newfield Music: recorded music Turning by Threes I Care Not for these Ladies Upon a Summer's Day...

  15. Walmart Sees the Light for Parking Lots

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    I don't think about parking lots often. Hot in the summer and jammed with frantic shoppers during holidays, I try to spend as little time in them as possible. But because my passion is energy...

  16. Holyrood Park Stone Tools Mobile Android 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goetz, Danielle

    2014-08-31

    and Edinburgh Museum with the landscape of Holyrood Park through the creation of an Android application. This application, HPST, will assist the public to learn about the artefact records by visualizing the artefacts’ locations, images, videos and site records...

  17. Graph searching and a generalized parking function 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Dimitrije Nenad

    2009-05-15

    Parking functions have been a focus of mathematical research since the mid-1970s. Various generalizations have been introduced since the mid-1990s and deep relationships between these and other areas of mathematics have ...

  18. Performance Modeling of Intelligent Car Parking Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Telek, Miklós

    introduction at the beginning of the century [2], the smart city concept enjoys an enormous attention from. In an intelligent car parking system the driver selects its destination on a smart- phone application when entering

  19. Urban Parks: Volunteers and Civic Engagement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuett, Michael A.

    2007-03-02

    When citizens are engaged with urban park and recreation departments, everyone benefits. This publication describes successful programs that involve community volunteers, and explains what managers can do to engage citizens in such programs....

  20. 10-12 September 2014 Discovery Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    10-12 September 2014 Discovery Park Purdue University WestLafayette,Indiana For more information industry decision makers about theroleoffoodsystemsinachievingsustainablenutritionsecurity from governments, private industry and academia? · What technologies, approaches and mechanisms

  1. Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

    2010-03-01

    Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago�s recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work.

  2. Permit Types, Tiers, and Parking Privileges 2014-2015 Permit Type/Neighborhood Permit Tier Parking Privileges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Privileges A (North Campus A Lot) Outer A lot on North Campus AP (Accessible Campus-wide Parking) ValidPermit Types, Tiers, and Parking Privileges 2014-2015 Permit Type/Neighborhood Permit Tier Parking in all permit-restricted parking spaces except reserved. Not valid in MT spaces. Must comply with posted

  3. Parking and Directions The EECS building is located at P8 and the nearest visitor parking lots are the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cafarella, Michael J.

    Parking and Directions The EECS building is located at P8 and the nearest visitor parking lots Express, Discover, MasterCard and VISA). If you have a blue or gold UM parking permit, please park in lot are the red lots located at N7 (2260 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor MI 48109) and N8 (1226 Murfin Ave, Ann Arbor MI

  4. University of Aberdeen Car Parking Policy -v2.0.docx University of Aberdeen Car Parking Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neri, Peter

    University of Aberdeen Car Parking Policy - v2.0.docx University of Aberdeen Car Parking Policy 1.0 Why have a car parking policy? The University of Aberdeen is aware of the importance of corporate. The University has developed to such an extent that its current car park capacity is not sufficient to provide

  5. 2 0 1 5 -2 0 1 6 R E N E W A L F O R M PARKING (check only one)PARKING (check only one)PARKING (check only one)PARKING (check only one)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, David J.

    this box, I am indicating that I would like to enter into the parking lottery for a space in the lot(s2 0 1 5 - 2 0 1 6 R E N E W A L F O R M FAYETTE SQUARE PARKING (check only one)PARKING (check only one)PARKING (check only one)PARKING (check only one) By checking this box, I am indicating that I plan

  6. National Targets Table

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecialAPPENDIXConcentrating Solar PowerParks CleanSafety MonthNationalH

  7. Desert pavement morphology and dynamics, Big Bend National Park, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Courtney Michelle

    2009-05-15

    29 30 41 42 44 47 48 50 51 52 ix FIGURE 20 Grain size distribution of Study Area 2 sediments, BBNP???. 21 Soil profile cross-sections (10 cm), Study Area 2??????... 22 Grain size distribution of Study Area 3... et al., (2002). Plan view photos show desert pavement from the Cima Volcanic Field in the eastern Mojave Desert, with a 50cm field of view (Wood, 2002). 18 The above study in the Mojave Desert concluded that DP1 has successively more ground...

  8. Soil Resource Inventory of Sequoia National Park, Central Part, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huntington, Gordon L.; Akeson, Mark A.

    1987-01-01

    8*) Somple No. Counly Lob No . Tulare DEPTH HORIZON SEQUOIASample No. 82CA-107-2 (l 9*) Tulare County Lob No J DEPTH (crescent omp Lob No. County Tulare Ndw. Road in T. 16S, R.

  9. Sarawak Forestry Department Brian Clark, Mulu National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cobb, Kim

    responded to radiative forcing in the geologic past? look at Holocene 2. What role did the tropical Pacific) ba04b (89cm) baby1 (10cm) baby2 (8cm) baby3 (5cm) gc03 (23cm) gc04 (6cm) mj01 (23cm) mj02 (20cm) sch01 (33cm) sch02 (86cm) sch03 (36cm) ssc01 (75cm) ssr01 (46cm) ssr02 (13cm) ssr03 (38cm) secret 1 (102

  10. Notes and records Reptiles of Katavi National Park, western

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaffer, H. Bradley

    , PO Box 661, Arusha, Tanzania, 3 PO Box 345, Usa River, Tanzania, 4 Conservation Science Group plains. Annual rainfall totals approximately 900 mm falling between November and April. The first study hinged terrapin X X X Squamata Lizards and Snakes Gekkonidae Geckos Hemidactylus mabouiaeac Tropical

  11. Nonmethane hydrocarbons in the rural southeast United States national parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aneja, Viney P.

    (6.3 to 18.4 ppbv), propane (2.1 to 12.9 ppbv), isopentane (1.3 to 5.7 ppbv), and toluene (1.0 to 7 combustion and industrial processes. Propylene-equivalent concentrations were calculated to account

  12. The seasonality of aerosol properties in Big Bend National Park 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Christopher Lee

    2007-04-25

    ), to characterize the seasonal variability of the Big Bend regions aerosol optical properties. Mass extinction efficiencies and relative humidity scattering enhancement factors were calculated for both externally and internally mixed aerosol populations for all size...

  13. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Unknown Notes Analyses of eight well samples taken consecutively during the flow test showed an inverse correlation between NH3 and Cl concentrations. The last sample taken...

  14. Mercury Vapor At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Varekamp...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DOE-funding Unknown References J. C. Varekamp, P. R. Buseck (1983) Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Additional References Retrieved...

  15. Soil Resource Inventory of Sequoia National Park, Central Part, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huntington, Gordon L.; Akeson, Mark A.

    1987-01-01

    west of Elk Creek Trail on a steep, east facing hill slopeElk Creek Study Area, they are located on ridge crests or on hill

  16. Pacific Island Network Inventory & Monitoring Program National Park Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    Brett Seymour Pearl Harbor over time 1943 Pearl Harbor was the mobilization zone for WWII Pacific theater Seymour Brett Seymour Brett SeymourJennifer Smith US Navy #12;

  17. National Parks Clean Up with Alternative Fuels | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    fuel vehicles and infrastructure (including biodiesel, compressed natural gas, E85-ethanol, and propane). As a result of industry partnerships, Toyota donated 23 Prius...

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mammoth Cave National Park Uses Only

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TA I

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Mowers Help National Park Cut

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TA IMaryland

  20. Hot Springs National Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNew Jersey:Hopkinsville, Kentucky:OpenHot PotCounty,| Open

  1. Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:Bore TechnologiesAssessmentOpenFish

  2. Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Thompson, 1985) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:Bore TechnologiesAssessmentOpenFishOpen Energy

  3. Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk,SageScheucoSedco Hills, California:

  4. Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona: Energy ResourcesProject | Open EnergyFlores,Laser LightLassen

  5. National Park Service Hydropower Assistance webpage | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI Ventures Ltd Jump to: navigation,Naples,DevelopmentLease Financing

  6. THE LABORATORY Located in Menlo Park, California, SLAC National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment TopMetathesis andSeparationsRelevant to Clean2,forfor

  7. San Clemente Island, Channel Islands National Park, California | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProjectData Dashboard RutlandSTEAB's PrioritiesFuel CellFlip|Dataof Energy

  8. San Miguel Island, Channel Islands National Park, California | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProjectData Dashboard RutlandSTEAB's PrioritiesFuelof Energy Miguel Island,

  9. 54 USC Subtitle I - National Park System | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram | Open Energy Information 55 et64ftOpenI -

  10. Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWinds Jump to:Laredo Ridge Wind Farm

  11. Energy Department and National Park Service Announce Clean Cities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find what youSummerEmployment Opportunities ThankPartnership to

  12. Energy Department and National Park Service Announce Clean Cities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find what youSummerEmployment Opportunities ThankPartnership

  13. It's official: the Manhattan Project National Historical Park | Y-12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeat Pumps Heat PumpsfacilityviaGasforVendors

  14. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures JumpCommercial Jump

  15. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures JumpCommercial Jump(Thompson, 1985) | Open Energy

  16. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9) WindGrid Project)Area (1982) | Open Energy

  17. Y-12 and the National Park Service study, part

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single and the history of When2Y-12 and

  18. Sustainable Transportation and National Parks Initiative Featured in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergyPlan | Department ofSUPPLEMENT NOVEMBERSupportingDepartmentTrustMagazine |

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Evaluating National Parks and Forest

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedofDepartmentVOICESEnergy 21st Century

  20. Energy Department and National Park Service Announce Clean Cities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice ofofWind Projects |EnergyAll 50 StatesClean EnergyPartnership

  1. Agencies Move Closer to Creating Manhattan Project National Park |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment of EnergyResearchers atDay 12:was createdNobel ISOWHO WEabove

  2. Driving the National Parks Forward | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory |Sectorfor $1.14 Per Gallon Driving for $1.14the

  3. Manhattan Project National Historical Park Open House Event

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport)Price

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Cities Helps National Parks Model

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender Pump Dispensers to someone byat HomeSustainable

  5. The Making of a National Park | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancialInvestingRenewableTeach and Learn5 BudgetHistory »

  6. ncaslNATIONAL COUNCIL FOR AIR AND STREAM IMPROVEMENT SCALE CONSIDERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    Bulletin No. 776. Research Triangle Park, N.C.: National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream, contact: Publications Coordinator NCASI P.O. Box 13318 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-33 18 (919) 5.58-1999 publications@ncasi.org National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, Inc. (NCASI

  7. Interagency Visitor Center at Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Calabasas, CA This project was to develop the first visitor center for the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area located in the Los Angeles, California area. The previous visitor center was across from a shopping mall in rental space at park headquarters in Thousand Oaks. The new facility is centrally located in the park at a much more appropriate natural and cultural resource setting. It is a partnership project with the Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority, which is a local land conservation and park agency. It is also a joint facility with California State Parks.

  8. ParkNet: A Mobile Sensor Network for Harvesting Real Time Vehicular Parking Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruteser, Marco

    of wasted gas. A recent study [2] indicated that up to 45% of traffic on some streets in New York City by municipal- ities in the ground or in parking meters. This necessitates a large fixed cost of installation of the problem in large cities and the governerment's dedication to long term investments in a smart parking

  9. The Social Life of Steeplechase Park: Neighborhood Dog-Park as a "Third Place 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulati, Nidhi 1986-

    2012-12-11

    that in the American suburbs, neighborhood parks have the potential to serve as ‘third places.’ The twofold purpose of this research was to examine Steeplechase dog-park using Oldenburg’s Third Place construct as a starting point; and then to operationalize third place...

  10. Winter Motor-Vehicle EMISSIONS in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Winter Motor-Vehicle EMISSIONS in Yellowstone National Park A ir-pollution emissions from off- road recreational vehicles have ris- en in national importance, even as emissions from these vehicles have declined of lawsuits, a new study shows that reductions in snowmobile emissions highlight the need for the snowcoach

  11. Origin of the northeastern basin and range seismic parabola: Thermal and mechanical effects of the Yellowstone hotspot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, M.H. (Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Centered about the track of the Yellowstone hotspot is a parabolic pattern of seismicity encompassing a region of aseismicity. Recent studies have shown that this pattern has migrated in tandem with the hotspot. A one dimensional finite-difference thermomechanical model is developed which successfully accounts for the observed patterns of seismicity. The volume, chemistry and timing of magma intrusion used in the model are contained by several geophysical, geochemical and geochronological studies of the eastern Snake River Plain. In this model, mafic magmas are intruded into a lithosphere that is already extending. The intrusions heat the surrounding rock resulting in locally increased strain rates. As the intruded magmas solidify, the length of time required to return strain rates to their pre-intrusion level is then determined. The model assumes constant horizontal tectonic forces and maps strain rate as a function of yield strength and time since intrusion. Model parameters such as crustal thickness, initial geothermal gradient, and amount of magma intruded, are varied in order to assess how they affect turnaround time for strain rates. Off-axis seismicity (seismicity within the seismic parabola exclusive of Yellowstone) is accounted for by lower crustal flow. The lower crustal flow under the seismic parabola is driven by buoyancy forces generated by a sublithospheric plume. The shape of the seismic parabola is controlled by the combination of two irrotational fields; a radial flow field due to the plume and a constant velocity field corresponding to plate motion. In summation the author discusses several other models that have recently been proposed to explain the observed patterns of seismicity and late Cenozoic tectonism of the northeastern Basin and Range province.

  12. www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 320 13 JUNE 2008 1419 6. National Parks Board Singapore, National Parks Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    of Advanced Fuel/Vehicle Systems--A European Study (www.lbst.de/gm-wtw). 8. International Energy Agency Potential of Renewable Energy. Also, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency in Southeast Asia with few natural resources. It relies heavily on imports of fossil fuels to meet its energy

  13. Parking Requirements and Housing Development: Regulation and Reform in Los Angeles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manville, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Michael Manville. 2013. “Parking Requirements and HousingPolicy Debate, 23(2): Minimum parking requirements address athe demand for off-street parking), but also tell developers

  14. Commercial Vehicle Parking in California: Exploratory Evaluation of the Problem and Possible Technology-Based Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Rodier, Caroline J.

    2007-01-01

    Drivers’ response to parking guidance and informationAdequacy of Commercial Truck Parking Facilities – TechnicalPartners for Adequate Parking Facilities Initiative Final

  15. Less Parking, More Carsharing: Supporting Small-Scale Transit-Oriented Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dentel-Post, Colin

    2012-01-01

    strategies  to   reduce  parking  requirements  while  demand  for  street  parking.   BIBLIOGRAPHY   AC  23E.28.090  In-­?lieu  Parking  Fee.   Retrieved  from  

  16. Pricing Our Way Out of Traffic Congestion: parking cash out and HOT lanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald C.; Brown, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    Opportunity to Reduce Minimum Parking Requirements," JournalOpportunity to Reduce Minimum Parking Requirements," Journalof Traffic Congestion: Parking Cash Out and HOTLanes Donald

  17. Parking requirements as a barrier to housing development: regulation and reform in Los Angeles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manville, Michael; Shoup, Donald C

    2010-01-01

    Renaissance resulting in parking shortage. Los AngelesJakle, Scully 2004. Lots of Parking. University of VirginiaDonald Shoup. 2005. People, Parking and Cities. Journal of

  18. Less Parking, More Carsharing: Supporting Small-Scale Transit-Oriented Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dentel-Post, Colin

    2012-01-01

    to  measuring  residential  parking  demand  in  transit  a  portion  of   residential  parking  demand.   Station  will  meet  residential  parking  demand   will  be  met  

  19. Office of Global Material Security | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (DOENNSA) and the U.K. Department of Energy and Climate Change concluded a workshop at Wilton Park, About This Site Budget IG Web Policy...

  20. Jean Lafitte Mammal Survey With support from the National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hood, Craig

    . It is illegal to collect any natural objects including mammals (even their remains). Just give us your info it into our GPS data. Please remember that this is a National Park and all resources are protected