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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

60 years of great science [Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This issue highlights Oak Ridge National Laboratory's contributions in more than 30 areas of research and related activities during the past 60 years and provides glimpses of current activities that are carrying on this heritage.

None

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Comparison of 1983 Great Lakes Winter Weather and Ice Conditions with Previous Years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Winter 1983 was one of the mildest winters in the past 200 years. One result of the unusual winter weather was the mildest overall ice season on the Great Lakes since systematic observations of ice cover extent on the Lakes were initiated some 20-...

Raymond A. Assel; C. Robert Snider; Reginald Lawrence

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Multi-year, Summertime Observations of Daytime Fair-Weather Cumuli at the ARM Southern Great Plains facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long data record (14-year) of ground-based observations at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is analyzed to document the macroscopic and dynamical properties of daytime fair-weather cumulus ...

Arunchandra S. Chandra; P. Kollias; B. A. Albrecht

4

Two-Year Simulation of the Great Lakes Region with a Coupled Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we report on an experiment aimed at evaluating the feasibility of the application of our coupled regional climate modeling system to long-term climate simulations over the Great Lakes region. The simulation analyzed covers a ...

Gary T. Bates; Steven W. Hostetler; Filippo Giorgi

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

A 10-year climatology of solar radiation for the Great Barrier Reef: implications for recent mass coral bleaching events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 10-year solar radiation climatology is developed for the Great Barrier Reef region using data from the Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (GMS). The method uses a look-up table based on the STREAMER radiative transfer model for a tropical atmosphere. ...

Itsara Masiri; Manuel Nunez; Evan Weller

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

A 3-Year Climatology of Cloud and Radiative Properties Derived from GOES-8 Data Over the Southern Great Plains  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3-Year Climatology of Cloud and Radiative Properties 3-Year Climatology of Cloud and Radiative Properties Derived from GOES-8 Data Over the Southern Great Plains M. M. Khaiyer, A. D. Rapp, D. R. Doelling, and M. L. Nordeen Analytical Service and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis, W. L. Smith, Jr., and L. Nguyen Atmospheric Sciences Division National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Introduction While the various instruments maintained at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF) provide detailed cloud and radiation measurements for a small area, satellite cloud property retrievals provide a means of examining the large-scale properties of the surrounding region over an extended period of time. Seasonal and inter-annual

7

Investigation of Large-Scale Atmospheric Moisture Budget and Land Surface Interactions over U.S. Southern Great Plains including for CLASIC (June 2007)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric moisture budget and surface interactions for the southern Great Plains are evaluated for contrasting May–June periods (1998, 2002, 2006, and 2007) as background for the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) of (wet) ...

Peter J. Lamb; Diane H. Portis; Abraham Zangvil

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

UW Madison Fleet Fiscal Year 2010 Rates: Fuel, maintenance and insurance costs are included. If fuel prices exceed the budgeted  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UW Madison Fleet Fiscal Year 2010 Rates: Fuel, maintenance and insurance costs are included. If fuel prices exceed the budgeted amount by a significant margin, the rates will be amended with a fuel surcharge at that time and the change notice will be posted in the fleet web site, rates page. Some rate

Sheridan, Jennifer

9

Erosion Potential of a Burn Site in the Mojave-Great Basin Transition Zone: Interim Summary of One Year of Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A historic return interval of 100 years for large fires in deserts in the Southwest U.S. is being replaced by one where fires may reoccur as frequently as every 20 to 30 years. This increase in fires has implications for management of Soil Sub-Project Corrective Action Units (CAUs) for which the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site office (NNSA/NSO) has responsibility. A series of studies has been initiated at uncontaminated analog sites to better understand the possible impacts of erosion and transport by wind and water should contaminated soil sites burn over to understand technical and perceived risk they might pose to site workers and public receptors in communities around the NTS, TTR, and NTTR; and to develop recommendations for stabilization and restoration after a fire. The first of these studies was undertaken at the Jacob fire, a lightning-caused fire approximately 12 kilometers north of Hiko, Nevada, that burned approximately 200 ha between August 6-8, 2008, and is representative of a transition zone on the NTS between the Mojave and Great Basin Deserts, where the largest number of Soil Sub-Project CAUs/CASs are located.

V. Etyemezian, D. Shafer, J. Miller, I. Kavouras, S. Campbell, D. DuBois, J. King, G. Nikolich, and S. Zitzer

2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

10

Recent Great Lakes Ice Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of ice observations made by cooperative observers from shoreline stations reveals significant changes in the ice season on the North American Great Lakes over the past 35years. Although the dataset is highly inhomogeneous and year-to-...

Howard P. Hanson; Claire S. Hanson; Brenda H. Yoo

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female (W, F) 474 Total includes 2561 permanent and 21 temporary employees. PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER National Nuclear Security Administration As of March 23, 2013...

12

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 1 YEAR 2011 Males 18 Females 23 YEAR 2011 SES 2 EJ/EK 2 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 35 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 1 American Indian Female 2 African American Male 3 African American Female 9 Asian Male 0 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 2 Hispanic Female 6 White Male 12 White Female 6 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Information Management & Chief Information Officer, NA-IM As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 18 43.9% 23 56.1% Gender Males Females 4.9% 4.9% 85.4% 4.9% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2.4% 4.9% 7.3% 22.0% 0.0% 0.0% 4.9% 14.6% 29.3% 14.6% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male

13

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

4 4 YEAR 2011 Males 21 Females 23 YEAR 2011 SES 3 EJ/EK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 3 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 31 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 5 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American Indian Female 0 African American Male 1 African American Female 2 Asian Male 1 Asian Female 1 Hispanic Male 6 Hispanic Female 10 White Male 13 White Female 10 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Office of General Counsel, NA-GC As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 21 47.7% 23 52.3% Gender Males Females 6.8% 2.3% 2.3% 6.8% 70.5% 11.4% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK EN 03 NN (Engineering) NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 0.0% 0.0% 2.3% 4.5% 2.3% 2.3% 13.6% 22.7% 29.5% 22.7% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male

14

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

6 6 YEAR 2011 Males 7 Females 9 YEAR 2011 SES 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 9 GS 15 2 GS 13 2 GS 12 1 GS 11 1 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American Indian Female 0 African American Male 1 African American Female 3 Asian Male 1 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 1 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 4 White Female 6 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator of External Affairs, NA-EA As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 7 43.8% 9 56.3% Gender Males Females 6.3% 56.3% 12.5% 12.5% 6.3% 6.3% Pay Plan SES NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) GS 15 GS 13 GS 12 GS 11 0.0% 0.0% 6.3% 18.8% 6.3% 0.0% 6.3% 0.0% 25.0% 37.5% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male Hispanic Female White Male White Female FY11 Workforce Diversity

15

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

40 40 YEAR 2011 Males 68 Females 72 YEAR 2011 SES 5 EJ/EK 1 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 115 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 1 American Indian Female 2 African American Male 3 African American Female 7 Asian Male 4 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 25 Hispanic Female 26 White Male 35 White Female 37 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Acquistion & Project Management, NA-APM As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 68 48.6% 72 51.4% Gender Males Females 3.6% 0.7% 11.4% 82.1% 2.1% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK NN (Engineering) NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 0.7% 1.4% 2.1% 5.0% 2.9% 0.0% 17.9% 18.6% 25.0% 26.4% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male

16

Great Britain | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Britain Britain Dataset Summary Description The windspeed database provides estimates of mean annual wind speed throughout the UK, averaged over a 1-kilometer square area, at each of the following three heights above ground level (agl): 10 meters, 25 meters, and 45 meters. The windspeed database is available through the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) website, and is provided for archive purposes only. The database is comprised of historic information, including results derived from mathematical models, so it should not be considered to be measured data, or up to date or accurate. Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released December 31st, 2000 (13 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords archive Great Britain Northern Ireland

17

Years  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology in and Technology in the National Interest 60 Years of Excellence Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory FY 2012 Annual Report About the Cover: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) engineers Chris Spadaccini (left) and Eric Duoss are shown experimenting with direct ink-writing to create micro- to macroscale structures with extreme precision. The Laboratory is advancing this process and other additive manufacturing technologies to develop new materials with extraordinary properties for use in a wide range of national-security and other applications. About the Laboratory: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was founded in 1952 to enhance the security of the United States by advancing nuclear weapons science and technology. With a talented and dedicated workforce and

18

Great Plains gasification project  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes organizational and research work on a coal gasification project which is based on North Dakota lignite. Many design changes have been incorporated into this plant, which is now being built after years of delay due to environmental, financial, and regulatory problems. Engineering and operational details are given for a project designed for conversion of 22,000 tons/day of liquid into fuel gas and several by products. Economic considerations are included.

Kuhn, A.K.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Great Plains: status of the Great Plains coal gasification project  

SciTech Connect

Updated information is presented on the Great Plains coal gasification project in North Dakota following the default of a $1.54 billion federal loan by the project sponsors. This report includes updated information obtained through October 31, 1985, on the loan default, Great Plains loan and gas pricing formula, legal matters and agreements, the Department of Energy's options and actions, Great Plains operations, and socioeconomic issues. The new information highlights changes in the gas pricing calculations; the Department's action to pay off the defaulted loan; legal action concerning gas purchase agreements; the project sponsors' proposed settlement; September revenue, expense, and production data; coal lease payments; capital improvement projects; plant by-products; and the final results of a North Dakota task force study of the potential socioeconomic impact if the plant closes.

Not Available

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Southern Great Plains  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govSitesSouthern Great Plains govSitesSouthern Great Plains SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Southern Great Plains SGP Central Facility, Lamont, OK 36° 36' 18.0" N, 97° 29' 6.0" W Altitude: 320 meters The Southern Great Plains (SGP) site was the first field measurement site established by DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Scientists are using the information obtained from the SGP to improve cloud and radiative models and parameterizations and, thereby, the performance of atmospheric general circulation models used for climate research.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Great Lakes | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lakes Lakes Dataset Summary Description This dataset is a geographic shapefile generated from the original raster data. The original raster data resolution is a 200-meter cell size. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released August 19th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 23rd, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords GIS Great Lakes NREL offshore wind shapefile U.S. wind windspeed Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 11.8 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment DISCLAIMER NOTICE This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations. DISCLAIMER NOTICE This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations.

22

Great American Smokeout —  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the American Cancer Society, is an annual event that encourages smokers to quit for at least 1 day in the hope that this might challenge them to stop permanently (1). This year, GASO will be held on November 18. Major changes have occurred since the first GASO in 1977. In 1978, approximately 34 % of adults smoked; by 2009, nearly 21 % smoked (2–4). Federal laws now prohibit smoking on airlines, and 24 states and the District of Columbia have comprehensive smoking bans (3,4). The U.S. government also has added coverage of smoking cessation treatments to health plans. As of October 1, 2010, Medicaid programs are required to cover tobaccodependence treatments for pregnant women, and in 2011, cessation coverage will be provided to all federal employees, retirees, and their spouses and dependents. Despite progress, 46.6 million U.S. adults smoke, 40% of nonsmokers are exposed to secondhand smoke, and 443,000 deaths each year are attributed to smoking and secondhand smoke (3–5). Additional information and support for quitting is available online

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Great Plains makes 100 billion cubic feet  

SciTech Connect

The Great Plains coal gasification plant on January 18, 1987 produced its 100 billionth cubic foot of gas since start-up July 28, 1984. Owned by the Department of Energy and operated by ANG Coal Gasification Company, the plant uses the Lurgi process to produce about 50 billion cubic feet per year of gas from five million tons per year of lignite. The plant has been performing at well above design capacity.

Not Available

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Great Western Malting Company geothermal project, Pocatello, Idaho. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Great Western Malting Company recently constructed a barley malting facility in Pocatello, Idaho, designed to produce 6.0 million bushels per year of brewing malt. This facility uses natural gas to supply the energy for germination and kilning processes. The escalating cost of natural gas has prompted the company to look at alternate and more economical sources of energy. Trans Energy Systems has investigated the viabiity of using geothermal energy at the new barley processing plant. Preliminary investigations show that a geothermal resource probably exists, and payback on the installation of a system to utilize the resource will occur in under 2 years. The Great Western Malting plant site has geological characteristics which are similar to areas where productive geothermal wells have been established. Geological investigations indicate that resource water temperatures will be in the 150 to 200/sup 0/F range. Geothermal energy of this quality will supply 30 to 98% of the heating requirements currently supplied by natural gas for this malting plant. Trans Energy Systems has analyzed several systems of utilizing the geothermal resource at the Great Western barley malting facility. These systems included: direct use of geothermal water; geothermal energy heating process water through an intermediary heat exchanger; coal or gas boosted geothermal systems; and heat pump boosted geothermal system. The analysis examined the steps that are required to process the grain.

Christensen, N.T.; McGeen, M.A.; Corlett, D.F.; Urmston, R.

1981-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

25

Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In fiscal year 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) received funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake a broad array of tasks to either directly or indirectly address the barriers that faced much of the Great Plains states and their efforts to produce and transmit wind energy at the time. This program, entitled Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project, was focused on the central goal of stimulating wind energy development through expansion of new transmission capacity or development of new wind energy capacity through alternative market development. The original task structure was as follows: Task 1 - Regional Renewable Credit Tracking System (later rescoped to Small Wind Turbine Training Center); Task 2 - Multistate Transmission Collaborative; Task 3 - Wind Energy Forecasting System; and Task 4 - Analysis of the Long-Term Role of Hydrogen in the Region. As carried out, Task 1 involved the creation of the Small Wind Turbine Training Center (SWTTC). The SWTTC, located Grand Forks, North Dakota, consists of a single wind turbine, the Endurance S-250, on a 105-foot tilt-up guyed tower. The S-250 is connected to the electrical grid on the 'load side' of the electric meter, and the power produced by the wind turbine is consumed locally on the property. Establishment of the SWTTC will allow EERC personnel to provide educational opportunities to a wide range of participants, including grade school through college-level students and the general public. In addition, the facility will allow the EERC to provide technical training workshops related to the installation, operation, and maintenance of small wind turbines. In addition, under Task 1, the EERC hosted two small wind turbine workshops on May 18, 2010, and March 8, 2011, at the EERC in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Task 2 involved the EERC cosponsoring and aiding in the planning of three transmission workshops in the midwest and western regions. Under Task 3, the EERC, in collaboration with Meridian Environmental Services, developed and demonstrated the efficacy of a wind energy forecasting system for use in scheduling energy output from wind farms for a regional electrical generation and transmission utility. With the increased interest at the time of project award in the production of hydrogen as a critical future energy source, many viewed hydrogen produced from wind-generated electricity as an attractive option. In addition, many of the hydrogen production-related concepts involve utilization of energy resources without the need for additional electrical transmission. For this reason, under Task 4, the EERC provided a summary of end uses for hydrogen in the region and focused on one end product in particular (fertilizer), including several process options and related economic analyses.

Brad G. Stevens, P.E.; Troy K. Simonsen; Kerryanne M. Leroux

2012-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

26

Fish of the Great Lakes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation FISH OF THE GREAT LAKES As you stand at the top of one of the tallest buildings in downtown...

27

Great Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Great Basin Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Great Basin Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.609920257001,"lon":-114.0380859375,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

28

The Great Gas Hydrate Escape  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Great Gas Great Gas Hydrate Escape The Great Gas Hydrate Escape Computer simulations revealing how methane and hydrogen pack into gas hydrates could enlighten alternative fuel production and carbon dioxide storage January 25, 2012 | Tags: Carver, Chemistry, Energy Technologies, Hopper, Materials Science PNNL Contact: Mary Beckman , +1 509 375-3688, mary.beckman@pnl.gov NERSC Contact: Linda Vu, +1 510 495 2402, lvu@lbl.gov The methane trapped in frozen water burns easily, creating ice on fire. For some time, researchers have explored flammable ice for low-carbon or alternative fuel or as a place to store carbon dioxide. Now, a computer analysis of the ice and gas compound, known as a gas hydrate, reveals key details of its structure. The results show that hydrates can hold hydrogen

29

Why Sequence Great Salt Lake?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Great Salt Lake? Great Salt Lake? On average, the Great Salt Lake is four times saltier than the ocean and also has heavy metals, high concentrations of sulfur and petroleum seeps. In spite of all this, the lake is the saltiest body of water to support life. The lake hosts brine shrimp, algae and a diverse array of microbes, not to mention the roughly 5 million birds that migrate there annually. The secret to these microbes' ability to survive under such harsh conditions might be revealed in their genes. Researchers expect the genetic data will provide insight into how the microorganisms tolerate pollutants such as sulfur and detoxify pollutants such as sulfur and heavy metals like mercury. The information could then be used to develop bioremediation techniques. Researchers also expect that sequencing microorganisms sampled

30

Drought in the Great Plains: History of Societal Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Great Plains has a long history of drought episodes which have, in some years, significantly reducedexpected crop yields. The historic evidence suggests that such droughts will probably recur in the future.The drought of the 1930's stimulated ...

Alan D. Hecht

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This progress report on the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project discusses Lignite coal, natural gas, and by-products production as well as gas quality. A tabulation of raw material, product and energy consumption is provided for plant operations. Capital improvement projects and plant maintenance activities are detailed and summaries are provided for environmental, safety, medical, quality assurance, and qualtiy control activities.

Not Available

1988-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

32

Electrofishing survey of the Great Miami River. Annual report, September 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fish sampling by electroshocking in the Great Miami River above and below the Fernald sit was designed to determine changes in the health of the fish community compared to the previous nine years and to collect samples for uranium analysis in fish filets. This document contains information describing the findings of this program. Topics discussed include: physical and chemical parameters, species richness, species diversity, and water analysis.

Stocker, L.E.; Miller, M.C.; Engman, J.; Evans, R.L.; Koch, R.W.; Brence, W.A. [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Great missions seeking great minds - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(RL) houses various remote The Robotics Laboratory (RL) houses various remote manipulator systems, including the Dual Arm Work manipulator systems, including the Dual Arm...

34

Great Plains Gasification Project status report  

SciTech Connect

The Great Plains Gasification Project is the first commercial synthetic fuels project based on coal conversion in the US. The goal is to convert North Dakota lignite into pipeline quality synthetic natural gas (SNG). The project consists of an open pit coal mine, a gasification plant, and an SNG pipeline in Mercer County, North Dakota. The project took 12 years from its conception to the production in 1984 of SNG for users. The author describes the plant's basic processes, the start-up activities and schedule, and some of the more interesting start-up problems.

Pollock, D.C.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on Regional Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on climate is assessed by comparing two decade-long simulations, with the lakes either included or excluded, using the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics Regional Climate Model, ...

Michael Notaro; Kathleen Holman; Azar Zarrin; Elody Fluck; Steve Vavrus; Val Bennington

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Technologies Available ...  

Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Technologies Available for Licensing Established by the Department of Energy (DOE) in 2007, the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research ...

37

Great Lakes Biomass State and Regional Partnership (GLBSRP)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Council of Great Lakes Governors administered the Great Lakes Biomass State and Regional Partnership (GLBSRP) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). This Partnership grew out of the existing Regional Biomass Energy Program which the Council had administered since 1983. The GLBSRP includes the States of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin. The GLBSRPĂ?Â?s overall goal is to facilitate the increased production and use of bioenergy and biobased products throughout the region. The GLBSRP has traditionally addressed its goals and objectives through a three-pronged approach: providing grants to the States; undertaking region-wide education, outreach and technology transfer projects; and, providing in-house management, support and information dissemination. At the direction of US Department of Energy, the primary emphasis of the GLBSRP in recent years has been education and outreach. Therefore, most activities have centered on developing educational materials, hosting workshops and conferences, and providing technical assistance. This report summarizes a selection of activities that were accomplished under this cooperative agreement.

Frederic Kuzel

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Multidecadal Drought Cycles in the Great Basin Recorded by the Great Salt Lake: Modulation from a Transition-Phase Teleconnection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the meteorological conditions associated with multidecadal drought cycles as revealed by lake level fluctuation of the Great Salt Lake (GSL). The analysis combined instrumental, proxy, and simulation datasets, including the ...

Shih-Yu Wang; Robert R. Gillies; Thomas Reichler

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Accomplishments At The Great Basin Center For Geothermal Energy | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Accomplishments At The Great Basin Center For Geothermal Energy Accomplishments At The Great Basin Center For Geothermal Energy Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Accomplishments At The Great Basin Center For Geothermal Energy Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy (GBCGE) has been funded by DOE since March 2002 to conduct geothermal resource exploration and assessment in the Great Basin. In that time, those efforts have led to significant advances in understanding the regional and local conditions necessary for the formation of geothermal systems. Accomplishments include the development of GPS-based crustal strain rate measurements as a geothermal exploration tool, development of new methods of detecting geothermal features with remotely sensed imagery, and the detection of

40

THE UNIVERSITYOF A GREAT CITY DEMANDS A GREAT UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planning Program and Coastal Sustainability Stu- dio, Louisiana State University; Director, Adaptation investments are informed by climate change trends and projections · Water: Increasing protection for wetlands partners to initiate climate adaptation measures, including: · Reserving land farther in from wetlands so

Kulp, Mark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Anthony Wayne: The History and Archaeology of an Early Great Lakes Steamboat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Great Lakes side-wheel steamboat Anthony Wayne was built in 1837 at Perrysburg, OH and participated in lakes shipping during a time when such vessels were experiencing their heyday. Designed as a passenger and cargo carrier, the steamer spent 13 years transporting goods and people throughout the Upper Lakes until succumbing to a boiler explosion while headed to Buffalo on 28 April 1850. The remains of Anthony Wayne were discovered in 2006 and two years later a collaborative project was begun for the purposes of documenting and assessing the present day condition of the wreck. Anthony Wayne is the oldest steamboat wreck on the Great Lakes to be studied by archaeologists and represents an important piece of maritime heritage that can aid researchers in understanding architectural and machinery specifics that are unknown to us today. This thesis presents the results of an archaeological and archival investigation of Anthony Wayne. Information pertaining to the discovery and significance of the vessel are presented, followed by descriptions of Perrysburg and its shipping industry, the steamer's owners, and how the vessel was built. The operational history of Anthony Wayne is then outlined chronologically, including ports of call, cargoes, masters, and incidents the steamer experienced. Details of the explosion and the aftermath of the sinking are then discussed, followed by a brief summary of other Great Lakes steamboat catastrophes from 1850 and why boilers explode. Focus then shifts to the two-year archaeological investigation, including project objectives, methodology, and findings. The construction specifics of the steamboat's hull, drive system, and associated artifacts are then presented, followed by post-project analysis and conclusions. A catalog of Great Lakes steam vessels, vessel enrollment documentation, the coroner's inquest following the disaster, and the initial dive report from the discoverers are furnished as appendices.

Krueger, Bradley Alan

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Great Plains Project: at worst a $1. 7 billion squeeze  

SciTech Connect

On January 29, 1982, seeking a loan guarantee for its coal-to-gas synfuels project, Great Plains Gasification Associates told the Department of Energy that they expected to reap $1.2 billion in net income to the partnership during the first 10 years of the venture. On March 31, 1983, Great Plains treasurer Rodney Boulanger had a different projection: a horrific loss of $773 million in the first decade. The Great Plains project, with construction 50% complete, is being built near Beulah, ND. The project has a design capacity of 137.5 million cubic feet a day of SNG. Great Plains' analysis assumes that the plant will operate at 70% of design capacity in 1985, 77% in 1986, 84% in 1987 and 91% thereafter. The company projects the total project cost at $2.1 billion, consisting of plant costs of $1.9 billion and coal mine costs of $156 million. In originally projecting a cumulative net income of better than $1 billion, the partners anticipated running losses in only three of the first 10 years, and cash distributions from the project of $893 million during the first decade. Under the new projections, even in the best case, the first four years would show losses and there would be no distribution to the partners. In the worst case, the project would run in the red every year for the first 10 years.

Maize, K.

1983-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

43

National Parks Move Transportation Forward in America's Great Outdoors |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Parks Move Transportation Forward in America's Great Parks Move Transportation Forward in America's Great Outdoors National Parks Move Transportation Forward in America's Great Outdoors March 28, 2013 - 3:00pm Addthis Together, the five newest National Parks Initiative projects will save the equivalent of nearly 10,000 gallons of gasoline and 71 tons of greenhouse gas emissions per year. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Together, the five newest National Parks Initiative projects will save the equivalent of nearly 10,000 gallons of gasoline and 71 tons of greenhouse gas emissions per year. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program What are the key facts? The five new National Parks Initiative projects will save the

44

Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes...

45

Financial situation of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GAO reviewed drafts of DOE's National Energy Policy Plan IV, calculated synthetic gas prices using Great Plains methodology, converted those prices to current year dollars, and used DOE's computer model of the project's economics to analyze the cash flow forecast. GAO found both the model and the data produced to be reliable. (PSB)

Not Available

1983-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

46

2009 Great Places Awards -- Call for Submissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009 Great Places Awards Places, the Environmental Designannounce the twelfth annual awards program for Place Design,ipation of Metropolis, the awards program has a new name in

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Mutations of the GREAT gene cause cryptorchidism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank accession no. AF453828 In humans, failure of testicular descent (cryptorchidism) is one of the most frequent congenital malformations, affecting 1–3 % of newborn boys. The clinical consequences of this abnormality are infertility in adulthood and a significantly increased risk of testicular malignancy. Recently, we described a mouse transgene insertional mutation, crsp, causing high intraabdominal cryptorchidism in homozygous males. A candidate gene Great (G-protein-coupled receptor affecting testis descent), was identified within the transgene integration site. Great encodes a seven-transmembrane receptor with a close similarity to the glycoprotein hormone receptors. The Great gene is highly expressed in the gubernaculum, the ligament that controls testicular movement during development, and therefore may be responsible for mediating hormonal signals that affect testicular descent. Here we show that genetic targeting of the Great gene in mice causes infertile bilateral intraabdominal cryptorchidism. The mutant gubernaculae fail to differentiate, indicating that the Great gene controls their development. Mutation screening of the human GREAT gene was performed using DHPLC analysis of the genomic DNA from 60 cryptorchid patients. Nucleotide variations in GREAT cDNA were found in both the patient and the control populations. A unique missense mutation (T222P) in the ectodomain of the GREAT receptor was identified in one of the patients. This mutant receptor fails to respond to ligand stimulation, implicating the GREAT gene in the etiology in some cases of cryptorchidism in humans.

Ivan P. Gorlov; Aparna Kamat; Natalia V. Bogatcheva; Eric Jones; Dolores J. Lamb; Anne Truong; Colin E. Bishop; Ken Mcelreavey; Er I. Agoulnik

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

great_lakes_90mwindspeed_off  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GISDataTechnologySpecificUnitedStatesWindHighResolutionGreatLakes90mWindspeedOffshoreWindHighResolution.zip> Description: Abstract: Annual average offshore wind...

49

The Great Plains coal gasification project status  

SciTech Connect

The Great Plains Gasification Project is the first commercial-sized plant to produce substitute natural gas from coal in the United States. The plant is designed to convert 14,000 tons/D of North Dakota lignite into 137.5 million standard cubic feet of gas per day. The plant construction has been successfully completed per original design, on schedule and on budget. The plant has also been successfully turned over from construction to operations, as per the original plan. With the completion of the capital projects being implemented at the plant, plans are to achieve 70 percent stream factor in the first year of production (1985). The DOE-Chicago Operations Office has been assigned the responsibility for monitoring the project's performance against baselines of cost, schedule, and technical criteria. During the startup phase of the project, significant technological advancements have been made and considerable knowledge has been gained, both by the operators and DOE (considering this to be a first of a kind plant built in the U.S.).

Bodnaruk, B.J.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Great Plains Gasification Project status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Great Plains Coal Gasification Project is designed to convert North Dakota lignite into pipeline quality high Btu synthetic natural gas (SNG). Located in Mercer County, North Dakota, the project consists of a coal gasification plant, coal mine, and an SNG pipeline. Construction of the project started in the summer of 1981 and was essentially complete by the fourth quarter of 1984. The plant operating staff started initial start-up planning in early 1982 and moved to the plant site in late 1982. The first unit taken over from construction was the secondary water treating unit and initial operations began on August 19, 1983. The remainder of the plant was commissioned and started up in a planned sequence with initial production of SNG occurring on July 28, 1983. Both trains were in operation and the plant was producing at about 70 percent of design capacity by December 1984-a date that has been targeted for in a start-up schedule prepared some 4-5 years earlier.

Pollock, D.C.; Stockwell, R.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Great Lakes Surface Environmental Analysis | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Great Lakes Surface Environmental Analysis Great Lakes Surface Environmental Analysis Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Great Lakes Surface Environmental Analysis Dataset Summary Description The Great Lakes Surface Environmental Analysis (GLSEA2) is a digital map of the Great Lakes surface water temperature and ice cover which is produced daily at the NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) in Ann Arbor, Michigan through the NOAA CoastWatch program. The GLSEA is stored as a 1024x1024 pixel map in PNG or ASCII format, suitable for viewing on PCs and workstations with readily available software. The lake surface temperatures are derived from NOAA polar-orbiting satellite imagery obtained through the Great Lakes CoastWatch program. The addition of ice cover information was implemented in early 1999, using data provided by the National Ice Center (NIC). Lake surface temperatures are updated daily with information from the cloud-free portions of the previous day's satellite imagery. If no imagery is available, a smoothing algorithm is applied to the previous day's map. Ice information will then be added, using the most recent Great Lakes Ice Analysis produced by NIC, currently daily during the ice season. GLERL is currently receiving a product suite of an average of 108 enhanced digital images including satellite-derived surface temperature (Fig. 1.1), visible and near-infrared reflectance, brightness temperatures, cloud masks, and satellite/solar zenith angle data from the NOAA/AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer).

52

Insolation resource assessment program plan. Fiscal year 1979--Fiscal year 1981. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Insolation Resource Assessment Program is to collect, standardize, certify, process,, and archive geophysical data for solar energy applications. The principal solar parameters to be measured are global, direct, diffuse and total radiation on an inclined surface. The measurement of the spectral distribution of solar radiation is also important to the development of several technologies. The aim of many of the completed, current, and planned projects presented in the IRAP Plan is to improve solar data collection methods and procedures and to refine solar radiation forecasting capabilities.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE April 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis An operator uses robotic manipulators to process RH TRU. An operator uses robotic manipulators to process RH TRU. Idaho - The Waste Disposition Project Team at the Department of Energy's Idaho Site has continued to keep its commitment to remove remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste out of Idaho, protecting the Snake River Plain Aquifer and keeping the Office of Environmental Management's commitment to environmental clean up. In 2007, the first shipment of RH TRU waste left the gates of the Idaho Site, headed to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. In the three years since, devoted individuals on the CH2M-WG, Idaho's (CWI)

54

WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE April 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis An operator uses robotic manipulators to process RH TRU. An operator uses robotic manipulators to process RH TRU. Idaho - The Waste Disposition Project Team at the Department of Energy's Idaho Site has continued to keep its commitment to remove remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste out of Idaho, protecting the Snake River Plain Aquifer and keeping the Office of Environmental Management's commitment to environmental clean up. In 2007, the first shipment of RH TRU waste left the gates of the Idaho Site, headed to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. In the three years since, devoted individuals on the CH2M-WG, Idaho's (CWI)

55

Status of the Great Plains coal gasification project - Summer 1983  

SciTech Connect

Construction of the Great Plains coal gasification plant in North Dakota was 3 weeks behind schedule as of May 31, 1983, but cumulative project costs were less than originally estimated. A March 1983 analysis by Great Plains raised questions about the project's economic viability, which is closely linked to future energy prices. The estimated gas prices used in the analysis were lower than those used in January 1982 to justify construction. As a result, the project's investors are concerned about possible losses during the early years of operations. GAO's review shows, however, that Great Plains did not consider substantial tax benefits which may be available to the parent companies of the project's investors. If these benefits are considered, the project's economic viability could be more positive. Should the investors end their participation, some tax benefits previously obtained would have to be repaid.

Not Available

1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

56

An Investigation of the Thermal and Energy Balance Regimes of Great Slave and Great Bear Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Great Slave Lake and Great Bear Lake have large surface areas, water volumes, and high latitudinal positions; are cold and deep; and are subject to short daylight periods in winter and long ones in summer. They are dissimilar hydrologically. ...

Wayne R. Rouse; Peter D. Blanken; Normand Bussičres; Anne E. Walker; Claire J. Oswald; William M. Schertzer; Christopher Spence

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

USACE Campaign Plan Making USACE GREAT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Army Corps of Engineers will, through execution of this Campaign Plan, become a GREAT organization briefings and outreach · Key Task: In-process field personnel at SPA HQ ­ SPA Action Item 1a2b: Recruit

US Army Corps of Engineers

58

About Upper Great Plains Regional Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Upper Great Plains Region carries out Western's mission in Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa, and Minnesota. We sell more than 9 billion kilowatt-hours of...

59

Energy and water in the Great Lakes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nexus between thermoelectric power production and water use is not uniform across the U.S., but rather differs according to regional physiography, demography, power plant fleet composition, and the transmission network. That is, in some regions water demand for thermoelectric production is relatively small while in other regions it represents the dominate use. The later is the case for the Great Lakes region, which has important implications for the water resources and aquatic ecology of the Great Lakes watershed. This is today, but what about the future? Projected demographic trends, shifting lifestyles, and economic growth coupled with the threat of global climate change and mounting pressure for greater U.S. energy security could have profound effects on the region's energy future. Planning for such an uncertain future is further complicated by the fact that energy and environmental planning and regulatory decisionmaking is largely bifurcated in the region, with environmental and water resource concerns generally taken into account after new energy facilities and technologies have been proposed, or practices are already in place. Based on these confounding needs, the objective of this effort is to develop Great Lakes-specific methods and tools to integrate energy and water resource planning and thereby support the dual goals of smarter energy planning and development, and protection of Great Lakes water resources. Guiding policies for this planning are the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact and the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The desired outcome of integrated energy-water-aquatic resource planning is a more sustainable regional energy mix for the Great Lakes basin ecosystem.

Tidwell, Vincent Carroll

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF RIVERBED HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY ALONG THE GREAT MIAMI RIVER, SOUTHWEST OHIO: A CONTINUANCE OF DATA GATHERING AND INSTRUMENTATION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A year-long practicum was undertaken to continue the investigation of riverbed scour and deposition at a site on the Great Miami River. Data were gathered… (more)

Windeler, Britton

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Synthetic fuels. Status of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes updated information obtained through February 14, 1986, on the loan-default, Great Plains loan and gas pricing formula, legal matters and agreements, the Department of Energy's options and actions, and Great Plains operations. The new information highlights changes in the gas pricing calculations; legal action concerning gas purchase agreements and mortgage foreclosure; the Department's determination of the project sponsors' outstanding liability; the Department's progress in evaluating its options; revenue, expense, production, and plant employment data; capital improvement projects; and plant maintenance issues. Our November fact sheet included information on socioeconomic issues. We have not obtained any additional information on these issues and are, therefore, not repeating the socioeconomic information in this fact sheet.

Not Available

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Great River Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Great River Energy Great River Energy Place Minnesota Utility Id 7570 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Great_River_Energy&oldid=410764"

63

Inventory Mistakes and the Great Moderation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why did the volatility of U.S. real GDP decline by more than the volatility of final sales with the Great Moderation in the mid-1980s? One possible explanation is that firms shifted their inventory behaviour towards a greater emphasis on production smoothing. In this paper, we investigate the role of inventories in the Great Moderation by estimating an unobserved components model that identifies inventory and sales shocks and their propagation. We find only mixed evidence of increased production smoothing. Instead, it was a reduction in inventory mistakes that accounts for the excess volatility reduction in output relative to sales. The inventory mistakes are informational errors related to production that must be set in advance and their reduction also helps to explain the changed forecasting role of inventories since the mid-1980s. Our findings provide an optimistic prognosis for the continuation of the Great Moderation.

James Morley; Aarti Singh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

GreatPoint Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GreatPoint Energy GreatPoint Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name GreatPoint Energy Address 222 Third Street Place Cambridge, Massachusetts Zip 02142 Sector Biomass Product Converts coal, petroleum coke and biomass into natural gas Website http://www.greatpointenergy.co Coordinates 42.3672873°, -71.0814466° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3672873,"lon":-71.0814466,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

65

Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendix F Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including Section 106 Consultation STATE OF CALIFORNIA - THE RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN, JR., Governor OFFICE OF HISTORIC PRESERVATION DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION 1725 23 rd Street, Suite 100 SACRAMENTO, CA 95816-7100 (916) 445-7000 Fax: (916) 445-7053 calshpo@parks.ca.gov www.ohp.parks.ca.gov June 14, 2011 Reply in Reference To: DOE110407A Angela Colamaria Loan Programs Office Environmental Compliance Division Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave SW, LP-10 Washington, DC 20585 Re: Topaz Solar Farm, San Luis Obispo County, California Dear Ms. Colamaria: Thank you for seeking my consultation regarding the above noted undertaking. Pursuant to 36 CFR Part 800 (as amended 8-05-04) regulations implementing Section

66

Update on the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project  

SciTech Connect

The Great Plains Gasification Plant is the US's first commercial synthetic fuels project based on coal conversion. The ANG Coal Gasification Company is the administer of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project for the United States Department of Energy. The Project is designed to convert 14 M TPD of North Dakota of lignite into 137.5 MM SCFD of pipeline quality synthetic natural gas (SNG). Located in Mercer County, North Dakota, the gasification plant, and an SNG pipeline. Some 12 years passed from the time the project was conceived unit it became a reality by producing SNG into the Northern Border pipeline in 1984 for use by millions of residential, commercial, and industrial consumers. In this paper, the basic processes utilized in the plant are presented. This is followed by a discussion of the start-up activities and schedule. Finally, some of the more interesting start-up problems are described.

Imler, D.L.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Date Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands UK US 01/13/14 7.83 7.76 7.90 8.91 8.76 8.11 3.68 01/06/14 8.00 7.78 7.94 8.92 8.74 8.09 3.69 12/30/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.68 12/23/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.63 12/16/13 7.86 7.79 8.05 9.00 8.78 8.08 3.61 12/9/13 7.95 7.81 8.14 8.99 8.80 8.12 3.63 12/2/13 7.91 7.68 8.07 8.85 8.68 8.08 3.64 11/25/13 7.69 7.61 8.07 8.77 8.63 7.97 3.65 11/18/13 7.99 7.54 8.00 8.70 8.57 7.92 3.57 11/11/13 7.63 7.44 7.79 8.63 8.46 7.85 3.55 11/4/13 7.70 7.51 7.98 8.70 8.59 7.86 3.61 10/28/13 8.02 7.74 8.08 8.96 8.79 8.04 3.64 10/21/13 7.91 7.71 8.11 8.94 8.80 8.05 3.70 10/14/13 7.88 7.62 8.05 8.87 8.74 7.97 3.69

68

Evaluation of herbacceous biomass crops in the northern Great Plains. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Herbaceous lignocellulose crops are a potential renewable feedstock for biochemical conversion systems second in size to wood products. Several herbaceous crops are utilized as forage crops in the northern Great Plains, but forage quality considerations usually dictates a early harvest. Biomass cropping does not have this constraint; therefore, little information was available on herbaceous crops utilized as energy crops prior to this project. Our primary objectives were to evaluate the biomass yield and select chemical components of several herbaceous crops for energy crops in the northern Great Plains, compare the economic feasibility of energy crops with common competing crops, and evaluate biomass cropping on summer fallow lands. Three good, two marginal, and one irrigated sites were used during 1988 to 1992 for the first component. At least six perennial and four annual biomass species were included at all sites. Three to four nitrogen (N) levels and a crop-recrop comparison (annuals only) were management intensities included. Biomass cropping on idled lands was performed on dryland at Carrington and evaluated the effects of removing leguminous biomass on fallowed lands. This report summarizes results from the 5-year project.

Meyer, D.W.; Norby, W.E.; Erickson, D.O.; Johnson, R.G. [North Dakota State Univ., Fargo, ND (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Serial Echocardiographic Evaluation of 22 Closely Related Great Danes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate a family of Great Danes with known dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) using serial echocardiographic evaluation. Animals, Materials, and Methods: Twenty-two dogs were included in this study. They were split into two groups, clinically normal and those with DCM. The dogs were scanned using 2D and M-mode echocardiography every thirty to sixty days beginning at approximately14-20 days of age. Data were collected and analyzed using generalized additive mixed regression, linear regression, and non-linear regression. Results: All dogs demonstrated progressive echocardiographic changes. The Great Danes with DCM showed several echocardiographic differences when compared to the normal dogs. They included differences in left ventricular diameter, left atrial diameter, interventricular septal thickness, ejection fraction, and fractional shortening. Conclusions: The present study shows that progressive echocardiographic changes occur in both clinically normal Great Danes and those with DCM as they mature. Additionally, the two groups differed with regards to left ventricular diameter, left atrial diameter, interventricular septal thickness, ejection fraction, and fractional shortening.

Farmer, Michael R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Supporting Water, Ecological, and Transportation Systems in the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

office. Participants included transportation and environmental professionals involved with stormwater managementEnvironmental Protection Agency (USEPA), Great Lakes National Program Office (GLNPO) Lake Michigan Lakewide ManagementEnvironmental Protection Agency (USEPA), Great Lakes National Program Office (GLNPO) Lake Michigan Lakewide Management

Beck, Judy; Kamke, Sherry; Majerus, Kimberly

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; ...

72

Great Lakes Biofuels LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Great Lakes Biofuels LLC Great Lakes Biofuels LLC Place Madison, Wisconsin Zip 53704 Sector Services Product Biodiesel research, consulting, management distribution and services company. Coordinates 43.07295°, -89.386694° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.07295,"lon":-89.386694,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

73

Great Lakes fish and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This short article discusses data presented at the Second North American Conference on Preparing for Climate Change, held in Washington, D.C. Magnuson and Regier predicted that Great Lakes fish productivity may increase as a result of the increased water temperatures caused by the greenhouse effect. However, they also predicted that other indirect alterations could do more harm than good; for example, the effects of warming on lake oxygen levels, or wind, which affects the mixing of warm, cool, and cold water.

Mlot, C.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Great Plains Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Great Plains Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Great Plains Wind Farm Facility Great Plains Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Noble Environmental Developer Noble Environmental Location Hansford County TX Coordinates 36.285809°, -101.358662° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.285809,"lon":-101.358662,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

75

Geothermal fluid genesis in the Great Basin  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Early theories concerning geothermal recharge in the Great Basin implied recharge was by recent precipitation. Physical, chemical, and isotopic differences between thermal and non-thermal fluids and global paleoclimatic indicators suggest that recharge occurred during the late Pleistocene. Polar region isotopic studies demonstrate that a depletion in stable light-isotopes of precipitation existed during the late Pleistocene due to the colder, wetter climate. Isotopic analysis of calcite veins and packrat midden megafossils confirm the depletion event occurred in the Great Basin. Isotopic analysis of non-thermal springs is utilized as a proxy for local recent precipitation. Contoured plots of deuterium concentrations from non-thermal and thermal water show a regional, systematic variation. Subtracting contoured plots of non-thermal water from plots of thermal water reveals that thermal waters on a regional scale are generally isotopically more depleted. Isolated areas where thermal water is more enriched than non-thermal water correspond to locations of pluvial Lakes Lahontan and Bonneville, suggesting isotopically enriched lake water contributed to fluid recharge. These anomalous waters also contain high concentrations of sodium chloride, boron, and other dissolved species suggestive of evaporative enrichment. Carbon-age date and isotopic data from Great Basin thermal waters correlate with the polar paleoclimate studies. Recharge occurred along range bounding faults. 151 refs., 62 figs., 15 tabs.

Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.K.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Great Falls lineament, Idaho and Montana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The name Great Falls lineament is given to a northeast-trending zone of diverse geologic features that can be traced northeastward from the Idaho batholith in the cordilleran miogeocline of the United States, across thrust belt structures and basement rocks of west-central and southwestern Montana, through the cratonic rocks of central Montana, and into southwesternmost Saskatchewan, Canada. The zone is well represented in east-central Idaho and west-central Montana where geologic mapping has outlined northeast-trending, high-angle faults and shear zones that: (1) extend more than 150 km (93 mi) from near Salmon, Idaho, northeastward toward Anaconda, Montana; (2) define a nearly continuous zone of faulting that shows recurrent movement from middle Proterozoic to Holocene time; (3) controlled the intrusion and orientation of some Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary batholithic rocks and early Tertiary dike swarms; and (4) controlled the uplift and orientation of the Anaconda-Pintlar Range. The boundary is also characterized by: high-angle faults, shear zones, and topographic lineaments; pronounced linear gravity and magnetic anomalies; igneous intrusions; and fault controlled depositional patterns and mineralization. That the Great Falls lineament is controlled by a similar Precambrian boundary between the Archean Wyoming province of southwestern Montana and early Proterozoic terrane to the north is speculative; however, the geologic features found along the Great Falls lineament share many common characteristics with features present along the Archean-Proterozoic boundary in Canada.

O'Neil, J.M.; Lopez, D.A.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Best Practices for Sustainable WInd Energy Development in the Great Lakes Region and Beyond  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document offers a menu of 18 different, yet complimentary preferred practices and policies. The best practices cover all phases of the wind energy development process - from the policies that allow for wind development, to the sustainable operation of a wind project, to the best practices for decommissioning a spent turbine - including applications for offshore wind. The practices include those that have been previously tested and proven effective, as well as new practices that were identified by experts in the field as needed for future wind developments. Each best practice includes information about the opportunities and challenges (pros and cons), and offers a case example that illustrates how that best practice is being utilized by a particular jurisdiction or wind project. The practices described in this publication were selected by a diverse group of interests from the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative that included environmental groups, industry, and federal, state and local government regulators. They were identified through a year long process that included a literature review, online survey and interviews with individuals from the public, private and non-profit sectors.

Great Lakes Commission; Victoria Pebbles; John Hummer; Celia Haven

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

78

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project: Quarterly technical progress report, third fiscal quarter 1987-1988, January-March 1988  

SciTech Connect

This progress report describes the operation of the Great Plains Gasification Plant, including lignite coal production, SNG production, gas quality, by-products, and certain problems encountered. (LTN)

Not Available

1988-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project: Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1988 (Fourth fiscal quarter, 1987-1988)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This progress report describes the operation of the Great Plains Gasification Plant, including lignite coal production, SNG production, gas quality, by-products, and certain problems encountered. (LTN)

Not Available

1988-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

80

Research on Electrical Properties of Severe Thunderstorms in the Great Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1978 we began a coordinated effort to study the electrical behavior of large and severe thunderstorms that form over the Great Plains of the central United States. Methods of approach include the study of characteristics of individual ...

W. David Rust; William L. Taylor; Donald R. MacGorman; Roy T. Arnold

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Temporal and Spatial Variability of Great Lakes Ice Cover, 1973–2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, temporal and spatial variability of ice cover in the Great Lakes are investigated using historical satellite measurements from 1973 to 2010. The seasonal cycle of ice cover was constructed for all the lakes, including Lake St. ...

Jia Wang; Xuezhi Bai; Haoguo Hu; Anne Clites; Marie Colton; Brent Lofgren

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement to Spur Development of Offshore Wind Projects Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement to Spur Development of...

83

Division of Water, Part 675: Great Lakes Water Withdrawal Registration...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

75: Great Lakes Water Withdrawal Registration Regulations (New York) Division of Water, Part 675: Great Lakes Water Withdrawal Registration Regulations (New York) Eligibility...

84

Great Plains Gasification Project process stream design data. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant (GPGP) in the first commercial coal-to-SNG synthetic fuel plant constructed and operated in the United States. This process stream design data report provides non-proprietary information to the public on the major GPGP process streams. The report includes a simplified plant process block flow diagram, process input/output diagrams and stream design data sheets for 161 major GPGP process and effluent streams. This stream design data provides an important base for evaluation of plant and process performance and for verification of the DOE ASPEN computer simulation models of the GPGP processes. 8 refs.

Honea, F.I.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

ASPEN physical property evaluation for Great Plains simulation. Great Plains ASPEN model development. [Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the steps taken to evaluate the pure component properties in the ASPEN data bank for those compounds required to simulate the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant where the compounds are also available in the DIPPR (Design Institute for Physical Property Data) data bank. DIPPR is a cooperative effort of industry, institutes and federal agencies interested in the compilation, measurement and evaluation of physical property data for industrially important compounds. It has been found that the ASPEN data bank is for the most part reliable, its main problem being lack of documentation. In the few instances where values were found to be either missing or to be unacceptable, recommended constants or equation parameters are presented in this report along with associated literature citations. In the cases where temperature dependent data were regressed to obtain new equation parameters, the detailed methods employed are also presented.

Millman, M.C.

1983-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

86

DOE receives title to Great Plains plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On June 30, 1986 the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project was sold at a foreclosure sale at the Mercer County courthouse in North Dakota. The US Department of Energy was the only bidder at the sale. DOE's bid for the plant was $1 billion DOE-secured loan that the five sponsor companies defaulted on when they withdrew from the project in August 1985. DOE did not receive title to the plant until a lawsuit filed by American Natural Resources (ANR) was settled on July 14, 1986. DOE has vowed to keep the plant running as long as it does not cost the taxpayers any money. Eventually DOE wishes to dispose of the plant. Therefore, in February 1986 DOE requested that interested organizations submit expressions of interest in the Great Plains plant. This paper, after discussing the lawsuit, summarizes the nine responses received by DOE. Some companies were willing for it to remain a coal gasification facility; other submitted plans for modifications to produce methanol.

Not Available

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

HUBZone, Great Opportunity for Small Businesses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Immediate Release HUBZone, Great Opportunity for Small Businesses CARLSBAD, N.M., March 25, 2003 - To help the region's small businesses attract federal and state work, Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) will offer a Small Business Fair on May 2 in Carlsbad to introduce the U.S. Small Business Administration's (SBA) HUBZone concept and other socioeconomic programs. WTS is the prime contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A HUBZone (Historically Underutilized Business Zone) is a geographic area designated by the SBA as economically depressed based on a ratio of population versus business volume in the area. What that means for regional businesses that qualify is an enhanced opportunity to participate in state and federal government contracts they might not ordinarily be

88

Great Plains Institute | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plains Institute Plains Institute Jump to: navigation, search Name Great Plains Institute Place Minneapolis, Minnesota Zip 55407 Product Works with multiple stakeholders to produce and implement policies, technologies and practices in the areas of energy security and bio-based materials. Coordinates 44.979035°, -93.264929° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.979035,"lon":-93.264929,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

89

Great Lakes Energy Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Coop Energy Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name Great Lakes Energy Coop Place Michigan Utility Id 38084 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC RFC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Alternative - Residential Residential Commercial and Industrial Loads Automated Power Monitoring Commercial Commercial and Industrial Loads Automated Power Monitoring - 200kW Commercial Commercial and industrial Loads Automated Power Monitoring Industrial Controlled Heating Commercial Controlled Water Heater - Opt 1 Commercial

90

Great Valley Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Ethanol LLC Valley Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Great Valley Ethanol LLC Place Bakersfield, California Product Developing a 63m gallon ethanol plant in Hanford, CA Coordinates 44.78267°, -72.801369° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.78267,"lon":-72.801369,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

91

Great Plains gets a running start  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States first commercial synthetic fuel plant has been geared up to deliver the $2 billion project by late 1984 in Beulah, North Dakota. The Great Plains coal gasification plant is rising quickly under a compressed 44 month schedule. Delivery of synthetic natural gas from the 125 million-cu-ft-a-day plant by 1984 is possible. Getting the $1.4 billion gasification plant, 22,000-ton-per-day coal mine and 365-mile, 20-in. dia pipeline connection completed on schedule and within budget is critical. The price of the product gas, which will be mixed with relatively cheap natural gas in the consortium's pipelines, has been set by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission at $6.75 per thousand cubic feet. This project has been planned since 1972. (DP)

Not Available

1981-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

92

Best Practices for Wind Energy Development in the Great Lakes Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report offers a menu of 18 different, yet complementary, preferred practices and policies. The best practices cover all phases of the wind energy development process - from the policies that allow for wind development, to the sustainable operation of a wind project, to the best practices for decommissioning a spent turbine - including applications for offshore wind. Each best practice describes the opportunities and challenges (pros and cons), and offers a case example that illustrates how that best practice is being utilized by a particular jurisdiction or wind project. The practices described in this publication were selected by a diverse group of interests from the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative that included environmental groups, industry, academia, and federal, state and local government regulators. The practices were identified through a year-long process that included a literature review, online survey and interviews with individuals from the public, private and non-profit sectors. Optimally, a suite of these best practices would be applied in an appropriate combination to fit the conditions of a particular wind project or a set of wind projects within a given locality or region.

Pebbles, Victoria; Hummer, John; Haven, Celia

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

93

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project. Technical quarterly report, 1st quarter, 1984. [Great Plains, Mercer County, North Dakota  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activities remain on schedule to meet the Great Plains Coal Gasification project's full gas production date. Detailed engineering is complete for the gasification plant. The remaining engineering tasks, which include field support activities and special projects, will be performed by the Contractors' Field Engineering Group. A substantial amount of construction progress was achieved during the first quarter. It is currently projected that construction will be complete at the end of September, 1984. Start-Up operations are continuing at a rapid pace. Commissioning activities are proceeding very well. The only remaining plant permit is the Permit to Operate, which will be issued in late 1985. Quality Assurance/Quality Control activities included the development of welding procedures for Operations personnel, safety relief valve testing, and equipment turnover inspections. Mine development activities remain on schedule. Initial coal deliveries to GPGA commenced this quarter.

Not Available

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Great River Energy (28 Member Cooperatives) - Commercial and Industrial  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Great River Energy (28 Member Cooperatives) - Commercial and Great River Energy (28 Member Cooperatives) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebates Great River Energy (28 Member Cooperatives) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Program Info Funding Source Great River Energy State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies by measure and member cooperative offering. Provider Great River Energy Great River Energy, a generation and transmission cooperative which serves

95

Great Lakes WIND Network | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WIND Network WIND Network Jump to: navigation, search Name Great Lakes WIND Network Address 4855 W 130th Place Cleveland, Ohio Zip 44135 Sector Wind energy Product Business and legal services;Consulting; Energy provider: energy transmission and distribution; Investment/finances;Maintenance and repair;Manufacturing; Research and development; Trainining and education Phone number 215-588-1440 Website http://www.glwn.org Coordinates 41.4228056°, -81.7801592° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4228056,"lon":-81.7801592,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

96

Moore's Curse and the Great Energy Delusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the United States can install in 10 years wind and solar generating capacity equivalent to that of thermal we have been told how natural gas will become the most important source of modern energy: widely, and there is not a single commercial breeder reactor operating anywhere in the world; in 2007 the United States derives

Smil, Vaclav

97

Lighting the Great Outdoors: LEDs in Exterior Applications  

SciTech Connect

Recent progress in the development of white light LEDs promises great impact by opening up the huge potential for LED illumination in new areas. One such area is general illumination for exterior applications. For example, there are an estimated combined 60.5 million roadway and parking installations in the U.S. These lights account for an estimated 53.3 TWh of electricity usage annually -- nearly 7% of all lighting. If LEDs could provide the same light performance with just 25% greater efficiency, savings of over 13 TWh could be achieved. In 2007, the authors assessed emerging LED lighting technologies in a parking garage and on a city street. The purpose of these tests was to enable a utility to determine whether energy efficiency programs promoting white light LED products might be justified. The results have supported the great promise of LEDs in exterior applications, while also highlighting the barriers that continue to hinder their widespread adoption. Such barriers include 1) inconsistent product quality across manufacturers; 2) lack of key metrics for comparing LEDs to conventional sources; and 3) high upfront cost of LED luminaires compared to conventional luminaires. This paper examines these barriers, ways in which energy-efficiency programs could help to overcome them, and the potential for energy and financial savings from LED lighting in these two exterior applications.

Cook, Tyson D. S.; Bryan, Mary M.; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

2008-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

98

Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative October 28, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The White House Council on Environmental Quality and the U.S. Department of Energy hosted a workshop with the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative in Chicago on October 26 - 27, 2010, focused on the siting of offshore wind power in the Great Lakes. The two day workshop brought together wind developers, Federal and state regulators, environmental advocates, and other regional stakeholders to discuss methods for ensuring greater clarity, certainty and coordination of Federal and state decision-making for offshore wind development in the Great Lakes.

99

Great Plains Gasification Project process stream design data. [Lurgi Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant (GPGP) is the first commercial coal-to-synthetic natural gas plant constructed and operated in the United States. This process stream design data report provides non-proprietary information to the public on the major GPGP process streams. The report includes a simplified plant process block flow diagram, process input/output diagrams, and stream design data sheets for 161 major GPGP process and effluent streams. This stream design data provides an important base for evaluation of plant and process performance and for verification of the Department of Energy's ASPEN (Advanced System for Process Engineering) computer simulation models of the GPGP processes. 8 refs., 22 figs., 2 tabs.

Honea, F.I.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Science Accelerator content now includes multimedia  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science Accelerator content now includes multimedia Science Accelerator has expanded its suite of collections to include ScienceCinema, which contains videos produced by the U.S....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Petroleum > Analysis > Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) ...

102

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) Impacts

103

Naturener USA LLC formerly Great Plains Wind Energy | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LLC formerly Great Plains Wind Energy LLC formerly Great Plains Wind Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Naturener USA, LLC (formerly Great Plains Wind & Energy) Place San Francisco, California Zip 94111 Sector Wind energy Product Developer of a wind farm in Montana, has been sold to Naturener S.A. References Naturener USA, LLC (formerly Great Plains Wind & Energy)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Naturener USA, LLC (formerly Great Plains Wind & Energy) is a company located in San Francisco, California . References ↑ "Naturener USA, LLC (formerly Great Plains Wind & Energy)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Naturener_USA_LLC_formerly_Great_Plains_Wind_Energy&oldid=3491

104

Great Lakes Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Great Lakes Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Great Lakes Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Great Lakes Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air-Source Heat Pumps: $250 Geothermal Heat Pumps: $500 Provider Great Lakes Energy Great Lakes Energy offers rebates to residential customers for the purchase of efficiency air-source heat pumps or geothermal heat pumps. A rebate of $250 is available for air-source heat pumps, and a $500 rebate is available for geothermal heat pumps. View the program website listed above to view program and efficiency specifics. A variety of rebates may also be available to Great Lake Energy residential

105

Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: Implications for exploration, exploitation, and environmental issues Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: Implications for exploration, exploitation, and environmental issues Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The objective of this ongoing project is the development of a representative geochemical database for a comprehensive range of elemental and isotopic parameters (i.e., beyond the typical data suite) for a range of geothermal systems in the Great Basin. Development of this database is one of the first steps in understanding the nature of geothermal systems in the Great Basin. Of particular importance in the Great Basin is utilizing

106

NETL: News Release - Great River Energy Unveils Prototype Module...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 9, 2005 Great River Energy Unveils Prototype Module Coal Dryer Novel Technology Expected to Improve Marketability and Environmental Performance of High-Moisture Coal...

107

Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Regional Gravity...

108

Instrumentation for Southem Great Plains D. L. Sisterson and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

counties are outlined. 318 Instrumentation for Southern Great Plains Table 1. Dates of installations of Instrumentation, side data system versions, and facilities at the SGP...

109

Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper:...

110

The Great Plains gasification project: Here today, for tomorrow  

SciTech Connect

Just a few years ago, there was a proliferation of synfuels projects. Pilot plants first proved their viability with long and successful test runs, then closed as market conditions shifted the focus away from synfuels. Plentiful oil, foreign and domestic, has put a serious damper on synfuels development. Due to the recent oil glut, Exxon cancelled its Colony Shale Oil Project, pulled up its stakes and left several ghost boom-towns in its wake. President Reagan-who originally wanted to eliminate the entire synfuels program-now wants to see the $13.5 billion budget of the Synthetic Fuels Corp. (SFC), a government agency, slashed by $10 billion. During the past several months, there has been some major news regarding synfuels projects. Two of the most familiar to those who follow the coal industry have just begun operating: The Cool Water Coal Gasification Project in Daggett, CA, (See Coal Mining, April, 1982, p. 126), and The Great Plains Coal Gasification Project near Beulah, ND which began operations in December toward producing 125,000,000 cu ft/day of high-Btu substitute natural gas (SNG) (the equivalent of 20,000 barrels of oil per day) from 14,000 tpd of lignite mined nearby. At a time when the government and private sector both seem to be putting the whammy on synfuels development, these plants are starting full operations.

Adam, B.O.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Over-Lake Meteorology and Estimated Bulk Heat Exchange of Great Slave Lake in 1998 and 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meteorological and thermistor moorings were deployed in Great Slave Lake during the Canadian Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Enhanced Study (CAGES) in 1998 and 1999. Large-scale meteorology included influence from a record ENSO ...

William M. Schertzer; Wayne R. Rouse; Peter D. Blanken; Anne E. Walker

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Composting with My Wiggly Friends - or, The Great Escape That Never  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Composting with My Wiggly Friends - or, The Great Escape That Never Composting with My Wiggly Friends - or, The Great Escape That Never Happened Composting with My Wiggly Friends - or, The Great Escape That Never Happened April 6, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis John Lippert It's hard for many of us of the "me" generation to think about being careful and conserving energy, even when it directly affects our pocketbooks. We leave the lights and television on when there's no one in the room, despite the fact that this specific action-or lack of action-increases our electricity consumption, raising our next electric bill. How much harder is it for us to take steps that may benefit our community, or society, but that are harder to discern how they affect us economically? My wife, Jane, and I have been composting for more than a dozen years.

113

Fall Is a Great Time for Energy Awareness | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fall Is a Great Time for Energy Awareness Fall Is a Great Time for Energy Awareness Fall Is a Great Time for Energy Awareness September 21, 2010 - 11:17am Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL A lot of people wait until the first of year to set goals and make life changes, but I think the change of seasons is a good time to think about these things, especially when it comes to energy use and saving strategies. Heating and cooling account for roughly 43% of an average home's energy use, so as the weather changes, how you use and save much of the energy for your home will obviously change as well. It's for these reasons that we created the seasonal Energy Savers Web site, which teaches you to stay cool and save money in the spring and summer, and stay warm and save money in the fall and winter.

114

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Great Lakes Carbon Corp - IL 21  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Great Lakes Carbon Corp - IL 21 Great Lakes Carbon Corp - IL 21 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: GREAT LAKES CARBON CORP. ( IL.21 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 333 North Michigan Avenue , Chicago , Illinois IL.21-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.21-1 Site Operations: Facility performed a limited amount of nuclear fuel fabrication in the 1950s. Facility also developed graphite production under an AEC contract. IL.21-1 IL.21-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to limited scope of activities performed IL.21-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes IL.21-3 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium, Thorium IL.21-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes IL.21-3

115

Fall Is a Great Time for Energy Awareness | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fall Is a Great Time for Energy Awareness Fall Is a Great Time for Energy Awareness Fall Is a Great Time for Energy Awareness September 21, 2010 - 11:17am Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL A lot of people wait until the first of year to set goals and make life changes, but I think the change of seasons is a good time to think about these things, especially when it comes to energy use and saving strategies. Heating and cooling account for roughly 43% of an average home's energy use, so as the weather changes, how you use and save much of the energy for your home will obviously change as well. It's for these reasons that we created the seasonal Energy Savers Web site, which teaches you to stay cool and save money in the spring and summer, and stay warm and save money in the fall and winter.

116

Albedo of the U.S. Great Plains as Determined from NOAA-9 AVHRR Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal variation of surface albedo is derived from NOAA-9 AVHRR observations of the US. Great Plains during the snow-free months of 1986 and 1987. Monthly albedo maps are constructed using a simple model-independent technique which includes ...

G. Gutman; G. Ohring; D. Tarpley; R. Ambroziak

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

The Potential Impacts of Climate Change on the Great Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global climate change could have a significant impact on the Great Lakes. A number of studies of the potential effects of climate change on the Great Lakes were commissioned by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, using common scenarios of ...

Joel B. Smith

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Big Windy (Great Escape Restaurant Turbine) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Big Windy (Great Escape Restaurant Turbine) Big Windy (Great Escape Restaurant Turbine) Jump to: navigation, search Name Big Windy (Great Escape Restaurant Turbine) Facility Big Windy (Great Escape Restaurant Turbine) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Great Escape Restaurant Location Schiller Park IL Coordinates 41.95547°, -87.865193° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.95547,"lon":-87.865193,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

119

Relating Geothermal Resources To Great Basin Tectonics Using Gps | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Relating Geothermal Resources To Great Basin Tectonics Using Gps Relating Geothermal Resources To Great Basin Tectonics Using Gps Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Relating Geothermal Resources To Great Basin Tectonics Using Gps Details Activities (8) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: The Great Basin is characterized by non-magmatic geothermal fields, which we hypothesize are created, sustained, and controlled by active tectonics. In the Great Basin, GPS-measured rates of tectonic "transtensional" (shear plus dilatational) strain rate is correlated with geothermal well temperatures and the locations of known geothermal fields. This has led to a conceptual model in which non-magmatic geothermal systems are controlled by the style of strain, where shear (strike-slip faulting)

120

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers April 24, 2013 - 4:37pm Addthis Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the American Institute of Physics Resources. Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the

122

Transmission line including support means with barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas insulated transmission line includes an elongated outer sheath, a plurality of inner conductors disposed within and extending along the outer sheath, and an insulating gas which electrically insulates the inner conductors from the outer sheath. A support insulator insulatably supports the inner conductors within the outer sheath, with the support insulator comprising a main body portion including a plurality of legs extending to the outer sheath, and barrier portions which extend between the legs. The barrier portions have openings therein adjacent the main body portion through which the inner conductors extend.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

A final report on the Great Plains Gasification Project's environmental, health, and safety information data system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNLs) role in providing information to Department of Energy (DOE) on environmental data generated at the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project (GPCGP) in Beulah, North Dakota. An information system, the Fossil Energy (FE) Environmental, Health, and Safety Information System (EHSIS) was developed at ORNL to assist in tracking, analyzing, and making readily available significant environmental information derived from Great Plains. The Great Plains module with its numerous files (e.g., Gasification Bibliography, Gasification Tables, and Great Plains Gasification Project -- Permits, Standards, or Exceedences/Incidents) is a major technical area located within the information system. Over 1388 Great Plains documents have been reviewed, abstracted, and made available on-line in the information system. Also in the information system are 911 tables of selected environmental data including monitoring data from the following six subject areas: (1) air quality; (2) water quality; (3) solid wastes; (4) hazardous wastes; (5) industrial hygiene; and (6) surface mining. 14 refs., 4 figs.

Noghrei-Nikbakht, P.A.; Roseberry, L.M.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

DISASTER POLICY Including Extreme Emergent Situations (EES)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the ACGME website with information relating to the ACGME response to the disaster. 3. The University-specific Program Requirements. Defined Responsibilities Following the Declaration of a Disaster or Extreme EmergentPage 123 DISASTER POLICY Including Extreme Emergent Situations (EES) The University of Connecticut

Oliver, Douglas L.

125

Reproductive Peformance of Great Egrets (Ardea alba) at High Island, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite habitat perturbations and seasonal fluctuations in reproduction, many studies report no significant inter-annual variation in Great Egret reproductive performance. I examined the reproductive performance of Great Egrets (Ardea alba) for two breeding seasons (2009 and 2010) immediately following Hurricane Ike at High Island, Texas. Breeding success, productivity, and mean brood size did not differ between years (U-test, P > 0.05). Fledging success at 21 days showed no significant difference between years, however fledging success at 28, 35, and 42 days decreased significantly between years (~15% reduction at 42 days; U-test, P = 0.027). The number of deaths per nest also differed significantly between 2009 and 2010 (0.36 and 0.95, respectively) (U-test, P = 0.013). Brood-size dependent mortality was also a significant between-year parameter (H test, P = 0.003). Successful nests in 2009 had a brood size range of 2 to 3, and of these nests, 6% and 50% experienced partial brood reduction, respectively; whereas 2010 brood size range for successful nests was 2 to 4, and 0%, 57%, and 100% of these nests, respectively, experienced partial brood reduction. Other parameters examined were water level, temperature, precipitation, prey availability, and human disturbance. I rejected my hypothesis that habitat conditions would be less conducive to high reproductive success in 2009 than 2010, due to the impacts of Hurricane Ike. My results suggest that Great Egrets have bimodal occurrences of nestling death that are expressed as a function of brood size, hatching spread, and nestling age. Reproductive performance studies should continue through at least fledging age (42 days post-hatching for Great Egrets) to better document the reproductive performance, especially by incorporating the apparent behavioral plasticity of nestlings.

McInnes, Andrew

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Assessment of Achievable Potential from Energy Efficiency Programs for Great River Energy: (2009-2030)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents results of a study to assess the achievable potential for electricity energy savings and peak demand reductions for Great River Energy (GRE) for the years 2009 through 2030. The approach involved applying the methodology and technology data developed for the EPRI National Study on the same subject and adapted to the specific market sector characteristics of the GRE service territory (EPRI report 1016987, Assessment of Achievable Potential from Energy Efficiency and Demand Response P...

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

127

Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement to Spur  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement to and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement to Spur Development of Offshore Wind Projects Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement to Spur Development of Offshore Wind Projects March 30, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - As part of President Obama's all of the above approach to energy, the Obama Administration today joined with the governors of Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, New York and Pennsylvania to announce the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that will streamline the efficient and responsible development of offshore wind resources in the Great Lakes. This effort underscores the President's commitment to American made energy, increasing energy independence, and creating jobs. "President Obama is focused on leveraging American energy sources,

128

Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional To Basin-Scale Relationship Between Geodetic Strain And Geological Structures Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional To Basin-Scale Relationship Between Geodetic Strain And Geological Structures Details Activities (9) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: We apply a new method to target potential geothermal resources on the regional scale in the Great Basin by seeking relationships between geologic structures and GPS-geodetic observations of regional tectonic strain. First, we establish a theoretical basis for underst~dingh ow the rate of fracture opening can be related to the directional trend of faults

129

The Frequency and Intensity of Great Lake Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyclones are an important feature of the Great Lakes region that can have important impacts on shipping, lake temperature profiles, ice cover, and shoreline property damages. The objective of this research is to analyze the frequency and ...

James R. Angel; Scott A. Isard

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Computer and Internet Use by Great Plains Farmers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marshall Frasier. 1999. “Farm Computer Adoption in the GreatW.M. Frasier. 2002. “Computers in Agriculture. ” Agronomy1263-1269. Baker, G. 1992. “Computer Adoption and Use by New

Smith, Aaron; Morrison Paul, Catherine J.; Goe, W. Richard; Kenney, Martin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

On Long-Term Net Flow over Great Bahama Bank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 398-day time series of middepth current measurements is combined with available wind and bottom pressure measurements and historical salinity data to characterize long-term net flow patterns over Great Bahama Bank between the Tongue of the ...

Ned P. Smith

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

PPPL: Great story, Bright Future | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Great story, Bright Future By Kitta MacPherson May 12, 2011 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One Stewart Prager Stewart Prager Stewart Prager Stewart Prager Stewart Prager...

133

Improving 30-Day Great Lakes Ice Cover Outlooks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prediction of Great Lakes ice cover is important for winter operations and planning activities. Current 30-day forecasts use accumulated freezing degree-days (AFDDs) to identify similar historical events and associated ice cover. The authors ...

Raymond Assel; Sheldon Drobot; Thomas E. Croley II

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Return Levels of Northern Great Plains Snow Water Equivalents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper estimates return levels of extreme snow water equivalents (SWE) in the northern Great Plains region, containing North and South Dakota, Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska. The return levels are estimated from extreme-value methods using a ...

Andrew J. Grundstein; Qi Qi Lu; Robert Lund

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Buildings Included on EMS Reports"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports" "Site","Property Name","Property ID","GSF","Incl. in Water Baseline (CY2007)","Water Baseline (sq. ft.)","Water CY2008 (sq. ft.)","Water CY2009 (sq. ft.)","Water Notes","Incl. in Energy Baseline (CY2003)","Energy Baseline (sq. ft.)","CY2008 Energy (sq. ft.)","CY2009 Energy (sq. ft.)","Energy Notes","Included as Existing Building","CY2008 Existing Building (sq. ft.)","Reason for Building Exclusion" "Column Totals",,"Totals",115139,,10579,10579,22512,,,3183365,26374,115374,,,99476 "Durango, CO, Disposal/Processing Site","STORAGE SHED","DUD-BLDG-STORSHED",100,"no",,,,,"no",,,,"OSF","no",,"Less than 5,000 GSF"

136

Power generation method including membrane separation  

SciTech Connect

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

138

Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

Rouse, Carl A. (Del Mar, CA); Simnad, Massoud T. (La Jolla, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Financial status of the Great Plains coal gasification project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Great Plains Gasification Associates and the Department of Energy (DOE) signed a loan guarantee agreement in January 1982 for up to $2.02 billion of the estimated $2.76 billion needed to construct a plant producing synthetic gas from coal. Faced with deteriorating financial projections in the wake of declining energy prices, Great Plains applied to the US Synthetic Fuels Corporation (SFC) for additional project assistance. In April 1984 SFC tentatively agreed to provide Great Plains up to $790 million in price guarantee assistance. In return, the Great Plains partners would contribute more equity and Great Plains would repay the DOE-guaranteed loan faster and share profits with SFC. According to GAO's assessment of SFC's proposed assistance, a lower amount of assistance could achieve the same results if Great Plains' partners could fully use certain tax credits and if energy prices and other assumptions remained the same as those SFC used in April 1984. Since April 1984, however, several changes have occurred, such as a continued decline in energy prices. An August 1984 SFC analysis indicated that the decline in energy price offset the effect of the increase tax credits. Other changes have also occurred, but SFC analyses subsequent to August 1984 showing the impact of these changes were not available to GAO. If all changes since April 1984 were incorporated into GAO's analyses, the results could be different.

Not Available

1985-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

140

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Utah (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 137,700 139,522 133,518 2000's 137,213 135,123 135,699 125,899 128,441 130,286 152,283 183,237...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 153,376 165,414 175,372 1970's 183,412 189,791 208,068 196,663 192,497 169,357 179,392 149,011...

142

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Ohio (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 877,039 792,617 823,448 2000's 871,444 787,719 813,735 832,563 812,084 811,759 729,264 791,733...

143

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 33,610 36,067 52,315 1970's 54,555 47,662 43,753 55,012 65,705 67,485 57,702 61,280 77,890...

144

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wisconsin (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 396,107 363,738 376,409 2000's 389,543 356,915 381,498 391,185 380,014 406,550 369,353 395,519...

145

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Arkansas (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 241,664 247,908 241,648 2000's 240,672 217,765 233,046 237,428 205,480 202,946 221,378 214,298...

146

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 107,796 117,124 130,062 1970's 132,708 146,217 159,970 180,274 189,192 181,949 178,220 131,266...

147

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Michigan (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 958,506 846,478 919,922 2000's 926,633 874,578 926,299 888,584 881,257 875,492 767,509 762,502...

148

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Idaho (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 63,483 63,781 66,160 2000's 66,758 73,723 65,510 65,329 69,572 69,202 69,202 74,395 81,646...

149

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Colorado (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 272,530 289,945 288,147 2000's 321,784 412,773 404,873 377,794 378,894 405,509 383,452 435,360...

150

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Illinois (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1,062,536 944,170 992,865 2000's 1,017,283 940,691 1,036,615 987,964 941,964 958,727 883,080...

151

Weather pattern climatology of the Great Plains and the related wind regime  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The meteorology of the Great Plains can be described as a constant progression of air masses, fronts and cyclonic storm systems. Each of these meteorological conditions can be characterized by identifiable isobaric and related weather parameter patterns. Nine such patterns have been defined to type the weather patterns in the Great Plains. Time series of weather pattern types were produced for 62 stations on the Great Plains. Statistical analyses of these time series produced annual and seasonal frequencies of occurrence of the weather pattern types. Maps of the annual and seasonal frequency of occurrence of weather pattern type are presented for the Great Plains. Persistence and alternation frequencies match what is expected for traveling temperate latitude cyclones, anticyclones and fronts. The wind regime for stations at which the anemometer height and location was constant (and known) for a minimum of three consecutive years was stratified by weather pattern type. Statistical analyses were made to show the response of the wind to the large-scale distribution of air pressure associated with a weather pattern type. The response of the wind to the weather pattern is a site-specific result of the interaction of the large-scale meteorology with local terrain, surface roughness and atmospheric stability. Mean wind speed discriminates between pairs of weather pattern types with better than 75% confidence for more than two-thirds of the possible pairs of weather pattern types.

Barchet, W.R.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Synthetic fuels. Status of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project, August 1, 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 1984, the Great Plains Gasification Associates had essentially finished constructing the nation's first commercial-scale coal gasification plant. As of July 31, 1985, Great Plains had contributed about $537 million in equity to the project and had borrowed $1.54 billion against a federal load guarantee made available by the Department of Energy (DOE). Since 1984 the project has faced deteriorating financial projections in the wake of declining energy prices. This is GAO's eighth semiannual report on Great Plains and covers the project's progress from January through August 1, 1985. GAO's objectives were to report on (1) the status of Great Plains' attempt to obtain additional federal financial assistance and (2) the status of the project's operational startup activities as of August 1, 1985. The Department of Energy Act of 1978 requires GAO to report on the status of the loan guarantee. Even though the Synthetic Fuels Corporation approved price guarantees in principle for Great Plains, DOE announced, on July 30, 1985, that it would not agree to restructuring its guaranteed loan. DOE rejected the proposed agreement, saying that it would not assure long-term plant operation at a reasonable cost to the taxpayers. The Great Plains sponsors then terminated their participation in the project on August 1, 1985, and defaulted on the $1.54 billion DOE-guaranteed loan. DOE directed the project administrator, ANG Coal Gasification Company, to continue plant operations pending a DOE decision about the project's future. DOE is assessing options including operating, leasing, selling, shutting down, mothballing, and scrapping the plant.

Bowsher, C.A.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Great Lakes Science Center Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Science Center Wind Farm Science Center Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Great Lakes Science Center Wind Farm Facility Great Lakes Science Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Great Lakes Science Center Developer Great Lakes Science Center Energy Purchaser Great Lakes Science Center Location Cleveland OH Coordinates 41.506659°, -81.696816° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.506659,"lon":-81.696816,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

155

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Oklahoma (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 459,508 490,070 456,573 2000's 450,596 400,740 429,152 443,139 444,514 487,723 528,236 563,474 590,997...

156

The greatest disaster: the failure of Great Britain's Ottoman Empire Policy, 1914  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Before 1914, Britain and Turkey had traditionally enjoyed a friendly relationship. How then did these two empires come to engage one another in a devastating war? In the years immediately preceding the First World War, the British government intended to ensure the Turks remained friendly neutrals in any conflict among the Great Powers. Why did this policy fail? The answers to these questions lie in the nature of the diplomatic relationship between Great Britain and the Ottoman Empire in the years preceding the First World War. Britain's policy towards the Ottoman Empire in the immediate prewar period was limited by British public opinion, Great Power politics, and Britain's own interests in areas under Ottoman rule. These factors led British decision-makers to pursue a policy rife with contradictory, often self-defeating aims. At the same time, British diplomats in Constantinople misjudged the nature of the Ottoman government and missed opportunities to improve Anglo-Turkish relations. Because they labored under the mistaken assumptions relayed by their diplomats in Turkey, British decision makers did not apprehend the depth of the Anglo-Turkish rift until it was beyond repair. Their last-ditch efforts on the eve of the First World War came far too late.

Rayburn, Joel Dawson

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Great Plains Coal Gasification project. Quarterly technical progress report, third quarter 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operations of the Great Plains Gasification Plant are reported for the third quarter of 1985. Contents include the following: (1) lignite coal production; (2) SNG production; (3) SNG gas quality; (4) by-products production and inventories; (5) on-stream factors; (6) raw material, product and by-product consumption and energy consumption for plant operations; (7) plant modifications-1985; (8) plant maintenance; (9) safety; (10) industrial hygiene; (11) medical services; (12) environmental; and (13) quality assurance/quality control activities.

Not Available

1985-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

158

Great Plains Coal Gasification project. Quarterly technical progress report fourth quarter, 1985  

SciTech Connect

The operations of the Great Plains Gasification plant are reported for the fourth quarter of 1985. Contents include the following: (1) lignite coal production; (2) SNG production; (3) SNG gas quality; (4) by-products production and inventories; (5) on-stream factors; (6) raw material, product and by-product consumption and energy consumption for plant operations; (7) plant modifications - 1985; (8) plant maintenance; (9) safety; (10) industrial hygiene; (11) medical service; (12) environmental; and (13) quality assurance/quality control activities.

Not Available

1986-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Models of Procyon A including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detailed models of Procyon A based on new asteroseismic measurements by Eggenberger et al (2004) have been computed using the Geneva evolution code including shellular rotation and atomic diffusion. By combining all non-asteroseismic observables now available for Procyon A with these seismological data, we find that the observed mean large spacing of 55.5 +- 0.5 uHz favours a mass of 1.497 M_sol for Procyon A. We also determine the following global parameters of Procyon A: an age of t=1.72 +- 0.30 Gyr, an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.290 +- 0.010, a nearly solar initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0234 +- 0.0015 and a mixing-length parameter alpha=1.75 +- 0.40. Moreover, we show that the effects of rotation on the inner structure of the star may be revealed by asteroseismic observations if frequencies can be determined with a high precision. Existing seismological data of Procyon A are unfortunately not accurate enough to really test these differences in the input physics of our models.

P. Eggenberger; F. Carrier; F. Bouchy

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

160

Why sequence thermophiles in Great Basin hot springs?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thermophiles in Great Basin hot springs? thermophiles in Great Basin hot springs? A thermophile is an organism that thrives in extremely hot temperature conditions. These conditions are found in the Great Basin hot springs, where the organisms have been exposed to unique conditions which guide their lifecycle. High temperature environments often support large and diverse populations of microorganisms, which appear to be hot spots of biological innovation of carbon fixation. Sequencing these microbes that make their home in deadly heat could provide various insights into understanding energy production and carbon cycling. Converting cellulosic biomass to ethanol is one of the most promising strategies to reduce petroleum consumption in the near future. This can only be achieved by enhancing recovery of fermentable sugars from complex

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Details Activities (8) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: Lithium/magnesium, lithium/sodium, and to a lesser extent, potassium/magnesium ratios in calcium carbonate tufa columns provide a fingerprint for distinguishing tufa columns formed from thermal spring waters versus those formed from non-thermal spring waters. These ratios form the basis of the Mg/Li, Na/Li, and K/Mg fluid geothermometers commonly used in geothermal exploration, which are based on the fact that at elevated temperatures, due to mineral-fluid equilibria, lithium

162

Two Days, One Great Mashup | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two Days, One Great Mashup Two Days, One Great Mashup Developer Data Web Services Source Code Challenges Semantic Web Blogs Let's Talk Developers You are here Data.gov » Communities » Developers Two Days, One Great Mashup Submitted by Data.gov Administrator on Tue, 12/18/2012 - 6:21pm Mashups are intriguing because you can create new stories from data that is accessible yet completely independent - multiple datasets merging in a way that was not expected," said Ryan McKeel, Digital Assets Applications Developer at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado, whose Open Energy Initiative (OpenEI.org) team helped build the Energy Data Mashup. "For instance, if you combine U.S. Census data with crime and voting records, you start painting a unique story that none of the data

163

JW Great Lakes Wind LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

JW Great Lakes Wind LLC JW Great Lakes Wind LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name JW Great Lakes Wind LLC Place Cleveland, Ohio Zip 44114-4420 Sector Wind energy Product Ohio based subsidiary of Juwi International that develops wind projects. Coordinates 41.504365°, -81.690459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.504365,"lon":-81.690459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

164

CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says August 31, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The feasibility of using carbon dioxide (CO2) injection for recovering between 250 million and 500 million additional barrels of oil from Kansas oilfields has been established in a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The University of Kansas Center for Research studied the possibility of near-miscible CO2 flooding for extending the life of mature oilfields in the Arbuckle Formation while simultaneously providing permanent geologic storage of carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas.

165

CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says August 31, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The feasibility of using carbon dioxide (CO2) injection for recovering between 250 million and 500 million additional barrels of oil from Kansas oilfields has been established in a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The University of Kansas Center for Research studied the possibility of near-miscible CO2 flooding for extending the life of mature oilfields in the Arbuckle Formation while simultaneously providing permanent geologic storage of carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas.

166

Status of the Great Plains coal gasification project  

SciTech Connect

Construction of the Great Plains coal gasification plant in North Dakota was 95 percent complete and only about 2 weeks behind schedule as of November 30, 1983. Cumulative project costs were less than originally estimated for this date. Due to a drop in forecasted energy prices, Great Plains, in September 1983, projected that plant operations could result in large after-tax losses and negative cash flows for the sponsors. Great Plains notified the Department of Energy that it was considering terminating its participation in the project in the absence of additional federal assistance. In this regard, additional assistance in the form of price guarantees for the project's synthetic natural gas are being considered by the US Synthetic Fuels Corporation.

Not Available

1984-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

167

Status of the Great Plains coal gasification project, August 1982  

SciTech Connect

Construction of the Great Plains coal gasification plant in Mercer County, North Dakota, is 4 to 6 weeks behind schedule, but no long-term impacts are anticipated. Cumulative project costs are lower than originally estimated. Overall, the management system established to oversee project construction appears comprehensive. However, some weaknesses exist in the computerized information system, which produces most project data. The Department of Energy complied with statutory requirements in awarding the Great Plains loan guarantee for an alternative fuel demonstration project and is actively working to fulfill its responsibilities as the project's overseer. However, the Department needs to audit the costs incurred by Great Plains to determine that funds are being used only for eligible project costs.

Not Available

1982-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

168

Saluting a Great American Scientist-Founder This Thanksgiving | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saluting a Great American Scientist-Founder This Thanksgiving Saluting a Great American Scientist-Founder This Thanksgiving Saluting a Great American Scientist-Founder This Thanksgiving November 24, 2010 - 11:32am Addthis Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science Tomorrow, we at the Department of Energy join with all of you, our fellow citizens, in giving thanks. We're thankful for the little things; for the fair gatherings of food and family and friends; for the tryptophan comas that will kick in amid the fowl football kick-offs. (The Lions are playing...followed by Cowboys and then the Bengals, teams with a combined record of seven wins and 23 losses.) We're even more thankful for the big things; for our nation; for our proud past and daring future; for the undaunted courage and iconoclastic

169

projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million in non-Federal cost sharing) over four years. The overall goal of the research is to develop carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and separation technologies that can achieve at least 90 percent CO 2 removal at no more than a 35 percent increase in the cost of electricity. The projects, managed by FE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), include: (1) Linde, LLC, which will use a post-combustion capture technology incorporating BASF's novel amine-based process at a 1-megawatt electric (MWe) equivalent slipstream pilot plant at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) (DOE contribution: $15 million); (2) Neumann Systems Group, Inc., which will design, construct, and test a patented NeuStreamTM absorber at the Colorado

170

DOE Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions DOE Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions September 30, 2011 - 2:30pm Addthis On September 27, 2011, the Department of Energy (DOE) approved revisions to its National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) regulations, and on September 28th, submitted the revisions to the Federal Register. The final regulations, which become effective 30 days after publication in the Federal Register, are the culmination of a 2-year process to review and update DOE's NEPA implementing procedures. This process involved internal evaluation, public participation, and Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) review. The revisions are designed to focus Departmental resources on projects with the potential for significant environmental impact, to better

171

Synthetic fuels: Status of the Great Plains coal gasification project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sponsors of the Great Plains coal gasification project in North Dakota defaulted on a federal loan in the amount of $1.54 billion. The Department of Energy has obtained title to the Great Plains project and is evaluating proposals from investment banking-type companies to assist it in selling the plant and its assets. This fact sheet highlights recent legal action concerning gas purchase agreements and mortgage foreclosure; the status of the project's sponsors' outstanding liability; DOE's progress in evaluating its options; revenue, expense, production, and plant employment data; capital improvement projects; and plant maintenance issues.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Great Republic: a historical and archaeological analysis of a Pacific mail steamship  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1986 the remains of a shipwreck were discovered on Sand Island in the mouth of the Columbia River in the Pacific Northwest. The following year, a team of archaeologists investigated the site in order to determine its original identity. After a series of dives, the team concluded that the wreck was the remains of the Hudson’s Bay Company brig, Isabella, a ship that was lost in that area in 1830. Recent investigations on the shipwreck disproved this identity. The turbulent conditions of the Columbia River have helped researchers by shifting a significant amount of sand overburden away from the vessel, exposing a greater area of the ship. With this new information, the wreck is now believed to be the remains of the wooden side-wheel steamer Great Republic that belonged to the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, rather than Isabella. This thesis investigates the history of Great Republic and its role in American maritime history, as well as its possible archaeological remains at the bottom of the Columbia River. In order to provide a clear and concise story, I begin with the history of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company and its importance in the development of the western coast of the United States. Since Great Republic was integral to the Asian trade of the nineteenth century, the second portion of the thesis is dedicated to Asian-American commercial and political relations during the nineteenth century. Great Republic and its three sister ships are then described and analyzed in detail based on contemporary sources. Finally, the archaeological evidence is assessed beginning with the discovery of the wreck. I detail the investigations and discoveries made on the wreck over the last 20 years. In my conclusions I discuss the importance of Great Republic from a historical standpoint and emphasize its place in American maritime history. I also detail key aspects concerning the wreck that I believe are imperative for future research. Though the remains convincingly appear to be those of Great Republic there are still structural features that need to be analyzed before a positive identification is possible.

Roberts, Andrew Philip

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Jupiter's Great Red Spot as a Shallow Water System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most current models of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) are cast in terms of a two-layer model, where a thin upper weather layer, which contains the vortex, overlies a much deeper layer, which is meant to represent the neutrally stratified deep ...

Timothy E. Dowling; Andrew P. Ingersoll

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Lake-Effect Thunderstorms in the Lower Great Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning, radar, and radiosonde data were examined to determine how frequently lake-effect storms (rain/snow) with lightning occurred over and near the lower Great Lakes region (Lakes Erie and Ontario) from September 1995 ...

Scott M. Steiger; Robert Hamilton; Jason Keeler; Richard E. Orville

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

INTRODUCTION The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy (GBCGE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in part- nership with U.S. industry to establish geothermal energy as a sustainable, environmentally sound, economically competitive contributor to energy supply in the western United States by (1) providing neededINTRODUCTION The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy (GBCGE) was established at the University

Arehart, Greg B.

176

August 2012 Brazil is one of the great success stories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

August 2012 Brazil is one of the great success stories of the last several decades ­ and today has become a vibrant democracy and an economic powerhouse. Brazil's international profile has never been and staff. Our study of Brazil is strong and our engagement with Brazil is growing. Today, work

Oxford, University of

177

Irrigation-Induced Rainfall and the Great Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The post–World War II increase in irrigation in the Great Plains represents the largest human-induced hydrologic impact in North America. Drawn primarily from the High Plains aquifer, water applied as irrigation in the region amounts to billions ...

Nathan Moore; Stuart Rojstaczer

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Western Gas Sands Project: Northern Great Plains Province review  

SciTech Connect

The synopsis outlines the Upper Cretaceous low permeability natural (biogenic) gas formations of the Northern Great Plains Province (NGPP) of Montana, Wyoming, North and South Dakota. The main objectives are to present a general picture of that stratigraphy, significant structures, and natural gas potential.

Newman, III, H E [comp.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 6,905 8,114 9,443 1970's 10,180 8,504 7,933 8,997 5,806 6,055 14,681 9,661 8,430 6 1980's 330...

180

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 4,972 6,374 6,613 1970's 5,851 8,232 10,712 9,387 8,040 12,177 8,742 8,405 5,503 6,923 1980's...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Vermont (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 8,052 7,726 8,025 2000's 10,411 7,906 8,353 8,386 8,672 8,358 8,041 8,851 8,609 8,621 2010's...

182

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 828 831 853 856 1,467 1,575 1,688 1,833 1,941 2,081 1990's 2,049 2,058 2,319 2,382 2,669 2,672...

183

Regional topography, physiography, and geology of the Northern Great Plains. Open file report  

SciTech Connect

The report analyzes the topography, physiography and geology of a 63 county area in North Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, and South Dakota. Geologic maps are included. In addition 7 1/2 minute quadrangle slope maps are included for 5 selected sites that are representative of the areas that are likely to be impacted with accelerated coal development in the Northern Great Plains. These maps are provided as tools for planning transportation facilities, utility corridors, siting of mines and related facilities, controlling erosion, determining reclamation potential, and preparation of mining plans.

Keefer, W.R.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Accountability report - fiscal year 1997  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the US NRC`s accountability report for fiscal year 1997. Topics include uses of funds, financial condition, program performance, management accountability, and the audited financial statement.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

This year's gasoline price increase not unusual - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... and trends. FAQs ... although in some years, including this year, the price increase ... Over the past 20 years, the average period of rising prices in the ...

186

Through the years  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Through the years Through the years Early 1960s Researchers at PNL (now called PNNL) developed the standards and devices for setting and measuring radiation doses received by nuclear industry work- ers. Tens of thousands of people, including children, have been mea- sured by whole-body counters since the 1960s to relate their physical content of radioactive materials to sources such as food and water. 1960s PNL formulated the first use of a digital computer for complete process control of a mass spectrometer. Mid-1960s PNL devised a computer code, called COBRA for COolant Boiling in Rod Arrays, which allowed for three-dimensional, multiphase hydrothermal modeling of reactor and other complex systems. 1967 PNL researchers continued the fundamental scientific and

187

Handbook for the GREAT08 Challenge: An image analysis competition for cosmological lensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing 2008 (GREAT08) Challenge focuses on a problem that is of crucial importance for future observations in cosmology. The shapes of distant galaxies can be used to determine the properties of dark energy and the nature of gravity, because light from those galaxies is bent by gravity from the intervening dark matter. The observed galaxy images appear distorted, although only slightly, and their shapes must be precisely disentangled from the effects of pixelisation, convolution and noise. The worldwide gravitational lensing community has made significant progress in techniques to measure these distortions via the Shear TEsting Program (STEP). Via STEP, we have run challenges within our own community, and come to recognise that this particular image analysis problem is ideally matched to experts in statistical inference, inverse problems and computational learning. Thus, in order to continue the progress seen in recent years, we are seeking an infusion of new ideas from these communities. This document details the GREAT08 Challenge for potential participants. Please visit http://www.great08challenge.info for the latest information.

Sarah Bridle; John Shawe-Taylor; Adam Amara; Douglas Applegate; Sreekumar T. Balan; Joel Berge; Gary Bernstein; Hakon Dahle; Thomas Erben; Mandeep Gill; Alan Heavens; Catherine Heymans; F. William High; Henk Hoekstra; Mike Jarvis; Donnacha Kirk; Thomas Kitching; Jean-Paul Kneib; Konrad Kuijken; David Lagatutta; Rachel Mandelbaum; Richard Massey; Yannick Mellier; Baback Moghaddam; Yassir Moudden; Reiko Nakajima; Stephane Paulin-Henriksson; Sandrine Pires; Anais Rassat; Alexandre Refregier; Jason Rhodes; Tim Schrabback; Elisabetta Semboloni; Marina Shmakova; Ludovic van Waerbeke; Dugan Witherick; Lisa Voigt; David Wittman

2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

188

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Great Smoky Mountains National Park  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Great Smoky Mountains Project (GSMP) Great Smoky Mountains Project (GSMP) Background Fine particle annual mass concentrations in the Tennessee Valley range from 14 to20 micrograms per cubic meter. All seven urban/suburban sites exceeded the annual PM2.5 standard; only the rural Lawrence County TN site remained below the 15 µg/m3 annual standard. None of the stations exceeded the 65 µg/m3 level of the 24-hour PM2.5 standard. Summer high-winter low seasonality is evident. The current FRM PM2.5 mass measurements under-estimate the contribution of volatile/semi-volatile nitrates and organic carbon species. The semi-volatile organic fraction is both highly variable and significant, and assessments of semi-volatile and non-volatile organic carbon fractions are needed when particle composition measurements are made, especially at urban sites.

189

Interactive Maps from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The interactive maps are built with layers of spatial data that are also available as direct file downloads (see DDE00299). The maps allow analysis of these many layers, with various data sets turned on or off, for determining potential areas that would be favorable for geothermal drilling or other activity. They provide information on current exploration projects and leases, Bureau of Land Management land status, and map presentation of each type of scientific spatial data: geothermal, geophysical, geologic, geodetic, groundwater, and geochemical.

190

Economics of the Great Plains coal gasification project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

the Great Plains project will be the Nation's first commercial-scale plant producing synthetic gas from coal. The project's first annual economic report, released in March 1983, was much less optimistic than a similar analysis prepared in January 1982 to justify construction. GAO found that: the main reason for the changed economic outlook was that the assumed synthetic gas prices used in the March analysis were significantly lower than those used previously. Great Plains did not, nor was it required to, consider tax implications to the parent companies of the project's partners. If these implications are considered, the economics could be more optimistic than the March 1983 report indicates. Should the partners end their participation, some tax benefits would have to be repaid. Although the project is a potentially attractive investment, its financial viability is extremely sensitive to the future prices of synthetic gas. Even a small deviation in prices could significantly affect its economics.

Not Available

1983-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

191

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 3. Great Lakes Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Great Lakes Region atlas assimilates six collections of wind resource data, one for the region and one for each of the five states that compose the Great Lakes region: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin. At the state level, features of the climate, topography, and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than in the regional discussion and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations over several time scales in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and of hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction, and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

Paton, D.L.; Bass, A.; Smith, D.G.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Energy Department Announces Five-Year Renewal of Funding for Bioenergy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Announces Five-Year Renewal of Funding for Energy Department Announces Five-Year Renewal of Funding for Bioenergy Research Centers Energy Department Announces Five-Year Renewal of Funding for Bioenergy Research Centers April 4, 2013 - 1:48pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced it would fund its three Bioenergy Research Centers for an additional five-year period, subject to continued congressional appropriations. The three Centers -including the BioEnergy Research Center (BESC) led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC) led by the University of Wisconsin-Madison in partnership with Michigan State University, and the Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory-were established by the Department's

193

Energy Department Announces Five-Year Renewal of Funding for Bioenergy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Five-Year Renewal of Funding for Five-Year Renewal of Funding for Bioenergy Research Centers Energy Department Announces Five-Year Renewal of Funding for Bioenergy Research Centers April 4, 2013 - 1:48pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced it would fund its three Bioenergy Research Centers for an additional five-year period, subject to continued congressional appropriations. The three Centers -including the BioEnergy Research Center (BESC) led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC) led by the University of Wisconsin-Madison in partnership with Michigan State University, and the Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory-were established by the Department's

194

DOE assists in meeting social impacts of Great Plains Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On August 15, 1986 Department of Energy Secretary John S. Herrington pledged that federal funds of $100,000 per month would be provided to the local governments and school districts of Mercer County, North Dakota. These funds are intended to assist the governments meet demands caused by the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant. The community impact assistance will continue for as long as the government is the owner of the facility.

Not Available

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS, being prepared jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the Department of the Interior’s Fish and Wildlife Service, will evaluate the environmental impacts of wind energy development in Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota – Western’s Upper Great Plains customer service region. Western will use the EIS to implement a comprehensive regional program to manage interconnection requests for wind energy projects.

196

Geothermal resources of the Washakie and Great Divide basins, Wyoming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geothermal resources of the Great Divide and Washakie Basins of southern Wyoming are described. Oil well bottomhole temperatures, thermal logs of wells, and heat flow data were interpreted within a framework of geologic and hydrologic constraints. It was concluded large areas in Wyoming are underlain by water hotter than 120{sup 0}F. Isolated areas with high temperature gradients exist within each basin. 68 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs. (ACR)

Heasler, H.P.; Buelow, K.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Ultrabroad-Band, Greatly Enhanced Light Absorption by Monolayer Graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate greatly enhanced light absorption by monolayer graphene over a broad spectral range, from visible to near infrared, based on the attenuated total reflection. In the experiment, graphene is sandwiched between two dielectric media referred as superstrate and substrate. Based on numerical calculation and experimental results, the closer the refractive indices of the superstrate and the substrate, the higher the absorption of graphene will be. The light absorption of monolayer graphene up to 42.7% is experimentally achieved.

Zhao, Wangshi; Lu, Zhaolin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Great Plaines installs directionally drilled crossings in Texas  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on installing a five- line wide, one-line long products system for ARCO Pipe Line Co. (APLC) in a crowded utility right of way required Great Plains Pipeline Construction Co. to complete three directionally drilled crossings and over 50 conventional bored crossings in the Channelview, Texas area. The pipe line route closely parallels a 4-mi ROW section of Houston Power and Light Co. (HP and L) and about 4 mi of Union Pacific Railroad tracks. Due to overhead towers carrying high-voltage electric transmission lines, Great Plains bored under the existing towers in HP and L's easement to preserve the right of way for future tower expansion. Laney, Inc., subcontracted the conventional bores underneath towers and minor roads. Laney Directional Drilling Co. was the prime contractor for two horizontal directionally drilled crossings of the Houston Ship Channel and Carpenter's Bayou. Great Plains, with its own crew, completed three roadway crossings in high-traffic areas. Engineering and material procurement was handled by APLC.

Thiede, K.L.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Water is used for many purposes, includ-ing growing crops, producing copper,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WATER USES Water is used for many purposes, includ- ing growing crops, producing copper, generating electricity, watering lawns, keeping clean, drinking and recreation. Bal- ancing the water budget comes down of the water budget. Reducing demand involves re- ducing how much water each person uses, lim- iting the number

200

Loss of Cherished Places -- Place Character and Climate Change along Australia's Great Ocean Road  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Change along Australia’s Great Ocean Road Ray Green The paceStudies along the Great Ocean Road The research discussedplace along Australia’s Great Ocean Road. 5 The road, in the

Green, Ray

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

(Great Plains Coal Gasification Project): Quarterly environmental, safety, and medical report, first quarter 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following brief synopsis is provided of the status of Environmental, Safety and Medical Programs described in the First Quarter 1988 Report. Tabular summaries of environmental QA/QC results and planned next quarter activities are presented in Sections 2.0 and 3.0, respectively. ANG continued permitting activity during the reporting period. These activities include reviewing the revised RCRA Part B application; receiving approval to discharge high temperature, low pressure steam condensate to the stormwater system; receiving approval to expand the current gasifier ash pit; submitting the results of the EPA laboratory audit samples; finalizing the contract for the Deepwell No. 1 and No. 2 work to comply with UIC-101; monitoring the progress of the cooling tower surge pond B liner leaks; receiving approval to delete several parameters in the Interim Groundwater Monitoring Plan; responding to an EPA Hazardous Waste Questionnaire and a CERCLA site assessment for DOE; submitting the DOE-assigned section for the Modified Permit Application; and submitting the first annual chemical inventory report to comply with Section 312 of SARA. ANG conducted eight monitoring programs in the vicinity of the Great Plains facility. The RAMP network consists of five monitoring sites, and it is designed to monitor meteorology and air quality in the vicinity of the Great Plains facility and the Antelope Valley and Coyote electric generating stations. ANG conducts ambient monitoring for H/sub 2/S at one site in the vicinity of the Great Plains facility. 15 figs., 49 tabs.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Household Energy Expenditure and Income Groups: Evidence from Great Britain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

  and  0.024  for  district heating However, as income is not observed its effect cannot be analysed.  Wu et al. (2004) examine the demand for space heating in Armenia, Moldova, and  Kyrgyz  Republic  using  household  survey  data.  In  these  countries...  and in some regions incomes are not sufficient to  afford space heating from district heating systems making these systems unviable.  We  analyse  electricity,  gas  and  overall  energy  spending  for  a  large  sample  of  households  in  Great  Britain.  We  discern  inflection  points  and  discuss...

Jamasb, Tooraj; Meier, H

203

Great plains coal gasification plant: Technical lessons learned report  

SciTech Connect

In a first of a kind, grass roots plant of the complexity of the Great Plains Gasification Plant the lessons learned are numerous and encompass a wide range of items. This report documents the lessons learned from all phases of the project from preliminary design through the most recent operation of the plant. Based on these lessons learned, suggestions are made for changes and/or process improvements to future synfuel plants. In addition, recommendations are made for research and development in selected areas. 46 refs., 31 figs., 33 tabs.

Delaney, R.C.; Mako, P.F.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Sulfur emissions reduction at the Great Plains coal gasification facility: Technical and economic evaluations  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an in-depth technical and economic review of over 40 sulfur control technologies that were considered for use at the Great Plains coal gasification facility in Beulah, North Dakota. The review was based on the production of substitute natural gas at rates of 152.5 {times} 10{sup 6} and 160 {times} 10{sup 6} scf/d from lignite containing 1.7% sulfur. The factors considered in evaluating each technology included the reduction of SO{sub 2} emissions, capital and operating costs, incremental cost per unit of produced gas, cost-effectiveness, and probability of success. 21 figs., 37 tabs.

Doctor, R.D.; Wilzbach, K.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Energy Systems Div.); Joseph, T.W. (USDOE Chicago Operations Office, Argonne, IL (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

(Great Plains Coal Gasification Associates). Quarterly technical progress report. [Lurgi Process  

SciTech Connect

The operations of the Great Plains Gasification plant are reported for the first quarter of 1986. Contents include the following: (1) lignite coal production; (2) SNG production; (3) SNG gas quality; (4) by-products production and inventories; (5) on-stream factors; (6) raw material, product and by-product consumption and energy consumption for plant operations; (7) plant modifications-1986 budget; (8) plant maintenance; (9) safety; (10) industrial hygiene; (11) medical services; (12) environmental executive summary; and (13) quality assurance/quality control activities.

Not Available

1986-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Georgia (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 363,402 360,973 328,730 2000's 408,209 343,698 375,567 372,492 388,751 406,852 414,377 435,919 419,057 456,082 2010's 521,557 512,398 NA...

207

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project, Mercer County, North Dakota. Quarterly technical and environmental report, fourth quarter, 1983. [Great Plains, Mercer County, North Dakota  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activities remain on schedule to meet Great Plains Gasification Associates' full gas production date. Gasification Plant: detailed engineering in the Contractors' home office was completed in the fourth quarter. The remaining engineering tasks, which include field support activities and special projects, will be performed by the Contractors' Field Engineering Group. A substantial amount of construction progress was achieved during the fourth quarter. Although the Plant's construction activities are still slightly behind schedule, it is currently forecasted that the construction schedule will be regained by the end of June 1984. Start-Up operations are continuing at a rapid pace. The current emphasis is on system turnover and commissioning activities. The environmental permitting for the construction phase is complete. Freedom Mine: mine development activities remain on schedule.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Status of the Great Plains coal gasification project  

SciTech Connect

ANG has extensive policies and procedures for overseeing the construction of the Great Plains project. Additional management comes from a computerized information system, various audit groups, and staff located at the project site. Neither we nor any other audit group identified significant deficiencies in ANG's computer system or the individual systems which feed into it. Overall, the system contains both automated and manual controls which ensure that the data generated from the system is reliable and accurate. The various audit and evaluation groups provide management continuous and significant information concerning major project components. Great Plains management recognized the usefulness of the information and acted on recommendations made which enhanced its overall effectiveness. ANG established and implemented comprehensive procedures to oversee the project's construction. These procedures appear adequate for managing and controlling all construction activities. For example, ANG's onsite managers have identified problems and suggested actions which ANG believes minimized the effect of these problems on the construction schedule. The Department of Energy has extensive procedures for monitoring this project. With few exceptions, the Department followed the procedures established. It has not, however, completed its audit of incurred costs to determine that loan guarantee funds are spent only for eligible project costs. Such an audit was underway and the Department expected to complete it in 1983.

Not Available

1983-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

209

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2001  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2001. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 23 NTS projects. Eleven sites were in desert tortoise habitat. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 588 acres, where 568 acres of disturbance would be off-road driving. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoise s were accidentally injured or killed at project areas. One tortoise was crushed by a vehicle on a paved road. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types on the NTS was completed and distributed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. Compilation of historical wildlife data was initiated. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Site-wide monitoring was conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, and raptor nests. Sixty-nine of 77 known owl burrows were monitored. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid March to early April. A total of 55 juvenile owls was detected from 11 breeding pairs. Pellet analysis of burrowing owls was completed which identified key prey species. A total of 272 bats, representing 10 bat species were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at water sources and selected tunnel and mine entrances. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Two of the eleven foals observed last year survived to yearlings. Seven active raptor nests were found and monitored this year. These included two Great-horned Owl nests, three Barn Owl nests, and two Red-tailed Hawk nests. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical spill test plans for four experiments at the HAZMAT Spill Center were reviewed for their potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

C. A. Wills

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS...

211

A Sustainable Biomass Industry for the North American Great Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The North American Great Plains (hereafter NAGP) region is economically distressed and prone to severe ecological disruptions such as soil erosion. Its water resources are over-used and subject to pollution from agricultural fertilizers and chemicals, issues common to agricultural lands globally. On the other hand, the region is well suited to the production of herbaceous biomass that can be combusted directly for power or converted to liquid transportation fuels. This paper reviews the geography, history and current condition of the NAGP and offers suggestions about how the agriculture, economy and environment of this and similar regions around the world can be made more sustainable and able to contribute to a reduction in CO2 emissions and consequent global warming.

Rosenberg, Norman J.; Smith, Steven J.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2000 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of he Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2000. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance,(3) ecosystem mapping, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 24 NTS projects. Seventeen sites were in desert tortoise habitat, and six acres of tortoise habitat were documented as being disturbed this year. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types o n the NTS was completed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Sitewide inventories were conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, raptor nests, and mule deer. Fifty-nine of 69 known owl burrows were monitored. Forty-four of the known burrows are in disturbed habitat. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid-March to early April. A total of 45 juvenile owls was detected from eight breeding pairs. One nest burrow was detected in the Mojave Desert,one in the Great Basin Desert, and six in the Transition ecoregion. Seventy bats, representing four bat species of concern, were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at selected tunnel and mine entrances verifying that some NTS mines and tunnels are used as bat roosts. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Four of the five foals observed last year have survived to yearlings. A monitoring plan for NTS horses was completed. Six active red-tailed hawk nests and 10 nestling red-tailed hawks were detected this year. Two spotlighting surveys for mule deer were conducted, each over three consecutive nights in October 1999 and August 2000. The mean sighting rate in October was 1.2 deer/10 kilometers (km) and 1.6 deer/10 km in August. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. Pahute Mesa Pond was confirmed to have vegetation,hydrology, and soil indicators that qualify the site as a jurisdictional wetland. The chemical spill test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center was reviewed for its potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

Wills, C.A.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

8 Great Strategies to Engage Tenants on Energy Efficiency | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This 45-slide PDF presentation details eight ways to engage your employees and tenants in saving energy. It also includes plenty of examples from successful ENERGY STAR partners...

214

Draft Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UGP Region includes all or parts of Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota, encompassing some areas of the United States with the highest potential for...

215

Great Sitkin Island Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sitkin Island Geothermal Area Sitkin Island Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Great Sitkin Island Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":52.06666667,"lon":-176.0833333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

216

Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant public design report. Volume I  

SciTech Connect

This Public Design Report provides, in a single document, available nonproprietary design information for the Great Plains Gasification Project, the first commercial coal gasification facility in the United States. In addition to the design aspects, the history of the project, the organization of the plant owners, and the role of the Department of Energy are briefly discussed. Plant capital and operating costs are also presented. An overview of the mine and plant operations is presented and is followed by detailed nonproprietary descriptions of the individual process units, plant systems, and products. Narrative process descriptions, simplified process flow diagrams, input/output stream data, operating conditions, catalyst and chemical requirements, and utility requirements are given for each unit. The process units are described as they were planned by July 1984. Any modification or alteration that occurred after that date will be the subject of a followup work. Plant startup provisions, environmental considerations and control, monitoring and safety considerations are also addressed for each operating unit. The report is published in two volumes. Volume I contains: (1) introduction; (2) overview of project (plant and mine, plant facilities, Basin Electric Antelope Valley Station); and (3) plant process data (coal, oxygen and steam, gasification and gas processing). 53 refs., 80 figs., 36 tabs.

Miller, W.R.; Belt, R.J.; Honea, F.I.; Ness, H.M.; Lang, R.A.; Berty, T.E.; Delany, R.C.; Mako, P.F.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant Public Design Report. Volume II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Public Design Report provides, in a single document, available nonproprietary design information for the Great Plains Gasification Project, the first commercial coal gasification facility in the United States. In addition to the design aspects, the history of the project, the organization of the plant owners, and the role of the Department of Energy are briefly discussed. Plant capital and operating costs are also presented. An overview of the mine and plant operations is presented and is followed by detailed nonproprietary descriptions of the individual process units, plant systems, and products. Narrative process descriptions, simplified process flow diagrams, input/output stream data, operating conditions, catalyst and chemical requirements, and utility requirements are given for each unit. The process units are described as they were planned by July 1984. Any modification or alteration that occurred after that date will be the subject of a followup work. Plant startup provisions, environmental considerations and control, monitoring and safety considerations are also addressed for each operating unit. The report is published in two volumes. Volume II contains: (1) plant process data (sulfur recovery, main flare - area 8300, liquid processing, ash handling and solids disposal, other systems); (2) plant startup procedure and schedule; (3) plant and employee safety; (4) GPGP cost data; and (5) references. 53 refs., 46 figs., 38 tabs.

Miller, W.R.; Belt, R.J.; Honea, F.I.; Ness, H.M.; Lang, R.A.; Berty, T.E.; Delany, R.C.; Mako, P.F.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Great Boiling Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boiling Springs Geothermal Area Boiling Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Great Boiling Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.66166667,"lon":-119.3616667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

219

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Residential Deliveries included...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices...

220

Property:Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Plants included in Capacity Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Water Supplies to the Great Lakes—Reconstructed from Tree-Rings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Correlations between the water supplies to each of the Great Lakes and prewhitened tree-ring chronologies from 16 sites around the Great Lakes suggested some strong associations for the summer months, particularly June and July. Some of these ...

W. A. R. Brinkmann

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Harper et al., eds.: Natural History of the Colorado Plateau and Great Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural History of the Colorado Plateau and Great Basin. K.University Press of Colorado, 1994, viii -I- 294 pp. , 41Natural History of the Colorado Plateau and Great Basin

Livingston, Stephanie

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Great Smoky Mountains Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to Alternative Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to Alternative Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to Alternative Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to Alternative Fuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to Alternative Fuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to Alternative Fuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to Alternative Fuels on AddThis.com...

224

2009 Reporting Year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

FRS Accumu- Book Value Year End Year's Foot Line # Gross Lated DD&A Net Additions DD&A of Disposals Other Balance Additions Other note Petroleum: A BCD E F G H IJ

225

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Wisconsin (Million Cubic Feet)

226

GPS Water Vapor Projects Within the ARM Southern Great Plains Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GPS Water Vapor Projects Within the ARM GPS Water Vapor Projects Within the ARM Southern Great Plains Region J. Braun, T. Van Hove, S. Y. Ha, and C. Rocken GPS Science and Technology Program University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado Abstract The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has a need for an improved capability to measure and characterize the four-dimensional distribution of water vapor within the atmosphere. Applications for this type of data include their use in radiation transfer studies, cloud-resolving and single-column models, and for the establishment of an extended time series of water vapor observations. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research's (UCAR) GPS Science and Technology (GST) Program is working with ARM to leverage the substantial investment in

227

Analysis of pipe failure at the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant  

SciTech Connect

The rupture of a carbon steel elbow in the methanation area of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant resulted in a fire and plant shutdown. Failure studies consisted of an on-site inspection and an extensive laboratory examination that included light metallography, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, chemical analyses, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. It was concluded that operation of a heat exchanger under off-specification conditions contributed to higher than design temperatures, lower than design pressures, and higher than design concentrations of carbon dioxide and water in the exit line from a condensate separator. Together, these conditions produced high levels of carbonic acid and higher than design velocities resulting in severe corrosion of the carbon steel.

Keiser, J.R.; Mayotte, J.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Dias, O.C. (Amoco Oil Co., Texas City, TX (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Analysis of pipe failure for the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rupture of a carbon steel elbow in the methanation area of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant resulted in a fire and plant shutdown. The failure was investigated by personnel from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and ANG Associates, the plant operators. These studies consisted of an on-site inspection and extensive laboratory examination that included optical metallography, x-ray fluorescence, x-ray diffraction, chemical analyses, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). It was concluded that operation of a heat exchanger under off-specification conditions contributed to higher than design temperatures, lower than design pressures, and higher than design concentrations of carbon dioxide and water in the exit line from a condensate separator. Together, these conditions produced high levels of carbonic acid and higher than design velocities resulting in severe corrosion of the carbon steel. 9 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Keiser, J.R.; Mayotte, J.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Dias, O.C. (Amoco Research Center, Naperville, IL (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

To all Sandians: Each year we at Sandia National Laboratories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

take great pride in cataloguing significant accomplishments achieved during the past year by the men and women who make up this great laboratory. The past year, 2001, was extraordinary for the diversity and richness of the achievements and for the one day, September 11, that so deeply affected and changed our laboratory and our nation. Sandia’s staff have rapidly shifted gears to turn up the rate of progress in our national security work, suddenly rendered even more important by the instantaneous change in the free world’s security situation that occurred that day. All across the Labs, individuals and teams have all made heroic efforts to extend our technology

unknown authors

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Issue 24 2012 Inside: Going green the great outdoors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into future research proposals include: (1) Identifying the possible feed stocks and conversion technologies yield via biosynthetic pathways and conversions and using waste CO2 and NOx emissions to enhance growth Ocean Sunrise Project on seaweed bioethanol production will produce bioethanol from farming Sargassum

Heinke, Dietmar

231

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 10,865 11,637 14,069 1970's 14,026 14,072 17,287 13,206 13,241 10,253 9,152 8,767 8,100 8,211 1980's 4,980 4,511 10,098 9,182 9,431 9,139 8,045 8,443...

232

Greatly Enhanced Detectability of Geothermal Tracers Through Laser-Induced Fluorescence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

WE have successfully completed a four-year R and D project to greatly reduce the detection limit of fluorescent tracers through the use of emerging laser-excitation, optical fiber, and CCD-spectroscopy technologies. Whereas the efforts over the first two years were directed at demonstrating a reduction in the detection limit of fluorescent compounds by a factor of 100 and at identifying several new fluorescein-derived tracer candidates, our recent efforts were focused primarily on the field demonstration of new tracers having detection limits in the low parts-per-quadrillion range. During the summer of 2001, we initiated field tests at the Dixie Valley, Nevada and at the Beowawe, Nevada geothermal fields using very small quantities of the fluorescein-derivative 6-carboxyfluorescein. Subsequently, we succeeded in measuring sub-part-per-trillion quantities of that candidate tracer at both the Beowawe and Dixie Valley geothermal reservoirs-using approximately 530 g of tracer at each setting. Our studies indicate that we could have observed a breakthrough using only 0.53 g of 6-carboxyfluorescein. This represents a reduction by a factor of 170,000 below the mass of tracer used in a previous tracer test at Beowawe.

Peter Rose; Joel Harris; Phaedra Kilbourn; James Kleimeyer; Troy Carter

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

233

Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations over the Great Lakes Region Driven by Three Global Data Sets  

SciTech Connect

The performance of regional climate simulations is evaluated for the Great Lakes region. Three 10-year (1990–1999) current-climate simulations are performed using the MM5 regional climate model (RCM) with 36-km horizontal resolution. The simulations employed identical configuration and physical parameterizations, but different lateral boundary conditions and sea-surface temperatures derived from the NCEP Global Reanalysis and output from the CCSM3 and GISS general circulation models (GCMs). The simulation results are compared to the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR). The three RCM simulations appeared to be more accurate in winter and least accurate in summer, and more accurate aloft than near the surface. The reanalysis-constrained simulation adequately captured the spatial distribution and seasonal cycle of the observed surface-air temperature and precipitation, but it produced consistently across all seasons a cold bias that is generally larger over the lakes than over land and a wet bias due to an overestimation of nonconvective precipitation. The simulated seasonal cycle of moisture–flux convergence over the region was in very good agreement with NARR. The two GCM-driven runs adequately simulated the spatial and seasonal variation of temperature, but overestimated cold-season precipitation and underestimated summer precipitation, reversing the observed annual precipitation cycle. The GISS-driven run failed to simulate the prevailing low-level flow and moisture convergence patterns. All three RCM simulations successfully captured the impact of the Great Lakes on the region's climate, especially on winter precipitation, a significant improvement over coarse-resolution GCM simulations over the region.

Zhong, Shiyuan (Sharon); Li, Xiuping; Bian, Xindi; Heilman, Warren E.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Gustafson, William I.

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

234

Allocation Year Rollover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Allocation Year Rollover Allocation Year Rollover Allocation Year Rollover: 2013 to 2014 Note: Allocation Year 2013 (AY13) ends at 23:59:59 on Monday, January 13, 2014. AY14 runs from Tuesday, January 14, 2014 through Monday, January 12, 2015. Below are major changes that will go into effect with the beginning of AY14 on Tuesday, January 14, 2014. All times listed are PST. Scheduled System Downtimes There will be no service disruption during the allocation year rollover this year. Interactive and batch use will continue uninterrupted (except for "premium" jobs on Hopper; see below). Charging Across AY Boundary All batch jobs will continue running during the rollover. Time accrued before midnight will be charged to AY13 repos; time accrued after midnight will be charged to AY14 repos. Running batch jobs that are associated with

235

Energetics of a Symmetric Circulation Including Momentum Constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theory of available potential energy (APE) for symmetric circulations, which includes momentum constraints, is presented. The theory is a generalization of the classical theory of APE, which includes only thermal constraints on the circulation. ...

Sorin Codoban; Theodore G. Shepherd

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Guam Refinery Thermal Cracking/Other (including Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Guam Refinery Thermal Cracking/Other (including Gas Oil) Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

237

Scheduling optimization of a real flexible job shop including side ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 19, 2013 ... including side constraints regarding preventive maintenance, fixture availabil- ...... Engineering and Engineering Management, pp. 787–791.

238

Great Plains coal gasification project - historical overview and progress  

SciTech Connect

The first commercial scale coal gasification plant in the US is nearing completion in North Dakota. The plant shares the site and other facilities with the Basin Electric Power Station. The gasification plant will draw its power directly from the Basin substation and Basin will receive coal fines from the gasification plant. (Coal fines cannot be gasified in the Lurgi units.) Planning, loan guarantee commitments, scheduling of construction, labor relations, and current situation are all briefly discussed. A table of project statistics is included.

Deeths, W.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Including management policies in a renewable energy system simulation model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, growing attention has been paid to the use of renewable resources to produce electricity. One of the main drawbacks of generating electricity through, say, wind power, however, is random input, which obviously results in random output. ...

Cristina Azcárate; Rosa Blanco; Fermín Mallor

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Dynamical Downscaling over the Great Lakes Basin of North America Using the WRF Regional Climate Model: The Impact of the Great Lakes System on Regional Greenhouse Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) is employed to dynamically downscale global warming projections produced using the Community Climate System Model (CCSM). The analyses are focused on the Great Lakes Basin of North America and the ...

Jonathan Gula; W. Richard Peltier

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Energy-related impacts on Great Plains agricultural productivity in the next quarter century, 1976--2000. Great plains agricultural council publication  

SciTech Connect

Contents: The food demand dimension; Agriculture's relationship to national energy goals; Assumptions relating to great plains agriculture; Agricultural energy usage in perspective; The emerging energy usage transition agenda; General energy related agricultural adjustment concepts; Operational and technological adjustments in energy intense components; Agribusiness impacts and adjustments; Forests and energy; Effects of great plains energy resource development on agriculture; Institutional and agency program demands.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

FIVE-YEAR FINANCIAL OUTLOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outlook) for the City of San Diego which presented a comprehensive examination of the City’s long range fiscal condition. The Financial Outlook has proven to be an important planning tool for the City of San Diego. The Outlook guided the City in establishing the fiscal year 2008 annual budget and has served throughout the year as the basis for longer term fiscal decisionmaking. The Outlook has communicated the City’s fiscal priorities along with the City’s strengths and the challenges that remain in achieving a balanced General Fund budget and fiscal health. The updated Five-Year Financial Outlook (2009-2013 Outlook) includes revised revenue and expenditure projections for fiscal years 2009 through 2013 as well as additional fiscal commitments that have emerged since the 2008-2012 Outlook was issued. Similar to the 2008-2012 Outlook, the revised revenue and expenditure estimates in the 2009-2013 Outlook are based on a variety of assumptions in the context of current and projected economic conditions. The updated Outlook not only identifies revenue and expenditure trends but also discusses risks and opportunities that affect fiscal decisions and the City’s ability to accomplish its strategic goals over the next five-year period. Those goals include: • Preservation of City services to the fullest extent possible. Fund the operations of new public facilities. • Meet contractual obligations and fund mandated programs. • Contribute the full payment of the Annual Required Contribution (ARC) for the City’s pension system. • Establish and maintain adequate General Fund reserves according to City Charter Section 91 and the City Reserve Policy recently approved by the City Council. • Address other significant financial obligations with a longer-term strategy.

Jerry Sanders; Jay M. Goldstone

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2009 Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2009 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2009 Year-End...

244

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2010 Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2010 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2010 Year-End...

245

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2011 Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2011 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2011 Year-End...

246

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2008 Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2008 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2008 Year-End...

247

Ancient and Modern Laminated Composites - From the Great Pyramid of Gizeh to Y2K  

SciTech Connect

Laminated metal composites have been cited in antiquity; for example, a steel laminate that may date as far back as 2750 B.C., was found in the Great Pyramid in Gizeh in 1837. A laminated shield containing bronze, tin, and gold layers, is described in detail by Homer. Well-known examples of steel laminates, such as an Adze blade, dating to 400 B.C. can be found in the literature. The Japanese sword is a laminated composite at several different levels and Merovingian blades were composed of laminated steels. Other examples are also available, including composites from China, Thailand, Indonesia, Germany, Britain, Belgium, France, and Persia. The concept of lamination to provide improved properties has also found expression in modern materials. Of particular interest is the development of laminates including high carbon and low carbon layers. These materials have unusual properties that are of engineering interest; they are similar to ancient welded Damascus steels. The manufacture of collectable knives, labeled ''welded Damascus'', has also been a focus of contemporary knifemakers. Additionally, in the Former Soviet Union, laminated composite designs have been used in engineering applications. Each of the above areas will be briefly reviewed, and some of the metallurgical principles will be described that underlie improvement in properties by lamination. Where appropriate, links are made between these property improvements and those that may have been present in ancient artifacts.

Wadsworth, J.; Lesuer, D.R.

2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

248

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial...

249

FAQ 23-How much depleted uranium -- including depleted uranium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is stored in the United States? How much depleted uranium -- including depleted uranium hexafluoride -- is stored in the United States? In addition to the depleted uranium stored...

250

Electrical machines and assemblies including a yokeless stator ...  

Wind Energy; Partners (27) Visual Patent Search; Success Stories; News; Events; Electrical machines and assemblies including a yokeless stator with modular lamination ...

251

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Other (including Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Other (including Gas Oil) Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

252

[Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will be diverse and widespread, including renewables, distributed generation, and energy storage. And they will increase rapidly all along the value chain, from suppliers to...

253

Stocks of Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Including SPR)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Stocks include those ...

254

Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11.2 Retro-Cx in Federal ESPCs Including Retro-Commissioning In Federal Energy Saving Performance Contracts Retro-commissioning generally reduces operating and maintenance costs,...

255

PLOT: A UNIX PROGRAM FOR INCLUDING GRAPHICS IN DOCUMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simple, easy-to-read graphics language designed specificallyPROGRAM FOR INCLUDING GRAPHICS IN DOCUMENTS Pavel Curtismeanings as in the GRAFPAC graphics system. Definl. ~ tions

Curtis, Pavel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in South Dakota (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers...

257

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Dakota (Including...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Dakota (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to...

258

Monte Carlo: in the beginning and some great expectations  

SciTech Connect

The central theme will be on the historical setting and origins of the Monte Carlo Method. The scene was post-war Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. There was an inevitability about the Monte Carlo Event: the ENIAC had recently enjoyed its meteoric rise (on a classified Los Alamos problem); Stan Ulam had returned to Los Alamos; John von Neumann was a frequent visitor. Techniques, algorithms, and applications developed rapidly at Los Alamos. Soon, the fascination of the Method reached wider horizons. The first paper was submitted for publication in the spring of 1949. In the summer of 1949, the first open conference was held at the University of California at Los Angeles. Of some interst perhaps is an account of Fermi's earlier, independent application in neutron moderation studies while at the University of Rome. The quantum leap expected with the advent of massively parallel processors will provide stimuli for very ambitious applications of the Monte Carlo Method in disciplines ranging from field theories to cosmology, including more realistic models in the neurosciences. A structure of multi-instruction sets for parallel processing is ideally suited for the Monte Carlo approach. One may even hope for a modest hardening of the soft sciences.

Metropolis, N.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Previous Year Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Awards Awards Previous Year Awards 2013 Allocation Awards This page lists the allocation awards for NERSC for the 2013 allocation year (Jan 8, 2013 through Jan 13, 2014). Read More » NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration (NISE) 2013 Awards NISE is a mechanism used for allocating the NERSC reserve (10% of the total allocation). In 2013 we made the second year of the two-year awards made in 2012, supplemented by projects selected by the NERSC director. Read More » Data Intensive Computing Pilot Program 2012/2013 Awards NERSC's new data-intensive science pilot program is aimed at helping scientists capture, analyze and store the increasing stream of scientific data coming out of experiments, simulations and instruments. Read More » 2012 Allocation Awards This page lists the allocation awards for NERSC for the 2012 allocation

260

Welcome Year in Review  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 NMMSS Users Annual Training Meeting Orlando, Florida-May 23-25, 2006 Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy & the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Welcome & Year In Review...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development Executive Summary In the 21st century new we focused on the case of un- conventional natural gas recovery from the Marcellus shale In addition

Walter, M.Todd

263

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development Executive Summary In the 21st the Marcellus shale In addition to the specific questions identified for the case of Marcellus shale gas in New

Angenent, Lars T.

264

What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Whistleblower Program > What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint?

265

Large-scale solar projects in the United States have made great...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the United States have made great progress in delivering competitively priced renewable electricity September 2013 The price at which electricity from large-scale solar power...

266

Division of Water, Part 675: Great Lakes Water Withdrawal Registration Regulations (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations set forth requirements for the registration of water withdrawals and reporting of water losses from the Great Lakes Basin. The regulations apply to water withdrawals from...

267

Orange County Great Park Welcomes U.S. Department of Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONTACT: MARCUS GINNATY 949-724-6574 Orange County Great Park Welcomes U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2013 Collegiate Teams * Representatives from 20 collegiate teams...

268

Wind Shear and Turbulence Profiles at Elevated Heights: Great Lakes and Midwest Sites (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analyzed wind resource characteristics at elevated heights (50 m-200+m) incuding shear and turbulence profiles for some areas of the Great Lakes and M idwest sites.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Electrofishing survey of the Great Miami River, September 17--18, 1996. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

The electrofishing survey of fish from the Great Miami River at RM 19, 24 and 38 from late summer 1996 demonstrated the sensitivity of the fish community to microhabitat variation. The variation was particularly clear between the pooled, low flow sections of the river and the runs, where fast current habitats occurred. In 1996, like most recent years, the differences were obvious between Rm 24 and RM 19 and RM 38. River Mile 24 was characterized by a fish community of current-loving fish, dominated by Catastomidae (suckers), and Ictaluridae (catfish). In contrast, samples from pooled stations at RM 19 and 38 were dominated by Centrarchidae, Clupeidae and Cyprinidae, particularly the carp. The microhabitats sampled around the abutments of bridges at RM 19 and 38 where fast current and physical structure occurred, both resembled the community at RM 24. Changes in the fish communities associated with the upstream/downstream changes in stream volume, channel size, morphology, etc., were evidenced by the community coefficients which showed least similarity between the most distant sites.

Moller, B.; Miller, M.C.; Buschelmann, F.; Evans, R.L. [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

FORUMA Hamilton Spectator Town Hall Event SPEAKERS INCLUDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in advance. RSVP to our Open Forum line at 905-526-3221. ONE YEAR LATER CODECODE REDREDWHERE YOU LIVE AFFECTS and will reflect on his own experiences, the findings of Code Red and his own work to suggest ways forward

Thompson, Michael

271

DYNAMIC MODELLING OF AUTONOMOUS POWER SYSTEMS INCLUDING RENEWABLE POWER SOURCES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(thermal, gas, diesel) and renewable (hydro, wind) power units. The objective is to assess the impact systems where the cost of conventional production is high. In recent years, the integration of wind energy is seen as an attractive alternative for fuel displacement. However, the intermittent nature of wind

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

272

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 315 300 283 199 105 66 57 57 73 130 189 307 1990 338 288 269 196 116 68 46 62 84 127 195 261 1991 335 311 259 187 105 61...

273

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Illinois (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 151,699 132,638 117,186 62,934 46,113 39,615 44,463 46,777 41,870 67,167 74,519 115,418 2002 131,434 119,430 122,242...

274

Agency Improvement Plan For Fiscal Year 2006 and Fiscal Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Improvement Plan For Fiscal Year 2006 and Fiscal Year 2007 More Documents & Publications U.S> Department of Energy, Fiscal Year 2007 Buy American Act Report. Audit Report:...

275

YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from cofiring coal with waste paper, sunflower hulls, and wood waste showed a broad spectrum of chemical and physical characteristics, according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C618 procedures. Higher-than-normal levels of magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxide were observed for the biomass-coal fly ash, which may impact utilization in cement replacement in concrete under ASTM requirements. Other niche markets for biomass-derived fly ash were explored. Research was conducted to develop/optimize a catalytic partial oxidation-based concept for a simple, low-cost fuel processor (reformer). Work progressed to evaluate the effects of temperature and denaturant on ethanol catalytic partial oxidation. A catalyst was isolated that had a yield of 24 mole percent, with catalyst coking limited to less than 15% over a period of 2 hours. In biodiesel research, conversion of vegetable oils to biodiesel using an alternative alkaline catalyst was demonstrated without the need for subsequent water washing. In work related to biorefinery technologies, a continuous-flow reactor was used to react ethanol with lactic acid prepared from an ammonium lactate concentrate produced in fermentations conducted at the EERC. Good yields of ester were obtained even though the concentration of lactic acid in the feed was low with respect to the amount of water present. Esterification gave lower yields of ester, owing to the lowered lactic acid content of the feed. All lactic acid fermentation from amylose hydrolysate test trials was completed. Management activities included a decision to extend several projects to December 31, 2003, because of delays in receiving biomass feedstocks for testing and acquisition of commercial matching funds. In strategic studies, methods for producing acetate esters for high-value fibers, fuel additives, solvents, and chemical intermediates were discussed with several commercial entities. Commercial industries have an interest in efficient biomass gasification designs but are waiting for economic incentives. Utility, biorefinery, pulp and paper, or o

Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

U-182: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

82: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates 82: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates U-182: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates June 4, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in Microsoft Windows. A remote user may be able to spoof code signing signatures. PLATFORM: Version(s): XP SP3, 2003 SP2, Vista SP2, 2008 SP2, 7 SP1, 2008 R2 SP1; and prior service packs ABSTRACT: The operating system includes some invalid intermediate certificates. The vulnerability is due to the certificate authorities and not the operating system itself. Reference Links: Security tracker ID 1027114 GENERIC-MAP-NOMATCH Vendor Advisory IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: The invalid certificates and their thumbprints are: Microsoft Enforced Licensing Intermediate PCA: 2a 83 e9 02 05 91 a5 5f c6

277

Removal of mineral matter including pyrite from coal  

SciTech Connect

Mineral matter, including pyrite, is removed from coal by treatment of the coal with aqueous alkali at a temperature of about 175.degree. to 350.degree. C, followed by acidification with strong acid.

Reggel, Leslie (Pittsburgh, PA); Raymond, Raphael (Bethel Park, PA); Blaustein, Bernard D. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1976-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

278

Free Energy Efficiency Kit includes CFL light bulbs,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Energy Efficiency Kit Kit includes CFL light bulbs, spray foam, low-flow shower head, and more i ci e n cy On Thursday, March 31st New River Light & Power will sponsor a seminar that is designed

Rose, Annkatrin

279

Characterizations of Aircraft Icing Environments that Include Supercooled Large Drops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of aircraft icing environments that include supercooled large drops (SLD) greater than 50 ?m in diameter have been made during 38 research flights. These flights were conducted during the First and Third Canadian Freezing Drizzle ...

Stewart G. Cober; George A. Isaac; J. Walter Strapp

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Including costs of supply chain risk in strategic sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost evaluations do not always include the costs associated with risks when organizations make strategic sourcing decisions. This research was conducted to establish and quantify the impact of risks and risk-related costs ...

Jain, Avani

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Including Atmospheric Layers in Vegetation and Urban Offline Surface Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A formulation to include prognostic atmospheric layers in offline surface schemes is derived from atmospheric equations. Whereas multilayer schemes developed previously need a complex coupling between atmospheric-model levels and surface-scheme ...

Valéry Masson; Yann Seity

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 63.3 59.3 57.9 57.0 57.4 61.3 1983-2013 Alabama 71.7 71.0 68.5 68.2 68.4 66.7 1989-2013 Alaska 94.1 91.6 91.1 91.0 92.3 92.6 1989-2013 Arizona 84.0 83.0 81.6 80.3 82.8 82.7 1989-2013 Arkansas 37.8 28.3 28.1 28.6 26.7 28.0 1989-2013

283

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 16.5 16.3 16.0 16.2 16.6 16.9 2001-2013 Alabama 22.1 21.7 21.6 22.8 22.0 22.7 2001-2013 Alaska 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2001-2013 Arizona 13.4 15.7 15.3 13.8 13.7 13.9 2001-2013 Arkansas 1.7 1.4 1.2 1.4 1.3 1.5 2001-2013

284

Mechanisms for Diurnal Boundary Layer Circulations in the Great Basin Desert  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this observation- and model-based study of the Great Basin Desert boundary layer is to illustrate the variety of locally forced circulations that can affect such an area during a diurnal cycle. The area of the Great Basin Desert (...

Daran L. Rife; Thomas T. Warner; Fei Chen; Elford G. Astling

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Recent Heavy Precipitation in the Vicinity of the Great Salt Lake: Just How Unusual?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long time series (1863–1984) of area)-average precipitation in the vicinity of the Great Salt Lake is shown to be highly correlated with the Great Salt Lake levels. This time series is used to assess the unusualness of the recent episode of ...

Thomas R. Karl; Pamela J. Young

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Recent Heavy Precipitation in the Vicinity of the Great Salt Lake: Just How Unusual?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long time series (1863–1984) of areal average precipitation in the vicinity of the Great Salt Lake is shown to be highly correlated with the Great Salt Lake levels. This time series is used to assess the unusual recent episode of heavy ...

Thomas R. Karl; Pamela J. Young

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

The Lake Effect of the Great Salt Lake: Overview and Forecast Problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lake-effect snow phenomenon along the shore of the Great Salt Lake (GSL) in Utah is documented and related to a similar, well-documented lake effect along the shores of the Great Lakes. Twenty-eight cases of GSL lake-effect snowfall are ...

David M. Carpenter

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project, Mercer County, North Dakota. Quarterly technical and environmental report, third quarter 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activities remain on schedule to meet Great Plains Gasification Associates (GPGA's) full gas production date. Gasification Plant - Detailed engineering is complete. Construction is 99% complete. Start-up operations are proceeding well. SNG was delivered to the product pipeline this quarter. The only remaining plant permit is the Permit to Operate, which is expected to be issued in late 1985. Quality Assurance/Quality Control Activities included major equipment inspections, further development of welding procedures, and continuation of the corrosion control/materials evaluation program. Freedom mine development activities remain on schedule.

Not Available

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS 8: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS Summary This EIS, being prepared jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service, will evaluate the environmental impacts of wind energy development in Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota - Western's Upper Great Plains customer service region. Western will use the EIS to implement a comprehensive regional program to manage interconnection requests for wind energy projects. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download March 22, 2013 EIS-0408: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS

290

Active Geothermal Systems And Associated Gold Deposits In The Great Basin |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Systems And Associated Gold Deposits In The Great Basin Geothermal Systems And Associated Gold Deposits In The Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Active Geothermal Systems And Associated Gold Deposits In The Great Basin Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: In western North America, a number of geothermal systems derive their heat from magmas or cooling intrusions. The interior of the Great Basin however, is characterized by widespread amagmatic geothermal activity that owes its existence to high crustal heat flow and active extensional tectonics. Both the magmatically heated and extensional fluid types in the Great Basin have recently, or are currently, depositing gold. Quaternary to Pliocene-aged gold deposits with adjacent high-temperature (≤ 150°C)

291

A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Details Activities (8) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: A 1:1,000,000 scale geothermal favorability map of the Great Basin is currently being published through the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology (NBMG) and is now available at the web site (http://www.unr.edu/geothermal/geothermal_gis2. htm) of the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy (GBCGE). This map allows for separate assessment of the potential for magmatically heated and extensional-type geothermal systems. Added to the map are temperature gradient wells from

292

Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great Basin Details Activities (4) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: A close spatial relationship exists between Quaternary borate deposits and moderate to high temperature (>=150oC) geothermal systems in the western part of the Great Basin. Similarly, a strong correlation exists between high concentrations of boron in groundwater and geothermal activity in the Great Basin. These relationships hae special significance for geothermal exploraion becauase ina number of cases, Quaternary surface borates occur without associated springs, and thus the borates can, and

293

Status of the Great Plains coal gasification project, May 31, 1984. [Mercer County, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The Great Plains coal gasification project in North Dakota was 99 percent complete and essentially on schedule on May 31, 1984. Cumulative project costs were $164 million less than originally estimated for this date, primarily due to reduced material, interest, and subcontractor costs. On the basis of reduced energy price forecasts, Great Plains in September 1983 projected large after-tax losses and negative cash flows from plant operations. To alleviate these losses, Great Plains applied to the US Synthetic Fuels Corporation for additional financial assistance. On April 26, 1984, the Corporation outlined its intentions to award Great Plains up to $790 million in assistance. As of August 10, 1984, the Corporation had not finalized the Great Plains assistance agreement.

Not Available

1984-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

294

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 10,596 10,988 10,169 6,662 3,882 2,012 1,562 1,499 1,718 3,437 6,386 11,183 1990 11,878 9,411 8,746 5,436 3,701 2,130...

295

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Idaho (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9,061 8,656 6,890 5,799 4,539 3,728 4,106 4,145 4,609 5,611 7,528 8,984 2002 8,747 8,547 7,861 5,699 4,667 3,654 3,038...

296

Outlook: The Next Twenty Years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

all this discussion, the outlook for the next twenty yearsLBNL-54470 OUTLOOK: THE NEXT TWENTY YEARS H. MURAYAMAUniversity of California. OUTLOOK: THE NEXT TWENTY YEARS H.

Murayama, Hitoshi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Fiscal Year Justification of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, epidemiology, laboratory services strengthen support for state, tribal, local, and territorial public healthDEPARTMENT of HEALTH and HUMAN SERVICES Fiscal Year 2012 Justification of Estimates Justification is one of several documents that fulfill the Department of Health and Human Services` (HHS

298

Year 2000: energy enough  

SciTech Connect

The growing needs for energy in the U.S. are reviewed, and it is predicted that energy supplies will need be more than doubled by the year 2000. The solution lies in three areas: goal targeting, resource management, and timing. A no-growth economy and an economy continuing growth at an appropriate rate are two scenarios discussed. The second major area of choice in fixing energy capabilities for the year 2000 involves management of fuel resources. Shortages of oil and gas dictate that the increase in energy consumption be changed to coal and uranium, both of which are available domestically; utilization of these energy sources will mean increased electrification. It is concluded, then, that the best avenues toward ensuring a national energy supply are utilization of coal and uranium and the practice of energy conservation through greater efficiency. Timing is the third critical area of decision making that affects future energy supply. The long lead time required to bring about a change in the national energy mix is cited. Current estimates indicate that now is the time to push toward a national electricity target of at least 7500 billion kWh for the year 2000. Meeting the target means almost four times the present electricity supply, at a growth rate of about 5.7 percent per year. This target assumes a reasonable measure of energy conservation. (MCW)

Starr, C.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

EVALUATING SHORT-TERM CLIMATE VARIABILITY IN THE LATE HOLOCENE OF THE NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This literature study investigated methods and areas to deduce climate change and climate patterns, looking for short-term cycle phenomena and the means to interpret them. Many groups are actively engaged in intensive climate-related research. Ongoing research might be (overly) simplified into three categories: (1) historic data on weather that can be used for trend analysis and modeling; (2) detailed geological, biological (subfossil), and analytical (geochemical, radiocarbon, etc.) studies covering the last 10,000 years (about since last glaciation); and (3) geological, paleontological, and analytical (geochemical, radiometric, etc.) studies over millions of years. Of importance is our ultimate ability to join these various lines of inquiry into an effective means of interpretation. At this point, the process of integration is fraught with methodological troubles and misconceptions about what each group can contribute. This project has met its goals to the extent that it provided an opportunity to study resource materials and consider options for future effort toward the goal of understanding the natural climate variation that has shaped our current civilization. A further outcome of this project is a proposed methodology based on ''climate sections'' that provides spatial and temporal correlation within a region. The method would integrate cultural and climate data to establish the climate history of a region with increasing accuracy with progressive study and scientific advancement (e. g., better integration of regional and global models). The goal of this project is to better understand natural climatic variations in the recent past (last 5000 years). The information generated by this work is intended to provide better context within which to examine global climate change. The ongoing project will help to establish a basis upon which to interpret late Holocene short-term climate variability as evidenced in various studies in the northern Great Plains, northern hemisphere, and elsewhere. Finally these data can be integrated into a history of climate change and predictive climate models. This is not a small undertaking. The goals of researchers and the methods used vary considerably. The primary task of this project was literature research to (1) evaluate existing methodologies used in geologic climate change studies and evidence for short-term cycles produced by these methodologies and (2) evaluate late Holocene climate patterns and their interpretations.

Joseph H. Hartman

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Impact of early diagenesis of Eolian reservoirs, Great Sand Dunes National Monument, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Dune and associated alluvial and playa deposits at Great Sand Dunes National Monument, Colorado, provide an excellent opportunity to study early diagenetic development of vertical and horizontal permeability barriers in recent eolian deposits (> 10 ka). Cements observed include calcite, aragonite, protodolomite(.), amorphous silica, iron hydroxide, smectite, trona, and halite. Cementation is controlled by the availability of water, with several hydrologic subenvironments producing different cements. Evaporative cementation in dunes adjacent to playas is commonly dominated by trona and halite, but calcite, aragonite, and amorphous silica also bind the sediment. These cements are generally most concentrated in fine laminations where capillary action has pulled water into dunes. Iron hydroxides, calcite, and amorphous silica precipitate at the interface between ground water and streams or lakes, where the pH gradient may exceed 5 pH units (pH 5.7-11.5). Subsequent movement of the ground-water table can result in cross-cutting cement zones. Early cementation in dunes prevents deflation and provides a mechanism for preservation of the reservoir unit. Intense cementation may permanently occlude porosity, or leaching may reestablish well-interconnected porosity. An understanding of the extent and composition of early cement zones can be used to improve hydrodynamic models for production and enhanced recovery.

Krystinik, L.F.; Andrews, S.; Fryberger, S.G.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Focus Area: Solar Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.leonardo-energy.org/webinar-introduction-small-scale-photovoltaic- Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/introduction-small-scale-photovoltaic Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Project Development This video teaches the viewer about photovoltaic arrays and RETscreen's photovoltaic module, which can be used to project the cost and production of an array. An example case study was

302

Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller Honda smart home October 2013 October-November Special Focus: Energy Efficiency, Buildings, and the Electric Grid Honda Motor Company Inc is proceeding with plans to build a Smart Home in Davis, California, to demonstrate the latest in renewable energy technologies and energy efficiency. The home is expected to produce more energy than is consumed, demonstrating how the goal of "zero net energy" can be met in the near term future. A ventilation controller developed by researchers at Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD) will be included in the smart home. EETD is currently working with the developers of the home control system to integrate its control algorithms.

303

Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Thin film solar cell including a spatially modulated intrinsic layer  

SciTech Connect

One or more thin film solar cells in which the intrinsic layer of substantially amorphous semiconductor alloy material thereof includes at least a first band gap portion and a narrower band gap portion. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is spatially graded through a portion of the bulk thickness, said graded portion including a region removed from the intrinsic layer-dopant layer interfaces. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is always less than the band gap of the doped layers. The gradation of the intrinsic layer is effected such that the open circuit voltage and/or the fill factor of the one or plural solar cell structure is enhanced.

Guha, Subhendu (Troy, MI); Yang, Chi-Chung (Troy, MI); Ovshinsky, Stanford R. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

305

Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Addressing questions about including environmental effects in the DMSO HLA  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Modeling and Simulation Office (DMSO) is developing a High Level Architecture (HLA) to support the DOD Modeling and Simulation (M and S) community. Many, if not all, of the simulations involve the environment in some fashion. In some applications, the simulation takes place in an acknowledged environment without any environmental functionality being taken into account. The Joint Training Federation Prototype (JTFp) is one of several prototype efforts that have been created to provide a test of the DMSO HLA. In addition to addressing the applicability of the HLA to a training community, the JTFp is also one of two prototype efforts that is explicitly including environmental effects in their simulation effort. These two prototyping efforts are examining the issues associated with the inclusion of the environment in an HLA federation. In deciding whether or not to include an environmental federation in the JTFp effort, a number of questions have been raised about the environment and the HLA. These questions have raised the issue of incompatibility between the environment and the HLA and also shown that there is something unique about including the environment in simulations. The purpose of this White Paper, which was developed with inputs from the National Air and Space [Warfare] Model Program among others, is to address the various questions that have been posed about including environmental effects in an HLA simulation.

Hummel, J.R.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

308

Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints Carlos Murillo{Sanchez Robert J algorithm for unit commitment that employs a Lagrange relaxation technique with a new augmentation. This framework allows the possibility of committing units that are required for the VArs that they can produce

309

Major initiatives in materials research at Western include  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in nuclear reactors; and a third in Engineering- J. Jiang, supported by UNENE, working on control in the theory of condensed matter, including its applications to polymers, optical, electronic, and magnetic NSERC Industrial Research Chairs who together make Western a leading university in nuclear power

Christensen, Dan

310

Status of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project, December 31, 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored construction of the Great Plains coal gasification project - designed to produce synthetic natural gas from coal in North Dakota - was completed in December 1984 on schedule. However, technical problems prevented Great Plains from meeting the inservice (commercial operation) target date of December 1, 1984. DOE believes the in-service date could occur in June 1985. Faced with deteriorating financial projections in the wake of declining energy prices, Great Plains applied to the US Synthetic Fuels Corporation (SFC) for additional assistance. In April 1984 SFC tentatively agreed to provide Great Plains up to $790 million in price guarantee assistance. In return, the Great Plains partners would contribute more equity, and Great Plains would repay the DOE-guaranteed loan faster and make profit-sharing payments to SFC. However, since SFC's tentative agreement for price guarantees, several events that could affect the project's financial outlook have occurred. For example, SFC and DOE have revised their energy price forecasts downward. In addition, Great Plains and SFC are negotiating a final agreement that could change some conditions of the tentative agreement.

Bowsher, C.A.

1985-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

311

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,032 979 1,003 855 565 457 471 518 560 657 654 1,014 1990 1,195 903 893 857 577 244 413 365 508 587 763 774 1991 1,089 979 864 605 667 414 538 540 555 628 496 895 1992 1,076 1,128 1,103 1,047 676 498 448 479 411 609 654 951 1993 1,140 1,359 1,325 907 429 330 273 364 243 503 1,008 1,324 1994 1,919 1,974 1,626 1,092 653 542 343 599 384 569 1,010 1,338 1995 1,077 1,679 1,883 1,353 901 562 413 582 294 580 1,216 1,523 1996 1,963 1,919 1,606 1,251 757 446 421 443 581 648 972 1,290 1997 1,694 1,744 1,739 1,144 892 537 430 399 460 637 1,211 1,416 1998 1,817 1,642 1,518 1,141 694 506 496 195 483 628 1,019 1,338

312

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,357 1,414 1,111 852 521 368 285 233 268 396 724 1,022 1990 1,305 1,199 1,085 822 628 410 247 234 241 378 759 1,132 1991 1,639 1,249 996 830 680 362 272 248 269 449 873 1,233 1992 1,404 1,078 821 668 438 309 264 269 287 439 760 1,271 1993 1,631 1,376 1,262 882 639 400 362 389 378 667 874 1,407 1994 1,351 1,412 1,065 869 544 369 291 270 308 550 915 1,287 1995 1,671 1,247 1,217 987 873 594 373 258 NA NA NA NA 1996 1,176 1,203 1,030 925 712 342 197 197 250 640 1,301 1,748 1997 1,570 1,309 1,403 1,189 958 491 623 287 316 554 966 1,088 1998 1,628 1,322 1,279 936 597 442 371 253 343 493 927 1,822

313

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,567 1,575 1,160 692 409 355 301 249 321 435 785 1,176 1990 1,313 1,283 1,000 610 479 389 293 280 292 459 822 1,315 1991 1,848 1,291 956 822 623 405 316 304 329 424 942 1,321 1992 1,543 1,167 834 643 447 343 345 330 369 465 889 1,557 1993 1,806 1,673 1,294 828 566 387 383 360 381 507 947 1,543 1994 1,510 1,457 1,121 771 480 377 374 306 357 571 1,098 1,667 1995 1,754 1,319 1,154 951 708 487 361 346 392 591 997 1,300 1996 1,734 1,783 1,359 996 710 477 346 354 421 597 1,107 1,621 1997 1,810 1,778 1,341 1,037 684 397 372 354 409 584 979 1,687 1998 1,969 1,564 1,417 1,072 686 535 405 380 386 577 1,045 1,640

314

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Vermont (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 1,164 1,003 1,084 834 544 381 304 307 361 438 658 827 2002 1,127 1,149 960 808 575 428 330 336 348 485 803 1,003 2003 1,153 1,191 1,062 906 539 367 293 312 325 502 708 1,029 2004 1,154 1,381 1,072 829 517 421 331 342 365 479 769 1,011 2005 1,211 1,280 1,199 776 558 404 310 298 295 418 666 943 2006 1,112 1,063 1,190 745 501 415 318 318 347 481 658 893 2007 1,104 1,375 1,250 915 536 382 340 331 342 423 696 1,158 2008 1,202 1,217 1,137 865 512 384 331 333 361 480 702 1,084 2009 1,407 1,307 1,076 794 507 409 348 321 337 508 684 922 2010 1,270 1,126 897 685 488 376 344 335 348 581 801 1,177

315

DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford January 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE , (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering natural gas transportation and distribution requirements to support the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and evaporator operations at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. DOE awarded a task order worth up to $5 million to the local, licensed supplier of natural gas in the Hanford area, Cascade Natural Gas Corporation (Cascade). Cascade will support DOE and its Environmental

316

Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe » Italy Western Europe » Italy (including San Marino) Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends As occurred in many industrialized nations, CO2 emissions from Italy rose steeply since the late 1940's until the growth was abruptly terminated in 1974. Since 1974, emissions from liquid fuels have vacillated, dropping from 76% to 46% of a static but varying total. Significant increases in natural gas consumption have compensated for the drop in oil consumption. In 2008, 35.8% of Italy's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions were due to natural gas consumption. Coal usage grew steadily until 1985 when CO2 emissions from coal consumption reached 16 million metric tons of carbon. Not until 2004 did coal usage exceed 1985 levels and now accounts for 13.9% of Italy's

317

Coordination). Participants include representatives from Balancing Authorities (BAs), Reliability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MRO Subject Matter Expert Team is an industry stakeholder group which includes subject matter experts from MRO member organizations in various technical areas. Any materials, guidance, and views from stakeholder groups are meant to be helpful to industry participants; but should not be considered approved or endorsed by MRO staff or its board of directors unless specified. Page | 2 Disclaimer The Midwest Reliability Organization (MRO) Standards Committee (SC) is committed to providing training and non-binding guidance to industry stakeholders regarding existing and emerging Reliability Standards. Any materials, including presentations, were developed through the MRO SC by Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) from member organizations within the MRO region. In 2012, SMEs in the field of System Operator Communications were brought together to prepare a guide for complying with NERC Reliability Standard COM-002-2 (Communications and

Will Behnke; Alliant Energy; Jacalynn Bentz; Great River Energy; Marie Knox Miso; Jacalynn Bentz; Marie Knox; Terry Harbour

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

NEWASH AND TECUMSETH: ANALYSIS OF TWO POST-WAR OF 1812 VESSELS ON THE GREAT LAKES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1953 the tangled, skeletal remains of a ship were pulled from the small harbor of Penetanguishene, Ontario. Local historians had hoped to raise the hull of a War of 1812 veteran, but the vessel pulled from the depths did not meet the criteria. Identified as H.M. Schooner Tecumseth, the vessel was built just after the War of 1812 had ended. Historical research of Tecumseth and her sister ship Newash, which remained in Penetanguishene harbor, illuminated the ships? shadowy past. Conceived and built after the war, the vessels sailed for only two years before being rendered obsolete by the terms of the Rush-Bagot disarmament agreement. Nevertheless, the two vessels offer a unique perspective from which to view the post-war period on the Great Lakes. The schooners? hulls were interpreted and analyzed using archaeological evidence. A theoretical rigging reconstruction was created, using contemporary texts and documentary evidence of the ships themselves. Architectural hull analysis was carried out to explore the nature of these vessels. From these varied approaches, a conception of Newash and Tecumseth has emerged, revealing ways in which the hulls were designed to fulfill their specific duties. The hulls were sharp, yet had capacious cargo areas. The rigs combined square-rigged and fore-and-aft sails for maximum flexibility. The designs of the hulls and rigging also reflect predominant attitudes of the period, in which naval vessels on the lakes gave way to merchant craft. Taken as a whole, Tecumseth and Newash illustrate how ships, while fluid in the nature of their work, are also singular entities that truly encapsulate a specific point in time and place.

Gordon, Leeanne E.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Flicker Performance of Modern Lighting Technologies including Impacts of Dimmers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existing industry standards on flicker measurement and assessment are based on the response of general purpose incandescent lamps. However, worldwide these lamps are being replaced with more energy efficient lamps including Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) and Light emitting Diode (LED) lamps. In order to keep the flicker standards relevant, the industry standard bodies on the subject are in need of the evidence that compares the flicker performance of new lighting ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

320

Conversion of geothermal waste to commercial products including silica  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the treatment of geothermal residue includes contacting the pigmented amorphous silica-containing component with a depigmenting reagent one or more times to depigment the silica and produce a mixture containing depigmented amorphous silica and depigmenting reagent containing pigment material; separating the depigmented amorphous silica and from the depigmenting reagent to yield depigmented amorphous silica. Before or after the depigmenting contacting, the geothermal residue or depigmented silica can be treated with a metal solubilizing agent to produce another mixture containing pigmented or unpigmented amorphous silica-containing component and a solubilized metal-containing component; separating these components from each other to produce an amorphous silica product substantially devoid of metals and at least partially devoid of pigment. The amorphous silica product can be neutralized and thereafter dried at a temperature from about 25.degree. C. to 300.degree. C. The morphology of the silica product can be varied through the process conditions including sequence contacting steps, pH of depigmenting reagent, neutralization and drying conditions to tailor the amorphous silica for commercial use in products including filler for paint, paper, rubber and polymers, and chromatographic material.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Multi-processor including data flow accelerator module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An accelerator module for a data flow computer includes an intelligent memory. The module is added to a multiprocessor arrangement and uses a shared tagged memory architecture in the data flow computer. The intelligent memory module assigns locations for holding data values in correspondence with arcs leading to a node in a data dependency graph. Each primitive computation is associated with a corresponding memory cell, including a number of slots for operands needed to execute a primitive computation, a primitive identifying pointer, and linking slots for distributing the result of the cell computation to other cells requiring that result as an operand. Circuitry is provided for utilizing tag bits to determine automatically when all operands required by a processor are available and for scheduling the primitive for execution in a queue. Each memory cell of the module may be associated with any of the primitives, and the particular primitive to be executed by the processor associated with the cell is identified by providing an index, such as the cell number for the primitive, to the primitive lookup table of starting addresses. The module thus serves to perform functions previously performed by a number of sections of data flow architectures and coexists with conventional shared memory therein. A multiprocessing system including the module operates in a hybrid mode, wherein the same processing modules are used to perform some processing in a sequential mode, under immediate control of an operating system, while performing other processing in a data flow mode.

Davidson, George S. (Albuquerque, NM); Pierce, Paul E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Global Analysis of Solar Neutrino Oscillations Including SNO CC Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For active and sterile neutrinos, we present the globally allowed solutions for two neutrino oscillations. We include the SNO CC measurement and all other relevant solar neutrino and reactor data. Five active neutrino oscillation solutions (LMA, LOW, SMA, VAC, and Just So2) are currently allowed at 3 sigma; three sterile neutrino solutions (Just So2, SMA, and VAC) are allowed at 3 sigma. The goodness of fit is satisfactory for all eight solutions. We also investigate the robustness of the allowed solutions by carrying out global analyses with and without: 1) imposing solar model constraints on the 8B neutrino flux, 2) including the Super-Kamiokande spectral energy distribution and day-night data, 3) including a continuous mixture of active and sterile neutrinos, 4) using an enhanced CC cross section for deuterium (due to radiative corrections), and 5) a optimistic, hypothetical reduction by a factor of three of the error of the SNO CC rate. For every analysis strategy used in this paper, the most favored solutions all involve large mixing angles: LMA, LOW, or VAC. The favored solutions are robust, but the presence at 3 sigma of individual sterile solutions and the active Just So2 solution is sensitive to the analysis assumptions.

John N. Bahcall; M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia; Carlos Pena-Garay

2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

323

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 4,784 4,016 4,367 3,046 2,022 1,568 1,475 1,454 1,534 1,843 2,639 4,396 1990 5,379 3,690 3,400 2,747 1,820 1,445 1,394 1,480 1,596 1,795 2,715 3,817 1991 4,947 4,647 3,990 2,629 1,928 1,677 1,613 1,679 1,789 2,052 3,200 4,162 1992 5,169 5,066 3,983 3,296 2,205 1,733 1,591 1,607 1,679 2,138 3,010 4,941 1993 5,866 5,566 5,426 3,602 1,988 1,532 1,437 1,539 1,674 2,067 3,379 3,292 1994 7,247 6,269 4,727 2,761 1,844 1,605 1,487 1,647 1,831 2,115 2,817 4,592 1995 5,839 6,031 4,241 3,065 1,766 1,579 1,487 1,475 1,597 1,740 3,263 5,279 1996 6,913 6,421 4,851 3,760 1,970 1,586 1,415 1,575 1,658 1,917 3,240 5,160

324

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Delaware (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 5,014 4,742 5,389 3,439 2,924 3,276 3,324 4,609 4,923 5,078 3,908 3,419 2002 5,258 4,880 4,847 3,830 2,810 2,738 6,396 3,816 4,170 3,843 3,936 5,597 2003 6,397 5,499 5,102 3,399 2,081 2,433 3,570 3,550 2,728 2,949 3,547 4,833 2004 6,827 5,602 4,600 3,387 3,731 2,595 2,620 2,437 2,880 2,484 4,033 6,759 2005 6,870 5,543 5,427 2,696 2,517 2,866 3,287 3,735 2,652 2,870 3,515 4,876 2006 5,025 4,699 4,451 2,549 2,659 3,204 3,812 3,447 2,516 2,972 3,454 4,379 2007 4,855 5,154 4,783 3,486 2,804 3,196 3,833 4,160 3,127 3,346 3,838 5,551 2008 5,197 5,132 4,474 3,574 2,885 3,871 4,077 3,567 3,009 2,937 4,178 5,239

325

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 26,553 25,448 24,717 16,375 10,150 5,954 4,570 4,467 5,047 8,855 15,776 28,269 1990 26,939 22,780 20,870 15,431 9,230 5,638 4,610 4,865 5,117 8,592 14,122 21,237 1991 29,054 24,902 21,321 14,617 9,583 5,601 4,916 4,508 5,510 9,450 12,966 23,131 1992 26,677 24,979 22,443 17,769 10,406 5,883 4,981 4,964 5,431 9,760 16,298 24,211 1993 28,122 27,427 25,623 18,238 9,009 5,968 5,035 4,140 5,767 10,193 16,875 23,833 1994 33,440 31,356 24,263 16,330 10,123 6,207 5,343 5,363 5,719 8,796 14,511 21,617 1995 27,945 29,223 23,980 18,384 11,004 6,372 5,664 5,778 6,417 9,647 19,742 29,922 1996 32,468 30,447 27,914 19,664 12,272 6,343 5,673 5,383 6,146 9,472 19,486 26,123

326

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Arizona (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 19,804 23,088 21,742 19,153 21,113 17,703 18,312 16,919 14,352 14,127 12,164 19,204 2002 19,840 19,954 18,340 14,544 14,463 17,262 23,546 22,088 20,988 19,112 17,712 21,662 2003 20,639 18,895 21,753 16,848 14,559 16,858 28,981 30,940 25,278 24,409 16,317 18,043 2004 25,379 30,143 26,925 23,982 26,878 29,819 35,860 33,244 27,591 23,349 23,090 26,140 2005 24,400 22,209 17,591 20,779 22,660 23,609 35,036 34,587 26,451 24,130 22,651 28,011 2006 26,212 24,177 22,606 21,814 22,339 30,548 34,718 36,448 30,678 32,378 24,493 29,027 2007 34,237 26,857 17,051 20,379 28,959 35,463 43,104 40,305 33,790 29,544 27,001 33,835

327

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Iowa (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 33,183 29,626 26,788 17,172 12,430 10,449 10,249 10,177 10,494 14,476 16,865 23,400 2002 28,527 25,072 25,693 18,706 13,413 10,076 9,731 9,815 10,403 14,561 22,219 27,225 2003 31,445 32,450 25,482 16,870 12,421 10,288 9,892 10,030 10,550 13,644 20,542 26,599 2004 32,639 30,955 23,081 15,569 11,543 10,481 9,546 10,080 10,193 14,132 20,759 27,591 2005 34,272 27,838 24,671 18,370 13,180 12,206 11,888 11,542 11,838 13,551 19,595 30,763 2006 26,997 26,909 23,941 17,158 14,088 12,588 13,244 11,886 12,277 18,360 22,732 25,747 2007 35,848 38,728 28,204 22,726 17,742 14,922 15,363 15,754 14,595 18,051 24,001 35,021

328

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,976 3,700 4,247 2,586 1,701 1,154 968 941 978 1,220 1,801 3,647 1990 4,168 3,115 3,057 2,477 1,557 1,131 1,049 961 1,016 1,095 1,686 2,738 1991 5,709 5,334 4,545 3,320 2,108 1,602 1,545 1,465 1,486 2,289 3,582 5,132 1992 6,323 6,382 5,073 3,807 2,391 1,784 1,553 1,586 1,615 2,491 3,895 5,565 1993 6,273 6,568 6,232 3,772 2,110 1,861 1,507 1,567 1,700 2,231 3,898 5,915 1994 8,122 6,354 5,634 2,844 2,547 1,709 1,732 1,588 2,016 2,531 3,582 5,475 1995 6,743 7,826 4,472 3,736 2,388 1,994 1,612 1,722 2,065 1,907 4,871 7,538 1996 7,648 6,515 5,476 3,766 2,672 1,816 1,608 1,866 1,922 2,427 4,693 5,433

329

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,493 3,435 3,545 3,083 2,670 2,570 2,525 2,369 2,484 2,444 2,868 3,620 1990 4,101 3,305 3,246 3,026 2,860 2,673 2,584 2,497 2,483 2,521 3,285 3,725 1991 3,875 3,770 3,782 3,363 2,978 2,674 2,845 2,708 2,998 2,798 3,519 3,954 1992 4,408 4,364 3,856 3,741 3,382 3,085 2,976 2,881 2,849 2,954 3,317 3,914 1993 3,951 4,078 4,088 3,871 3,362 3,085 2,919 2,830 2,887 2,983 3,336 3,760 1994 4,619 3,941 3,853 3,374 3,078 2,937 2,855 2,909 2,896 2,814 3,089 3,570 1995 4,274 4,361 3,900 3,433 3,055 2,930 2,970 2,751 2,818 2,840 3,171 3,883 1996 4,731 4,272 4,167 3,918 3,336 3,029 2,836 2,716 2,840 2,957 3,179 3,830

330

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,919 4,336 3,961 2,180 1,261 1,357 1,019 1,007 1,096 1,245 1,948 3,942 1990 4,957 3,368 2,807 2,223 1,398 1,065 1,030 1,043 1,081 1,260 1,948 2,949 1991 5,034 4,043 2,848 1,778 1,211 1,027 998 1,023 1,045 1,184 2,497 3,297 1992 4,159 3,861 2,708 2,114 1,358 1,108 1,062 1,022 1,029 1,219 2,078 3,596 1993 4,757 4,174 3,999 2,923 1,540 1,078 1,013 1,047 1,126 1,389 2,480 3,473 1994 5,101 4,707 3,388 2,306 1,360 1,107 990 887 1,253 1,275 1,897 3,136 1995 4,387 4,171 3,478 2,027 1,337 1,156 1,015 1,021 1,060 1,183 2,265 4,311 1996 5,411 5,249 3,895 2,964 1,519 1,052 1,056 1,060 1,106 1,356 2,462 3,876

331

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Arkansas (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 26,139 20,654 21,940 16,528 13,819 12,558 14,779 16,061 15,014 18,239 19,675 22,233 2002 24,431 24,940 22,284 19,166 15,635 16,964 18,741 17,700 16,789 16,932 17,770 21,567 2003 27,116 27,256 22,904 18,625 17,603 17,849 18,208 18,467 15,282 16,402 16,960 20,603 2004 24,746 25,909 21,663 16,382 15,991 14,085 14,456 14,551 11,956 14,094 13,138 18,337 2005 22,386 19,719 19,170 15,597 14,643 15,315 16,703 17,392 13,113 13,511 15,272 20,113 2006 19,984 19,909 19,394 17,499 17,865 19,198 19,107 19,963 16,976 17,107 15,346 19,021 2007 20,936 22,984 17,280 15,779 16,099 17,982 17,998 22,294 15,747 13,225 15,235 18,728

332

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Utah (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 20,043 17,426 13,012 11,173 7,791 7,056 6,214 6,023 6,572 9,189 11,646 18,505 2002 19,727 17,659 15,165 8,453 7,113 5,260 5,915 6,481 7,591 11,589 13,814 16,447 2003 16,474 16,494 12,825 10,664 6,942 5,612 6,174 6,166 6,229 7,898 13,299 16,533 2004 21,414 17,627 10,247 9,033 6,775 5,344 6,398 5,617 6,456 8,714 13,097 17,058 2005 18,357 16,430 13,763 12,951 9,253 7,461 7,380 6,187 6,053 6,449 9,027 16,786 2006 19,708 17,533 16,428 13,496 8,309 8,516 8,734 8,180 8,599 9,422 13,464 19,710 2007 27,918 22,251 16,927 13,476 12,260 11,106 9,771 9,790 10,976 12,425 15,630 20,497 2008 27,371 26,146 20,495 17,995 13,506 10,286 10,157 10,919 10,422 11,249 14,386 19,141

333

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in North Carolina (Including Vehicle  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 29,800 21,808 20,434 14,585 11,544 11,979 13,229 15,763 11,364 14,905 15,898 19,179 2002 27,750 25,444 22,993 16,550 13,274 14,816 16,400 17,088 13,640 15,047 19,024 27,257 2003 32,135 30,180 20,979 15,717 12,038 9,338 12,359 13,177 11,210 12,814 16,520 25,999 2004 31,785 30,416 22,379 16,242 16,033 12,711 12,866 13,027 11,970 11,729 15,635 24,946 2005 30,538 27,324 26,203 17,851 13,162 12,669 15,688 16,197 12,616 12,082 15,331 25,731 2006 25,596 23,904 23,271 15,873 13,091 13,120 17,476 19,153 11,452 14,070 18,457 22,889 2007 26,988 29,743 21,686 17,606 13,644 14,343 14,640 22,849 15,744 14,159 17,540 23,411

334

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,283 3,376 2,280 1,227 653 472 357 346 390 522 1,313 2,304 1990 2,864 2,779 2,272 1,203 860 581 373 364 374 629 1,382 2,540 1991 4,055 3,108 2,282 1,771 1,316 668 405 375 407 551 1,634 2,704 1992 3,330 2,952 1,866 1,155 642 457 410 372 405 545 1,329 3,120 1993 3,922 3,682 2,988 1,839 1,248 707 597 594 606 946 2,023 3,436 1994 3,929 3,846 2,665 2,037 962 814 820 787 882 1,883 3,542 4,335 1995 4,244 3,324 2,948 2,429 1,675 1,122 861 899 1,088 1,905 2,605 3,724 1996 4,549 4,604 3,129 2,479 1,356 892 904 874 1,279 2,073 3,185 4,220 1997 5,030 4,454 3,350 2,664 1,263 942 923 939 1,120 2,012 3,174 5,257

335

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Michigan (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 133,140 112,047 111,301 76,191 48,707 41,686 43,845 44,577 40,142 59,283 71,352 92,053 2002 119,902 108,891 104,208 87,138 63,810 52,457 51,899 47,094 40,938 53,419 82,015 114,268 2003 140,545 133,702 114,085 80,651 53,258 37,279 35,261 42,115 32,744 49,901 69,659 99,067 2004 137,906 127,671 102,442 76,978 54,610 41,310 38,001 37,565 37,285 48,239 71,870 107,025 2005 133,079 112,812 108,608 72,884 50,886 47,768 50,667 44,890 35,502 42,661 64,574 111,058 2006 104,803 99,454 96,633 65,814 43,901 35,824 43,332 39,459 31,740 50,167 70,643 85,634 2007 100,406 124,441 98,314 69,491 43,699 33,353 30,415 38,655 30,211 36,831 59,171 97,411

336

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Louisiana (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 90,750 82,773 86,038 87,577 81,223 77,877 93,937 105,743 93,365 92,353 85,277 92,797 2002 102,807 96,945 102,315 94,281 91,511 97,058 107,870 109,348 97,986 94,054 96,857 102,289 2003 106,504 91,821 89,554 89,376 88,426 78,863 91,469 95,243 85,824 84,198 83,677 94,139 2004 101,114 98,005 96,851 86,763 89,143 89,075 96,344 98,583 93,156 94,397 89,577 99,046 2005 102,652 87,403 100,620 97,398 104,027 102,860 104,234 99,244 82,252 75,899 72,958 91,598 2006 80,495 79,755 88,341 86,459 88,047 89,170 97,472 103,508 88,124 89,721 89,141 94,300 2007 100,669 93,075 95,251 91,900 94,668 99,373 92,367 104,606 87,792 91,661 83,575 89,348

337

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Florida (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 34,086 30,338 35,463 39,708 42,466 46,947 53,430 53,352 55,306 52,955 42,205 47,598 2002 50,177 41,302 50,453 55,845 56,767 62,343 67,197 70,144 65,136 64,259 47,600 45,144 2003 53,384 43,538 54,761 51,487 62,575 58,312 64,041 61,764 62,150 59,558 56,488 50,525 2004 50,877 49,866 51,687 53,442 62,663 69,628 72,443 70,540 70,259 66,961 50,122 53,169 2005 59,417 49,956 60,238 55,269 64,436 69,719 90,376 84,114 67,877 63,782 55,683 46,489 2006 54,827 56,557 68,707 73,645 85,346 87,268 88,949 86,772 83,397 76,817 58,594 56,867 2007 57,409 56,412 60,397 70,366 76,461 81,312 93,683 97,040 88,865 89,976 66,512 67,153

338

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 28,465 29,564 21,880 18,656 19,249 21,469 15,319 17,351 19,452 19,856 21,665 26,192 1990 30,798 34,767 27,425 23,423 18,540 17,392 21,030 17,705 23,233 17,384 22,637 30,759 1991 31,793 23,911 26,128 28,375 21,468 20,003 22,080 16,547 23,307 26,510 20,109 27,379 1992 38,234 23,834 24,413 18,379 27,118 22,150 21,150 21,633 19,247 19,112 20,999 28,738 1993 27,151 31,334 21,654 18,276 18,032 15,638 18,341 14,348 16,845 19,708 20,404 28,553 1994 29,342 27,032 23,156 18,463 22,621 18,091 25,752 14,123 14,604 17,844 25,032 25,929 1995 31,883 25,693 23,399 23,976 24,831 19,028 21,954 18,362 19,391 21,272 22,818 26,152

339

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Pennsylvania (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 96,012 79,547 77,363 52,992 33,092 26,098 25,208 27,662 29,499 38,457 46,614 63,083 2002 80,458 74,651 70,773 53,368 38,209 33,401 32,700 34,743 30,425 40,462 58,542 83,877 2003 101,975 96,176 79,246 53,759 36,015 29,095 30,298 32,640 26,799 39,895 47,467 78,054 2004 100,298 95,715 73,189 54,937 42,873 33,367 36,047 33,735 32,060 34,578 50,908 74,224 2005 90,958 84,388 85,058 50,137 38,196 34,547 36,133 37,648 32,674 35,439 50,234 80,301 2006 76,519 77,324 76,877 49,039 37,224 36,803 44,307 41,471 31,545 40,867 49,703 63,941 2007 78,283 95,894 81,570 63,089 41,955 37,217 42,996 50,308 38,092 42,936 57,228 82,068

340

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 6,069 7,033 6,197 2,868 1,601 1,279 1,180 1,097 1,241 1,528 2,542 5,873 1990 7,587 5,618 4,176 3,424 2,281 1,519 1,312 1,355 1,235 1,613 2,520 4,567 1991 8,702 6,014 4,265 2,489 1,702 1,330 1,290 1,279 1,299 1,590 3,974 5,653 1992 6,180 5,310 3,653 2,956 1,785 1,540 1,407 1,292 1,240 1,449 2,608 5,771 1993 7,076 6,147 5,910 3,743 2,057 1,439 1,324 1,432 1,345 1,544 3,424 5,327 1994 6,644 6,611 4,717 2,954 1,875 1,384 1,364 1,256 1,384 1,475 2,207 4,632 1995 6,358 6,001 5,160 2,968 2,354 1,794 1,558 1,524 1,903 1,836 3,020 5,164 1996 7,808 7,923 5,595 4,413 2,222 1,770 1,798 1,678 1,759 1,900 3,273 6,014

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341

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Ohio (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 136,340 110,078 102,451 66,525 41,541 34,864 34,025 32,667 33,129 48,517 59,935 87,118 2002 106,011 98,576 94,429 70,082 51,854 40,885 40,538 38,774 34,999 51,972 76,275 108,800 2003 140,436 123,688 99,629 65,861 43,326 32,959 33,810 37,562 32,918 52,253 65,617 103,846 2004 137,568 117,976 93,845 67,347 46,827 33,561 34,567 34,689 34,129 47,268 64,279 99,290 2005 122,404 107,459 105,183 63,669 47,239 37,221 35,833 37,060 33,808 42,569 65,578 113,292 2006 95,548 97,666 85,732 52,957 42,766 33,443 36,271 36,307 35,048 54,845 69,951 88,329 2007 105,108 128,279 87,809 70,627 41,797 34,877 33,361 40,637 34,554 41,730 69,858 102,787

342

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Nebraska (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 17,481 15,747 13,983 11,129 7,094 5,429 8,556 6,368 5,506 5,854 10,730 11,012 2002 16,123 14,049 12,938 10,424 6,676 4,984 8,748 7,414 6,786 6,218 9,753 13,269 2003 15,675 15,319 13,354 8,644 6,232 4,472 7,653 7,469 5,904 6,758 8,775 13,011 2004 16,104 16,445 12,058 7,983 6,255 5,830 6,952 6,641 4,338 5,935 8,995 13,129 2005 17,242 14,641 11,440 8,360 6,579 5,853 7,874 8,028 6,345 6,081 8,200 13,733 2006 15,551 13,741 13,940 10,766 7,411 7,500 9,685 9,019 6,665 7,092 10,375 13,432 2007 17,851 19,390 16,040 10,333 9,436 7,602 10,286 11,264 8,529 7,818 10,704 15,974 2008 20,241 20,433 17,488 13,024 9,556 9,390 10,050 10,893 8,126 10,847 13,250 17,360

343

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 23,636 24,435 21,187 13,360 8,237 3,927 3,565 3,735 4,397 8,946 15,949 30,143 1990 25,317 19,642 20,361 13,373 7,446 4,838 3,975 4,165 4,240 7,272 13,757 19,190 1991 26,286 24,481 20,157 11,779 6,341 3,971 3,703 3,933 4,196 8,065 15,488 21,940 1992 26,321 24,820 20,215 15,893 7,455 5,016 4,291 4,260 4,418 9,092 15,094 23,770 1993 25,230 26,706 25,531 15,019 6,359 5,221 3,939 3,860 4,492 9,636 14,979 23,071 1994 33,573 29,301 22,713 14,498 7,933 5,111 4,027 4,287 4,492 7,331 12,594 20,936 1995 28,306 29,814 21,860 14,128 8,132 4,979 4,697 4,406 4,623 7,916 18,650 27,649 1996 33,993 29,732 26,650 16,833 8,960 7,661 4,569 4,401 4,048 8,548 18,274 26,298

344

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Georgia (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 49,414 34,292 35,867 25,368 20,633 20,544 24,229 26,863 21,857 25,679 23,983 34,450 2002 44,041 37,992 33,260 23,775 22,612 24,924 30,113 29,701 24,899 23,785 32,829 47,106 2003 56,470 43,704 31,355 30,232 21,920 20,512 23,789 26,828 21,628 22,981 26,920 45,508 2004 52,486 48,806 31,529 28,718 26,610 24,562 26,132 26,093 22,927 22,025 29,012 49,125 2005 47,756 39,503 39,085 25,191 23,198 26,957 31,619 33,089 28,453 26,199 32,483 52,399 2006 39,904 45,015 35,118 26,670 26,891 30,790 36,980 38,808 25,412 31,321 35,677 40,816 2007 49,163 47,589 32,236 31,955 27,318 31,415 32,039 49,457 31,028 27,420 33,851 41,413

345

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New Hampshire (Including Vehicle  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 3,171 3,309 2,951 2,280 1,441 1,134 1,003 888 1,182 1,589 1,904 2,520 2002 2,917 3,188 2,833 2,179 1,815 1,423 1,657 1,055 1,381 1,038 1,847 3,507 2003 6,844 6,457 5,490 3,772 3,085 2,034 3,900 5,640 4,166 4,643 3,574 4,515 2004 5,204 7,595 6,870 6,131 2,712 4,473 4,167 4,306 4,766 3,194 5,704 6,026 2005 6,958 7,545 6,875 5,691 6,049 5,824 5,780 6,010 4,491 4,069 5,173 5,988 2006 7,782 6,823 7,852 4,511 2,505 2,608 3,895 5,107 5,407 5,917 3,850 6,263 2007 6,645 5,329 5,157 5,429 3,826 4,223 5,642 5,420 5,969 4,295 4,527 5,641 2008 7,786 7,653 7,558 5,076 4,511 4,124 5,536 4,876 5,352 5,548 6,443 6,692

346

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maryland (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 28,398 21,618 21,408 13,900 9,252 8,342 9,046 11,007 9,109 12,662 13,558 17,125 2002 24,221 22,802 20,670 12,534 8,846 8,846 10,514 12,842 10,157 12,911 20,408 28,827 2003 31,739 28,530 21,240 15,685 9,809 8,723 8,128 7,986 7,131 11,863 16,167 27,049 2004 33,576 27,062 20,558 14,623 9,867 8,560 7,704 8,271 7,535 11,725 16,222 26,279 2005 29,469 25,497 24,272 13,414 10,273 10,104 9,641 11,634 8,302 12,060 16,807 28,263 2006 24,101 24,846 19,870 11,807 9,034 9,251 11,438 11,236 8,042 11,895 16,300 21,239 2007 24,841 32,498 20,950 15,805 8,835 9,239 9,540 12,974 9,655 10,242 17,911 25,311 2008 28,394 26,094 20,551 12,340 9,832 9,808 10,778 7,669 8,974 12,394 20,316 25,502

347

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wyoming (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 7,475 6,484 5,643 5,505 4,182 3,864 3,515 3,541 3,688 4,790 5,518 6,170 2002 6,844 5,846 6,319 5,737 5,034 4,070 4,980 4,124 4,599 6,126 7,421 8,523 2003 7,672 7,313 7,026 5,737 4,976 4,408 4,112 4,164 4,356 5,062 5,554 7,236 2004 7,555 7,180 6,077 5,400 4,775 4,216 4,064 4,187 4,024 5,032 6,153 6,963 2005 7,585 6,443 6,231 5,612 5,092 4,247 4,081 3,903 4,080 4,829 5,360 7,262 2006 7,304 6,824 6,957 5,389 4,762 4,109 4,108 4,063 3,935 5,157 5,893 6,958 2007 7,982 7,322 6,900 5,469 4,958 4,253 3,873 3,944 4,150 5,003 6,095 7,723 2008 8,446 7,443 6,660 5,737 5,057 4,098 3,749 3,805 3,520 4,922 5,595 7,419

348

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Colorado (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 57,089 50,447 49,042 41,157 30,506 23,904 22,403 22,033 19,905 22,672 30,231 42,797 2002 47,541 44,713 45,909 30,319 24,230 22,105 26,301 21,119 21,764 34,563 38,884 46,826 2003 44,971 47,164 38,292 25,380 24,811 18,484 23,772 23,529 20,981 22,248 39,408 48,023 2004 47,548 44,859 30,853 28,458 23,766 20,408 22,895 21,210 20,651 26,731 39,719 50,977 2005 50,356 41,495 39,617 33,501 25,108 20,725 26,350 23,387 22,698 29,399 38,140 54,566 2006 45,074 45,360 42,614 26,074 20,799 20,115 23,277 22,817 18,928 30,373 38,546 49,332 2007 62,803 46,554 33,579 30,243 25,136 25,014 28,465 26,787 27,444 32,786 39,145 57,263

349

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maine (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 6,537 6,903 6,950 5,791 7,780 6,957 8,161 9,020 8,835 8,864 9,644 9,127 2002 9,857 10,737 9,131 9,186 10,030 9,602 7,965 10,909 8,186 10,974 12,161 11,924 2003 8,047 5,034 5,581 5,924 4,577 4,916 6,000 5,629 5,606 6,652 5,970 6,036 2004 7,095 8,049 7,635 7,137 6,496 6,314 6,648 7,333 6,100 7,027 7,786 7,858 2005 5,882 5,823 5,955 5,764 4,162 5,163 5,883 6,097 4,936 4,955 4,236 2,234 2006 3,888 4,850 5,239 4,090 5,138 4,996 6,505 5,264 5,580 6,835 5,939 5,217 2007 6,180 5,355 4,869 4,768 4,222 4,680 6,405 6,403 4,340 3,731 4,999 6,480 2008 6,142 5,066 5,389 5,928 5,679 4,545 6,177 5,002 5,965 5,812 6,785 6,712

350

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,133 2,021 2,066 1,635 999 803 692 763 712 775 1,090 2,052 1990 1,986 1,857 1,789 1,384 951 699 514 572 721 574 836 1,589 1991 2,204 2,308 2,131 1,381 1,063 784 705 794 689 658 1,071 1,764 1992 2,300 2,256 2,132 1,774 1,056 764 718 673 653 753 1,103 1,921 1993 2,352 2,438 2,166 1,550 1,150 731 664 703 684 841 1,040 1,909 1994 2,303 1,865 1,483 1,588 979 815 753 692 740 785 1,082 1,658 1995 2,280 2,583 2,089 1,607 1,158 884 820 744 766 794 1,116 2,194 1996 2,147 1,942 1,551 1,925 1,233 824 878 750 774 804 1,195 2,325 1997 2,334 2,315 2,183 1,738 1,372 951 782 853 852 899 1,354 2,379

351

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,156 2,125 1,533 1,100 1,004 890 790 805 811 954 1,257 1,690 1990 1,959 1,963 1,740 1,185 1,006 970 879 782 701 1,157 1,026 1,705 1991 2,447 1,839 1,739 1,593 1,333 1,121 947 1,005 761 1,104 1,095 1,976 1992 2,327 1,873 1,725 1,335 1,012 945 1,015 824 872 982 1,022 2,170 1993 2,271 2,110 2,016 1,314 1,341 1,052 919 939 909 1,047 1,421 2,211 1994 2,334 2,277 1,995 1,456 1,300 1,136 995 909 978 1,146 1,541 2,625 1995 2,551 2,139 1,868 1,784 1,558 1,268 1,082 978 1,009 1,151 1,444 1,871 1996 2,466 2,309 2,268 1,811 1,454 1,286 1,145 1,062 1,116 1,269 1,817 2,417 1997 2,717 2,634 2,447 1,900 1,695 1,412 1,099 1,148 1,195 1,273 1,800 2,638

352

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wisconsin (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 52,126 51,020 52,466 24,969 17,238 15,421 16,478 16,540 16,716 25,355 26,981 41,400 2002 49,850 43,815 48,646 31,946 24,278 16,100 16,531 15,795 16,659 28,429 39,330 49,912 2003 62,523 55,695 44,756 32,270 20,752 15,502 15,630 18,099 16,485 24,636 36,907 47,677 2004 65,038 48,498 41,599 27,544 21,106 15,420 15,949 14,951 16,063 23,268 33,602 56,693 2005 59,667 45,463 47,647 29,885 23,265 22,788 21,959 22,549 19,566 23,868 35,232 54,600 2006 44,700 49,036 42,628 24,331 20,527 17,607 20,221 19,919 18,038 31,566 36,227 44,483 2007 53,637 61,738 41,274 32,627 19,348 17,305 18,156 21,627 17,044 22,827 36,770 53,091

353

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Kansas (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 35,585 27,368 26,284 16,906 10,552 11,171 18,862 17,962 13,422 11,375 14,263 20,610 2002 28,513 25,068 25,566 17,348 13,424 13,947 18,253 20,062 15,937 13,007 21,946 26,371 2003 31,180 29,594 25,952 16,337 13,386 11,371 15,614 15,421 13,725 13,096 15,980 25,771 2004 30,087 29,036 21,955 15,496 13,148 12,282 11,912 13,013 13,177 13,809 15,207 23,992 2005 29,876 25,291 20,604 15,459 12,953 11,687 13,164 13,264 12,147 11,254 14,924 25,902 2006 25,596 23,451 22,320 16,673 12,748 14,289 18,023 17,171 12,559 13,555 17,451 24,135 2007 29,886 31,709 22,007 16,753 13,449 14,165 16,842 20,565 16,098 15,324 19,705 29,579

354

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Oklahoma (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 45,337 36,026 35,468 29,023 26,153 28,194 41,056 38,697 30,910 29,194 26,719 33,193 2002 42,957 42,546 40,981 36,989 28,784 31,741 39,440 43,092 34,007 26,058 27,197 34,574 2003 44,633 43,363 39,395 32,941 30,147 32,417 46,076 47,914 30,139 28,937 26,588 39,627 2004 44,286 47,720 40,198 35,528 36,608 33,843 39,855 38,791 36,056 30,069 25,036 35,444 2005 42,941 41,516 38,987 36,599 35,972 45,327 48,696 49,698 42,454 32,097 30,402 42,813 2006 42,641 45,534 43,562 45,754 43,689 44,512 51,955 56,344 37,425 35,388 34,881 46,374 2007 55,048 57,329 44,646 43,762 41,758 42,250 47,969 58,650 43,759 42,172 36,392 49,540

355

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Kentucky (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 31,659 23,182 21,670 14,953 9,527 8,890 9,668 9,881 10,024 12,591 16,271 23,216 2002 26,131 24,533 23,241 14,879 12,317 11,623 13,804 10,869 11,129 14,628 21,069 27,646 2003 34,776 29,032 20,580 14,017 10,797 9,334 9,467 10,296 10,390 13,196 16,933 27,218 2004 32,640 27,566 21,630 15,771 12,331 11,249 10,810 11,428 10,883 13,355 17,689 27,203 2005 29,373 24,036 24,578 15,557 13,614 13,693 12,658 14,134 12,122 14,104 19,304 29,050 2006 23,093 23,721 20,380 14,447 13,054 12,108 12,861 13,777 11,131 14,865 17,982 22,930 2007 26,916 29,946 20,044 17,410 12,573 11,418 10,304 16,709 11,848 13,874 18,696 24,799

356

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,176 1,936 2,098 1,489 1,094 891 908 808 866 970 1,324 1,964 1990 2,455 1,649 1,576 1,262 1,040 846 836 830 872 965 1,315 1,749 1991 2,199 2,076 1,746 1,143 908 818 810 859 875 952 1,492 1,917 1992 2,276 2,158 1,745 1,436 1,068 944 820 882 875 1,006 1,345 2,089 1993 2,268 2,155 2,200 1,507 1,007 877 832 840 846 947 1,463 2,070 1994 2,845 2,472 1,910 1,174 1,027 1,342 913 949 947 1,089 1,361 1,843 1995 2,600 2,626 2,111 1,382 1,045 1,013 950 956 1,044 1,054 1,674 2,414 1996 3,136 2,782 2,190 1,884 1,154 997 940 957 1,041 1,157 1,644 2,447 1997 2,378 2,381 1,793 1,202 1,268 1,096 989 1,004 1,884 1,167 1,757 2,639

357

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 25,565 24,630 25,344 18,494 12,079 8,747 8,382 8,305 8,812 11,741 16,631 27,650 1990 24,659 23,697 22,939 17,706 11,586 10,272 9,602 9,683 10,261 12,661 17,210 24,715 1991 28,442 25,685 23,462 17,684 11,669 9,641 10,331 9,764 9,195 11,571 17,033 25,121 1992 29,246 29,912 27,748 23,039 13,518 9,915 9,327 9,456 9,582 12,860 16,804 25,808 1993 28,857 29,740 28,926 20,266 11,667 11,221 10,477 10,502 9,972 13,970 18,205 26,928 1994 31,014 32,757 29,376 21,207 13,641 11,207 10,158 10,485 10,002 12,399 16,783 24,226 1995 28,329 29,345 28,182 20,813 14,459 11,501 11,281 10,797 10,619 13,394 22,325 30,309 1996 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

358

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Carolina (Including Vehicle  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 17,028 13,472 12,569 10,957 8,683 9,367 10,138 11,625 9,077 11,870 11,334 12,725 2002 20,494 17,611 16,270 14,448 14,921 14,889 16,325 15,616 11,675 10,993 12,221 16,164 2003 18,666 17,514 12,917 11,948 9,803 8,615 10,304 12,231 8,766 8,909 9,675 14,460 2004 19,029 19,575 14,664 11,619 12,602 10,686 12,311 13,363 11,234 9,815 10,497 15,861 2005 19,494 16,945 17,212 12,523 11,619 12,506 16,813 18,833 10,439 8,087 9,210 15,920 2006 14,609 15,594 14,881 12,013 11,535 13,578 18,401 19,755 10,930 12,902 14,061 14,246 2007 18,348 19,666 12,154 11,405 11,154 12,705 14,438 22,784 13,231 12,270 11,398 13,530

359

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Indiana (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 77,275 61,840 57,608 37,045 27,762 26,685 25,473 29,184 25,697 34,650 39,146 51,997 2002 65,893 58,962 58,569 44,882 32,659 27,696 30,899 30,668 28,357 37,204 49,556 68,056 2003 80,534 70,155 52,368 35,903 31,266 25,652 24,580 26,666 27,072 34,914 46,556 64,253 2004 80,680 70,341 53,056 37,842 30,840 25,006 25,592 27,498 26,658 33,102 43,630 65,054 2005 72,775 58,428 61,390 39,473 30,697 28,897 28,628 29,602 26,476 32,838 44,576 70,488 2006 56,899 57,392 54,200 34,311 30,004 26,873 29,579 29,996 27,630 39,210 47,253 56,403 2007 66,914 76,347 49,045 40,498 29,129 27,272 28,150 34,503 29,267 35,013 48,878 63,510

360

Information regarding previous INCITE awards including selected highlights  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Information regarding previous INCITE awards including selected highlights Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Accessing ASCR Supercomputers Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) Research & Evaluation Prototypes (REP) Innovative & Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Composite armor, armor system and vehicle including armor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite armor panels are disclosed. Each panel comprises a plurality of functional layers comprising at least an outermost layer, an intermediate layer and a base layer. An armor system incorporating armor panels is also disclosed. Armor panels are mounted on carriages movably secured to adjacent rails of a rail system. Each panel may be moved on its associated rail and into partially overlapping relationship with another panel on an adjacent rail for protection against incoming ordnance from various directions. The rail system may be configured as at least a part of a ring, and be disposed about a hatch on a vehicle. Vehicles including an armor system are also disclosed.

Chu, Henry S.; Jones, Warren F.; Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Thinnes, Gary L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a pu GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

363

Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties

Bawendi, Moungi G. (Boston, MA); Sundar, Vikram C. (New York, NY)

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

364

Calling all great examples of open government data | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calling all great examples of open government data Calling all great examples of open government data Developer Data Web Services Source Code Challenges Semantic Web Blogs Let's Talk Developers You are here Data.gov » Communities » Developers » Forums Calling all great examples of open government data Submitted by Jeanne Holm on Mon, 11/15/2010 - 5:49am Log in to vote 5 There are so many great examples of open government data being published. We've linked to some of them at http://www.data.gov/community, but so many more exist. What sites do you know of? Which countries are making their data more open and their operations more transparent? Add new comment Open Government Best Practices Permalink Submitted by Aftab Datta on Mon, 11/15/2010 - 11:28am. New Zealand representative at the IOGDC gave a success story on open

365

Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: From 1957 to 1961 a regional gravity survey was made over the northern part of the Great Salt Lake Desert and adjacent areas in Utah, eastern Nevada, and southeastern Idaho. A total of 1040 stations were taken over an area of about 7000 square miles. The results were compiled as a Bouguer gravity anomaly map with a contour interval of 2 mgal. The Bouguer values ranged from a high of about -120 mgal over the outcrop areas to a

366

Multiscale Analysis of the 7 December 1998 Great Salt Lake–Effect Snowstorm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The large-scale and mesoscale structure of the Great Salt Lake–effect snowstorm of 7 December 1998 is examined using radar analyses, high-density surface observations, conventional meteorological data, and a simulation by the Pennsylvania State ...

W. James Steenburgh; Daryl J. Onton

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

The Rising Level of the Great Salt Lake: Impacts and Adjustments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Societal responses to climatic fluctuations can be difficult and costly. The recent case of the rising level of the Great Salt Lake indicates that resource managers are often unprepared to respond to climate related impacts, except in an ad hoe ...

Peter M. Morrisette

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon, and the Great War discourse on "Shell-Shock"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction: The infantrymen of the Great War experienced the unimaginable. Soldiers in the trenches internalized images of confusion and gore, and returned to a society unwilling and often unable to comprehend their ...

Schilling, Thomas C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

On death ground : why weak states resist great powers explaining coercion failure in asymmetric interstate conflict  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Great Powers often adopt coercive strategies, threatening or using limited force to convince weak states to comply with their demands. While coercive strategies have succeeded in just over half of asymmetric crises since ...

Haun, Phil M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Hydrological and Dynamical Characteristics of Summertime Droughts over U.S. Great Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A drought pattern and its time evolution over the U.S. Great Plains are investigated from time series of climate divisional monthly mean surface air temperature and total precipitation anomalies. The spatial pattern consists of correlated ...

Fong-Chiau Chang; Eric A. Smith

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Interannual and Seasonal Variability of the Surface Energy Balance and Temperature of Central Great Slave Lake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses interannual and seasonal variability in the thermal regime and surface energy fluxes in central Great Slave Lake during three contiguous open-water periods, two of which overlap the Canadian Global Energy and Water Cycle ...

Wayne R. Rouse; Claire M. Oswald; Jacqueline Binyamin; Peter D. Blanken; William M. Schertzer; Christopher Spence

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Sensitivity of the Great Plains Severe-Storm Environment to Soil-Moisture Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the influence of differences in ground moisture over the southern Great Plairs and the Mexican plateau on the formation and evolution of the dryline, the elevated mixed layer, and the local planetary boundary layer. These ...

John M. Lanicci; Toby N. Carlson; Thomas T. Warner

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Association between Winter Precipitation and Water Level Fluctuations in the Great Lakes and Atmospheric Circulation Patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric precipitation in the Great Lakes basin, as a major mediating variable between atmospheric circulation and lake levels, is analyzed relative to both. The effect of cumulative winter precipitation on lake levels varies from lake to lake ...

Sergei N. Rodionov

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Spatiotemporal Trends in Lake Effect and Continental Snowfall in the Laurentian Great Lakes, 1951–1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new raster-based monthly snowfall climatology was derived from 1951–1980 snowfall station data for the Laurentian Great Lakes. An automated methodology was used to obtain higher spatial resolution than previously obtained. The increase in ...

D. C. Norton; S. J. Bolsenga

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Supporting Water, Ecological, and Transportation Systems in the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8-9, 2004. Ann Arbor, Michigan. Great Lakes InformationKeystone, Colorado. Lake Michigan (MI) Lakewide ManagementOffice (GLNPO) Lake Michigan Lakewide Management Plan (LaMP)

Beck, Judy; Kamke, Sherry; Majerus, Kimberly

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Great science observatories in the space station era and OWL efforts in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A concept of “Space Factory” on the International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) is described. By following the four great observatories that purposefully took advantage of the Space Transportation System (STS)

Yoshiyuki Takahashi

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact (multi-state)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act describes the management of the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence River basin, and regulates water withdrawals, diversions, and consumptive uses from the basin. The Act establishes a Council,...

378

A Climatology of Freezing Rain in the Great Lakes Region of North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 15-yr climatology of freezing rain surrounding the Great Lakes region of North America has been constructed using data from rawinsondes, surface stations, and gridded reanalyses from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction. This ...

John Cortinas Jr.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The Influence of Large-Scale Flow on Fall Precipitation Systems in the Great Lakes Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A synoptic climatology is presented of the precipitation mechanisms that affect the Great Lakes Basin. The focus is on fall because increasing precipitation in this season has contributed to record high lake levels since the 1960s and because the ...

Emily K. Grover; Peter J. Sousounis

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Multiyear Summertime Observations of Daytime Fair-Weather Cumuli at the ARM Southern Great Plains Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long data record (14 yr) of ground-based observations at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is analyzed to document the macroscopic and dynamical properties of daytime fair-weather cumulus clouds ...

Arunchandra S. Chandra; Pavlos Kollias; Bruce A. Albrecht

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Drought Recurrence in the Great Plains as Reconstructedfrom Long-Term Tree-Ring Records  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently collected tree-ring data were used to reconstruct drought from 1700 to the present in four regionsflanking the Great Plains. Regions were centered in Iowa, Oklahoma, eastern Montana and eastern Wyoming.Reconstructions derived by multiple ...

Charles W. Stockton; David M. Meko

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Increasing Great Lake–Effect Snowfall during the Twentieth Century: A Regional Response to Global Warming?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on the climate of surrounding regions is significant, especially in leeward settings where lake-effect snowfall occurs. Heavy lake-effect snow represents a potential natural hazard and plays important ...

Adam W. Burnett; Matthew E. Kirby; Henry T. Mullins; William P. Patterson

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Two Nerds . . . One Love . . . and A Great Golden Ring | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nerds . . . One Love . . . and A Great Golden Ring Nerds . . . One Love . . . and A Great Golden Ring Two Nerds . . . One Love . . . and A Great Golden Ring August 17, 2011 - 4:26pm Addthis Two scientists got engaged in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York. | Video from The Daily Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science The work of the Energy Department has led to many scientific and technological breakthroughs. Today, we're highlighting a different kind of breakthrough - the engagement of two former Office of Science interns, who recently celebrated 'the nerdiest engagement ever' at a great golden ring. Dave Mosher and Kendra Snyder were both interns at the Energy Department's Fermilab, a high-energy physics center located close to Chicago, although

384

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

ORAU's Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (HCTT-CHE)

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

385

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

ORAU' s Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (HCTT-CHE)

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

386

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-31 SUMMARY OF GREAT LAKES WEATHER AND ICE CONDITIONS,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Description 3.2.1 Fall Cooling Phase 3.2.2 Ice Formation and Breakup Phases 3.2.3 The Ice Cycle cm LakeEs of +* SUMMARY OF GREAT LAKES WEATHER AND ICE CONDITIONS, WINTER 1978-79 B. H. Dewitt D. F. Kahlbaum D. G. Baker,-MOSWERlC AOMlNlSTRAllON #12;NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-31 SUMMARY OF GREAT LAKES WEATHER AND ICE

387

Calendar Year 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Office of Inspector General 
1000 3 Office of Inspector General 
1000 Independence Avenue, SW 
 Washington, DC 20585 202-586-4128 en Audit Report: OAS-FS-14-03 http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-report-oas-fs-14-03 Audit Report: OAS-FS-14-03

388

Notices ROUTINE USES OF RECORDS MAINTAINED IN THE SYSTEM, INCLUDING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

83 Federal Register 83 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 51 / Friday, March 15, 2013 / Notices ROUTINE USES OF RECORDS MAINTAINED IN THE SYSTEM, INCLUDING CATEGORIES OF USERS AND THE PURPOSES OF SUCH USES: The Department may disclose information contained in a record in this system of records under the routine uses listed in this system of records without the consent of the individual if the disclosure is compatible with the purposes for which the record was collected. These disclosures may be made on a case-by-case basis or, if the Department has complied with the computer matching requirements of the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended (Privacy Act), under a computer matching agreement. Any disclosure of individually identifiable information from a record in this system must also comply with the requirements of section

389

Copper laser modulator driving assembly including a magnetic compression laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser modulator (10) having a low voltage assembly (12) with a plurality of low voltage modules (14) with first stage magnetic compression circuits (20) and magnetic assist inductors (28) with a common core (91), such that timing of the first stage magnetic switches (30b) is thereby synchronized. A bipolar second stage of magnetic compression (42) is coupled to the low voltage modules (14) through a bipolar pulse transformer (36) and a third stage of magnetic compression (44) is directly coupled to the second stage of magnetic compression (42). The low voltage assembly (12) includes pressurized boxes (117) for improving voltage standoff between the primary winding assemblies (34) and secondary winding (40) contained therein.

Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA); Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

[Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 of 7: Research on the Characteristics of a Modern Grid by the NETL 2 of 7: Research on the Characteristics of a Modern Grid by the NETL Modern Grid Strategy Team Accommodates All Generation and Storage Options Last month we presented the first Principal Characteristic of a Modern Grid, "Motivates and Includes the Consumer". This month we present a second characteristic, "Accommodates All Generation and Storage Options". This characteristic will fundamentally transition today's grid from a centralized model for generation to one that also has a more balanced contribution from decentralized generation and storage. This characteristic, along with the other six, define a Modern Grid that will power the 21 st Century economy. For a more detailed discussion on "Accommodates All Generation and Storage Options", please see:

391

Search for Earth-like planets includes LANL star analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search for earth-like planets Search for earth-like planets Search for Earth-like planets includes LANL star analysis The mission will not only be able to search for planets around other stars, but also yield new insights into the parent stars themselves. March 6, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

392

Dye laser amplifier including a specifically designed diffuser assembly  

SciTech Connect

A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continuous replened supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a relatively high flow rate and a specifically designed diffuser assembly for slowing down the flow of dye while, at the same time, assuring that as the dye stream flows through the diffuser assembly it does so in a stable manner.

Davin, James (Gilroy, CA); Johnston, James P. (Stanford, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode. Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between {minus}15 C and 150 C.

Bates, J.B.; Dudney, N.J.; Gruzalski, G.R.; Luck, C.F.

1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

394

Hydraulic engine valve actuation system including independent feedback control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydraulic valve actuation assembly may include a housing, a piston, a supply control valve, a closing control valve, and an opening control valve. The housing may define a first fluid chamber, a second fluid chamber, and a third fluid chamber. The piston may be axially secured to an engine valve and located within the first, second and third fluid chambers. The supply control valve may control a hydraulic fluid supply to the piston. The closing control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the second fluid chamber to the supply control valve. The opening control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the supply control valve to the second fluid chamber.

Marriott, Craig D

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

395

A thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential are disclosed. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

Baldasaro, Paul F.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte  

SciTech Connect

Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between -15.degree. C. and 150.degree. C.

Bates, John B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dudney, Nancy J. (Knoxville, TN); Gruzalski, Greg R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Luck, Christopher F. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Occult Mediastinal Great Vessel Trauma: The Value of Aortography Performed During Angiographic Screening for Blunt Cervical Vascular Trauma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose. To determine the value of aortography in the assessment of occult aortic and great vessel injuries when routinely performed during screening angiography for blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI). Methods. One hundred and one consecutive patients who received both aortography and screening four-vessel angiography over 4 years were identified retrospectively. Angiograms for these patients were evaluated, and the incidence of occult mediastinal vascular injury was determined. Results. Of the 101 patients, 6 (6%) had angiographically documented traumatic aortic injuries. Of these 6 patients, one injury (17%) was unsuspected prior to angiography. Four of the 6 (67%) also had BCVI. One additional patient also had an injury to a branch of the subclavian artery. Conclusion. Routine aortography during screening angiography for BCVI is not warranted due to the low incidence (1%) of occult mediastinal arterial injury. However, in the setting of a BCVI screening study and no CT scan of the chest, aortography may be advantageous.

Ray, Charles E. [Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States)], E-mail: cray@dhha.org; Bauer, Jason R. [University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (United States); Cothren, C. Clay [Denver Health Medical Center, Department of Surgery (United States); Turner, James H. [Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States); Moore, Ernest E. [Denver Health Medical Center, Department of Surgery (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

2013 Director's New Year Address  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Director's New Year Address 2013 Director's New Year Address Print Looking Forward and Celebrating 20 Years in 2013 falocne We recently sat down with ALS Director Roger Falcone to...

399

Procurement Organization, Sandia National Laboratories. Annual report, fiscal year 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the purchasing and transportation activities of the Procurement Organization for Fiscal Year 1995. Activities for both the New Mexico and California locations are included.

Stimak, D.R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The effects of regional climate change on space conditioning needs and the energy industry in the Great Lakes region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To date, studies of the effects of potential climate change on energy use and demand have been done on a macro scale or with coarse model data but, in reality, regional climate change effects will determine the actual behavior of energy users. The output from a 3-year simulation of the coupled NCAR CCM/MM4 regional climate modeling system is used to examine changes in average temperature and temperature variability on a regional scale, the impacts of such change on the need for space conditioning in the Great Lakes region, and the subsequent changes in energy demand. The NCAR modeling system uses general circulation model results to drive a more highly resolved mesoscale model to produce a detailed regional climate. A 3-year run of both base case and doubled CO{sub 2} climate for the United States has been produced. From these results, changes in heating and cooling degree days, and changes in consecutive days above or below various temperature thresholds were calculated. Heating and cooling energy use intensities that are representative of the residential building stock found in the region were used to convert climate data to energy demand. The implications for the energy industry are discussed. The model results indicate that the changed climate under doubled carbon dioxide conditions would have large impacts on energy use, although it is difficult to determine the balance between decreased heating needs and increased cooling needs. It was found that biases present in the temperature output of the modeling system are greater for the Great Lakes region than for the rest of the U.S. and limit the usefulness of the present data set for determining the effects of climate change on energy use in that area.

Fernau, M.E.; Maloney, E.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bates, G.T. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants  

SciTech Connect

An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocalello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

402

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 12 figs.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

403

CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

404

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

405

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

406

Analysis of 70 Ophiuchi AB including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of solar-like oscillations for stars belonging to a binary system provides a unique opportunity to probe the internal stellar structure and to test our knowledge of stellar physics. Such oscillations have been recently observed and characterized for the A component of the 70 Ophiuchi system. A model of 70 Ophiuchi AB that correctly reproduces all observational constraints available for both stars is determined. An age of 6.2 +- 1.0 Gyr is found with an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.266 +- 0.015 and an initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0300 +- 0.0025 when atomic diffusion is included and a solar value of the mixing-length parameter assumed. A precise and independent determination of the value of the mixing-length parameter needed to model 70 Oph A requires accurate measurement of the mean small separation, which is not available yet. Current asteroseismic observations, however, suggest that the value of the mixing-length parameter of 70 Oph A is lower or equal to the solar calibrated value. The e...

Eggenberger, P; Carrier, F; Fernandes, J; Santos, N C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Analysis of alpha Centauri AB including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detailed models of alpha Cen A and B based on new seismological data for alpha Cen B by Carrier & Bourban (2003) have been computed using the Geneva evolution code including atomic diffusion. Taking into account the numerous observational constraints now available for the alpha Cen system, we find a stellar model which is in good agreement with the astrometric, photometric, spectroscopic and asteroseismic data. The global parameters of the alpha Cen system are now firmly constrained to an age of t=6.52+-0.30 Gyr, an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.275+-0.010 and an initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0434+-0.0020. Thanks to these numerous observational constraints, we confirm that the mixing-length parameter alpha of the B component is larger than the one of the A component, as already suggested by many authors (Noels et al. 1991, Fernandes & Neuforge 1995 and Guenther & Demarque 2000): alpha_B is about 8% larger than alpha_A (alpha_A=1.83+-0.10 and alpha_B=1.97+-0.10). Moreover, we show that asteroseismic measurements enable to determine the radii of both stars with a very high precision (errors smaller than 0.3%). The radii deduced from seismological data are compatible with the new interferometric results of Kervella et al. (2003) even if they are slightly larger than the interferometric radii (differences smaller than 1%).

P. Eggenberger; C. Charbonnel; S. Talon; G. Meynet; A. Maeder; F. Carrier; G. Bourban

2004-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

408

Analysis of 70 Ophiuchi AB including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of solar-like oscillations for stars belonging to a binary system provides a unique opportunity to probe the internal stellar structure and to test our knowledge of stellar physics. Such oscillations have been recently observed and characterized for the A component of the 70 Ophiuchi system. A model of 70 Ophiuchi AB that correctly reproduces all observational constraints available for both stars is determined. An age of 6.2 +- 1.0 Gyr is found with an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.266 +- 0.015 and an initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0300 +- 0.0025 when atomic diffusion is included and a solar value of the mixing-length parameter assumed. A precise and independent determination of the value of the mixing-length parameter needed to model 70 Oph A requires accurate measurement of the mean small separation, which is not available yet. Current asteroseismic observations, however, suggest that the value of the mixing-length parameter of 70 Oph A is lower or equal to the solar calibrated value. The effects of atomic diffusion and of the choice of the adopted solar mixture were also studied. We also tested and compared the theoretical tools used for the modeling of stars for which p-modes frequencies are detected by performing this analysis with three different stellar evolution codes and two different calibration methods. We found that the different evolution codes and calibration methods we used led to perfectly coherent results.

P. Eggenberger; A. Miglio; F. Carrier; J. Fernandes; N. C. Santos

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

409

Interim performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. [Glossary included  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is a response to the Photovoltaic Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-590) which required the generation of performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. Since the document is evolutionary and will be updated, the term interim is used. More than 50 experts in the photovoltaic field have contributed in the writing and review of the 179 performance criteria listed in this document. The performance criteria address characteristics of present-day photovoltaic systems that are of interest to manufacturers, government agencies, purchasers, and all others interested in various aspects of photovoltaic system performance and safety. The performance criteria apply to the system as a whole and to its possible subsystems: array, power conditioning, monitor and control, storage, cabling, and power distribution. They are further categorized according to the following performance attributes: electrical, thermal, mechanical/structural, safety, durability/reliability, installation/operation/maintenance, and building/site. Each criterion contains a statement of expected performance (nonprescriptive), a method of evaluation, and a commentary with further information or justification. Over 50 references for background information are also given. A glossary with definitions relevant to photovoltaic systems and a section on test methods are presented in the appendices. Twenty test methods are included to measure performance characteristics of the subsystem elements. These test methods and other parts of the document will be expanded or revised as future experience and needs dictate.

DeBlasio, R.; Forman, S.; Hogan, S.; Nuss, G.; Post, H.; Ross, R.; Schafft, H.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Residential Commercial Industrial Year  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Residential Commercial Industrial Year and State Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers 2000 Total ................... 4,996,179 59,252,728 3,182,469 5,010,817 8,142,240 220,251 2001 Total ................... 4,771,340 60,286,364 3,022,712 4,996,446 7,344,219 217,026 2002 Total ................... 4,888,816 61,107,254 3,144,169 5,064,384 7,507,180 205,915 2003 Total ................... R 5,079,351 R 61,871,450 R 3,179,493 R 5,152,177 R 7,150,396 R 205,514 2004 Total ................... 4,884,521 62,469,142 3,141,653 5,135,985 7,250,634 212,191 Alabama ...................... 43,842 806,175 26,418 65,040 169,135 2,800 Alaska.......................... 18,200 104,360 18,373 13,999 46,580 10 Arizona ........................

411

WMAP First Year Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) science team has released results from the first year of operation at the Earth-Sun L2 Lagrange point. The maps are consistent with previous observations but have much better sensitivity and angular resolution than the COBE DMR maps, and much better calibration accuracy and sky coverage than ground-based and balloon-borne experiments. The angular power spectra from these ground-based and balloon-borne experiments are consistent within their systematic and statistical uncertainties with the WMAP results. WMAP detected the large angular-scale correlation between the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the CMB caused by electron scattering since the Universe became reionized after the "Dark Ages", giving a value for the electron scattering optical depth of 0.17+/-0.04. The simplest Lambda-CDM model with n=1 and Omega_tot=1 provides an adequate fit to the WMAP data and gives parameters which are consistent with determinations of the Hubble constant and observations of the accelerating Universe using supernovae. The time-ordered data, maps, and power spectra from WMAP can be found at http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov along with 13 papers by the WMAP science team describing the results in detail.

E. L. Wright

2003-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

412

Month Day Year  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mr. Michael Kido Mr. Michael Kido U.S. Department of Energy Office of the General Counsel 1000 Independence Avenue SW. Washington, DC, 20585-0121 January 8, 2013 Michael, The following, in accordance with the Federal Register requirements for Ex Parte communications with staff from the US Department of Energy, will serve to document our recent meeting. On December 27, I was contacted by Ms. Ashley Armstrong, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program and asked if I would be willing to meet with her and certain US DOE staff to discuss UL's "different testing and certification offerings as they relate to electric motors". I agreed and the agenda was subsequently solidified to include:

413

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster—readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that—help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners' (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. While the purpose of the CAT is to further prepare the community for an influenza pandemic, its framework is an extension of the traditional all-hazards approach to planning and preparedness. As such, the information gathered by the tool is useful in preparation for most widespread public health emergencies. This tool is primarily intended for use by those involved in healthcare emergency preparedness (e.g., community planners, community disaster preparedness coordinators, 9-1-1 directors, hospital emergency preparedness coordinators). It is divided into sections based on the core agency partners, which may be involved in the community's influenza pandemic influenza response.

HCTT-CHE

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

414

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster—readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that—help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners' (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. While the purpose of the CAT is to further prepare the community for an influenza pandemic, its framework is an extension of the traditional all-hazards approach to planning and preparedness. As such, the information gathered by the tool is useful in preparation for most widespread public health emergencies. This tool is primarily intended for use by those involved in healthcare emergency preparedness (e.g., community planners, community disaster preparedness coordinators, 9-1-1 directors, hospital emergency preparedness coordinators). It is divided into sections based on the core agency partners, which may be involved in the community's influenza pandemic influenza response.

HCTT-CHE

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

415

Wind Regimes in Complex Terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research was designed to provide an understanding of physical wind mechanisms within the complex terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee to assess the impacts of regional air flow with regard to synoptic and mesoscale weather changes, wind direction shifts, and air quality. Meteorological data from 2008 2009 were analyzed from 13 meteorological sites along with associated upper level data. Up to 15 ancillary sites were used for reference. Two-step complete linkage and K-means cluster analyses, synoptic weather studies, and ambient meteorological comparisons were performed to generate hourly wind classifications. These wind regimes revealed seasonal variations of underlying physical wind mechanisms (forced channeled, vertically coupled, pressure-driven, and thermally-driven winds). Synoptic and ambient meteorological analysis (mixing depth, pressure gradient, pressure gradient ratio, atmospheric and surface stability) suggested up to 93% accuracy for the clustered results. Probabilistic prediction schemes of wind flow and wind class change were developed through characterization of flow change data and wind class succession. Data analysis revealed that wind flow in the Great Valley was dominated by forced channeled winds (45 67%) and vertically coupled flow (22 38%). Down-valley pressure-driven and thermally-driven winds also played significant roles (0 17% and 2 20%, respectively), usually accompanied by convergent wind patterns (15 20%) and large wind direction shifts, especially in the Central/Upper Great Valley. The behavior of most wind regimes was associated with detectable pressure differences between the Lower and Upper Great Valley. Mixing depth and synoptic pressure gradients were significant contributors to wind pattern behavior. Up to 15 wind classes and 10 sub-classes were identified in the Central Great Valley with 67 joined classes for the Great Valley at-large. Two-thirds of Great Valley at-large flow was defined by 12 classes. Winds flowed on-axis only 40% of the time. The Great Smoky Mountains helped create down-valley pressure-driven winds, downslope mountain breezes, and divergent air flow. The Cumberland Mountains and Plateau were associated with wind speed reductions in the Central Great Valley, Emory Gap Flow, weak thermally-driven winds, and northwesterly down sloping. Ridge-and-valley terrain enhanced wind direction reversals, pressure-driven winds, as well as locally and regionally produced thermally-driven flow.

Birdwell, Kevin R [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The Composite Characteristics of Cirrus Clouds: Bulk Properties Revealed by One Year of Continuous Cloud Radar Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of midlatitude cirrus clouds are examined using one year of continuous vertically pointing millimeter-wave cloud radar data collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma. The goal ...

Gerald G. Mace; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Thomas P. Ackerman

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Behind Every Good Metabolite there is a Great Enzyme (and perhaps a structure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today, due to great technological advancements, it is possible to study everything at the same time. This ability has given birth to “totality” studies in the fields of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. In turn, the combined study of all these global analyses gave birth to the field of systems biology. Another “totality” field brought to life with new emerging technologies is structural genomics, an effort to determine the three-dimensional structure of every protein encoded in a genome. The Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID) is a specialized structural genomics effort composed of academic (University of Washington), government (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory), not-for-profit (Seattle BioMed), and commercial (Emerald BioStructures) institutions that is funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (Federal Contract: HHSN272200700057C and HHSN27220120025C) to apply genome-scale approaches in solving protein structures from biodefense organisms, as well as those causing emerging and re-emerging disease. In five years over 540 structures have been deposited into the Protein Data Bank (PDB) by SSGICD. About one third of all SSGCID structures contain bound ligands, many of which are metabolites or metabolite analogues present in the cell. These proteins structures are the blueprints for the structure-based design of the next generation of drugs against bacterial pathogens and other infectious diseases. Many of the selected SSGCID targets are annotated enzymes from known metabolomic pathways essential to cellular vitality since selectively “knocking-out” one of the enzymes in an important pathway with a drug may be fatal to the organism. One reason metabolomic pathways are important is because of the small molecules, or metabolites, produced at various steps in these pathways and identified by metabolomic studies. Unlike genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics that may be influenced by epigenetic, post-transcriptional, and post-translational modifications, respectively, the metabolites present in the cell at any one time represent downstream biochemical endproducts, and therefore, metabolite profiles may be most closely associated with a phenotype and provide valuable information for infectious disease research. Metabolomic data would be even more useful if it could be linked to the vast amount of structural genomics data. Towards this goal SSGCID has created an automated website (http://apps.sbri.org/SSGCIDTargetStatus/Pathway) that assigns selected SSGCID target proteins to MetaCyc pathways (http://metacyc.org/). Details of this website will be provided here. The SSGCID-Pathway website represents a first big step towards linking metabolites and metabolic pathways to structural genomic data with the goal of accelerating the discovery of new agents to battle infectious diseases.

Buchko, Garry W.; Phan, Isabelle; Cron, Lisabeth; Stacy, Robin; Stewart, Lance J.; Staker, Bart L.; Edwards, Tom E.; Varani, Gabriele; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Myler, Peter J.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Projects of the year  

SciTech Connect

The Peabody Hotel, Orlando, Florida was the site of Power Engineering magazine's 2006 Projects of the Year Awards Banquet, which kicked-off the Power-Gen International conference and exhibition. The Best Coal-fired Project was awarded to Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association Inc., owner of Springenville Unit 3. This is a 400 MW pulverized coal plant in Springeville, AZ, sited with two existing coal-fired units. Designed to fire Powder River Basin coal, it has low NOx burners and selective catalytic reduction for NOx control, dry flue gas desulfurization for SO{sub 2} control and a pulse jet baghouse for particulate control. It has a seven-stage feedwater heater and condensers to ensure maximum performance. Progress Energy-Carolinas' Asheville Power Station FGD and SCR Project was awarded the 2006 coal-fired Project Honorable Mention. This plant in Skyland, NC was required to significantly reduce NOx emissions. When completed, the improvements will reduce NOx by 93% compared to 1996 levels and SO{sub 2} by 93% compared to 2001 levels. Awards for best gas-fired, nuclear, and renewable/sustainable energy projects are recorded. The Sasyadko Coal-Mine Methane Cogeneration Plant near Donezk, Ukraine, was given the 2006 Honorable Mention for Best Renewable/Sustainable Energy Project. In November 2004, Ukraine was among 14 nations to launch the Methane to Markets partnership. The award-winning plant is fuelled by methane released during coal extraction. It generates 42 MW of power. 4 photos.

Hansen, T.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids. Volume 6. Preliminary analysis of upgrading alternatives for the Great Plains liquid by-production streams. Interim report, March 1987-February 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amoco and Lummus Crest have developed seven cases for upgrading by-product liquids from the Great Plains Coal Gasification plant to jet fuels, and in several of the cases, saleable chemicals in addition to jet fuels. The analysis shows that the various grades of jet fuel can be produced from the Great Plains tar oil, but not economically. However the phenolic and naptha streams do have the potential to significantly increase (on the order of $10-15 million/year) the net revenues at Great Plains by producing chemicals, especially cresylic acid, cresol, and xylenol. The amount of these chemicals, which can be marketed, is a concern, but profits can be generated even when oxygenated chemical sales are limited to 10% of the U.S. market. Another concern is that while commercial processes exist to extract phenolic mixtures, these processes have not been demonstrated with the Great Plains phenolic stream.

Fleming, B.A.; Fox, J.D.; Furlong, M.W.; Masin, J.G.; Sault, L.P.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Funding for state, city, and county governments in the state includes:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MT MT Montana Total Sum City, County, and SEO Allocations All $13,971,000 MT Montana State Energy Office $9,593,500 MT Anaconda-Deer Lodge City $50,000 MT Billings City $1,003,000 MT Bozeman City $175,500 MT Butte-Silver Bow City $138,700 MT Great Falls City $570,100 MT Havre City $50,000 MT Helena City $138,600 MT Kalispell City $96,700 MT Miles City City $50,000 MT Missoula City $680,400 MT Cascade County $94,400 MT Flathead County $274,200 MT Gallatin County $198,700 MT Lake County $119,500 MT Lewis and Clark County $120,400 MT Lincoln County $80,000 MT Missoula County $151,000 MT Park County $67,100 MT Ravalli County $167,400 MT Yellowstone County $151,800 In addition, today's announcement includes funding for the following Tribal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Fueling the Navy's Great Green Fleet with Advanced Biofuels | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fueling the Navy's Great Green Fleet with Advanced Biofuels Fueling the Navy's Great Green Fleet with Advanced Biofuels Fueling the Navy's Great Green Fleet with Advanced Biofuels December 5, 2011 - 5:44pm Addthis Idaho National Laboratory describes R&D efforts to transform raw biomass into quality feedstocks for the production of renewable fuels, power and bioproducts. Aaron Crowell Senior Technical Research Analyst What does this project do? Develops and utilizes domestically produced biofuels to make our military and the nation more secure. From transporting the oil necessary to fuel jets and vehicles to supplying battery packs to infantry, energy plays a central role in almost everything the U.S. military does. Because of this reliance, it's imperative that the military cultivate energy sources that are not subject to the whims of

422

Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation Of Old  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation Of Old Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation Of Old And New Refraction Data Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation Of Old And New Refraction Data Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Utilizing commercial mine blasts and local earthquakes, as well as a dense array of portable seismographs, we have achieved long-range crustal refraction profiles across northern Nevada and the Sierra Nevada Mountains. In our most recent refraction experiment, the Idaho-Nevada-California (INC) transect, we used a dense spacing of 411 portable seismographs and 4.5-Hz geophones. The instruments were able to record events ranging from large mine blasts to small local earthquakes.

423

Geek-Up[6.10.2011]: Thermoelectrics' Great Power, Key Ingredient in Bone's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10.2011]: Thermoelectrics' Great Power, Key Ingredient in 10.2011]: Thermoelectrics' Great Power, Key Ingredient in Bone's Nanostructure Geek-Up[6.10.2011]: Thermoelectrics' Great Power, Key Ingredient in Bone's Nanostructure June 10, 2011 - 5:07pm Addthis Data image on lead telluride thermal conductivity | Photo Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory Data image on lead telluride thermal conductivity | Photo Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Identifying a key ingredient in bone's nanostructure may help treat and prevent bone diseases such as osteoporosis and develop new light-weight, high-strength materials for innovative technologies. Advanced thermoelectric materials could be used to develop vehicle

424

New CO2 Enhanced Recovery Technology Could Greatly Boost U.S. Oil |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CO2 Enhanced Recovery Technology Could Greatly Boost U.S. Oil CO2 Enhanced Recovery Technology Could Greatly Boost U.S. Oil New CO2 Enhanced Recovery Technology Could Greatly Boost U.S. Oil March 3, 2006 - 11:40am Addthis WASHINGTON , D.C. - The Department of Energy (DOE) released today reports indicating that state-of-the-art enhanced oil recovery techniques could significantly increase recoverable oil resources of the United States in the future. According to the findings, 89 billion barrels or more could eventually be added to the current U.S. proven reserves of 21.4 billion barrels. "These promising new technologies could further help us reduce our reliance on foreign sources of oil," Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman said. "By using the proven technique of carbon sequestration, we get the double

425

Happy New Year! | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Happy New Year! Happy New Year! Home > Groups > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(155) Contributor 7 January, 2013 - 10:09 analysis BHFS Colorado interface Legal review Texas As we welcome the new year, we are finishing up edits to the roadmap following input from our legal team at [www.bhfs.com BHFS] and are starting to develop mock-ups for the new and improved GRR web interface. We are thrilled to have had so much feedback and input from all of you this past year on what can be done to improve the usability of this tool, and will continue to solicit input and feedback from you as development progresses. We have narrowed our focus of adding additional states for FY13 to include Colorado and Texas. This will allow us more time to focus on some of the

426

Multi-Year SSL Market Development Support Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan sets out a strategic, five year framework for guiding DOE's market development support activities for high-performance solid-state lighting (SSL) products for the U.S. general illumination market. The market development support activities described in this plan, which span federal fiscal years 2012 to 2016, are intended to affect the types of SSL general illumination products adopted by the market, to accelerate commercial adoption of those products, and to support appropriate application of those products to maximize energy savings. DOE has established aggressive FY16 goals for these activities, including goals for the types of products brought to market, the market adoption of those products, and the energy savings achieved through use of SSL products. These goals are for the combined effect of DOE's SSL market development support and R and D investment, as well as the leveraged activities of its partners. Goals include: (1) inducing the market introduction of SSL products achieving 140 lumens per Watt (lm/W) for warm white products, and 155 lm/W for cool white products, and (2) inducing sales of high-performance SSL products that achieve annual site electricity savings of 21 terawatt hours (0.25 quadrillion Btus primary energy) by FY16. To overcome identified market barriers and to achieve the above five year goals, DOE proposes to carry out the following strategy. DOE will implement a multi-year program to accelerate adoption of good quality, high performance SSL products that achieve significant energy savings and maintain or improve lighting quality. Relying on lessons learned from past emerging technology introductions, such as compact fluorescent lamps, and using newly developed market research, DOE will design its efforts to minimize the likelihood that the SSL market will repeat mistakes that greatly delayed market adoption of earlier emerging technology market introductions. To achieve the maximum effect per dollar invested, DOE will work closely with lighting industry organizations 'such as the Next Generation Lighting Industry Alliance, North American Illuminating Engineering Society, and the International Association of Lighting Designers' and with other government programs seeking to improve lighting energy efficiency. While DOE will work closely with these organizations and others from lighting and electric utility industry, the program will focus primarily on assisting buyers of SSL products and others acting on their behalf because satisfied buyers are essential to the success of SSL market adoption. The work product of DOE's efforts will primarily be information, of the right type, at the right time, and provided efficiently to those who can best use it. A secondary work product of DOE's program will be market opportunities, in which DOE will seek to reduce the risks and costs for manufacturers of SSL products to sell good quality, high performance products to motivated buyers. In short, DOE plans to implement a multi-year program that produces highly useful and widely available information for buyers and their agents, while producing important market opportunities for producers, avoids the mistakes of the past, and is closely coordinated with industry and government. The market needs and the overall strategy were used for deciding which types of programs and projects DOE should create, and what general form they should take. Progress toward achieving plan goals with the above program elements will be monitored and periodically reported.

Ledbetter, Marc R.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Neutron capture therapy: Years of experimentation---Years of reflection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes early research on neutron capture therapy over a number of years, beginning in 1950, speaking briefly of patient treatments but dwelling mostly on interpretations of our animal experiments. This work carried out over eighteen years, beginning over forty years ago. Yet, it is only fitting to start by relating how neutron capture therapy became part of Brookhaven's Medical Research Center program.

Farr, L.E.

1991-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

428

Great Historical Events that were Significantly Affected by the Weather: Part 9, the Year Leading to the Revolution of 1789 in France (II)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is an extension of an earlier paper (Neumann 1977) on historical events affected by the weather. More data are published herein on rainfall, pressure and temperature for spring-early summer 1788, when a severe drought struck France ...

J. Neumann; J. Dettwiller

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Characterization of Ambient Ozone Levels in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ambient ozone data collected at two sites in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP) are summarized and compared with data from an urban and a low-elevation rural site. The ozone climatology in the park is found to be similar to that of ...

Stephen F. Mueller

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Low-rank coal research: Volume 3, Combustion research: Final report. [Great Plains  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume III, Combustion Research, contains articles on fluidized bed combustion, advanced processes for low-rank coal slurry production, low-rank coal slurry combustion, heat engine utilization of low-rank coals, and Great Plains Gasification Plant. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

Mann, M. D.; Hajicek, D. R.; Zobeck, B. J.; Kalmanovitch, D. P.; Potas, T. A.; Maas, D. J.; Malterer, T. J.; DeWall, R. A.; Miller, B. G.; Johnson, M. D.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

The Relationship between Great Lakes Water Levels, Wave Energies, and Shoreline Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The latter half of the twentieth century can be characterized as a period of rising water levels on the Great Lakes, with record high levels in 1974 and 1986. Concurrent with these periods of high water level are reported periods of high ...

G. A. Meadows; L. A. Meadows; W. L. Wood; J. M. Hubertz; M. Perlin

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Parameterization of Lakes and Wetlands for Energy and Water Balance Studies in the Great Lakes Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lakes and wetlands are prevalent around the Great Lakes and play an important role in the regional water and energy cycle. However, simulating their impacts on regional-scale hydrology is still a major challenge and not widely attempted. In the ...

Vimal Mishra; Keith A. Cherkauer; Laura C. Bowling

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

The Operational Implementation of a Great Lakes Wave Forecasting System at NOAA/NCEP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a Great Lakes wave forecasting system at NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) is described. The system is an implementation of the WAVEWATCH III model, forced with atmospheric data from NCEP’s regional WRF ...

Jose-Henrique G. M. Alves; Arun Chawla; Hendrik L. Tolman; David Schwab; Gregory Lang; Greg Mann

434

A Climatology of Cold-Season Nonconvective Wind Events in the Great Lakes Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 44-yr climatology of nonconvective wind events (NCWEs) for the Great Lakes region has been created using hourly wind data for 38 first-order weather stations during the months of November through April. The data were analyzed in terms of the ...

Matthew C. Lacke; John A. Knox; John D. Frye; Alan E. Stewart; Joshua D. Durkee; Christopher M. Fuhrmann; Sarah M. Dillingham

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

The Great 2006 Heat Wave over California and Nevada: Signal of an Increasing Trend  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the great California–Nevada heat waves can be classified into primarily daytime or nighttime events depending on whether atmospheric conditions are dry or humid. A rash of nighttime-accentuated events in the last decade was punctuated by ...

Alexander Gershunov; Daniel R. Cayan; Sam F. Iacobellis

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

What is the Issue? There is a great deal of excitement about the green economy, clean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to legitimize public investment in "clean tech" firms via tax incentives, state and local economic developersWhat is the Issue? There is a great deal of excitement about the green economy, clean technology in renewable energy and energy efficiency are not well understood. Since these employment projections are used

Wang, Z. Jane

437

The Great Plains Low-Level Jet during the Warm Season of 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hourly wind profiler observations from the NOAA Profiler Network were used to develop a climatology of the low-level jet (LLJ) over the Great Plains of the central United States from April to September of 1993. The peak precipitation episode of ...

Raymond W. Arritt; Thomas D. Rink; Moti Segal; Dennis P. Todey; Craig A. Clark; Mark J. Mitchell; Kenneth M. Labas

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Evaluation of the Stretford Unit at the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report gives the results of an evaluation of the design and operational characteristics of the Stretford Sulfur Recovery Unit installed in the Great Plains Gasification Project, Beulah, North Dakota. The report contains discussion of the H/sub 2/S removal capability of the unit, the potential of solids deposition and the expected solution losses. 11 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Lang, R.A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Great Plains ASPEN model development: executive summary. Final topical report for Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Scientific Design Company contracted with the United States Department of Energy through its Morgantown Energy Technology Center to develop a steady-state simulation model of the Great Plains Coal Gasification plant. This plant produces substitute natural gas from North Dakota lignite. The model was to be developed using the ASPEN (Advanced System for Process Engineering) simulation program. The project was divided into the following tasks: (1) Development of a simplified overall model of the process to be used for a sensitivity analysis to guide the development of more rigorous section models. (2) Review and evaluation of existing rigorous moving-bed gasifier models leading to a recommendation of one to be used to model the Great Plains gasifiers. Adaption and incorporation of this model into ASPEN. (3) Review of the accuracy and completeness of the physical properties data and models provided by ASPEN that are required to characterize the Great Plains plant. Rectification of inaccurate or incomplete data. (4) Development of rigorous ASPEN models for critical unit operations and sections of the plant. (5) Evaluation of the accuracy of the ASPEN Cost Estimation and Evaluation System and upgrading where feasible. Development of a preliminary cost estimate for the Great Plains plant. (6) Validation of the simulation models developed in the course of this project. Determination of model sensitivity to variations of technical and economic parameters. (7) Documentation of all work performed in the course of this project. Essentially all of these tasks were completed successfully. 34 figs.

Rinard, I.H.; Stern, S.S.; Millman, M.C.; Schwint, K.J.; Benjamin, B.W.; Kirman, J.J.; Dweck, J.S.; Mendelson, M.A.

1986-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

440

Proceedings of the 17th ACM Great Lakes symposium on VLSI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welcome to the 17th edition of the Great Lakes Symposium on VLSI (GLSVLSI), the first one held outside of USA and at the beautiful Stresa-Lago Maggiore of Italy. Since its first meeting in March 1991 at Kalamazoo, Michigan, GLSVLSI has traveled ...

Hai Zhou; Enrico Macii; Zhiyuan Yan; Yehia Massoud

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Anatomy of Great Plains Protracted Heat Waves (especially the 1980 U.S. summer drought)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The protracted heat wave and drought of the Great Plains during summer 1980 was a manifestation of an abnormal form of the general circulation. An upper-level continental high developed rapidly over the Southern Plains in late May and persisted ...

Jerome Namias

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Coherence between the Great Salt Lake Level and the Pacific Quasi-Decadal Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lake level elevation of the Great Salt Lake (GSL), a large closed basin lake in the arid western United States, is characterized by a pronounced quasi-decadal oscillation (QDO). The variation of the GSL elevation is very coherent with the QDO ...

Shih-Yu Wang; Robert R. Gillies; Jiming Jin; Lawrence E. Hipps

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Winter 1994 Weather and Ice Conditions for the Laurentian Great Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Laurentian Great Lakes developed their most extensive ice cover in over a decade during winter 1994 [December-February 1993/94 (DJF 94)]. Extensive midlake ice formation started the second half of January, about 2 weeks earlier than normal. ...

Raymond A. Assel; John E. Janowiak; Sharolyn Young; Daron Boyce

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Price, Weather, and “Acreage Abandonment” in Western Great Plains Wheat Culture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multivariate analyses of acreage abandonment patterns in the U.S. Great Plains winter wheat region indicate that the major mode of variation is an in-phase oscillation confined to the western half of the overall area, which is also the area with ...

Patrick J. Michaels

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

A Climatology of the Warm Season Great Plains Low-Level Jet Using Wind Profiler Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hourly observations from the Wind Profiler Demonstration Network during the warm season months of 1991 and 1992 were used to develop a climatology of the low-level jet (LLJ) over the Great Plains of the central United States. The maximum overall ...

Mark J. Mitchell; Raymond W. Arritt; Ken Labas

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Cooperative highly available multiprocessor (Champ) networks have great potential for signal processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An expandable processor-independent software environment designed to support high availability and fault-tolerant computation uses a network of elements, possibly dissimilar, and achieves speed through concurrent processing. Champ has great potential for signal processing networks, especially with single-chip VHSIC elements.

Wischmeyer, C.E.; Weiman, R.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Change in biomass of benthic and planktonic algae along a disturbance gradient for 24 Great  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Change in biomass of benthic and planktonic algae along a disturbance gradient for 24 Great Lakes. The PC1 site score was significantly related to both periphyton and phytoplankton biomass, respectively accounted for 18% of the variation in epiphyton biomass. Periphytic and epiphytic biomass were negatively

McMaster University

448

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-20 SUMMARY OF GREAT LAKES WEATHER AND ICE CONDITIONS,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling Phase 3.2.2 Ice Formation and Breakup Phases 3.2.3 The Ice Cycle on Lake Superior 3.2.4 The IceNOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-20 SUMMARY OF GREAT LAKES WEATHER AND ICE CONDITIONS, WINTER of this NOAA Environmental Research Laboratories publication. ii #12;LANDSAT fake color image of ice cover

449

A Case Study of the Summertime Great Plains Low Level Jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case study of the kinematical and dynamical evolution of the summertime Great Plains low level jet (LLJ) is presented. Airborne radar altimetry was used to discern the x and y components of the geostrophic wind at three levels in the lower ...

Thomas R. Parish; Alfred R. Rodi; Richard D. Clark

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Simulation of the Arid Climate of the Southern Great Basin Using a Regional Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the development effort of a regional climate model (RCM)for the southern Great Basin, this paper present savalidation analysis of the climatology generated by a high-resolution RCM driven by observations. The RCM is aversion of the ...

Filippo Giorgi; Gary T. Bates; Steven J. Nieman

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Causes of Long-Term Drought in the U.S. Great Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Great Plains experienced a number of multiyear droughts during the last century, most notably the droughts of the 1930s and 1950s. This study examines the causes of such droughts using ensembles of long-term (1930–2000) simulations ...

Siegfried D. Schubert; Max J. Suarez; Philip J. Pegion; Randal D. Koster; Julio T. Bacmeister

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Development, implementation, and skill assessment of the NOAA/NOS Great Lakes Operational Forecast System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development, implementation, and skill assessment of the NOAA/NOS Great Lakes Operational Forecast Lakes Operational Forecast System (GLOFS) uses near-real-time atmospheric observa- tions and numerical weather prediction forecast guidance to produce three-dimensional forecasts of water temperature

453

GREAT MINDSTHINK ELECTRIC / WWW.EVS26.ORG CanGreenElectricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's reactions." "If I need to drive 500 miles, I just rent a car." "Never fight a war for electricity." "There model is buy an electric car, put a solar array on your house, charge after midnight, and let your solar that with my support of sustainability." "I already feel great about driving the electric car. I don't need

California at Davis, University of

454

J . Fluid Mech. (1989),vol. 207, p p . 133-152 Printed in Great Britain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with a fixed randomly generated velocity field. At infinite resolution, the modified dynamics with energyJ . Fluid Mech. (1989),vol. 207, p p . 133-152 Printed in Great Britain 133 Extremal energy) Certain modifications of the Euler equations of fluid motion lead to systems in which the energy decays

Vallis, Geoff

455

Google: An Application of Linear Algebra (The mathematics of a great success)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Google: An Application of Linear Algebra (The mathematics of a great success) Peter Butkovic Peter Butkovic Google: An Application of Linear Algebra #12;Peter Butkovic Google: An Application of Linear Algebra #12;Peter Butkovic Google: An Application of Linear Algebra #12;Hyun's Map of the Web Peter

Butkovic, Peter

456

Temporal and Spatial Variations in Hail in the Upper Great Plains and Midwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The distribution of hail days during 1961–80 in the northern Great Plains-Midwest was evaluated on a temporal and spatial basis to help interpret crop-hail losses. Comparisons with earlier (1901–60) hail day data revealed the seven-state study ...

Stanley A. Changnon Jr.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Biomass and &nergy Vol. 3, No. 5, pp. 301-307, 1992 Printed in Great Britain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass and &nergy Vol. 3, No. 5, pp. 301-307, 1992 Printed in Great Britain 0961-9534/92 $5.00 + 0 saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process is a favored option for conversion of the lignocellulosic biomass biomass, ethanol, woody crops, herbaceous crops, agricultural residues. 1. INTRODUCIION Although ethanol

California at Riverside, University of

458

On the study of wind energy at great heights using remote sensing techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the study of wind energy at great heights using remote sensing techniques Alfredo Pe~na1 by the wind energy industry due to the high sensitivity that the wind characteristics have on the performance Dong energy, Dong Energy, Kraftværksvej 53, DK-7000, Fredericia, Denmark e-mail: alfredo

459

OCRWM annual report to Congress, fiscal year 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the progress in the activities of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. Chapters include: Yucca Mountain site characterization project; Waste acceptance, storage and transportation project; Program management; Working with external parties; and Financial management. Also included in five appendices are: financial statements; key federal laws and regulations; fiscal year 1997 Congressional testimony and meetings with regulators and oversight bodies; OCREM publications for fiscal year 1997; and selected publications from other organizations during fiscal year 1997.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

(Great Plains Coal Gasification project): Quarterly environmental, safety, medical, and industrial hygiene report, First quarter, 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ANG continued permitting activity during the reporting period. ANG conducted eight monitoring programs in the vicinity of the Great Plains facility. The RAMP network consists of five monitoring sites, and is designed to monitor meteorology and air quality in the vicinity of the Great Plains facility, and the Antelope Valley and Coyote electric generating stations. There were no exceedences of applicable state or federal standards for SO/sub 2/, NO/sub 2/, TSP, or ozone. ANG conducts ambient monitoring for H/sub 2/S at one site in the vicinity of the Great Plains facility. ANG conducts additional ambient monitoring for SO/sub 2/ at two sites in order to ensure that ambient air quality standards are not violated. ANG conducts groundwater monitoring programs associated with desulfurization waste disposal, deepwell injection, RCRA-compliance monitoring, gasifier ash disposal, and the surge ponds. Major activities on each program are summarized. ANG conducted six monitoring programs associated with process and effluent streams at the Great Plains facility to satisfy conditions in federal and state permits. The Continuous Emission Monitoring system is designed to provide for the continuous monitoring of emissions and fuel usage from all major fuel burning sources in the Great Plains facility. ANG conducts a comprehensive program to locate, characterize and eliminate objectionable odors. A total of thirty-three plant boundary surveys and sixty off-site surveys were conducted. Odors were detected at levels of two odor units or less approximately 81.7% of the time at distances up to 6 miles downwind during the off-site surveys. A total of nine odor complaints were received. To evaluate overall performance of pollution control systems, ANG examines selected process data and conducts periodic compliance and/or performance tests. 18 figs., 23 tabs.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Introduction: Twenty Years of ACCESS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vision of future priorities in transportation research ands 20th Transportation Center. A year ago, UCTC’s future, and

Cervero, Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Great Plains Gasification Associates. Quarterly technical and environmental report, Great Plains coal gasification project, Mercer County, North Dakota, second quarter, 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activities remain on schedule to meet Great Plains Gasification Associate's start-up and coal delivery dates as well as the completion of the pipeline. Home Office engineering is essentially complete for the Plant. The remaining engineering tasks will involve field support activities and special projects. A substantial amount of construction progress was achieved during the second quarter. Although construction is still slightly behind schedule for the Plant, it is currently forecasted that construction will be back on schedule by the end of October, 1983. Start-up activities are continuing at a rapid pace. The current emphasis is on precommissioning planning and the development and implementation of the computer systems required to run the plant. Mine development activities remain on schedule. Almost all of the environmental permitting for the construction phase is complete. Engineering for the pipeline is complete. Construction started this quarter and should be completed by August 15, 1983.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

RDI's Wisdom Way Solar Village Final Report: Includes Utility Bill Analysis of Occupied Homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

7. 2-4 bedrooms, 1,100-1,700 ft2. The design heating loads in the homes were so small that each home is heated with a single, sealed-combustion, natural gas room heater. The cost savings from the simple HVAC systems made possible the tremendous investments in the homes' envelopes. The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) monitored temperatures and comfort in several homes during the winter of 2009-2010. In the Spring of 2011, CARB obtained utility bill information from 13 occupied homes. Because of efficient lights, appliances, and conscientious home occupants, the energy generated by the solar electric systems exceeded the electric energy used in most homes. Most homes, in fact, had a net credit from the electric utility over the course of a year. On the natural gas side, total gas costs averaged $377 per year (for heating, water heating, cooking, and clothes drying). Total energy costs were even less - $337 per year, including all utility fees. The highest annual energy bill for any home evaluated was $458; the lowest was $171.

Robb Aldrich, Steven Winter Associates

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

RDI's Wisdom Way Solar Village Final Report: Includes Utility Bill Analysis of Occupied Homes  

SciTech Connect

In 2010, Rural Development, Inc. (RDI) completed construction of Wisdom Way Solar Village (WWSV), a community of ten duplexes (20 homes) in Greenfield, MA. RDI was committed to very low energy use from the beginning of the design process throughout construction. Key features include: 1. Careful site plan so that all homes have solar access (for active and passive); 2. Cellulose insulation providing R-40 walls, R-50 ceiling, and R-40 floors; 3. Triple-pane windows; 4. Airtight construction (~0.1 CFM50/ft2 enclosure area); 5. Solar water heating systems with tankless, gas, auxiliary heaters; 6. PV systems (2.8 or 3.4kWSTC); 7. 2-4 bedrooms, 1,100-1,700 ft2. The design heating loads in the homes were so small that each home is heated with a single, sealed-combustion, natural gas room heater. The cost savings from the simple HVAC systems made possible the tremendous investments in the homes' envelopes. The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) monitored temperatures and comfort in several homes during the winter of 2009-2010. In the Spring of 2011, CARB obtained utility bill information from 13 occupied homes. Because of efficient lights, appliances, and conscientious home occupants, the energy generated by the solar electric systems exceeded the electric energy used in most homes. Most homes, in fact, had a net credit from the electric utility over the course of a year. On the natural gas side, total gas costs averaged $377 per year (for heating, water heating, cooking, and clothes drying). Total energy costs were even less - $337 per year, including all utility fees. The highest annual energy bill for any home evaluated was $458; the lowest was $171.

Robb Aldrich, Steven Winter Associates

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Neutron capture therapy: Years of experimentation---Years of reflection  

SciTech Connect

This report describes early research on neutron capture therapy over a number of years, beginning in 1950, speaking briefly of patient treatments but dwelling mostly on interpretations of our animal experiments. This work carried out over eighteen years, beginning over forty years ago. Yet, it is only fitting to start by relating how neutron capture therapy became part of Brookhaven`s Medical Research Center program.

Farr, L.E.

1991-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

466

Monitoring Soil Erosion on a Burned Site in the Mojave-Great Basin Transition Zone: Final Report for the Jacob Fire Site  

SciTech Connect

A historic return interval of 100 years for large fires in the U.S. southwestern deserts is being replaced by one where fires may reoccur as frequently as every 20 to 30 years. The shortened return interval, which translates to an increase in fires, has implications for management of Soil Corrective Action Units (CAUs) and Corrective Action Sites (CASs) for which the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office has responsibility. A series of studies was initiated at uncontaminated analog sites to better understand the possible impacts of erosion and transport by wind and water should contaminated soil sites burn. The first of these studies was undertaken at the Jacob Fire site approximately 12 kilometers (7.5 miles) north of Hiko, Nevada. A lightning-caused fire burned approximately 200 hectares during August 6-8, 2008. The site is representative of a transition between Mojave and Great Basin desert ecoregions on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), where the largest number of Soil CAUs/CASs are located. The area that burned at the Jacob Fire site was primarily a Coleogyne ramosissima (blackbrush) and Ephedra nevadensis (Mormon tea) community, also an abundant shrub assemblage in the similar transition zone on the NNSS. This report summarizes three years of measurements after the fire. Seven measurement campaigns at the Jacob Fire site were completed. Measurements were made on burned ridge (upland) and drainage sites, and on burned and unburned sites beneath and between vegetation. A Portable In-Situ Wind Erosion Lab (PI-SWERL) was used to estimate emissions of suspended particles at different wind speeds. Context for these measurements was provided through a meteorological tower that was installed at the Jacob Fire site to obtain local, relevant environmental parameters. Filter samples, collected from the exhaust of the PI-SWERL during measurements, were analyzed for chemical composition. Runoff and water erosion were quantified through a series of rainfall/runoff simulation tests in which controlled amounts of water were delivered to the soil surface in a specified amount of time. Runoff data were collected from understory and interspace soils on burned ridge and drainage areas. Runoff volume and suspended sediment in the runoff were sampled; the particle size distribution of the sediment was determined by laboratory analysis. Several land surface and soil characteristics associated with runoff were integrated by the calculation of site-specific curve numbers. Several vegetation surveys were conducted to assess post-burn recovery. Data from plots in both burned and unburned areas included species identification, counts, and location. Characterization of fire-affected area included measures at both the landscape scale and at specific sites. Although wind erosion measurements indicate that there are seasonal influences on almost all parameters measured, several trends were observed. PI-SWERL measurements indicated the potential for PM10 windblown dust emissions was higher on areas that were burned compared to areas that were not. Among the burned areas, understory soils in drainage areas were the most emissive, and interspace soils along burned ridges were least emissive. By 34 months after the burn (MAB), at the end of the study, emissions from all burned soil sites were virtually indistinguishable from unburned levels. Like the amount of emissions, the chemical signature of the fire (indicated by the EC-Soil ratio) was elevated immediately after the fire and approached pre-burn levels by 24 MAB. Thus, the potential for wind erosion at the Jacob Fire site, as measured by the amount and type of emissions, increased significantly after the fire and returned to unburned levels by 24 MAB. The effect of fire on the potential for water erosion at the Jacob Fire site was more ambiguous. Runoff and sediment from ridge interspace soils and unburned interspace soils were similar throughout the study period. Seldom, if ever, did runoff and sediment occur in burned drainage area soils. Fo

Miller, Julianne [DRI] DRI; Etyemezian, Vic [DRI] DRI; Cablk, Mary E. [DRI] DRI; Shillito, Rose [DRI] DRI; Shafer, David [DOE Grand Junction, Colorado] DOE Grand Junction, Colorado

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

<30 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70+ 35.3% 29.4% 17.6% 5.9% 11.8% 0.0% Age Groups as a Percentage of Workforce 0.0% 23.5% 58.8% 17.6% Education J.D.Ph.DSc.D Degrees Masters Degrees...

468

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

<30 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70+ 24.8% 15.0% 21.7% 31.8% 5.6% 1.0% Age Groups as a Percentage of Workforce 0.3% 31.5% 37.4% 30.8% Education J.D.Ph.DSc.D Degrees Masters Degrees...

469

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

50% <30 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70+ 2.3% 2.3% 20.5% 50.0% 22.7% 2.3% Age Groups as a Percentage of Workforce 6.8% 38.6% 45.5% 9.1% Education J.D.Ph.DSc.D Degrees Masters Degrees...

470

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

50% <30 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70+ 6.6% 41.7% 32.7% 16.0% 3.0% 0.0% Age Groups as a Percentage of Workforce 0.4% 7.6% 16.0% 76.0% Education J.D.Ph.DSc.D Degrees Masters Degrees...

471

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

<30 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70+ 11.6% 27.9% 18.6% 18.6% 23.3% 0.0% Age Groups as a Percentage of Workforce 41.9% 16.3% 25.6% 16.3% Education J.D.Ph.DSc.D Degrees Masters...

472

Yearly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2009, a new activity was launched under the International Energy Agency Wind Implementing Agreement (IEA Wind) for the small wind sector. The main focus of this activity, called Task 27, is to develop recommended practices for consumer labeling of existing commercial small wind turbines. Participants will also exchange information about the status of the small wind industry in the member countries. This report outlines the status of the small wind sector in 2009 in the countries participating in Task 27. (For more information about IEA Wind and the consumer label developed under Task 27, see www.ieawind.org.)

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M) 15 Hispanic Female (H, F) 11 White Male (W, M) 49 White Female (W, F) 12 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Los Alamos Field Office As of March 23, 2013 1.0% 9.4% 28.1%...

474

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 0 Hispanic Male 1 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 28 White Female 6 Workforce Diversity Kansas City Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER...

475

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

29 Hispanic Male 220 Hispanic Female 202 White Male 1340 White Female 519 Workforce Diversity National Nuclear Security Administration As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL...

476

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M) 5 Hispanic Female (H, F) 4 White Male (W, M) 25 White Female (W, F) 17 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Livermore Field Office As of March 23, 2013 1.2% 4.7% 3.5%...

477

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

7 Asian Female 6 Hispanic Male 8 Hispanic Female 7 White Male 128 White Female 83 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Immedidate Office of the Deputy Administrator (NA-20) As of...

478

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M) 12 Hispanic Female (H, F) 11 White Male (W, M) 34 White Female (W, F) 16 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Sandia Field Office As of March 23, 2013 2.5% 8.8% 13.8% 1.3%...

479

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

3 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 23 Hispanic Female 24 White Male 36 White Female 35 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Acquistion & Project Management...

480

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

White Male (W,M) 29 26 -10.34% White Female (W,F) 19 16 -15.79% Change DIVERSITY Change Livermore Field Office As of September 26, 2013 TOTAL WORKFORCE Change GENDER...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "years include great" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

3 Asian Female 4 Hispanic Male 21 Hispanic Female 47 White Male 61 White Female 92 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Management & Budget, NA-MB As of Sep...

482

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 1 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 0 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 8 White Female 3 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE 9 64.3% 5 35.7%...

483

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 4 Hispanic Male 5 Hispanic Female 4 White Male 30 White Female 19 Workforce Diversity Livermore Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER DIVERSITY...

484

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M) 74 Hispanic Female (H, F) 22 White Male (W, M) 393 White Female (W, F) 19 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Assistant Deputy Administrator for Secure Transportation...

485

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 1 Hispanic Male 0 Hispanic Female 1 White Male 46 White Female 22 Workforce Diversity Y-12 Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE DIVERSITY GENDER 51...

486

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 0 Hispanic Male 0 Hispanic Female 3 White Male 9 White Female 1 Workforce Diversity Office of the Administrator (NA-1) As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE...

487

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

32 TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER NNSA Production Office (NPO) As of March 23, 2013 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY 1.5% 0.7% 21.9% 21.9% 1.5% 16.8% 32.8% 2.9% Pay Plan Males 65.7% Females 34.3%...

488

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 7 Hispanic Female 18 White Male 40 White Female 28 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear Security, NA-70 As...

489

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

-8.33% White Male (W,M) 34 34 0.00% White Female (W,F) 17 16 -5.88% Change DIVERSITY Change Sandia Field Office As of September 26, 2013 TOTAL WORKFORCE Change GENDER...

490

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0.00% White Male (W,M) 15 13 -13.33% White Female (W,F) 8 6 -25.00% Change DIVERSITY Change Savannah River Field Office As of September 26, 2013 TOTAL WORKFORCE Change...

491

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M) 6 Hispanic Female (H, F) 6 White Male (W, M) 51 White Female (W, F) 14 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Nevada Field Office As of March 23, 2013 1.1% 3.4% 1.1% 31.8%...

492

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 1 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 0 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 14 White Female 8 DIVERSITY GENDER Workforce Diversity Savannah River Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN...

493

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 2 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 5 Hispanic Female 3 White Male 29 White Female 5 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Safety & Health, NA-SH As of Sep 24,...

494

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 3 Asian Female 1 Hispanic Male 1 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 76 White Female 22 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Deputy Administrator for Naval Reactors (NA-30) As of March 24,...