National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for years future electricity

  1. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-10-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  2. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-11-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  3. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2013-04-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  4. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-09-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  5. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.

    2012-10-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It is being presented at the Utility Variable-Generation Integration Group Fall Technical Workshop on October 24, 2012.

  6. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.; Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in an Union of Concerned Scientists webinar on June 12, 2012.

  7. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. This presentation was presented in a Wind Powering America webinar on August 15, 2012 and is now available through the Wind Powering America website.

  8. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a Power Systems Engineering Research Center webinar on September 4, 2012.

  9. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a webinar given by the California Energy Commission.

  10. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented to the 2012 Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners, during their June, 2012, meeting. The Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners is a regional association within the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC).

  11. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMeo, E.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at Wind Powering America States Summit. The Summit, which follows the American Wind Energy Association's (AWEA's) annual WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition, provides state Wind Working Groups, state energy officials, U.S. Energy Department and national laboratory representatives, and professional and institutional partners an opportunity to review successes, opportunities, and challenges for wind energy and plan future collaboration.

  12. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at the 2012 RE AMP Annual Meeting. RE-AMP is an active network of 144 nonprofits and foundations across eight Midwestern states working on climate change and energy policy with the goal of reducing global warming pollution economy-wide 80% by 2050.

  13. Conversations about electricity and the future: Findings of an international seminar and lessons from a year of surprises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossin, A.D.; Fowler, K.

    1991-06-01

    In January 1990 thirty-two experts from twelve countries convened for a five-day working Seminar on the Berkeley Campus of the University of California to discuss electricity supply and demand. The participants brought with them deep and diverse backgrounds in energy issues. A major concern of the First 1990 Group on Electricity was the potential impact of electricity shortages on the environment, just at a time of growing awareness of environmental deterioration. These concerns extend from local problems to nations, regions and global impacts. Indeed, because of the importance of electricity in our lives, potential electric power shortages already foreseeable in this decade could overwhelm public concern for the environment, unless critical, long-leadtime measures are taken very soon. The First 1990 Group on Electricity's Findings and Conclusions, the thinking that led to them, and the impact of events in the intervening year form the content of this book.

  14. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.; Sandor, D.; Wiser, R.; Schneider, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  15. Renewable Electricity Futures for the United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Renewable Electricity Futures Study (RE Futures) provides an analysis of the grid integration opportunities, challenges, and implications of high levels of renewable electricity generation for the U.S. electric system. The study is not a market or policy assessment. Rather, RE Futures examines renewable energy resources and many technical issues related to the operability of the U.S. electricity grid, and provides initial answers to important questions about the integration of high penetrations of renewable electricity technologies from a national perspective. RE Futures results indicate that a future U.S. electricity system that is largely powered by renewable sources is possible and that further work is warranted to investigate this clean generation pathway.

  16. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Executive Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Renewable Electricity Futures Study (RE Futures) provides an analysis of the grid integration opportunities, challenges, and implications of high levels of renewable electricity generation for the U.S. electric system. The study is not a market or policy assessment. Rather, RE Futures examines renewable energy resources and many technical issues related to the operability of the U.S. electricity grid, and provides initial answers to important questions about the integration of high penetrations of renewable electricity technologies from a national perspective. RE Futures results indicate that a future U.S. electricity system that is largely powered by renewable sources is possible and that further work is warranted to investigate this clean generation pathway.

  17. Renewable Electricity Futures for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, Trieu; Hand, Maureen; Baldwin, Sam F.; Wiser , Ryan; Brinkman, G.; Denholm, Paul; Arent, Doug; Porro, Gian; Sandor, Debra; Hostick, Donna J.; Milligan, Michael; DeMeo, Ed; Bazilian, Morgan

    2014-04-14

    This paper highlights the key results from the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study. It is a detailed consideration of renewable electricity in the United States. The paper focuses on technical issues related to the operability of the U. S. electricity grid and provides initial answers to important questions about the integration of high penetrations of renewable electricity technologies from a national perspective. The results indicate that the future U. S. electricity system that is largely powered by renewable sources is possible and the further work is warranted to investigate this clean generation pathway. The central conclusion of the analysis is that renewable electricity generation from technologies that are commercially available today, in combination with a more flexible electric system, is more than adequate to supply 80% of the total U. S. electricity generation in 2050 while meeting electricity demand on an hourly basis in every region of the United States.

  18. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 1. Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.; Baldwin, S.; DeMeo, E.; Reilly, J. M.; Mai, T.; Arent, D.; Porro, G.; Meshek, M.; Sandor, D.

    2012-06-15

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%–90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Learn more at the RE Futures website. http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/

  19. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 1: Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.; Wiser, R.; Sandor, D.; Brinkman, G.; Heath, G.; Denholm, P.; Hostick, D.J.; Darghouth, N.; Schlosser, A.; Strzepek, K.

    2012-06-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  20. Primer on electricity futures and other derivatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoft, S.; Belden, T.; Goldman, C.; Pickle, S.

    1998-01-01

    Increased competition in bulk power and retail electricity markets is likely to lower electricity prices, but will also result in greater price volatility as the industry moves away from administratively determined, cost-based rates and encourages market-driven prices. Price volatility introduces new risks for generators, consumers, and marketers. Electricity futures and other derivatives can help each of these market participants manage, or hedge, price risks in a competitive electricity market. Futures contracts are legally binding and negotiable contracts that call for the future delivery of a commodity. In most cases, physical delivery does not take place, and the futures contract is closed by buying or selling a futures contract on or near the delivery date. Other electric rate derivatives include options, price swaps, basis swaps, and forward contracts. This report is intended as a primer for public utility commissioners and their staff on futures and other financial instruments used to manage price risks. The report also explores some of the difficult choices facing regulators as they attempt to develop policies in this area.

  1. Concept for Management of the Future Electricity System (Smart...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Concept for Management of the Future Electricity System (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Concept for Management of the Future Electricity System...

  2. Renewable Electricity Futures Study: Executive Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Futures Study Executive Summary NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Volume 2 PDF Volume 3 PDF Volume 1 PDF Volume 4 PDF Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Baldwin, S. U.S. Department of Energy DeMeo, E. Renewable Energy Consulting Services, Inc. Reilly, J.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Mai, T.

  3. Presentation to EAC: Renewable Electricity Futures Activities & Status,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    October 29, 2010 | Department of Energy Presentation to EAC: Renewable Electricity Futures Activities & Status, October 29, 2010 Presentation to EAC: Renewable Electricity Futures Activities & Status, October 29, 2010 Presentation to the Electricity Advisory Committee, October 29, 2010, on Renewable Electricity Futures Activities & Status. The presentation provides a high-level overview of the Renewable Electricity Futures study, its current status, modeling approach, and key

  4. The Electricity Transmission System Future Vision & Grid Challenges

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Future Vision & Grid Challenges Summary Results of Breakout Group Discussions Electricity ... System A seamless, cost-effective electricity system, from generation to end-use, ...

  5. An electric vehicle vision of the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sperling, D.

    1995-12-01

    We are at the cusp of a technological revolution in automotive technology. The opportunity for creating a more diverse, efficient, and environmentally benign transportation system is before us. Electric drive options are especially attractive. Vehicles powered by batteries, fuel cells, or some combination of these are quite, produce much less pollution and greenhouse gases than internal combustion engines, and require little or no petroleum. I will address vehicle technology futures in terms of new government initiatives and current regulatory activities in California and Washington DC. I will put these initiatives and opportunities in a political and economic framework.

  6. Renewable Electricity Futures: Exploration of Up to 80% Renewable Electricity Penetration in the United States (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.; DeMeo, E.; Hostick, D.; Mai, T.; Schlosser, C. A.

    2013-04-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  7. Renewable Electricity Futures: Operational Analysis of the Western...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of integrating large amounts of renewable electricity generation into the U.S. power system (Mai et al. 2012). RE Futures examined renewable energy resources, technical issues...

  8. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 4: Bulk Electric Power Systems. Operations and Transmission Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, Michael; Ela, Erik; Hein, Jeff; Schneider, Thomas; Brinkman, Gregory; Denholm, Paul

    2012-06-15

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%–90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Learn more at the RE Futures website. http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/

  9. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2. Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustine, Chad; Bain, Richard; Chapman, Jamie; Denholm, Paul; Drury, Easan; Hall, Douglas G.; Lantz, Eric; Margolis, Robert; Thresher, Robert; Sandor, Debra; Bishop, Norman A.; Brown, Stephen R.; Felker, Fort; Fernandez, Steven J.; Goodrich, Alan C.; Hagerman, George; Heath, Garvin; O'Neil, Sean; Paquette, Joshua; Tegen, Suzanne; Young, Katherine

    2012-06-15

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%–90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Learn more at the RE Futures website. http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/

  10. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3. End-Use Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostick, Donna; Belzer, David B.; Hadley, Stanton W.; Markel, Tony; Marnay, Chris; Kintner-Meyer, Michael

    2012-06-15

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%–90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Learn more at the RE Futures website. http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/

  11. Electric steelmaking: recent trends and future constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burwell, C.C.

    1984-05-01

    This report provides a very brief description of steelmaking, and an overview of comparative data, primarily related to the use of energy and materials for each of the major steelmaking processes. This is followed by a discussion of possible limitations on the use of scrap - the current raw material for electric steel - and possible technological routes for overcoming them. The economics of electric-steel production in general, and of electric minimills in particular, seem clearly established. Electric steel-making is viable in its own right. The trend toward electric steelmaking provides significant economic and competitive advantages for producers and important overall economic, environmental and energy advantages for the US at large. Conversion to electric steelmaking offers a 4 to 1 advantage in terms of the overall energy used to produce a ton of steel, and a 2 to 1 savings in energy cost for the producer. The amount of energy saved, to produce the same amount of steel in 1967 and 1980, was equivalent to 25 million tons of coal. Furthermore, the amount of old scrap used to produce a ton of steel has doubled since 1967 because of the use of electric furnaces. Using the existing scrap to produce steel would save the energy equivalent of two billion barrels of oil. 44 references, 6 figures, 7 tables.

  12. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 4: Bulk Electric Power Systems: Operations and Transmission Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Hein, J.; Schneider, T.; Brinkman, G.; Denholm, P.

    2012-06-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  13. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustine, C.; Bain, R.; Chapman, J.; Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Hall, D.G.; Lantz, E.; Margolis, R.; Thresher, R.; Sandor, D.; Bishop, N.A.; Brown, S.R.; Cada, G.F.; Felker, F.

    2012-06-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  14. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3: End-Use Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostick, D.; Belzer, D.B.; Hadley, S.W.; Markel, T.; Marnay, C.; Kintner-Meyer, M.

    2012-06-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  15. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Volume 1: Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electrcity Futures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Renewable Electricity Futures Study (RE Futures) is an initial investigation of the extent to which renewable energy supply can meet the electricity demands of the contiguous United States1 over the next several decades. This study includes geographic and electric system operation resolution that is unprecedented for long-term studies of the U.S. electric sector. The analysis examines the implications and challenges of renewable electricity generation levels—from 30% up to 90%, with a focus on 80%, of all U.S. electricity generation from renewable technologies—in 2050. The study focuses on some key technical implications of this environment, exploring whether the U.S. power system can supply electricity to meet customer demand with high levels of renewable electricity, including variable wind and solar generation. The study also begins to address the potential economic, environmental, and social implications of deploying and integrating high levels of renewable electricity in the United States.

  16. COLLOQUIUM: Future Electrical Technologies From a GE Viewpoint...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1, 2015, 4:00pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Future Electrical Technologies From a GE Viewpoint Dr. James Bray GE Global Research I will give a brief overview of...

  17. The Future of Electric Vehicles and Arizona State University's MAIL

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Battery | Department of Energy The Future of Electric Vehicles and Arizona State University's MAIL Battery The Future of Electric Vehicles and Arizona State University's MAIL Battery August 11, 2010 - 4:26pm Addthis Cody Friesen and his team at Arizona State University | Photo Credit Arizona State University Cody Friesen and his team at Arizona State University | Photo Credit Arizona State University Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this

  18. Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems: Sensitivities to Changes in Future Electricity Market Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darghouth, Naim; Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan

    2013-01-09

    This scoping study investigates the impact of, and interactions among, three key sources of uncertainty in the future value of bill savings from customer-sited PV, focusing in particular on residential customers. These three sources of uncertainty are: changes to electricity market conditions that would affect retail electricity prices, changes to the types of retail rate structures available to residential customers with PV, and shifts away from standard net-metering toward other compensation mechanisms for residential PV. We investigate the impact of a range of electricity market scenarios on retail electricity prices and rate structures, and the resulting effects on the value of bill savings from PV. The scenarios include various levels of renewable and solar energy deployment, high and low natural gas prices, the possible introduction of carbon pricing, and greater or lesser reliance on utility-scale storage and demand response. We examine the bill savings from PV with time-invariant, flat residential retail rates, as well as with time-varying retail rates, including time-of-use (TOU) rates and real-time pricing (RTP). In addition, we explore a flat rate with increasing-block pricing (IBP). We evaluate the bill savings from PV with net metering, as currently allowed in many states, as well as scenarios with hourly netting, a partial form of net metering. This scoping study is the first known effort to evaluate these types of interactions in a reasonably comprehensive fashion, though by no means have we considered every possible change to electricity market conditions, retail rate structures, or PV compensation mechanisms. It focuses solely on the private value of bill savings for residential PV and does not seek to quantify the broader social or economic cost or value of solar electricity. Our analysis applies assumptions based loosely on California’s electricity market in a future year (2030); however, it is neither intended to forecast California’s future market, nor are our conclusions intended to have implications specific only to the California market. That said, some of the findings are unique to our underlying assumptions, as described further within the main body of the report, along with other key limitations.

  19. Wireless Electric Charging: The Future of Plug-In Electric Vehicles is

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Going Cordless | Department of Energy Wireless Electric Charging: The Future of Plug-In Electric Vehicles is Going Cordless Wireless Electric Charging: The Future of Plug-In Electric Vehicles is Going Cordless March 7, 2016 - 3:50pm Addthis Researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory test a wireless charger on the fully-electric Toyota Scion iQ at a demonstration site. | Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory Researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory test a wireless charger

  20. Perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, B.; Schaffhauser, A.

    1994-04-01

    This report offers perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry. These perspectives will be used in further research to assess the prospects for Integrated Resource Planning (IRP). The perspectives are developed first by examining economic, political and regulatory, societal, technological, and environmental trends that are (1) national and global in scope and (2) directly related to the electric utility industry. Major national and global trends include increasing global economic competition, increasing political and ethnic strife, rapidly changing technologies, and increasing worldwide concern about the environment. Major trends in the utility industry include increasing competition in generation; changing patterns of electricity demand; increasing use of information technology to control power systems; and increasing implementation of environmental controls. Ways in which the national and global trends may directly affect the utility industry are also explored. The trends are used to construct three global and national scenarios- ``business as usual,`` ``technotopia future,`` and ``fortress state`` -and three electric utility scenarios- ``frozen in headlights,`` ``megaelectric,`` and ``discomania.`` The scenarios are designed to be thought provoking descriptions of potential futures, not predictions of the future, although three key variables are identified that will have significant impacts on which future evolves-global climate change, utility technologies, and competition. While emphasis needs to be placed on understanding the electric utility scenarios, the interactions between the two sets of scenarios is also of interest.

  1. "GRID 2030" A NATIONAL VISION FOR ELECTRICITY'S SECOND 100 YEARS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "GRID 2030" A NATIONAL VISION FOR ELECTRICITY'S SECOND 100 YEARS "GRID 2030" A NATIONAL VISION FOR ELECTRICITY'S SECOND 100 YEARS The purpose of this document is to describe the ...

  2. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Volume 3: End-Use Electricity Demand

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This volume details the end-use electricity demand and efficiency assumptions. The projection of electricity demand is an important consideration in determining the extent to which a predominantly renewable electricity future is feasible. Any scenario regarding future electricity use must consider many factors, including technological, sociological, demographic, political, and economic changes (e.g., the introduction of new energy-using devices; gains in energy efficiency and process improvements; changes in energy prices, income, and user behavior; population growth; and the potential for carbon mitigation).

  3. A National Vision for Electricity's Second 100 Years | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy A National Vision for Electricity's Second 100 Years A National Vision for Electricity's Second 100 Years The purpose of this document is to describe the common vision articulated at the National Electric System Vision meeting. The U.S. Department of Energy will use this vision to help implement President Bush's call for "...modernizing America's electric delivery system" and the 51 recommendations contained in the National Transmission Grid Study. Various stakeholders,

  4. After 70 years of service, taking action for the future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    After 70 years of service, taking action for the future Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit After 70 years of service, taking action for the future April 1, 2013 Director Charlie McMillan Lab Director Charlie McMillan. Contact Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email Welcome, everyone, to the latest edition of Connections. As we at the Laboratory

  5. Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transmission and Distribution Programs. | Department of Energy Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric Transmission and Distribution Programs. Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric Transmission and Distribution Programs. The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) is the primary organization within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for research, development, demonstration, technology transfer, and policy development

  6. Irradiation imposed degradation of the mechanical and electrical properties of electrical insulation for future accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polinski, J.; Chorowski, M.; Bogdan, P.; Strychalski, M.; Rijk, G. de

    2014-01-27

    Future accelerators will make extensive use of superconductors made of Nb{sub 3}Sn, which allows higher magnetic fields than NbTi. However, the wind-and-react technology of Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting magnet production makes polyimide Kapton non applicable for the coils' electrical insulation. A Nb{sub 3}Sn technology compatible insulation material should be characterized by high radiation resistivity, good thermal conductivity, and excellent mechanical properties. Candidate materials for the electrical insulation of future accelerator's magnet coils have to be radiation certified with respect to potential degradation of their electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties. This contribution presents procedures and results of tests of the electrical and mechanical properties of DGEBA epoxy + D400 hardener, which is one of the candidates for the electrical insulation of future magnets. Two test sample types have been used to determine the material degradation due to irradiation: a untreated one (unirradiated) and irradiated at 77 K with 11 kGy/min intense, 4MeV energy electrons beam to a total dose of 50 MGy.

  7. 10 Year Transmission Plan for the Western Electricity Interconnection Released

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) announced the release of its first 10-Year Regional Transmission Plan (Plan) for the Western Interconnection. The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability awarded WECC a $14.5 million grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to expand on its transmission planning activities.

  8. Office of Electricity Delivery And Energy Reliability To Hold Technical Conference On The Design Of Future Electric Transmission

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On March 4, 2009, the Department of Energy’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) will conduct a technical conference in the Washington, DC area to discuss the design of future electric transmission. The technical conference will discuss the likely demand for future electric transmission and whether the development of conceptual alternative extra high voltage (EHV) systems would assist generation developers, State energy policy officials, utility planners, and other stakeholders.

  9. Nuclear electric propulsion for future NASA space science missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yen, Chen-wan L.

    1993-07-20

    This study has been made to assess the needs, potential benefits and the applicability of early (circa year 2000) Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) technology in conducting NASA science missions. The study goals are: to obtain the performance characteristics of near term NEP technologies; to measure the performance potential of NEP for important OSSA missions; to compare NEP performance with that of conventional chemical propulsion; to identify key NEP system requirements; to clarify and depict the degree of importance NEP might have in advancing NASA space science goals; and to disseminate the results in a format useful to both NEP users and technology developers. This is a mission performance study and precludes investigations of multitudes of new mission operation and systems design issues attendant in a NEP flight.

  10. Options Impacting the Electric System of the Future (ESF); NREL (National

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Renewable Energy Laboratory) (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Options Impacting the Electric System of the Future (ESF); NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Options Impacting the Electric System of the Future (ESF); NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) As utilities are faced with adapting to new technologies, technology and policy due diligence are necessary to ensure the development of a future grid that brings greater

  11. Options Impacting the Electric System of the Future (ESF); NREL...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This presentation explores the different kinds of future directions the power industry could consider to create, discussing key components necessary for success. It will also ...

  12. Envisioning a Renewable Electricity Future for the United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This paper presents high renewable electricity penetration scenarios in the United States using detailed capacity expansion modeling that is designed to properly account for the variability and uncertainty of wind and solar resources. The scenarios focus solely on the electricity system, an important sector within the larger energy sector, and demonstrate long-term visions of a U.S. power system where renewable technologies, including biomass, geothermal, hydropower, solar, and wind, contribute 80% of 2050 annual electricity, including 49–55% from wind and solar photovoltaic generation. We also present the integration challenges of achieving this high penetration and characterize the options to increase grid flexibility to manage variability.

  13. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This volume includes chapters discussing biopower, geothermal, hydropower, ocean, solar, wind, and storage technologies. Each chapter includes a resource availability estimate, technology cost and performance characterization, discussions of output characteristics and grid service possibilities, large-scale production and deployment issues, and barriers to high penetration along with possible responses to them. Only technologies that are currently commercially available—biomass, geothermal, hydropower, solar PV, CSP, and wind-powered systems—are included in the modeling analysis. Some of these renewable technologies—such as run-of-river hydropower, onshore wind, hydrothermal geothermal, dedicated and co-fired-with-coal biomass—are relatively mature and well-characterized. Other renewable technologies—such as fixed-bottom offshore wind, solar PV, and solar CSP—are at earlier stages of deployment with greater potential for future technology advancements over the next 40 years.

  14. Decision-Making for High Renewable Electricity Futures in the United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This short Report Review highlights aspects of policy, regulation, finance, markets and operations that can help enable high penetration renewable energy electricity generation futures. It uses analytical results from the NREL Renewable Electricity Futures (REF) Study as a basis for discussion. As technical issues have been shown not to be key impediments for this pathway at the hourly level for the bulk system, we focus on other aspects of public and private decision-making. We conclude by describing how the REF might inform future research and development by the scientific community.

  15. Assessment of Future Vehicle Transportation Options and their Impact on the Electric Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Vehicle Transportation Options and Their Impact on the Electric Grid January 10, 2010 New Analysis of Alternative Transportation Technologies 3 What's New? * Additional Alternative Transportation Vehicles - Compressed Air Vehicles (CAVs) * Use electricity from the grid to power air compressor that stores compressed air - Natural Gas Vehicles (NGVs) * Connection to grid is in competing demand for fuel * Still an internal combustion engine (ICE) - Hydrogen Vehicles * Use fuel cell

  16. "Solid-state Lighting: 'The case' 10 Years After and FutureProspects...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solid-state Lighting: 'The case' 10 Years After and Future Prospects" paper will be ... Twitter Google + Vimeo GovDelivery SlideShare "Solid-state Lighting: 'The case' 10 Years ...

  17. Hybrid Electric Vehicle, Winner of the "FutureCar Challenge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hybrid Electric Vehicle, Winner of the "FutureCar Challenge," to Recharge at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, One of Only Three Stops Between Sacramento, Calif. and Washington, D.C. For more information contact: George Douglas (303) 275-4096 or (303) 880-2913 (cellular) Golden, Colo., July 15, 1997 -- Media are invited to photograph "FutureCar" winner and interview students who designed it. What: The "FutureCar Challenge" winner, a modified Ford Taurus,

  18. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Volume 4: Bulk Electric Power Systems: Operations and Transmission Planning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This volume focuses on the role of variable renewable generation in creating challenges to the planning and operations of power systems and the expansion of transmission to deliver electricity from remote resources to load centers. The technical and institutional changes to power systems that respond to these challenges are, in many cases, underway, driven by the economic benefits of adopting more modern communication, information, and computation technologies that offer significant operational cost savings and improved asset utilization. While this volume provides background information and numerous references, the reader is referred to the literature for more complete tutorials.

  19. Illinois Rural Electric Cooperative Wins DOE Wind Cooperative of the Year

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Award | Department of Energy Illinois Rural Electric Cooperative Wins DOE Wind Cooperative of the Year Award Illinois Rural Electric Cooperative Wins DOE Wind Cooperative of the Year Award February 17, 2006 - 12:02pm Addthis WASHINGTON , DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that Illinois Rural Electric Cooperative (IREC) will receive the 2005 Wind Cooperative of the Year Award. The utility was cited for its leadership, demonstrated success, and innovation in its wind

  20. This document is to provide input for a probable future state of the electric system and electric industry in 2030

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bruce Renz - Renz Consulting State of the Electric System in 2030 The Issue Last month's SGN article by Joe Miller discussed how the transition to a Smart Grid might take place. Joe's article was part of a series that has discussed the seven Principal Characteristics of a Smart Grid. While those seven characteristics promise a future in which the power grid supports and enables the needs of 21 st century society, such a grid does not exist today. And it will not exist tomorrow unless there is a

  1. 35 Years of Innovation - Leading the Way to a Clean Energy Future...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WIND TECHNOLOGY CENTER 35 YEARS OF INNOVATION Leading the Way to a Clean Energy Future NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency ...

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    300 YEAR 2011 Males 109 Females 191 YEAR 2011 SES 9 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 2 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 203 NU (TechAdmin Support) 38 NF (Future Ldrs) 47 YEAR 2011 American Indian...

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    86 YEAR 2012 Males 103 Females 183 YEAR 2012 SES 7 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 1 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 202 NU (TechAdmin Support) 30 NF (Future Ldrs) 45 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male...

  4. Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy (DOE) for research, development, demonstration, technology transfer, and policy development activities for the electric transmission and distribution system. ...

  5. Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Future Print Information about the future expansion of research fields for synchrotrons and the growing number of light sources, including free electron lasers (FELs) will...

  6. "Solid-state Lighting: 'The case' 10 Years After and Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Prospects" paper will be translated in Chinese Solid-state Lighting: 'The case' 10 Years After and Future Prospects" paper will be translated in Chinese - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure

  7. Mastering Uncertainty and Risk at Multiple Time Scales in the Future Electrical Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chertkov, Michael; Bent, Russell W.; Backhaus, Scott N.

    2012-07-10

    Today's electrical grids enjoy a relatively clean separation of spatio-temporal scales yielding a compartmentalization of grid design, optimization, control and risk assessment allowing for the use of conventional mathematical tools within each area. In contrast, the future grid will incorporate time-intermittent renewable generation, operate via faster electrical markets, and tap the latent control capability at finer grid modeling scales; creating a fundamentally new set of couplings across spatiotemporal scales and requiring revolutionary advances in mathematics techniques to bridge these scales. One example is found in decade-scale grid expansion planning in which today's algorithms assume accurate load forecasts and well-controlled generation. Incorporating intermittent renewable generation creates fluctuating network flows at the hourly time scale, inherently linking the ability of a transmission line to deliver electrical power to hourly operational decisions. New operations-based planning algorithms are required, creating new mathematical challenges. Spatio-temporal scales are also crossed when the future grid's minute-scale fluctuations in network flows (due to intermittent generation) create a disordered state upon which second-scale transient grid dynamics propagate effectively invalidating today's on-line dynamic stability analyses. Addressing this challenge requires new on-line algorithms that use large data streams from new grid sensing technologies to physically aggregate across many spatial scales to create responsive, data-driven dynamic models. Here, we sketch the mathematical foundations of these problems and potential solutions.

  8. Renewable Electricity Futures. Operational Analysis of the Western Interconnection at Very High Renewable Penetrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, Gregory

    2015-09-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures Study (RE Futures)--an analysis of the costs and grid impacts of integrating large amounts of renewable electricity generation into the U.S. power system--examined renewable energy resources, technical issues regarding the integration of these resources into the grid, and the costs associated with high renewable penetration scenarios. These scenarios included up to 90% of annual generation from renewable sources, although most of the analysis was focused on 80% penetration scenarios. Hourly production cost modeling was performed to understand the operational impacts of high penetrations. One of the conclusions of RE Futures was that further work was necessary to understand whether the operation of the system was possible at sub-hourly time scales and during transient events. This study aimed to address part of this by modeling the operation of the power system at sub-hourly time scales using newer methodologies and updated data sets for transmission and generation infrastructure. The goal of this work was to perform a detailed, sub-hourly analysis of very high penetration scenarios for a single interconnection (the Western Interconnection). It focused on operational impacts, and it helps verify that the operational results from the capacity expansion models are useful. The primary conclusion of this study is that sub-hourly operation of the grid is possible with renewable generation levels between 80% and 90%.

  9. 35 Years of Innovation - Leading the Way to a Clean Energy Future (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is at the forefront of energy innovation. For more than three decades, our researchers have built unparalleled expertise in renewable energy technologies while supporting the nation's vision that wind and water can provide clean, reliable, and cost-effective electricity. The NWTC strives to be an essential partner to companies, other DOE laboratories, government agencies, and universities around the world seeking to create a better, more sustainable future.

  10. Fact #779: May 13, 2013 EPA's Top Ten Rated Vehicles List for Model Year 2013 is All Electric

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2013 model year marks the first time when the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) top ten most fuel efficient vehicles list is comprised entirely of electric vehicles. Electric vehicles...

  11. Lakeland Electric SGIG Consumer Behavior Study Interim (Year 1) Evaluation Report (February 2015)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This interim evaluation report summarizes results from the first year of Lakeland Electric’s two-year 3-Period Time of Use (TOU) program called “Shift-to-Save” (STS). Lakeland Electric has undertaken this study as part of a full system-wide deployment of advanced metering infrastructure funded in part by a grant from the Department of Energy’s Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) Program.

  12. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: DOE's 10-Year Vision for Plug-in Electric Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EV Everywhere is a Clean Energy Grand Challenge to have the U.S. become the first nation in the world to produce plug-in electric vehicles that are as affordable for the average American family as today's gasoline-powered vehicles within the next 10 years.

  13. PNNL Expert Landis Kannberg Discusses the Electrical Grid of the Future

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Landis Kannberg

    2013-06-10

    Mechanical Engineer Landis Kannberg discusses how PNNL is improving the nation's electricity infrastructure.

  14. PNNL Expert Landis Kannberg Discusses the Electrical Grid of the Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landis Kannberg

    2011-10-11

    Mechanical Engineer Landis Kannberg discusses how PNNL is improving the nation's electricity infrastructure.

  15. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Rollout … Renewable Electricity Generation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    April 30, 2013 Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Rollout - Renewable Electricity Generation 2 EERE's National Mission To create American leadership in the global transition to a clean energy economy 1) High-Impact Research, Development, and Demonstration to Make Clean Energy as Affordable and Convenient as Traditional Forms of Energy 2) Breaking Down Barriers to Market Entry 3 Why Clean Energy Matters To America * Winning the most important global economic

  16. Comparative health and safety assessment of alternative future electrical-generation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habegger, L.J.; Gasper, J.R.; Brown, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    The report is an analysis of health and safety risks of seven alternative electrical generation systems, all of which have potential for commercial availability in the post-2000 timeframe. The systems are compared on the basis of expected public and occupational deaths and lost workdays per year associated with 1000 MWe average unit generation. Risks and their uncertainties are estimated for all phases of the energy production cycle, including fuel and raw material extraction and processing, direct and indirect component manufacture, on-site construction, and system operation and maintenance. Also discussed is the potential significance of related major health and safety issues that remain largely unquantifiable. The technologies include: the SPS; a low-Btu coal gasification system with an open-cycle gas turbine combined with a steam topping cycle (CG/CC); a light water fission reactor system without fuel reprocessing (LWR); a liquid metal fast breeder fission reactor system (LMFBR); a central station terrestrial photovoltaic system (CTPV); and a first generation fusion system with magnetic confinement. For comparison with the baseload technologies, risk from a decentralized roof-top photovoltaic system with 6 kWe peak capacity and battery storage (DTPV) was also evaluated.

  17. Electric and hybrid vehicles program. 5th annual report to Congress for Fiscal Year 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-03-01

    This fifth annual report on the implementation of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development and Demonstration Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-413, as amended by Public Law 95-238, referred to as the Act) complies with the reporting requirements established in Section 14 of the Act. In addition to informing the Congress of the progress and plans of the Department of Energy Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program, this report is intended to serve as a communication link between the Department and all of the public and private interests involved in making the program a success. The Annual Report represents the major summary of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program activities; since July 1981, DOE has ceased publication of the EHV Quarterly Reports with Congressional approval. The fourth quarter activities for FY 1981 are included in this report. During FY 1981, significant progress was made toward implementing the policies established by Congress in the Act. There has been a noticeable increase in interest shown by both the automobile manufacturing and the supply sectors of our economy in electric and hybrid vehicles. This year, the emphasis in the Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program shifted from vehicle demonstration and preparation for production readiness to research, development, test, and evaluation of advanced technologies to achieve the attributes necessary to make electric and hybrid vehicles a practical transportation alternative. Research and development efforts in batteries and propulsion components, as well as total vehicle systems, continue to reveal significant progress toward providing industry with technology options that will result in vehicles with greater public acceptance.

  18. Future States: The Convergence of Smart Grid, Renewables, Shale Gas, and Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick Cirillo; Guenter Conzelmann

    2013-03-20

    Dick Cirillo and Guenter Conzelmann present on research involving renewable energy sources, the use of natural gas, electric vehicles, and the SMART grid.

  19. Future States: The Convergence of Smart Grid, Renewables, Shale Gas, and Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dick Cirillo; Guenter Conzelmann

    2013-06-07

    Dick Cirillo and Guenter Conzelmann present on research involving renewable energy sources, the use of natural gas, electric vehicles, and the SMART grid.

  20. Electric Industry Structure and Regulatory Responses in a High Distributed Energy Resources Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corneli, Steve; Kihm, Steve; Schwartz, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of distributed energy resources (DERs) that can generate, manage and store energy on the customer side of the electric meter is widely recognized as a transformative force in the power sector. This report focuses on two key aspects of that transformation: structural changes in the electric industry and related changes in business organization and regulation that are likely to result from them. Both industry structure and regulation are inextricably linked. History shows that the regulation of the power sector has responded primarily to innovation in technologies and business models that created significant structural changes in the sector’s cost and organizational structure.

  1. The future of GPS-based electric power system measurements, operation and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rizy, D.T.; Wilson, R.E.; Martin, K.E.; Litzenberger, W.H.; Hauer, J.F.; Overholt, P.N.; Sobajic, D.J.

    1998-11-01

    Much of modern society is powered by inexpensive and reliable electricity delivered by a complex and elaborate electric power network. Electrical utilities are currently using the Global Positioning System-NAVSTAR (GPS) timekeeping to improve the network`s reliability. Currently, GPS synchronizes the clocks on dynamic recorders and aids in post-mortem analysis of network disturbances. Two major projects have demonstrated the use of GPS-synchronized power system measurements. In 1992, the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI) sponsored Phase Measurements Project used a commercially available Phasor Measurements Unit (PMU) to collect GPS-synchronized measurements for analyzing power system problems. In 1995, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) under DOE`s and EPRI`s sponsorship launched the Wide Area Measurements (WAMS) project. WAMS demonstrated GPS-synchronized measurements over a large area of their power networks and demonstrated the networking of GPS-based measurement systems in BPA and WAPA. The phasor measurement technology has also been used to conduct dynamic power system tests. During these tests, a large dynamic resistor was inserted to simulate a small power system disturbance.

  2. California's electricity system of the future scenario analysis in support of public-interest transmission system R&D planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph; Stovall, John P.

    2003-04-01

    The California Energy Commission directed the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions to analyze possible future scenarios for the California electricity system and assess transmission research and development (R&D) needs, with special emphasis on prioritizing public-interest R&D needs, using criteria developed by the Energy Commission. The scenarios analyzed in this report are not predictions, nor do they express policy preferences of the project participants or the Energy Commission. The public-interest R&D needs that are identified as a result of the analysis are one input that will be considered by the Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research staff in preparing a transmission R&D plan.

  3. Published assessments bearing on the future use of ceramic superconductors by the electric power sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giese, R.F.; Wolsky, A.M.

    1992-08-25

    Much has been written about ceramic superconductors since their discovery in 1986. Most of this writing reports and describes scientific research. However, some authors have sought to put this research in context: to assess where the field stands, what might be technically feasible, what might be economically feasible, and what potential impacts ceramic superconductors will bring to the electric power sector. This report`s purpose is to make the results of already published assessments readily available. To that end, this report lists and provides abstracts for various technical and economic assessments related to applications of High-Temperature Superconductors (HTS) to the electric power sector. Those studies deemed most important are identified and summarized. These assessments were identified by two means. First, members of the Executive Committee identified some reports as worthy of consideration and forwarded them to Argonne National Laboratory. Twelve assessments were selected. Each of these is listed and summarized in the following section. Second, a bibliographic search was performed on five databases: INSPEC, NTIS, COMPENDEX, Energy Science & Technology, and Electric Power Database. The search consisted of first selecting all papers related to High Temperature Superconductors. Then papers related to SMES, cables, generators, motors, fault current limiters, or electric utilities were selected. When suitable variants of the above terms were included, this resulted in a selection of 493 citations. These citations were subjected to review by the authors. A number of citations were determined to be inappropriate (e.g. a number referred to digital transmission lines for electronics and communications applications). The reduced list consisted of 200 entries. Each of these citations, with an abstract, is presented in the following sections.

  4. Published assessments bearing on the future use of ceramic superconductors by the electric power sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giese, R.F.; Wolsky, A.M.

    1992-08-25

    Much has been written about ceramic superconductors since their discovery in 1986. Most of this writing reports and describes scientific research. However, some authors have sought to put this research in context: to assess where the field stands, what might be technically feasible, what might be economically feasible, and what potential impacts ceramic superconductors will bring to the electric power sector. This report's purpose is to make the results of already published assessments readily available. To that end, this report lists and provides abstracts for various technical and economic assessments related to applications of High-Temperature Superconductors (HTS) to the electric power sector. Those studies deemed most important are identified and summarized. These assessments were identified by two means. First, members of the Executive Committee identified some reports as worthy of consideration and forwarded them to Argonne National Laboratory. Twelve assessments were selected. Each of these is listed and summarized in the following section. Second, a bibliographic search was performed on five databases: INSPEC, NTIS, COMPENDEX, Energy Science Technology, and Electric Power Database. The search consisted of first selecting all papers related to High Temperature Superconductors. Then papers related to SMES, cables, generators, motors, fault current limiters, or electric utilities were selected. When suitable variants of the above terms were included, this resulted in a selection of 493 citations. These citations were subjected to review by the authors. A number of citations were determined to be inappropriate (e.g. a number referred to digital transmission lines for electronics and communications applications). The reduced list consisted of 200 entries. Each of these citations, with an abstract, is presented in the following sections.

  5. Electric and Magnetic Fields Research and Public Information Dissemination Program annual report for fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) Research and Public Information Dissemination (RAPID) Program was authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 as a near-term effort to expand and accelerate the research needed to address the EMF issue. As required by this legislation, the EMF Interagency Committee, the National EMF Advisory Committee (NEMFAC), and the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) are providing valued input and advice for the direction of this program. With this input and advice, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) have developed and are implementing five-year program plans. Multi-year health effects research projects and related EMF measurement and exposure assessment projects are underway using funds appropriated in fiscal years 1994, 1995, and 1996 together with voluntary non-Federal contributions. The results of these research projects, along with the results of other EMF research, will be used as input to the hazard evaluation effort, which is the focus of the EMF RAPID Program. A coordinated interagency program is underway to communicate needed information on the EMF issue in a clear manner to the public and other decision makers.

  6. Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program 18th annual report to Congress for Fiscal Year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    The Department remains focused on the technologies that are critical to making electric and hybrid vehicles commercially viable and competitive with current production gasoline-fueled vehicles in performance, reliability, and affordability. During Fiscal Year 1994, significant progress was made toward fulfilling the intent of Congress. The Department and the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (a partnership of the three major domestic automobile manufacturers) continued to work together and to focus the efforts of battery developers on the battery technologies that are most likely to be commercialized in the near term. Progress was made in industry cost-shared contracts toward demonstrating the technical feasibility of fuel cells for passenger bus and light duty vehicle applications. Two industry teams which will develop hybrid vehicle propulsion technologies have been selected through competitive procurement and have initiated work, in Fiscal Year 1994. In addition, technical studies and program planning continue, as required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992, to achieve the goals of reducing the transportation sector dependence on imported oil, reducing the level of environmentally harmful emissions, and enhancing industrial productivity and competitiveness.

  7. 10-Year Strategic Vision: Forging the Future of the DOE JGI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-09-01

    Dramatic technological advances in genomics continue to transform modern biology. The DOE Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) has been at the leading edge of large-scale sequence-based science from its inception. Presently our ability to generate genomic data greatly outpaces our capacity to convert these data into biological insights. Bridging the gap between a sequenced genome and understanding of organism-scale functions is a significant unsolved problem in modern biology. Consequently, as the DOE JGI plans for its future, a major objective is to couple the generation of sequence data with the development of new large-scale experimental and computational capabilities to functionally annotate DNA sequences, thereby narrowing the gap between generation and interpretation of sequence data.

  8. Techno-economic assessment of electric steelmaking through the year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosley, J. J.; Clark, J. P.; Dancy, T. E.; Fruehan, R. J.; McIntyre, E. H.

    1987-07-01

    This paper presents a critical review of the outlook for electric steelmaking including an assessment of existing and potential electric arc furnace (EAF) capacity. Suggested areas of development to minimize energy consumption and optimize output are also featured. 20 figs.; 62 tabs.

  9. 40 years of progress in NDT - History as a guide to the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farley, Mike

    2014-02-18

    The paper is focussed on the progress which has been made over 40 years in the science, technology and application of NDT/NDE both during manufacture and in-service, from the perspective of the author and his background in the energy industries in the UK. New techniques not dreamt of 40 years ago and new technology such as personal computers, lasers and robotics which are now common-place in everyday life have transformed some aspects of NDT. But other aspects have remained unchanged, including the continued use of the more basic NDT methods and the challenges of recruitment, training, certification and motivation of personnel. There have been major changes in the world scene over 40 years including the globalization of trade, the emergence of new countries as industrial powers, and the ageing of safety critical infrastructure. These have impacted on NDT business and on the activities of the international NDT community (including ICNDT, the International Committee for NDT). The paper concludes by introducing the activities championed by ICNDT to promote the understanding of the importance of NDT, to support the development of NDT Societies around the world, to educate users on the correct use of personnel certification and to pursue the objective of global harmonisation and recognition of third party certification.

  10. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    you nay give us will be greatly uppreckted. VPry truly your23, 9. IX. Sin0j3, Mtinager lclectronics and Nuclear Physics Dept. omh , WESTINGHOUSE-THE NAT KING IN ELECTRICITY

  11. Two Colorado-Based Electric Cooperatives Selected as 2014 Wind Cooperatives of the Year.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tri-State Generation and Transmissions Association (Tri-State) and San Isabel Electric Association (San Isabel) of Colorado have been recognized by the Energy Department and the National Rural...

  12. Electricity Use in the Pacific Northwest: Utility Historical Sales by Sector, 1989 and Preceding Years.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-06-01

    This report officially releases the compilation of regional 1989 retail customer sector sales data by the Bonneville Power Administration. This report is intended to enable detailed examination of annual regional electricity consumption. It gives statistics covering the time period 1970--1989, and also provides observations based on statistics covering the 1983--1989 time period. The electricity use report is the only information source that provides data obtained from each utility in the region based on the amount of electricity they sell to consumers annually. Data is provided on each retail customer sector: residential, commercial, industrial, direct-service industrial, and irrigation. The data specifically supports forecasting activities, rate development, conservation and market assessments, and conservation and market program development and delivery. All of these activities require a detailed look at electricity use. 25 figs., 34 tabs.

  13. Fact #717: March 5, 2012 Availability of Electric Charging Stations Has Increased Dramatically in Recent Years

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the end of September 2009, there were just 465 electric vehicle charging stations nationwide. By the end of January 2012, the number of charging stations had grown to 6,033. California has...

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    YEAR 2014 AVERAGE AGE 48.6 UNDER 30 2 30-39 5 40-49 8 50-59 17 60-69 3 70 AND UP 0 YEAR 2014 AVERAGE LENGTH 16.3 LESS THAN 10 YEARS 11 10-19 YEARS 10 20-29 YEARS 11 30-39 YEARS 3 ...

  15. Electricity Use in the Pacific Northwest: Utility Historical Sales by Sector, 1990 and Preceding Years.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-06-01

    This report officially releases the compilation of regional 1990 retail customer sector sales data by the Bonneville Power Administration. The report is intended to enable detailed examination of annual regional electricity consumption. It also provides observations based on statistics covering the 1983--1990 time period, and gives statistics covering the time period 1970--1990. The electricity use report is the only information source that provides data obtained from each utility in the region based on the amount of electricity they sell annually to four sectors. Data is provided on each retail customer sector and also on the customers Bonneville serves directly: residential, commercial, industrial, direct-service industrial, and irrigation. 21 figs., 40 tabs.

  16. Fact #854 January 5, 2015 Driving Ranges for All-Electric Vehicles in Model Year 2014 Vary from 62 to 265 Miles – Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Driving Ranges for All-Electric Vehicles in Model Year 2014 Vary from 62 to 265 Miles

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    69 YEAR 2014 Males 34 Females 35 YEAR 2014 SES 5 EJEK 1 EN 05 8 EN 04 5 NN (Engineering) 27 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 22 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska...

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    42 YEAR 2014 Males 36 Females 6 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 2 EJEK 5 EN 05 7 EN 04 6 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 6 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 YEAR 2012 Males 65 Females 29 YEAR 2012 SES 3 EJEK 5 EN 04 3 NN (Engineering) 21 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 61 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 YEAR 2011 Males 21 Females 23 YEAR 2011 SES 3 EJEK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 3 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 31 NU (TechAdmin Support) 5 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American...

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    92 YEAR 2012 Males 52 Females 40 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 7 EN 04 13 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 27 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 38 NU (TechAdmin Support) 5 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0...

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    558 YEAR 2013 Males 512 Females 46 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EJEK 2 EN 04 1 NN (Engineering) 11 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 220 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 321 YEAR 2013...

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    11 YEAR 2012 Males 78 Females 33 YEAR 2012 SES 2 EJEK 9 EN 05 1 EN 04 33 NN (Engineering) 32 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 31 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 2...

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    02 YEAR 2011 Males 48 Females 54 YEAR 2011 SES 5 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 13 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 80 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American Indian...

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2013 Males 27 Females 11 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 8 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 15 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    31 YEAR 2013 Males 20 Females 11 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 12 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,...

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    16 YEAR 2012 Males 84 Females 32 YEAR 2012 SES 26 EJEK 2 EN 05 9 NN (Engineering) 39 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 30 NU (TechAdmin Support) 10 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    34 YEAR 2012 Males 66 Females 68 YEAR 2012 SES 6 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 110 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 1 American Indian Female 2...

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    80 YEAR 2012 Males 51 Females 29 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 22 EN 04 21 NN (Engineering) 14 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 21 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 YEAR 2012 Males 30 Females 11 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 9 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 17 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    96 YEAR 2013 Males 69 Females 27 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 9 EN 04 27 NN (Engineering) 26 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 30 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    31 YEAR 2012 Males 19 Females 12 YEAR 2012 SES 2 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 12 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American Indian...

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    0 YEAR 2013 Males 48 Females 32 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EJEK 7 EN 04 11 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 33 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska...

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    40 YEAR 2011 Males 68 Females 72 YEAR 2011 SES 5 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 115 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 1 American Indian...

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    00 YEAR 2012 Males 48 Females 52 YEAR 2012 SES 5 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 11 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 80 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American Indian...

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    137 YEAR 2013 Males 90 Females 47 YEAR 2013 SES 2 SL 1 EJEK 30 EN 04 30 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 45 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of Employees 14 GENDER YEAR 2012 Males 9 Females 5 YEAR 2012 SES 2 EJEK 2 NN (Engineering) 4 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 6 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American Indian Female 0...

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3 YEAR 2012 Males 21 Females 22 YEAR 2012 SES 3 EJEK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 3 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 30 NU (TechAdmin Support) 5 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

  19. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A

  20. Long Beach Transit: Two-Year Evaluation of Gasoline-Electric Hybrid Transit Buses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lammert, M.

    2008-06-01

    This report focuses on a gasoline-electric hybrid transit bus propulsion system. The propulsion system is an alternative to standard diesel buses and allows for reductions in emissions (usually focused on reductions of particulate matter and oxides of nitrogen) and petroleum use. Gasoline propulsion is an alternative to diesel fuel and hybrid propulsion allows for increased fuel economy, which ultimately results in reduced petroleum use.

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Males 139 Females 88 YEAR 2012 SES 13 EX 1 EJEK 8 EN 05 23 EN 04 20 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 91 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 62 NU (TechAdmin Support) 7 YEAR 2012 American Indian...

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    563 YEAR 2012 Males 518 Females 45 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 2 EN 04 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 209 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 335 YEAR 2012...

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7 YEAR 2012 Males 64 Females 33 YEAR 2012 SES 2 EJEK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 30 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 26 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 32 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2012 American Indian...

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 YEAR 2012 Males 37 Females 7 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 6 EN 05 5 EN 04 7 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 17 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 6 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 2...

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7 YEAR 2011 Males 38 Females 9 YEAR 2011 SES 1 EJEK 6 EN 05 5 EN 04 7 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 19 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 7 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 2...

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2013 Males 62 Females 26 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 28 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 25 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 27 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    6 YEAR 2012 Males 64 Females 32 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 5 EN 05 3 EN 04 23 EN 03 9 NN (Engineering) 18 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 33 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2012 American Indian...

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2013 Males 58 Females 27 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 4 EN 05 3 EN 04 21 EN 03 8 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 28 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    78 YEAR 2012 Males 57 Females 21 YEAR 2012 SES 2 SL 1 EJEK 12 EN 04 21 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 24 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male...

  10. Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program. Seventeenth annual report to Congress for Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This program, in cooperation with industry, is conducting research, development, testing, and evaluation activities to develop the technologies that would lead to production and introduction of low-and zero-emission electric and hybrid vehicles into the Nation`s transportation fleet. This annual report describes program activities in the areas of advanced battery, fuel cell, and propulsion systems development. Testing and evaluation of new technology in fleet site operations and laboratories are also provided. Also presented is status on incentives (CAFE, 1992 Energy Policy Act) and use of foreign components, and a listing of publications by DOE, national laboratories, and contractors.

  11. Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program. Sixteenth annual report to Congress for fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This report describes the progress achieved in developing electric and hybrid vehicle technologies, beginning with highlights of recent accomplishments in FY 1992. Detailed descriptions are provided of program activities during FY 1992 in the areas of battery, fuel cell, and propulsion system development, and testing and evaluation of new technology in fleet site operations and in laboratories. This Annual Report also contains a status report on incentives and use of foreign components, as well as a list of publications resulting from the DOE program.

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2012 Males 149 Females 115 YEAR 2012 SES 17 EX 1 EJEK 7 EN 05 2 EN 04 9 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 56 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 165 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 GS 13 1 YEAR 2012 American...

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2014 Males 61 Females 24 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJ/EK 8 EN 04 22 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 28 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 2 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 3 African American Male (AA M) 0 African American Female (AA F) 0 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 3 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 13 Hispanic Female (H F) 10 White Male (W M) 43 White Female (W F) 11

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    82 YEAR 2014 Males 57 Females 25 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 3 EJ/EK 4 EN 04 2 NN (Engineering) 20 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 53 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 0 African American Male (AA M) 9 African American Female (AA F) 9 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 2 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 1 Hispanic Male (H M) 3 Hispanic Female (H F) 5 White Male (W M) 43 White Female (W F) 10 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    93 YEAR 2014 Males 50 Females 43 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 EJ/EK 3 NN (Engineering) 13 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 74 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 2 African American Male (AA M) 5 African American Female (AA F) 6 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 0 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 6 Hispanic Female (H F) 14 White Male (W M) 39 White Female (W F) 21 DIVERSITY

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    YEAR 2014 Males 11 Females 2 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 2 EJ/EK 1 EN 04 1 NN (Engineering) 5 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 4 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 0 African American Male (AA M) 0 African American Female (AA F) 0 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 10 White Female (W F) 2 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9 YEAR 2014 Males 9 Females 10 YEAR 2014 SES 7 ED 1 EJ/EK 1 EN 05 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 8 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 1 African American Female (AA F) 5 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 3 White Male (W M) 7 White Female (W F) 1 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2014 Males 92 Females 43 YEAR 2014 SES 8 EX 1 EJ/EK 4 EN 05 9 EN 04 12 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 57 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 42 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 1 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 9 African American Female (AA F) 11 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 4 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 2 Hispanic Male (H M) 12 Hispanic Female (H F) 7 White Male (W M) 66 White Female (W F) 22 PAY PLAN

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    563 YEAR 2014 Males 517 Females 46 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 2 EJ/EK 2 EN 04 1 NN (Engineering) 11 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 218 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 327 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 14 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 2 African American Male (AA M) 18 African American Female (AA F) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 8 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 2 Hispanic Male (H M) 76 Hispanic Female (H F) 21 White Male

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    89 YEAR 2014 Males 98 Females 91 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 14 EX 1 EJ/EK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 4 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 32 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 130 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 GS 15 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 1 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 0 African American Male (AA M) 5 African American Female (AA F) 14 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 3 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 7 Hispanic Male (H M) 7 Hispanic Female (H F) 10 White Male

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    43 YEAR 2014 Males 162 Females 81 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 26 EJ/EK 3 EN 05 7 NN (Engineering) 77 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 108 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 22 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 5 African American Female (AA F) 9 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 2 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 154 White Female (W F)

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    74 YEAR 2014 Males 96 Females 78 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 8 EJ/EK 4 EN 04 11 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 34 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 113 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 2 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 3 African American Female (AA F) 11 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 5 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 25 Hispanic Female (H F) 25 White Male (W M) 61 White

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 YEAR 2014 Males 7 Females 7 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 7 GS 15 1 GS 14 2 GS 13 2 GS 10 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 0 African American Male (AA M) 3 African American Female (AA F) 2 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 0 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 4 White Female (W F) 5 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    16 YEAR 2014 Males 72 Females 144 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 8 EJ/EK 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 198 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 9 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 2 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 2 African American Male (AA M) 10 African American Female (AA F) 38 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 3 Hispanic Male (H M) 15 Hispanic Female (H F) 33 White Male (W M) 44 White Female (W F) 68 DIVERSITY TOTAL

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    26 YEAR 2014 Males 81 Females 45 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 SL 1 EJ/EK 25 EN 04 26 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 44 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 4 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 3 African American Female (AA F) 7 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 4 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 1 Hispanic Male (H M) 6 Hispanic Female (H F) 6 White Male (W M) 68 White

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2014 Males 18 Females 10 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 9 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 4 African American Female (AA F) 4 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 13 White Female (W F) 5

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2014 Males 18 Females 20 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 3 EJ/EK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 3 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 28 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 0 African American Male (AA M) 1 African American Female (AA F) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 0 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 1 Hispanic Male (H M) 4 Hispanic Female (H F) 7 White Male (W M) 13 White Female (W F) 11

  8. Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-07-23

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  9. Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-05-02

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    25 Females 10 YEAR 2014 SES 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 8 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 13 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 1 African American Female (AA F) 3 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 0 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 24 White Female (W F) 6 TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Kansas City

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9 Females 24 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJ/EK 4 EN 05 3 EN 04 22 EN 03 8 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 27 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 2 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 5 African American Female (AA F) 2 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 21 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 2 Hispanic Male (H M) 5 Hispanic Female (H F) 3 White Male (W M) 26 White Female (W F) 16

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    17 Females 18 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJ/EK 3 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 30 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 1 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 2 African American Male (AA M) 3 African American Female (AA F) 7 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 2 Hispanic Female (H F) 6 White Male (W M) 10 White Female (W F) 3 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Associate

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 Females 25 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJ/EK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 25 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 25 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 25 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 1 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 3 African American Female (AA F) 3 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 2 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 2 Hispanic Male (H M) 6 Hispanic Female (H F) 6 White Male (W M) 46 White Female (W F) 13

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    -9.09% YEAR 2012 2013 SES 1 1 0.00% EN 05 1 1 0.00% EN 04 11 11 0.00% NN (Engineering) 8 8 0.00% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 17 14 -17.65% NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 2...

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Females 863 YEAR 2013 SES 102 EX 3 SL 1 EJEK 89 EN 05 41 EN 04 170 EN 03 18 NN (Engineering) 448 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 1249 NU (TechAdmin Support) 76 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 321...

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Females 942 YEAR 2012 SES 108 EX 4 SL 1 EJEK 96 EN 05 45 EN 04 196 EN 03 20 NN (Engineering) 452 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 1291 NU (TechAdmin Support) 106 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 335...

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    YEAR 2012 2013 SES 2 1 -50.00% EN 05 0 1 100.00% EN 04 4 4 0.00% NN (Engineering) 13 12 -7.69% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 13 9 -30.77% NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 1...

  18. Future Communications Needs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Future Communications Needs Future Communications Needs Chart of Oncor Electric Delivery's Future Communications Needs PDF icon Future Communications Needs More Documents & ...

  19. DOE National Power Grid recommendations: unreliable guides for the future organization of the bulk electric-power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.T. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The bulk electric power supply industry needs leadership to meet its problems effectively, economically, and with the least injury to the environment during the rest of the century. The industry's pluralistic character, which is one of its strengths, and the range of the federal antitrust laws have blunted industry response to the challenge of supplying adequate bulk power. DOE failed to recognize the leadership vacuum and to use the opportunity provided by its Final Report on the National Power Grid Study to adopt a more effective role. DOE can still recover and urge Congress to pass the necessary enabling legislation to establish a regional bulk power supply corporation that would generate and transmit electric power for sale to federally chartered, privately owned electric utilities having no corporate links to their wholesale customers. 87 references.

  20. Year

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . U.S. Coal Production, 2009 - 2015 (thousand short tons) Year January - March April - June July - September October - December Total 2009 282,772 263,017 269,339 259,796 1,074,923 2010 265,702 264,982 277,505 276,180 1,084,368 2011 273,478 264,291 275,006 282,853 1,095,628 2012 266,865 241,047 258,956 249,591 1,016,458 2013 244,867 243,211 257,595 239,169 984,842 2014 245,271 245,844 255,377 253,557 1,000,049 2015 240,189 211,130 237,263 207,355 895,936 Note: Total may not equal sum of

  1. 35 Years of Innovation: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory Leads the Way to a Clean Energy Future (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-02-01

    With a history of over 35 years of successful innovation, this booklet highlights some of the many successes throughout the years.

  2. Projecting Electricity Demand in 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Hadley, Stanton W.; Markel, Tony; Marnay, Chris; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the development of end-use electricity projections and load curves that were developed for the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study (hereafter RE Futures), which explored the prospect of higher percentages (30% − 90%) of total electricity generation that could be supplied by renewable sources in the United States. As input to RE Futures, two projections of electricity demand were produced representing reasonable upper and lower bounds of electricity demand out to 2050. The electric sector models used in RE Futures required underlying load profiles, so RE Futures also produced load profile data in two formats: 8760 hourly data for the year 2050 for the GridView model, and in 2-year increments for 17 time slices as input to the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model. The process for developing demand projections and load profiles involved three steps: discussion regarding the scenario approach and general assumptions, literature reviews to determine readily available data, and development of the demand curves and load profiles.

  3. Renewable Electricity Working Group Presentation

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Renewable Electricity Working Group Chris Namovicz, Renewable Electricity Analysis Team July 9, 2013 Agenda * Review status of AEO 2013 * Discuss new model updates and development efforts for AEO 2014 and future AEOs - Model updates - Policy updates - Planned additions updates - Performance updates * Obtain feedback from stakeholders on any key items that EIA should look at Chris Namovicz, July 9 2 Status of AEO 2013 Chris Namovicz, July 9 * AEO 2013 was released in stages this year - Reference

  4. World oil - An essay on its spectacular 120-year rise (1859-1979), recent decline, and uncertain future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linden, H.R.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of the evolution of the oil security problems of import-dependent industrialized countries and of the rise and recent erosion of the market power of the major oil exporting countries, particularly those located in the Persian Gulf area. The counterproductive reaction of the United States and other large oil importers to the resulting oil supply and price instability, especially since the 1973-74 oil embargo, is critiqued. In addition, the synergism between the early commercialization of crude oil production and refining in the United States and the development of the automobile industry is discussed, and the long-term outlook for oil-base transportation fuels is assessed. OPEC's role in destabilizing the world oil market during the 1970s and its current efforts to restabilize it are evaluated, as is the likely future course of world oil prices and of U.S. and other non-OPEC production. An important finding of this study is that the share of oil in the world energy mix has peaked and will continue its downward trend and that recurring expectations for a sharp escalation of world oil prices and shortages are based on erroneous assessments of the fundamentals governing the oil business.

  5. Energy for our Future

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... gallons of diesel per year "Stronger Together for the Next 100 Years" Looking into The Future... (Traditional Athabascan Solar Array?) "Stronger Together for the Next 100 Years"

  6. Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

    1987-06-01

    The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive.

  7. NYMEX Coal Futures - Energy Information Administration

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    providing companies in the electric power industry with secure and reliable risk management tools by creating a series of electricity futures contracts fashioned to meet the...

  8. A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Chang, Wen-Kuei; Lin, Hung-Wen

    2013-05-01

    Buildings consume more than one third of the world?s total primary energy. Weather plays a unique and significant role as it directly affects the thermal loads and thus energy performance of buildings. The traditional simulated energy performance using Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) weather data represents the building performance for a typical year, but not necessarily the average or typical long-term performance as buildings with different energy systems and designs respond differently to weather changes. Furthermore, the single-year TMY simulations do not provide a range of results that capture yearly variations due to changing weather, which is important for building energy management, and for performing risk assessments of energy efficiency investments. This paper employs large-scale building simulation (a total of 3162 runs) to study the weather impact on peak electricity demand and energy use with the 30-year (1980 to 2009) Actual Meteorological Year (AMY) weather data for three types of office buildings at two design efficiency levels, across all 17 ASHRAE climate zones. The simulated results using the AMY data are compared to those from the TMY3 data to determine and analyze the differences. Besides further demonstration, as done by other studies, that actual weather has a significant impact on both the peak electricity demand and energy use of buildings, the main findings from the current study include: 1) annual weather variation has a greater impact on the peak electricity demand than it does on energy use in buildings; 2) the simulated energy use using the TMY3 weather data is not necessarily representative of the average energy use over a long period, and the TMY3 results can be significantly higher or lower than those from the AMY data; 3) the weather impact is greater for buildings in colder climates than warmer climates; 4) the weather impact on the medium-sized office building was the greatest, followed by the large office and then the small office; and 5) simulated energy savings and peak demand reduction by energy conservation measures using the TMY3 weather data can be significantly underestimated or overestimated. It is crucial to run multi-decade simulations with AMY weather data to fully assess the impact of weather on the long-term performance of buildings, and to evaluate the energy savings potential of energy conservation measures for new and existing buildings from a life cycle perspective.

  9. Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  10. CASL - Westinghouse Electric Company

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear technology is helping to provide future generations with safe, clean and reliable electricity. Key Contributions Definition of CASL challenge problems Existing codes and...

  11. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 2003" ,"All Buildings* Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  12. Electricity 101 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources » Electricity 101 Electricity 101 FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS: Why do other countries use different shaped plugs? Why do outlets have three holes? Why do we have AC electricity? Can we harness lightning as an energy source? Can we have wireless transmission of electricity? SYSTEM: What is electricity? Where does electricity come from? What is the "grid"? How much electricity does a typical household use? How did the electric system evolve? What does the future look like?

  13. Miscellaneous States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Miscellaneous States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

  14. Lower 48 States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Lower 48 States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

  15. Louisiana--North Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Louisiana--North Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

  16. Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future October 19, 2011 - 5:46pm Addthis David Sandalow David Sandalow Former Under Secretary of Energy (Acting) and Assistant Secretary for Policy & International Affairs Why does it matter? Four clean energy technologies-wind turbines, electric vehicles, photovoltaic cells and fluorescent lighting-use materials at risk of supply disruptions in the next five years. Earlier this month, United States, Japanese

  17. New York City Transit Drives Hybrid Electric Buses into the Future; Advanced Technology Vehicles in Service, Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (Fact Sheet)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HYBRID ELECTRIC TRANSIT BUS EVALUATIONS The role of AVTA is to bridge the gap between R&D and commercial availability of advanced vehicle technologies that reduce U.S. petroleum use while improving air quality. AVTA supports the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program in moving these technologies from R&D to market deployment by examining market factors and customer requirements, evaluating performance and durability of alternative

  18. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of...

  19. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C9. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  20. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures by Census Division, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number...

  1. Create a Sustainable Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Create a Sustainable Future Image of river edge with text overlay of 'How does LANL accomplish future stewardship of the natural and historical resources?' We sample to detect any release of materials to the environment. We manage environmental concerns by eco region. We evaluate our impact on the environment. We consult with experts and stakeholders. We fund projects that reduce environmental effects. Create a Sustainable Future Home Planning for Years to Come Living a Sustainable Future

  2. Electric and hybrid vehicle program, site operator program quarterly progress report for April through June 1996 (third quarter of fiscal year 1996)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francfort, J.; Bassett, R.R.; Briasco, S.

    1997-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Site Operator Program was initially established to meet the requirements of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1976. The Program has since evolved in response to new legislation and interests. The goals of the Site Operator Program include the field evaluation of electric vehicles (EVs) in real-world applications and environments; the advancement of electric vehicle technologies; the development of infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use; and increasing the awareness and acceptance of EVs by the public. The Site Operator Program currently consists of eleven participants under contract and two other organizations that have data-sharing agreements with the Program (Table ES-1). Several national organizations have joined DOE to further the introduction and awareness of electric vehicles, including: (1) EVAmerica (a utility program) and DOE conduct performance and evaluation tests to support market development for electric vehicles; and (2) DOE, the Department of Transportation, the Electric Transportation Coalition, and the Electric Vehicle Association of the Americas are conducting a series of workshops to encourage urban groups in Clean Cities (a DOE program) to initiate the policies and infrastructure development necessary to support large-scale demonstrations, and ultimately the mass market use, of electric vehicles. The current focus of the Program is the collection and dissemination of EV operations and performance data to aid in the evaluation of real-world EV use. This report contains several sections with vehicle evaluation as a focus.

  3. Quantifying the Value of Hydropower in the Electric Grid. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Key, T.

    2013-02-01

    The report summarizes a 3-year DOE study focused on defining value of hydropower assets in a changing electric grid. The study looked at existing large hydropower operations in the U.S., models for different electricity futures, markets, costs of existing and new technologies as well as trends related to hydropower investments in other parts of the world.

  4. 2015 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Now Available

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability has released the 2015 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study. Section 1221(a) of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, codified at 16 U.S.C. 824p(a), directs the Secretary of Energy to conduct an electric transmission congestion study every three years, and to prepare it in consultation with affected states and regional reliability organizations. The Study released today seeks to provide information about transmission congestion by focusing on specific indications of transmission constraints and congestion and their consequences. It focuses primarily on historical trends over the past few years, and looks into the future to the extent possible.

  5. The future of methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, D.G.

    1995-12-31

    Natural gas, mainly methane, produces lower CO{sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions than either oil or coal; thus further substitutions of methane for these fuels could help mitigate air pollution. Methane is, however, a potent greenhouse gas and the domestication of ruminants, cultivation of rice, mining of coal, drilling for oil, and transportation of natural gas have all contributed to a doubling of the amount of atmospheric methane since 1800. Today nearly 300,000 wells yearly produce ca. 21 trillion cubic feet of methane. Known reserves suggest about a 10 year supply at the above rates of recovery; and the potential for undiscovered resources is obscured by uncertainty involving price, new technologies, and environmental restrictions steming from the need to drill an enormous number of wells, many in ecologically sensitive areas. Until all these aspects of methane are better understood, its future role in the world`s energy mix will remain uncertain. The atomic simplicity of methane, composed of one carbon and four hydrogen atoms, may mask the complexity and importance of this, the most basic of organic molecules. Within the Earth, methane is produced through thermochemical alteration of organic materials, and by biochemical reactions mediated by metabolic processes of archaebacteria; some methane may even be primordial, a residue of planetary accretion. Methane also occurs in smaller volumes in landfills, rice paddies, termite complexes, ruminants, and even many humans. As an energy source, its full energy potential is controversial. Methane is touted by some as a viable bridge to future energy systems, fueled by the sun and uranium and carried by electricity and hydrogen.

  6. Utah Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  7. Electrical Engineer- OPEN CONTINUOUS ANNOUNCEMENT

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This recruitment is an OPEN CONTINUOUS ANNOUNCEMENT (OCA) being utilized to fill current and future Electrical Engineer vacancies within BPA's Transmission Field Services organization. Positions...

  8. Electric Transmission System Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lauren Azar Senior Advisor to Secretary Chu November 2, 2012 Electric Transmission System ... Can we agree on several key design attributes for the future grid? Taking Action in the ...

  9. Fact #854 January 5, 2015 Driving Ranges for All-Electric Vehicles in Model Year 2014 Vary from 62 to 265 Miles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Driving ranges for all-electric vehicles vary considerably. Based on the official Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) range values reported on window stickers, the Mitsubishi i-MiEV has the...

  10. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program, Site Operator Program. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1995 (first quarter of fiscal year 1996)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francfort, J.E.; Bassett, R.R.; Briasco, S.

    1996-03-01

    This is the Site Operator Program quarterly report for USDOE electric and hybrid vehicle research. Its mission now includes the three major activity categories of advancement of electric vehicle (EV) technologies, development of infrastructure elements needed to support significant EV use and increasing public awareness and acceptance of EVs. The 11 Site Operator Program participants, their geographic locations, and the principal thrusts of their efforts are identified. The EV inventories of the site operators totals about 250 vehicles. The individual fleets are summarized.

  11. Michigan Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  12. Louisiana Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  13. Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  14. Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  15. Montana Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  16. New York Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) New York Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  17. Electric power annual 1998. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this report, Electric Power Annual 1998 Volume 1 (EPAVI), is to provide a comprehensive overview of the electric power industry during the most recent year for which data have been collected, with an emphasis on the major changes that occurred. In response to the changes of 1998, this report has been expanded in scope. It begins with a general review of the year and incorporates new data on nonutility capacity and generation, transmission information, futures prices from the Commodity futures Trading commission, and wholesale spot market prices from the pennsylvania-new Jersey-Maryland Independent System Operator and the California Power Exchange. Electric utility statistics at the Census division and State levels on generation, fuel consumption, stocks, delivered cost of fossil fuels, sales to ultimate customers, average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold, and revenues from those retail sales can be found in Appendix A. The EPAVI is intended for a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric power industry, and the general public.

  18. Energy for the Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy for the Future

  19. Texas State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

  20. Louisiana State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

  1. Miscellaneous States Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

  2. EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Generating Capacity Release Date: January 3, 2013 | Next Release: August 2013 Year Existing Units by Energy Source Unit Additions Unit Retirements 2011 XLS XLS XLS 2010 XLS XLS XLS 2009 XLS XLS XLS 2008 XLS XLS XLS 2007 XLS XLS XLS 2006 XLS XLS XLS 2005 XLS XLS XLS 2004 XLS XLS XLS 2003 XLS XLS XLS Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." Related links Electric Power Monthly Electric Power Annual Form EIA-860 Source Data

  3. Impact of residential PV adoption on Retail Electricity Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, DWH; Adlakha, S; Low, SH; De Martini, P; Chandy, KM

    2013-11-01

    The price of electricity supplied from home rooftop photo voltaic (PV) solar cells has fallen below the retail price of grid electricity in some areas. A number of residential households have an economic incentive to install rooftop PV systems and reduce their purchases of electricity from the grid. A significant portion of the costs incurred by utility companies are fixed costs which must be recovered even as consumption falls. Electricity rates must increase in order for utility companies to recover fixed costs from shrinking sales bases. Increasing rates will, in turn, result in even more economic incentives for customers to adopt rooftop PV. In this paper, we model this feedback between PV adoption and electricity rates and study its impact on future PV penetration and net-metering costs. We find that the most important parameter that determines whether this feedback has an effect is the fraction of customers who adopt PV in any year based solely on the money saved by doing so in that year, independent of the uncertainties of future years. These uncertainties include possible changes in rate structures such as the introduction of connection charges, the possibility of PV prices dropping significantly in the future, possible changes in tax incentives, and confidence in the reliability and maintainability of PV. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. 2012 National Electricity Forum | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Forum 2012 National Electricity Forum At the 2012 National Electricity Forum, held February 8-9, 2012 and jointly organized by DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability (OE) and the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC), the GTT presented its vision of the future grid. Return to GTT Activities PDF icon 2012 National Electricity Forum - GTT Vision of the Future Grid, Lauren Azar (DOE) More Documents & Publications GTT 2012

  5. Presentation to EAC: Renewable Electricity Futures Activities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications SunShot Vision Study: February 2012 (Book), SunShot, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) SunShot Vision Study: February 2012 (Book), SunShot, ...

  6. NREL: Energy Analysis - Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Flow in 2050 (Compare to Baseline Projections) Screen capture of a dynamic map that is animated to display power flow in 2010 through 2050 The National Renewable Energy ...

  7. Office of Electricity Delivery And Energy Reliability To Hold...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Delivery And Energy Reliability To Hold Technical Conference On The Design Of Future Electric Transmission Office of Electricity Delivery And Energy Reliability To Hold Technical ...

  8. Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) 2009: Keeping the Lights...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) 2009: Keeping the Lights on in a New World ... and plans for meeting future electricity needs that will result in reliable ...

  9. Electric sales and revenue 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the US. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1996. 16 figs., 20 tabs.

  10. Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 ...

  11. Electric and hybrid electric vehicles: A technology assessment based on a two-stage Delphi study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vyas, A.D.; Ng, H.K.; Santini, D.J.; Anderson, J.L.

    1997-12-01

    To address the uncertainty regarding future costs and operating attributes of electric and hybrid electric vehicles, a two stage, worldwide Delphi study was conducted. Expert opinions on vehicle attributes, current state of the technology, possible advancements, costs, and market penetration potential were sought for the years 2000, 2010, and 2020. Opinions related to such critical components as batteries, electric drive systems, and hybrid vehicle engines, as well as their respective technical and economic viabilities, were also obtained. This report contains descriptions of the survey methodology, analytical approach, and results of the analysis of survey data, together with a summary of other factors that will influence the degree of market success of electric and hybrid electric vehicle technologies. Responses by industry participants, the largest fraction among all the participating groups, are compared with the overall responses. An evaluation of changes between the two Delphi stages is also summarized. An analysis of battery replacement costs for various types is summarized, and variable operating costs for electric and hybrid vehicles are compared with those of conventional vehicles. A market penetration analysis is summarized, in which projected market shares from the survey are compared with predictions of shares on the basis of two market share projection models that use the cost and physical attributes provided by the survey. Finally, projections of market shares beyond the year 2020 are developed by use of constrained logit models of market shares, statistically fitted to the survey data.

  12. Louisiana - South Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

  13. Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 ...

  14. Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 ...

  15. Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 ...

  16. 2013 Year in Review

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 Year in Review i 2013 YIR May 2014 Year-in-Review: 2013 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy DOE / 2013 Year in Review ii 2013 YIR For Further Information This report was prepared by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability under the direction of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary, and William Bryan, Deputy Assistant Secretary. Specific

  17. Open cycle liquid desiccant dehumidifier and hybrid solar/electric absorption refrigeration system. Annual report, January 1993--December 1993. Calendar year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimmo, B.G.; Thornbloom, M.D.

    1995-04-01

    This annual report presents work performed during calendar year 1993 by the Florida Solar Energy Center under contract to the US Department of Energy. Two distinctively different solar powered indoor climate control systems were analyzed: the open cycle liquid desiccant dehumidifier, and an improved efficiency absorption system which may be fired by flat plate solar collectors. Both tasks represent new directions relative to prior FSEC research in Solar Cooling and Dehumidification.

  18. Choices for a Brighter Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Choices for a Brighter Future For more information contact: George Douglas, 303-275-4096 e:mail: George Douglas Golden, Colo., Nov. 12, 1999 - More and more Americans are getting the power to choose electricity suppliers as the utility industry is deregulated and reorganized. Those energy choices can affect health and well-being for many decades to come. Renewable energy sources—solar, wind, biomass, geothermal and hydropower—can provide reliable electricity while reducing environmental

  19. Texas--RRC District 10 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Texas--RRC District 10 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 ...

  20. thermo-electric power conversion technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    thermo-electric power conversion technology - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home ... Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar ...

  1. Florida Keys Electric Cooperative- Residential Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: The Florida Keys Electric Cooperative rebates were depleted in June of 2015. According to the website, rebates will be offered again dependent upon future funding.

  2. U.S. Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  3. Vision of the Future Grid | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vision of the Future Grid Vision of the Future Grid Vision of the Future Grid The GTT developed a draft vision (below) which describes a future electricity system and lists several key attributes of that system. In its current form, this vision incorporates comments made by stakeholders during meetings organized by the GTT. The vision will continue to evolve and be refined as the GTT engages with the broader stakeholder community. Vision of the Future Grid A seamless, cost-effective electricity

  4. Electric sales and revenue 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the United States. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1994.

  5. Electric sales and revenue 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the US. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1997. 16 figs., 17 tabs.

  6. Florida's electric industry and solar electric technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camejo, N.

    1983-12-01

    The Florida Electric Industry is in a process of diversifying its generation technology and its fuel mix. This is being done in an effort to reduce oil consumption, which in 1981 accounted for 46.5% of the electric generation by fuel type. This does not compare well with the rest of the nation where oil use is lower. New coal and nuclear units are coming on line, and probably more will be built in the near future. However, eventhough conservation efforts may delay their construction, new power plants will have to be built to accomodate the growing demand for electricity. Other alternatives being considered are renewable energy resources. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a research project in which 10 electric utilities in Florida and the Florida Electric Power Coordinating Group rated six Solar Electric options. The Solar Electric options considered are: 1) Wind, 2) P.V., 3) Solar thermal-electric, 4) OTEC, 5) Ocean current, and 6) Biomass. The questionaire involved rating the economic and technical feasibility, as well as, the potential environmental impact of these options in Florida. It also involved rating the difficulty in overcoming institutional barriers and assessing the status of each option. A copy of the questionaire is included after the references. The combined capacity of the participating utilities represent over 90% of the total generating capacity in Florida. A list of the participating utilities is also included. This research was done in partial fulfillment for the Mater's of Science Degree in Coastal Zone Management. This paper is complementary to another paper (in these condensed conference proceedings) titled COASTAL ZONE ENERGY MANAGEMENT: A multidisciplinary approach for the integration of Solar Electric Systems with Florida's power generation system, which present a summary of the Master's thesis.

  7. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

  8. Lower 48 States Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Lower 48 States Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

  9. Louisiana - North Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - North Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

  10. DOE: Quantifying the Value of Hydropower in the Electric Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-31

    The report summarizes research to Quantify the Value of Hydropower in the Electric Grid. This 3-year DOE study focused on defining value of hydropower assets in a changing electric grid. Methods are described for valuation and planning of pumped storage and conventional hydropower. The project team conducted plant case studies, electric system modeling, market analysis, cost data gathering, and evaluations of operating strategies and constraints. Five other reports detailing these research results are available a project website, www.epri.com/hydrogrid. With increasing deployment of wind and solar renewable generation, many owners, operators, and developers of hydropower have recognized the opportunity to provide more flexibility and ancillary services to the electric grid. To quantify value of services, this study focused on the Western Electric Coordinating Council region. A security-constrained, unit commitment and economic dispatch model was used to quantify the role of hydropower for several future energy scenarios up to 2020. This hourly production simulation considered transmission requirements to deliver energy, including future expansion plans. Both energy and ancillary service values were considered. Addressing specifically the quantification of pumped storage value, no single value stream dominated predicted plant contributions in various energy futures. Modeling confirmed that service value depends greatly on location and on competition with other available grid support resources. In this summary, ten different value streams related to hydropower are described. These fell into three categories; operational improvements, new technologies, and electricity market opportunities. Of these ten, the study was able to quantify a monetary value in six by applying both present day and future scenarios for operating the electric grid. This study confirmed that hydropower resources across the United States contribute significantly to operation of the grid in terms of energy, capacity, and ancillary services. Many potential improvements to existing hydropower plants were found to be cost-effective. Pumped storage is the most likely form of large new hydro asset expansions in the U.S. however, justifying investments in new pumped storage plants remains very challenging with current electricity market economics. Even over a wide range of possible energy futures, up to 2020, no energy future was found to bring quantifiable revenues sufficient to cover estimated costs of plant construction. Value streams not quantified in this study may provide a different cost-benefit balance and an economic tipping point for hydro. Future studies are essential in the quest to quantify the full potential value. Additional research should consider the value of services provided by advanced storage hydropower and pumped storage at smaller time steps for integration of variable renewable resources, and should include all possible value streams such as capacity value and portfolio benefits i.e.; reducing cycling on traditional generation.

  11. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program's water power research activities. Water power is the nation's largest source of clean, domestic, renewable energy. Harnessing energy from rivers, manmade waterways, and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses can help secure America's energy future. Water power technologies fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower facilities include run-of-the-river, storage, and pumped storage. Most conventional hydropower plants use a diversion structure, such as a dam, to capture water's potential energy via a turbine for electricity generation. Marine and hydrokinetic technologies obtain energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, free-flowing rivers, streams and ocean thermal gradients to generate electricity. The United States has abundant water power resources, enough to meet a large portion of the nation's electricity demand. Conventional hydropower generated 257 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity in 2010 and provides 6-7% of all electricity in the United States. According to preliminary estimates from the Electric Power Resource Institute (EPRI), the United States has additional water power resource potential of more than 85,000 megawatts (MW). This resource potential includes making efficiency upgrades to existing hydroelectric facilities, developing new low-impact facilities, and using abundant marine and hydrokinetic energy resources. EPRI research suggests that ocean wave and in-stream tidal energy production potential is equal to about 10% of present U.S. electricity consumption (about 400 terrawatt-hours per year). The greatest of these resources is wave energy, with the most potential in Hawaii, Alaska, and the Pacific Northwest. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Water Power Program works with industry, universities, other federal agencies, and DOE's national laboratories to promote the development and deployment of technologies capable of generating environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity from the nation's water resources.

  12. Electric Bike Sharing--System Requirements and Operational Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cherry, Christopher; Worley, Stacy; Jordan, David

    2010-08-01

    Bike sharing is an exciting new model of public-private transportation provision that has quickly emerged in the past five years. Technological advances have overcome hurdles of early systems and cities throughout the globe are adopting this model of transportation service. Electric bikes have simultaneously gained popularity in many regions of the world and some have suggested that shared electric bikes could provide an even higher level of service compared to existing systems. There are several challenges that are unique to shared electric bikes: electric-assisted range, recharging protocol, and bike and battery checkout procedures. This paper outlines system requirements to successfully develop and deploy an electric bike sharing system, focusing on system architecture, operational concepts, and battery management. Although there is little empirical evidence, electric bike sharing could be feasible, depending on demand and battery management, and can potentially improve the utility of existing bike sharing systems. Under most documented bike sharing use scenarios, electric bike battery capacity is insufficient for a full day of operation, depending on recharging protocol. Off-board battery management is a promising solution to address this problem. Off-board battery management can also support solar recharging. Future pilot tests will be important and allow empirical evaluation of electric bikesharing system performance. (auth)

  13. Future land use plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-31

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) changing mission, coupled with the need to apply appropriate cleanup standards for current and future environmental restoration, prompted the need for a process to determine preferred Future Land Uses for DOE-owned sites. DOE began the ``Future Land Use`` initiative in 1994 to ensure that its cleanup efforts reflect the surrounding communities` interests in future land use. This plan presents the results of a study of stakeholder-preferred future land uses for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), located in central Long Island, New York. The plan gives the Laboratory`s view of its future development over the next 20 years, as well as land uses preferred by the community were BNL ever to cease operations as a national laboratory (the post-BNL scenario). The plan provides an overview of the physical features of the site including its history, topography, geology/hydrogeology, biological inventory, floodplains, wetlands, climate, and atmosphere. Utility systems and current environmental operations are described including waste management, waste water treatment, hazardous waste management, refuse disposal and ground water management. To complement the physical descriptions of the site, demographics are discussed, including overviews of the surrounding areas, laboratory population, and economic and non-economic impacts.

  14. Electric Vehicle Handbook: Electrical Contractors (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Electrical Contractors Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Electrical Contractors 2 Table of Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PEV Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Charging Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Installing and Maintaining EVSE . . . . . . . 9 EVSE Training for Electrical Contractors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Electrifying the Future . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Clean Cities Helps Deploy PEV

  15. future grid | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dc(266) Contributor 31 October, 2014 - 10:58 What do you know about the grid? black out brown out bulk power system electricity grid future grid grid history security Smart Grid...

  16. U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  17. Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies Revolution Now: The ... of their total market (e.g. electricity, cars and lighting), they are growing rapidly. ...

  18. Assessment of Future Vehicle Transportation Options and their...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Vehicle Transportation Options and Their Impact on the Electric Grid January 10, 2010 New Analysis of Alternative Transportation Technologies 3 What's New? * Additional ...

  19. Electric power annual 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-06

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

  20. HVDC transmission: a path to the future?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teichler, Stephen L.; Levitine, Ilia

    2010-05-15

    Direct current transmission has been the poor stepchild of the U.S. electric industry. Although early-generation plants were based on DC technology, it was soon deemed uneconomical to transmit electricity over long distances, but it now appears poised for a change. Both the increasing technical potential and changing economics of HVDC lines promise a growing role in the future. (author)

  1. A small RTG for future planetary missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cockfield, R.D.; Kull, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    A design study was conducted to characterize conceptual designs for a small Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG), one that might be suitable for future planetary missions. Conceptual design configurations were derived from the General Purpose Heat Source{emdash}RTG (GPHS-RTG), with the design goal of providing 70 watts of electrical power at the end of a ten year mission life. Design improvements for mass minimization were evaluated, considering also the technical risk of the corresponding engineering development required. It was concluded that an RTG mass of 18 kg could be achieved with moderate risk. Further studies are recommended to define in detail the testing and other development activities that would be required to bring the conceptual design for such an RTG to reality. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Electric chiller handbook. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    Electric chillers have dominated the market for large commercial cooling systems due to their history of reliable, economical operation. The phaseout of CFCs and deregulation of the utility industry are two factors that significantly impact the chiller market. The CFC phaseout is resulting in the upgrading or replacement of thousands of electric chillers nationwide. In a deregulated environment, utilities are finding increasing need to provide services that can win and retain new customers. Utility representatives need current information on applying and selecting cost-effective chiller systems. The objective of this report was to develop a comprehensive handbook that helps utility technical and marketing staff, their customers, and design professionals evaluate and select the best options for chilled-water systems in commercial buildings. Investigators used a variety of industry data sources to develop market-share information for electric and gas chiller systems and to determine applications according to building age, type, and region. Discussions with chiller manufacturers provided information on product availability, performance, and ownership cost. Using EPRI`s COMTECH software, investigators performed comprehensive cost analyses for placement of large and small chillers in three representative cities. Case studies of actual installations support these analyses. Electric Chiller Handbook provides a single source of current information on all major issues associated with chiller selection and application. Key issues include chiller availability and markets, rated performance, future viability of various refrigerant options, the cost-effectiveness of alternative chillers, and chilled-water system optimization. The Handbook also describes available hardware, outlines the features and costs of gas-fired competitive systems, and provides methods and comparisons of life-cycle costing of various chiller system options. Analyses of chiller features and economics show that electric chillers are preferable to gas chillers in the large majority of applications, consistent with current market trends. Furthermore, today`s chillers offer a wide range of efficiencies and refrigerant options to serve cooling system needs for the 20-year lifetime of the chiller. Finally, new higher-efficiency models of electric chillers offer very attractive paybacks.

  3. Electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

  4. Options for Kentucky's Energy Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Demick

    2012-11-01

    Three important imperatives are being pursued by the Commonwealth of Kentucky: ? Developing a viable economic future for the highly trained and experienced workforce and for the Paducah area that today supports, and is supported by, the operations of the US Department of Energys (DOEs) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Currently, the PGDP is scheduled to be taken out of service in May, 2013. ? Restructuring the economic future for Kentuckys most abundant indigenous resource and an important industry the extraction and utilization of coal. The future of coal is being challenged by evolving and increasing requirements for its extraction and use, primarily from the perspective of environmental restrictions. Further, it is important that the economic value derived from this important resource for the Commonwealth, its people and its economy is commensurate with the risks involved. Over 70% of the extracted coal is exported from the Commonwealth and hence not used to directly expand the Commonwealths economy beyond the severance taxes on coal production. ? Ensuring a viable energy future for Kentucky to guarantee a continued reliable and affordable source of energy for its industries and people. Today, over 90% of Kentuckys electricity is generated by burning coal with a delivered electric power price that is among the lowest in the United States. Anticipated increased environmental requirements necessitate looking at alternative forms of energy production, and in particular electricity generation.

  5. Texas - RRC District 9 Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 9 Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

  6. Texas - RRC District 10 Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 10 Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

  7. Texas - RRC District 8 Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 8 Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

  8. Texas - RRC District 5 Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 5 Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  9. Texas - RRC District 6 Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 6 Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  10. Texas - RRC District 1 Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 1 Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  11. The future of energy gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, D.G.

    1995-04-01

    Natural gas, mainly methane, produces lower CO {sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x}, SO {sub 2} and particulate emissions than either oil or coal; thus further substitutions of methane for these fuels could help mitigate air pollution. Methane is, however, a potent greenhouse gas and the domestication of ruminants, cultivation of rice, mining of coal, drilling for oil, and transportation of natural gas have all contributed to a doubling of the amount of atmospheric methane since 1800. Today nearly 300,000 wells yearly produce each 21 trillion cubic feet of methane. Known reserves suggest about a 10 year supply at the above rates of recovery; and the potential for undiscovered resources is obscured by uncertainty involving price, new technologies, and environmental restrictions stemming from the need to drill an enormous number of wells, many in ecologically sensitive areas. The atomic simplicity of methane, composed of one carbon and four hydrogen atoms, may mask the complexity of this, the most basic of organic molecules. Within the Earth, methane is produced through thermochemical alteration of organic materials, and by biochemical reactions mediated by metabolic processes of archaebacteria; some methane may even be primordial, a residue of planetary accretion. Methane is known to exist in the mantle and lower crust. Near the Earth`s surface, methane occurs in enormous oil and/or gas reservoirs in rock, and is absorbed in coal, dissolved in water, and trapped in a latticework of ice-like material called gas hydrate. Methane also occurs in smaller volumes in landfills, rice paddies, termite complexes, ruminants, and even many humans. As an energy source, methane accounts for roughly 25 percent of current U.S. consumption, but its full energy potential is controversial. Methane is touted by some as a viable bridge to future energy systems, fueled by the sun and uranium and carried by electricity and hydrogen.

  12. Electricity | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sources » Electricity Electricity March 17, 2016 Dr. Imre Gyuk -- pictured speaking at a Green Mountain Power energy storage event -- was recently recognized for his game-changing work in energy storage. | Photo courtesy of the Clean Energy States Alliance. 10 Questions with Energy Storage Expert Imre Gyuk Dr. Imre Gyuk, recently awarded the NAATBatt Lifetime Achievement Award for Energy Storage, talks about what energy storage is, how the energy storage field has changed in the last 10 years

  13. Modeling renewable portfolio standards for the annual energy outlook 1998 - electricity market module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. It consists of four submodules: the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) Submodule, the Electricity Fuel Dispatch (EFD) Submodule, the Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP) Submodule, and the Load and Demand-Side Management (LDSM) Submodule. For the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98), the EMM has been modified to represent Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS), which are included in many of the Federal and state proposals for deregulating the electric power industry. A RPS specifies that electricity suppliers must produce a minimum level of generation using renewable technologies. Producers with insufficient renewable generating capacity can either build new plants or purchase {open_quotes}credits{close_quotes} from other suppliers with excess renewable generation. The representation of a RPS involves revisions to the ECP, EFD, and the EFP. The ECP projects capacity additions required to meet the minimum renewable generation levels in future years. The EFD determines the sales and purchases of renewable credits for the current year. The EFP incorporates the cost of building capacity and trading credits into the price of electricity.

  14. Hawaii electric system reliability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Loose, Verne William

    2012-09-01

    This report addresses Hawaii electric system reliability issues; greater emphasis is placed on short-term reliability but resource adequacy is reviewed in reference to electric consumers' views of reliability %E2%80%9Cworth%E2%80%9D and the reserve capacity required to deliver that value. The report begins with a description of the Hawaii electric system to the extent permitted by publicly available data. Electrical engineering literature in the area of electric reliability is researched and briefly reviewed. North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and measures for generation and transmission are reviewed and identified as to their appropriateness for various portions of the electric grid and for application in Hawaii. Analysis of frequency data supplied by the State of Hawaii Public Utilities Commission is presented together with comparison and contrast of performance of each of the systems for two years, 2010 and 2011. Literature tracing the development of reliability economics is reviewed and referenced. A method is explained for integrating system cost with outage cost to determine the optimal resource adequacy given customers' views of the value contributed by reliable electric supply. The report concludes with findings and recommendations for reliability in the State of Hawaii.

  15. 2014 Year-in-Review

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4 Year-in-Review i 2014 YIR May 2015 Year-in-Review: 2014 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy For Further Information This report was prepared by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability under the direction of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary, and Thomas Roston, Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary. Specific questions about this report may be directed to John Ostrich, Office of Electricity

  16. The Future of Automobile Battery Recycling | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Future of Automobile Battery Recycling Title The Future of Automobile Battery Recycling Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2014 Authors Gaines, LL Abstract...

  17. Enabling Future Li-Ion Battery Recycling | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Li-Ion Battery Recycling Title Enabling Future Li-Ion Battery Recycling Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2014 Authors Gaines, LL Abstract Presentation made...

  18. Solar Electric Propulsion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric Propulsion - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  19. Intermediate future forecasting system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gass, S.I.; Murphy, F.H.; Shaw, S.H.

    1983-12-01

    The purposes of the Symposium on the Department of Energy's Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) were: (1) to present to the energy community details of DOE's new energy market model IFFS; and (2) to have an open forum in which IFFS and its major elements could be reviewed and critiqued by external experts. DOE speakers discussed the total system, its software design, and the modeling aspects of oil and gas supply, refineries, electric utilities, coal, and the energy economy. Invited experts critiqued each of these topics and offered suggestions for modifications and improvement. This volume documents the proceedings (papers and discussion) of the Symposium. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each presentation for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  20. Electrical Safety

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Electrical Design Criteria ... of High-Voltage and Low-Current ... as a higher level of authority. Per the Integrated Safety Management model, ...

  1. Electric power annual 1995. Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    This document summarizes pertinent statistics on various aspects of the U.S. electric power industry for the year and includes a graphic presentation. Data is included on electric utility retail sales and revenues, financial statistics, environmental statistics of electric utilities, demand-side management, electric power transactions, and non-utility power producers.

  2. Energy 101: Electric Vehicles | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Vehicles Energy 101: Electric Vehicles January 9, 2012 - 4:22pm Addthis A look at how electric vehicles (EVs) work and what current and future models are doing to cut transit costs, reduce emissions, and strengthen our nation's energy security. John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs While the North American International Auto Show is slated to kick off today in Detroit, and the industry is already abuzz with the latest innovations in electric

  3. Roles of electricity: Electric steelmaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burwell, C.C.

    1986-07-01

    Electric steel production from scrap metal continues to grow both in total quantity and in market share. The economics of electric-steel production in general, and of electric minimills in particular, seem clearly established. The trend towards electric steelmaking provides significant economic and competitive advantages for producers and important overall economic, environmental, and energy advantages for the United States at large. Conversion to electric steelmaking offers up to a 4-to-1 advantage in terms of the overall energy used to produce a ton of steel, and s similar savings in energy cost for the producer. The amount of old scrap used to produce a ton of steel has doubled since 1967 because of the use of electric furnaces.

  4. Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants - Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 0 29 85 Administration

    Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricity Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Electric power plants generating capacity Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of

  5. Electricity production using solar energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demirbas, M.F.

    2007-07-01

    In this study, a solar-powered development project is used to identify whether it is possible to utilize solar technologies in the electricity production sector. Electricity production from solar energy has been found to be a promising method in the future. Concentrated solar energy can be converted to chemical energy via high-temperature endothermic reactions. Coal and biomass can be pyrolyzed or gasified by using concentrated solar radiation for generating power. Conventional energy will not be enough to meet the continuously increasing need for energy in the future. In this case, renewable energy sources will become important. Solar energy is an increasing need for energy in the future. Solar energy is a very important energy source because of its advantages. Instead of a compressor system, which uses electricity, an absorption cooling system, using renewable energy and kinds of waste heat energy, may be used for cooling.

  6. Electric machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi; Reddy, Patel Bhageerath

    2012-07-17

    An interior permanent magnet electric machine is disclosed. The interior permanent magnet electric machine comprises a rotor comprising a plurality of radially placed magnets each having a proximal end and a distal end, wherein each magnet comprises a plurality of magnetic segments and at least one magnetic segment towards the distal end comprises a high resistivity magnetic material.

  7. AVTA: 2010 Electric Vehicles International Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe testing results of the 2010 Electric Vehicles International neighborhood electric vehicle. Neighborhood electric vehicles reach speeds of no more than 35 miles per hour and are only allowed on roads with speed limits of up to 35 miles per hour. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  8. Electric sales and revenue, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-21

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenues, and average revenue. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1990. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the revenue billed for the amount of kilowatthours sold, revenue from income, unemployment and other State and local taxes, energy or demand charges, consumer services charges, environmental surcharges, franchise fees, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  9. Electrical connector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dilliner, Jennifer L.; Baker, Thomas M.; Akasam, Sivaprasad; Hoff, Brian D.

    2006-11-21

    An electrical connector includes a female component having one or more receptacles, a first test receptacle, and a second test receptacle. The electrical connector also includes a male component having one or more terminals configured to engage the one or more receptacles, a first test pin configured to engage the first test receptacle, and a second test pin configured to engage the second test receptacle. The first test receptacle is electrically connected to the second test receptacle, and at least one of the first test pin and the second test pin is shorter in length than the one or more terminals.

  10. Electric Vehicle-Smart Grid Interoperability | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrical Contractors Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Electrical Contractors 2 Table of Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PEV Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Charging Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Installing and Maintaining EVSE . . . . . . . 9 EVSE Training for Electrical Contractors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Electrifying the Future . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Clean Cities Helps Deploy PEV

  11. Texas--RRC District 6 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Texas--RRC District 6 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 ...

  12. Texas--RRC District 5 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Texas--RRC District 5 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 ...

  13. Texas--RRC District 1 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Texas--RRC District 1 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 ...

  14. Texas--RRC District 8 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Texas--RRC District 8 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 ...

  15. Texas--RRC District 9 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Texas--RRC District 9 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 ...

  16. Schneider Electric Video 2 (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bridget McNulty, Electric Vehicle Marketing and Communication: So here in the Schneider Electric Rhode Island office, we've had two dual charging stations for almost two years now, since fall of...

  17. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Electricity Generation Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Rollout - Renewable Electricity Generation Office of Energy Efficiency and ...

  18. Future of the Department of Energy's uranium enrichment enterprise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sewell, P.G.

    1991-11-01

    The national energy strategy (NES) developed at President Bush's direction provides a focus for the US Department of Energy (DOE) future policy and funding initiatives including those of the uranium enrichment enterprise. The NES identifies an important and continuing role for nuclear energy as part of a balanced array of energy sources for meeting US energy needs, especially the growing demand for electricity. For many years, growth in US electricity demand has exhibited a strong correlation with growth in gross national product. NEW projections indicate that the US will need between 190 and 275 GW of additional system capacity by 2010. In order to unable nuclear power to help meet this need, the NEW establishes basic objectives for nuclear power. These objectives are to have a first order of a new nuclear power plant by 1995 and to have such a plant operational by 2000. The expansion of nuclear power anticipated in the NEW affirms a continuing need for a strong domestic uranium enrichment services supply capability. In terms of the future outlook for uranium enrichment, the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) technology continues to hold great promise for commercial application. If AVLIS efforts are successful, significant financial benefits from the commercial use of AVLIS will be realized by customers and the AVLIS deployment entity by approximately the year 2000 and thereafter.

  19. Electrical Safety

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Fig. 1-1. Flow down of Electrical AHJ and worker responsibility. 3 DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 2.0 ... When equipment contains storage batteries, workers should be protected from the various ...

  20. Electric sales, revenue, and bills 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-15

    This document contains two sections. The Background'' section provides a discussion on (1) how average revenue per kilowatthour and typical net monthly bills differ; (2) the classes of electric utility ownership; and, (3) the classes of service or sectors. The Year at a Glance'' section provides a summary of pertinent statistics during the year related to sales of electricity to ultimate consumers, electric revenue from those sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. 5 figs., 22 tabs.

  1. Electric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foster, Jr., John S.; Wilson, James R.; McDonald, Jr., Charles A.

    1983-01-01

    1. In an electrical energy generator, the combination comprising a first elongated annular electrical current conductor having at least one bare surface extending longitudinally and facing radially inwards therein, a second elongated annular electrical current conductor disposed coaxially within said first conductor and having an outer bare surface area extending longitudinally and facing said bare surface of said first conductor, the contiguous coaxial areas of said first and second conductors defining an inductive element, means for applying an electrical current to at least one of said conductors for generating a magnetic field encompassing said inductive element, and explosive charge means disposed concentrically with respect to said conductors including at least the area of said inductive element, said explosive charge means including means disposed to initiate an explosive wave front in said explosive advancing longitudinally along said inductive element, said wave front being effective to progressively deform at least one of said conductors to bring said bare surfaces thereof into electrically conductive contact to progressively reduce the inductance of the inductive element defined by said conductors and transferring explosive energy to said magnetic field effective to generate an electrical potential between undeformed portions of said conductors ahead of said explosive wave front.

  2. NREL Releases Report on Testing Electric Vehicles to Optimize...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    designers and utilities to evaluate the performance of various EVs and hybrids to optimize how they connect with electric utility grids today - and "smart grids" in the future. ...

  3. NREL's Enhanced Scenario Framework for Electricity Sector Analysis...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL's Enhanced Scenario Framework for Electricity Sector Analysis Provides Cost, ... October 19, 2015 Projections of potential energy futures are highly dependent on the ...

  4. Communication and Control of Electric Vehicles Supporting Renewables: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markel, T.; Kuss, M.; Denholm, P.

    2009-08-01

    Discusses the technologies needed, potential scenarios, limitations, and opportunities for using grid-connected renewable energy to fuel the electric vehicles of the future.

  5. Comments of Oncor Electric Delivery Company LLC | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Broadband Plan by Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to ... More Documents & Publications Current Communications Needs Future Communications Needs NBP ...

  6. Workforce Training Case Study Workforce Training for the Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Preparing the U.S. Foundation for Future Electric Energy Systems: A Strong Power and Energy Engineering Workforce. April 2009. < http:www.ieee- pes.org...

  7. Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2013-01-01

    The current and future projected cost and performance characteristics of new electric generating capacity are a critical input into the development of energy projections and analyses.

  8. Solar Power and the Electric Grid, Energy Analysis (Fact Sheet...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particularly solar power, and how they will contribute to the future electricity system. ... Utility-scale solar and wind power plants are conceptually similar to conventional ...

  9. General Electric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Electric Place: Fairfield, Connecticut Zip: 06828 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Year Founded: 1892 Website: www.ge.com Coordinates: 41.1758333, -73.2719444...

  10. electricity grid | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dc(266) Contributor 31 October, 2014 - 10:58 What do you know about the grid? black out brown out bulk power system electricity grid future grid grid history security Smart Grid...

  11. Future Sulfur Dioxide Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Pitcher, Hugh M.; Wigley, Tom M.

    2005-12-01

    The importance of sulfur dioxide emissions for climate change is now established, although substantial uncertainties remain. This paper presents projections for future sulfur dioxide emissions using the MiniCAM integrated assessment model. A new income-based parameterization for future sulfur dioxide emissions controls is developed based on purchasing power parity (PPP) income estimates and historical trends related to the implementation of sulfur emissions limitations. This parameterization is then used to produce sulfur dioxide emissions trajectories for the set of scenarios developed for the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES). We use the SRES methodology to produce harmonized SRES scenarios using the latest version of the MiniCAM model. The implications, and requirements, for IA modeling of sulfur dioxide emissions are discussed. We find that sulfur emissions eventually decline over the next century under a wide set of assumptions. These emission reductions result from a combination of emission controls, the adoption of advanced electric technologies, and a shift away from the direct end use of coal with increasing income levels. Only under a scenario where incomes in developing regions increase slowly do global emission levels remain at close to present levels over the next century. Under a climate policy that limits emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide emissions fall in a relatively narrow range. In all cases, the relative climatic effect of sulfur dioxide emissions decreases dramatically to a point where sulfur dioxide is only a minor component of climate forcing by the end of the century. Ecological effects of sulfur dioxide, however, could be significant in some developing regions for many decades to come.

  12. Annual Public Electric Utility data - EIA-412 data file

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    412 Archive Data (The EIA-412 survey has been terminated.) The EIA-412 "Annual Electric Industry Financial Report" collected information such as income statements, balance sheets, sales and purchases, and transmission line data. Form EIA-412 data Schedules Year 2 Electric Balance Sheet 3 Electric Income Statement 4 Electric Plant 5 Taxes, Tax Equivalents, Contributions, and Services During Year 6 Sales of Electricity for Resale (Account 447) 7 Electric Operation and Maintenance

  13. The Future of Energy from Nuclear Fission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Son H.; Taiwo, Temitope

    2013-04-13

    Nuclear energy is an important part of our current global energy system, and contributes to supplying the significant demand for electricity for many nations around the world. There are 433 commercial nuclear power reactors operating in 30 countries with an installed capacity of 367 GWe as of October 2011 (IAEA PRIS, 2011). Nuclear electricity generation totaled 2630 TWh in 2010 representing 14% the worlds electricity generation. The top five countries of total installed nuclear capacity are the US, France, Japan, Russia and South Korea at 102, 63, 45, 24, and 21 GWe, respectively (WNA, 2012a). The nuclear capacity of these five countries represents more than half, 68%, of the total global nuclear capacity. The role of nuclear power in the global energy system today has been motivated by several factors including the growing demand for electric power, the regional availability of fossil resources and energy security concerns, and the relative competitiveness of nuclear power as a source of base-load electricity. There is additional motivation for the use of nuclear power because it does not produce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or local air pollutants during its operation and contributes to low levels of emissions throughout the lifecycle of the nuclear energy system (Beerten, J. et. al., 2009). Energy from nuclear fission primarily in the form of electric power and potentially as a source of industrial heat could play a greater role for meeting the long-term growing demand for energy worldwide while addressing the concern for climate change from rising GHG emissions. However, the nature of nuclear fission as a tremendously compact and dense form of energy production with associated high concentrations of radioactive materials has particular and unique challenges as well as benefits. These challenges include not only the safety and cost of nuclear reactors, but proliferation concerns, safeguard and storage of nuclear materials associated with nuclear fuel cycles. In March of 2011, an unprecedented earthquake of 9 magnitude and ensuing tsunami off the east coast of Japan caused a severe nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan (Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet, 2011). The severity of the nuclear accident in Japan has brought about a reinvestigation of nuclear energy policy and deployment activities for many nations around the world, most notably in Japan and Germany (BBC, 2011; Reuter, 2011). The response to the accident has been mixed and its full impact may not be realized for many years to come. The nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan has not directly affected the significant on-going nuclear deployment activities in many countries. China, Russia, India, and South Korea, as well as others, are continuing with their deployment plans. As of October 2011, China had the most reactors under construction at 27, while Russia, India, and South Korea had 11, 6, and 5 reactors under construction, respectively (IAEA PRIS, 2011). Ten other nations have one or two reactors currently under construction. Many more reactors are planned for future deployment in China, Russia, and India, as well as in the US. Based on the World Nuclear Associations data, the realization of Chinas deployment plan implies that China will surpass the US in total nuclear capacity some time in the future.

  14. Electricity Portfolio Simulation Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-09-01

    Stakeholders often have competing interests when selecting or planning new power plants. The purpose of developing this preliminary Electricity Portfolio Simulation Model (EPSim) is to provide a first cut, dynamic methodology and approach to this problem, that can subsequently be refined and validated, that may help energy planners, policy makers, and energy students better understand the tradeoffs associated with competing electricity portfolios. EPSim allows the user to explore competing electricity portfolios annually from 2002 tomore » 2025 in terms of five different criteria: cost, environmental impacts, energy dependence, health and safety, and sustainability. Four additional criteria (infrastructure vulnerability, service limitations, policy needs and science and technology needs) may be added in future versions of the model. Using an analytic hierarchy process (AHP) approach, users or groups of users apply weights to each of the criteria. The default energy assumptions of the model mimic Department of Energy’s (DOE) electricity portfolio to 2025 (EIA, 2005). At any time, the user can compare alternative portfolios to this reference case portfolio.« less

  15. Impact of Nuclear Energy Futures on Advanced Fuel Cycle Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent W. Dixon; Steven J. Piet

    2004-10-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act requires the Secretary of Energy to inform Congress before 2010 on the need for a second geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel. By that time, the spent fuel discharged from current commercial reactors will exceed the statutory limit of the first repository (63,000 MTiHM commercial, 7,000 MT non-commercial). There are several approaches to eliminate the need for another repository in this century. This paper presents a high-level analysis of these spent fuel management options in the context of a full range of possible nuclear energy futures. The analysis indicates the best option to implement varies depending on the nuclear energy future selected. The first step in understanding the need for different spent fuel management approaches is to understand the size of potential spent fuel inventories. A full range of potential futures for domestic commercial nuclear energy is considered. These energy futures are as follows: 1. Existing License Completion - Based on existing spent fuel inventories plus extrapolation of future plant-by-plant discharges until the end of each operating license, including known license extensions. 2. Extended License Completion - Based on existing spent fuel inventories plus a plant-by-plant extrapolation of future discharges assuming on all operating plants having one 20-year extension. 3. Continuing Level Energy Generation - Based on extension of the current ~100 GWe installed commercial base and average spent fuel discharge of 2100 MT/yr through the year 2100. 4. Continuing Market Share Generation Based on a 1.8% compounded growth of the electricity market through the year 2100, matched by growing nuclear capacity and associated spent fuel discharge. 5. Growing Market Share Generation - Extension of current nuclear capacity and associated spent fuel discharge through 2100 with 3.2% growth representing 1.5% market growth (all energy, not just electricity) and 1.7% share growth. Share growth results in tripling market share by 2100 from the current 8.4% to 25%, equivalent to continuing the average market growth of last 50 years for an additional 100 years. Five primary spent fuel management strategies are assessed against each of the energy futures to determine the number of geological repositories needed and how the first repository would be used. The geological repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has the physical potential to accommodate all the spent fuel that will be generated by the current fleet of domestic commercial nuclear reactors, even with license extensions. If new nuclear plants are built in the future as replacements or additions, the United States will need to adopt spent fuel treatment to extend the life of the repository. Should a significant number of new nuclear plants be built, advanced fuel recycling will be needed to fully manage the spent fuel within a single repository. The analysis also considers the timeframe for most efficient implementation of new spent fuel management strategies. The mix of unprocessed spent fuel and processed high level waste in Yucca Mountain varies with each future and strategy. Either recycling must start before there is too much unprocessed waste emplaced or unprocessed waste will have to be retrieved later with corresponding costs. For each case, the latest date to implement reprocessing without subsequent retrieval is determined.

  16. EIS-0394: FutureGen Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The EIS provides information about the potential environmental impacts of the DOE's proposal to provide federal funding to FutureGen Alliance, Inc. for the FutureGen Project. The project would include the planning, design, construction, and operation by the Alliance of a coal-fueled electric power and hydrogen gas production plant integrated with carbon dioxide capture and geologic sequestration of the captured gas.

  17. Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Will County, Illinois officials yesterday formally broke ground on a new $7 million project (that includes $1 million of Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant funds) to turn methane gas from the Prairie View Landfill into electricity in a partnership with Waste Management. Will County will receive revenue from the sale of the gas created from decomposing garbage which will be harnessed and converted to generate 4.8 megawatts of green electrical power and used to power up to 8,000 homes. The future revenue generated from the sale of the gas and the sale of the electricity could reach $1 million annually.

  18. FutureGen.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Erik Turner Summer 2004 Technical Career Intern Program The Pennsylvania State University FutureGen And the importance of project management Outline * FutureGen technologies * ...

  19. Living a Sustainable Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Living a Sustainable Future Living a Sustainable Future August 1, 2013 Biomass to fuel project The Laboratory's biomass team is working to solve the energy crisis through...

  20. OSCARS-Future-Tech

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OSCARS and Future Tech Engineering Services The Network OSCARS How It Works Who's Using OSCARS? OSCARS and Future Tech OSCARS Standard and Open Grid Forum OSCARS Developers...

  1. Nuclear and Particle Futures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear and Particle Futures Nuclear and Particle Futures The Lab's four Science Pillars harness our scientific capabilities for national security solutions. Contacts Pillar ...

  2. Electric power monthly, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the U.S., Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. This April 1994 issue contains 1993 year-end data and data through January 1994.

  3. Electrical, electromagnetic, and magnetotelluric methods | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    poor until the last several years when application of numerical techniques using computers permitted forward and inverse solutions to electrical boundary value problems in two...

  4. Case Study - National Rural Electric Cooperative Association...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... the next five years," says Mark Stallons, President and CEO of Owen Electric Cooperative in Owenton, KY. "These upgrades should help delay those decisions by reducing demand." ...

  5. Lodi Electric Utility- PV Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: Lodi Electric Utility accepted applications for program year 2015 from January 2 - 30, 2015. The program is fully subscribed for 2015.  

  6. Electrically powered hand tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, Kurt S.; Reed, Teddy R.

    2007-01-16

    An electrically powered hand tool is described and which includes a three phase electrical motor having a plurality of poles; an electrical motor drive electrically coupled with the three phase electrical motor; and a source of electrical power which is converted to greater than about 208 volts three-phase and which is electrically coupled with the electrical motor drive.

  7. Fiscal year 1986 Department of Energy Authorization (uranium enrichment and electric energy systems, energy storage and small-scale hydropower programs). Volume VI. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Energy Research and Production of the Committee on Science and Technology, US House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, February 28; March 5, 7, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Volume VI of the hearing record covers three days of testimony on the future of US uranium enrichment and on programs involving electric power and energy storage. There were four areas of concern about uranium enrichment: the choice between atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) and the advanced gas centrifuge (AGC) technologies, cost-effective operation of gaseous diffusion plants, plans for a gas centrifuge enrichment plant, and how the DOE will make its decision. The witnesses represented major government contractors, research laboratories, and energy suppliers. The discussion on the third day focused on the impact of reductions in funding for electric energy systems and energy storage and a small budget increase to encourage small hydropower technology transfer to the private sector. Two appendices with additional statements and correspondence follow the testimony of 17 witnesses.

  8. Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, A.; Zinaman, O.; Logan, J.

    2012-12-01

    Use of both natural gas and renewable energy has grown significantly in recent years. Both forms of energy have been touted as key elements of a transition to a cleaner and more secure energy future, but much of the current discourse considers each in isolation or concentrates on the competitive impacts of one on the other. This paper attempts, instead, to explore potential synergies of natural gas and renewable energy in the U.S. electric power and transportation sectors.

  9. Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Judy; DeForest, Nicholas; Kiliccote, Sila; Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Donadee, Jon

    2011-05-15

    Residential customers in California's Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) territory have seen several electricity rate structure changes in the past decade. This poster: examines the history of the residential pricing structure and key milestones; summarizes and analyzes the usage between 2006 and 2009 for different baseline/climate areas; discusses the residential electricity Smart Meter roll out; and compares sample bills for customers in two climates under the current pricing structure and also the future time of use (TOU) structure.

  10. Electric sales and revenue: 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1993. Operating revenue includes energy charges, demand charges, consumer service charges, environmental surcharges, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. The revenue does not include taxes, such as sales and excise taxes, that are assessed on the consumer and collected through the utility. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. Because electric rates vary based on energy usage, average revenue per kilowatthour are affected by changes in the volume of sales. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  11. A systems model and potential leverage points for base load electric generating options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brownson, D.A.; Hanson, D.J.; Price, L.G.; Sebo, D.E.

    1993-09-01

    The mission and structure of electric utilities may change significantly to meet the challenges on the next several decades. In addition, providing electrical energy in an environmentally responsible manner will continue to be a major challenge. The methods of supplying electrical power may change dramatically in the future as utilities search for ways to improve the availability and reliability of electrical power systems. The role of large, base load generating capacity to supply the bulk of a utility`s electrical power is evolving, but it will continue to be important for many years to come. The objective of this study is to examine the systems structure of five base load capacity options available to a utility and identify areas where technological improvements could produce significant changes in their systems. These improvements would enhance the likelihood that these options would be selected for providing future electrical capacity. Technology improvements are identified and discussed, but it was beyond the scope of this work to develop strategies for specific Idaho National Engineering Laboratory involvement.

  12. U.S. Department of Energy Charter Electricity Advisory Committee

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Charter Electricity Advisory Committee 1. Committee's Official Designation: Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) 2. Committee's Obiectives and Scope of Activities and Duties: The EAC will conduct the following activities: A. Advise on electricity reliability, security and policy issues of concern to the Department of Energy. B. Periodically review and make recommendations on DOE electricity programs and initiatives, including electricity-related R&D programs. C. Advise on current and future

  13. PROJECT PROFILE: Electric Power Research Institute | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Electric Power Research Institute PROJECT PROFILE: Electric Power Research Institute Project Name: Leveraging Industry Research to Educate a Future Electric Grid Workforce in the Western U.S. Funding Opportunity: Solar Training and Education for Professionals (STEP) SunShot Subprogram: Soft Costs Location: Knoxville, TN SunShot Award Amount: $1,000,000 Awardee Cost Share: $250,000 The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) along with university, utility, and electric industry partners

  14. Fact #796: September 9, 2013 Electric Vehicle and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales History

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have been available in the U.S. in limited numbers for many years. The introduction of the Nissan Leaf and Chevrolet Volt at the...

  15. Texas--RRC District 8A Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Texas--RRC District 8A Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 ...

  16. Texas--RRC District 7B Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Texas--RRC District 7B Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 ...

  17. Texas--RRC District 7C Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Texas--RRC District 7C Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 ...

  18. Union Training Future Electricians in Solar Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Electricians in Indiana believe solar power is the future, and they are preparing for it. The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 725 (IBEW 725) in Terre Haute, Ind., purchased 60 solar panels and plans to train its members in solar installation.

  19. Active stewardship: sustainable future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental stewardship commitment Environmental stewardship stories Better Electric Grids Power grid efficiency Protecting power grids Smart grid powers community Greenhouse ...

  20. Water for future Mars astronauts?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water for future Mars astronauts? Water for future Mars astronauts? Within its first three months on Mars, NASA's Curiosity Rover saw a surprising diversity of soils and sediments along a half-kilometer route that tell a complex story about the gradual desiccation of the Red Planet. September 26, 2013 This image shows two areas on Mars in a location named Rocknest that were scooped out by the Curiosity Rover last year. Researchers took samples of the areas to determine whether they were wetter

  1. Rising to the Challenge: Innovating toward our Clean Energy Future...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rising to the Challenge: Innovating toward our Clean Energy Future Rising to the Challenge: ... The Chinese are on pace to get nearly 20% of their electricity from renewables by 2020 ...

  2. COLLOQUIUM: Dawn, the Asteroid Redirect Mission, and the Future...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 9, 2015, 2:00pm to 3:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Dawn, the Asteroid Redirect Mission, and the Future of Solar Electric Propulsion Dr. John Brophy NASA Jet ...

  3. Climate mitigation’s impact on global and regional electric power sector water use in the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan

    2013-08-05

    Over the course of this coming century, global electricity use is expected to grow at least five fold and if stringent greenhouse gas emissions controls are in place the growth could be more than seven fold from current levels. Given that the electric power sector represents the second largest anthropogenic use of water and given growing concerns about the nature and extent of future water scarcity driven by population growth and a changing climate, significant concern has been expressed about the electricity sector’s use of water going forward. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that an often overlooked but absolutely critical issue that needs to be taken into account in discussions about the sustainability of the electric sector’s water use going forward is the tremendous turn over in electricity capital stock that will occur over the course of this century; i.e., in the scenarios examined here more than 80% of global electricity production in the year 2050 is from facilities that have not yet been built. The authors show that because of the large scale changes in the global electricity system, the water withdrawal intensity of electricity production is likely to drop precipitously with the result being relatively constant water withdrawals over the course of the century even in the face of the large growth in electricity usage. The ability to cost effectively reduce the water intensity of power plants with carbon dioxide capture and storage systems in particular is key to constraining overall global water use.

  4. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics,...

  5. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Contact Information and Staff The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. ...

  6. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Information and Staff The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S....

  7. FutureGen: Stepping-Stone to Sustainable Fossil-Fuel Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitney, S.E.

    2006-11-01

    This presentation will highlight the U.S. Department of Energy's FutureGen Initiative. The nearly $1 billion government-industry project is a stepping-stone toward future coal-fired power plants that will produce hydrogen and electricity with zero-emissions, including carbon dioxide. The 275-megawatt FutureGen plant will initiate operations around 2012 and employ advanced coal gasification technology integrated with combined cycle electricity generation, hydrogen production, and carbon capture and sequestration. The initiative is a response to a presidential directive to develop a hydrogen economy by drawing upon the best scientific research to address the issue of global climate change. The FutureGen plant will be based on cutting-edge power generation technology as well as advanced carbon capture and sequestration systems. The centerpiece of the project will be coal gasification technology that can eliminate common air pollutants such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides and convert them to useable by-products. Gasification will convert coal into a highly enriched hydrogen gas, which can be burned much more cleanly than directly burning the coal itself. Alternatively, the hydrogen can be used in a fuel cell to produce ultra-clean electricity, or fed to a refinery to help upgrade petroleum products. Carbon sequestration will also be a key feature that will set the Futuregen plant apart from other electric power plant projects. The initial goal will be to capture 90 percent of the plant's carbon dioxide, but capture of nearly 100 percent may be possible with advanced technologies. Once captured, the carbon dioxide will be injected as a compressed fluid deep underground, perhaps into saline reservoirs. It could even be injected into oil or gas reservoirs, or into unmineable coal seams, to enhance petroleum or coalbed methane recovery. The ultimate goal for the FutureGen plant is to show how new technology can eliminate environmental concerns over the future use of coal--the most abundant fossil fuel in the United States with supplies projected to last 250 years. FutureGen's co-production of power and hydrogen will also serve as a stepping-stone to an environmentally sustainable energy future.

  8. Coal: America's energy future. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-03-15

    Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman requested the National Coal Council in April 2005 a report identifying the challenges and opportunities of more fully exploring the USA's domestic coal resources to meet the nations' future energy needs. This resultant report addresses the Secretary's request in the context of the President's focus, with eight findings and recommendations that would use technology to leverage the USA's extensive coal assets and reduce dependence on imported energy. Volume I outlines these findings and recommendations. Volume II provides technical data and case histories to support the findings and recommendations. Chapter headings of Volume I are: Coal-to-Liquids to Produce 2.6 MMbbl/d; Coal-to-Natural Gas to Produce 4.0 Tcf Per Year; Coal-to-Clean Electricity; Coal to Produce Ethanol; Coal-to-Hydrogen; Enhanced Oil and Gas (Coalbed Methane); Recovery as Carbon Management Strategies; Delineate U.S. Coal Reserves and Transportation Constraints as Part of an Effort to Maximize U.S. Coal Production; and Penn State Study, 'Economic Benefits of Coal Conversion Investments'.

  9. Solar Power and the Electric Grid, Energy Analysis (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-03-01

    In today's electricity generation system, different resources make different contributions to the electricity grid. This fact sheet illustrates the roles of distributed and centralized renewable energy technologies, particularly solar power, and how they will contribute to the future electricity system. The advantages of a diversified mix of power generation systems are highlighted.

  10. A model for IPP sales to electric utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, G.L.; Anderson, R.W.

    1996-11-01

    This paper shows several constraints that an unregulated plant would encounter. Florida Power Corporation has built a plant that has the characteristics of an IPP operating in the future deregulated electricity market. This plant, the University of Florida Cogeneration Plant undergoes the same conditions experienced in an IPP selling energy to the electric utilities when its contractual electric customer was unable to take the energy. It is a model of the future deregulated IPP.

  11. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Phil Haupt Electric | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Phil Haupt Electric Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Phil Haupt Electric Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Phil Haupt Electric Joined the Challenge: March 2014 Headquarters: Roseville, CA Charging Location: Roseville, CA Domestic Employees: 5 Phil Haupt Electric has more than 28 years of experience in the electrical industry. The company demonstrated its commitment to sustainability by adding a PEV as the company vehicle in (INSERT YEAR) and encouraging its employees to adopt

  12. Financial statistics of major US publicly owned electric utilities 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-15

    This publication presents 5 years (1990--94) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented. Composite tables present: Aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, financial indicators, electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, and operating revenue, and electric energy account data.

  13. Electrical receptacle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leong, Robert

    1993-01-01

    The invention is a receptacle for a three prong electrical plug which has either a tubular or U-shaped grounding prong. The inventive receptacle has a grounding prong socket which is sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having two ridges to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket. The two ridges are made to prevent the socket from expanding when either the U-shaped grounding prong or the tubular grounding prong is inserted.

  14. Electrical receptacle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leong, R.

    1993-06-22

    The invention is a receptacle for a three prong electrical plug which has either a tubular or U-shaped grounding prong. The inventive receptacle has a grounding prong socket which is sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having two ridges to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket. The two ridges are made to prevent the socket from expanding when either the U-shaped grounding prong or the tubular grounding prong is inserted.

  15. Wireless Power Transfer for Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scudiere, Matthew B; McKeever, John W

    2011-01-01

    As Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicles (EVs and HEVs) become more prevalent, there is a need to change the power source from gasoline on the vehicle to electricity from the grid in order to mitigate requirements for onboard energy storage (battery weight) as well as to reduce dependency on oil by increasing dependency on the grid (our coal, gas, and renewable energy instead of their oil). Traditional systems for trains and buses rely on physical contact to transfer electrical energy to vehicles in motion. Until recently, conventional magnetically coupled systems required a gap of less than a centimeter. This is not practical for vehicles of the future.

  16. Planning for the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesh, Pamela

    2009-06-15

    Four changes to integrated resource planning could significantly improve alignment between future utility spending and the forces and changes that are upending past preconceptions of how to predict future load. (author)

  17. Keck Futures Initiative

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Complex Systems Conference, November 12 - 15, 2008 Challa Kumar(second from left) was invited to attend 1st National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Complex Systems Conference

  18. Create a Sustainable Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Create a Sustainable Future Image of river edge with text overlay of 'How does LANL accomplish future stewardship of the natural and historical resources?' We sample to detect any...

  19. Wind Generation in the Future Competitive California Power Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sezgen, O.; Marnay, C.; Bretz, S.

    1998-03-01

    The goal of this work is to develop improved methods for assessing the viability of wind generation in competitive electricity markets. The viability of a limited number of possible wind sites is assessed using a geographic information system (GIS) to determine the cost of development, and Elfin, an electric utility production costing and capacity expansion model, to estimate the possible revenues and profits of wind farms at the sites. This approach improves on a simple profitability calculation by using a site-specific development cost calculation and by taking the effect of time varying market prices on revenues into account. The first component of the work is to develop data characterizing wind resources suitable for use in production costing and capacity expansion models, such as Elfin, that are capable of simulating competitive electricity markets. An improved representation of California wind resources is built, using information collected by the California Energy Commission (CE C) in previous site evaluations, and by using a GIS approach to estimating development costs at 36 specific sites. These sites, which have been identified as favorable for wind development, are placed on Digital Elevation Maps (DEMs) and development costs are calculated based on distances to roads and transmission lines. GIS is also used to develop the potential capacity at each site by making use of the physical characteristics of the terrain, such as ridge lengths. In the second part of the effort, using a previously developed algorithm for simulating competitive entry to the California electricity market, the Elfin model is used to gauge the viability of wind farms at the 36 sites. The results of this exercise are forecasts of profitable development levels at each site and the effects of these developments on the electricity system as a whole. Under best guess assumptions, including prohibition of new nuclear and coal capacity, moderate increase in gas prices and some decline in renewable capital costs, about 7.35 GW of the 10 GW potential capacity at the 36 specific sites is profitably developed and 62 TWh of electricity produced per annum by the year 2030. Most of the development happens during the earlier years of the forecast. Sensitivity of these results to future gas price scenarios is also presented. This study also demonstrates that an analysis based on a simple levelized profitability calculation approach does not sufficiently capture the implications of time varying prices in a competitive market.

  20. Expectations models of electric utilities' forecasts: a case study of econometric estimation with influential data points

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vellutini, R. de A.S.; Mount, T.D.

    1983-01-01

    This study develops an econometric model for explaining how electric utilities revise their forecasts of future electricity demand each year. The model specification is developed from the adaptive expectations hypothesis and it relates forecasted growth rates to actual lagged growth rates of electricity demand. Unlike other studies of the expectation phenomenon, expectations of future demand levels constitute an observable variable and thus can be incorporated explicitly into the model. The data used for the analysis were derived from the published forecasts of the nine National Electric Reliability Councils in the US for the years 1974 to 1980. Three alternative statistical methods are used for estimation purposes: ordinary least-squares, robust regression and a diagnostic analysis to identify influential observations. The results obtained with the first two methods are very similar, but are both inconsistent with the underlying economic logic of the model. The estimated model obtained from the diagnostics approach after deleting two aberrant observations is consistent with economic logic, and supports the hypothesis that the low growth demand experienced immediately following the oil embargo in 1973 were disregarded by the industry for forecasting purposes. The model includes transitory effects associated with the oil embargo that gradually disappear over time, the estimated coefficients for the lagged values of actual growth approach a structure with declining positive weights. The general shape of this asymptotic structure is similar to the findings in many economic applications using distributed lag models.

  1. Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management

  2. U.S. Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

  3. Texas - RRC District 8A Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 8A Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

  4. Texas - RRC District 7B Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 7B Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  5. Texas - RRC District 7C Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 7C Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  6. FutureGen Project Launched | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Launched FutureGen Project Launched December 6, 2005 - 4:29pm Addthis Government, Industry Agree to Build Zero-Emissions Power Plant of the Future WASHINGTON, DC -- Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy has signed an agreement with the FutureGen Industrial Alliance to build FutureGen, a prototype of the fossil-fueled power plant of the future. The nearly $1 billion government-industry project will produce electricity and hydrogen with

  7. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 40 -4.76% YEAR 2013 2014 Males 37 35 -5.41% Females 5 5 0% YEAR 2013 2014 SES 2 2 0% EJEK 5 4 -20.00% EN 05 5 7 40.00% EN 04 6 6 0% EN 03 1 1 0% NN...

  8. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    79 67 -15.19% YEAR 2013 2014 Males 44 34 -22.73% Females 35 33 -5.71% YEAR 2013 2014 SES 6 4 -33.33% EJEK 1 1 0% EN 05 9 8 -11.11% EN 04 6 5 -16.67% NN...

  9. Statistical recoupling: A new way to break the link between electric-utility sales and revenues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, E.

    1993-09-01

    In 1991, US electric utilities spent almost $1.8 billion on demand-side management (DSM) programs. These programs cut peak demands 5% and reduced electricity sales 1% that year. Utility projections suggest that these reductions will increase to 9% and 3%, respectively, by the year 2001. However, utility DSM efforts vary enormously across the country, concentrated in a few states along the east and west coasts and the upper midwest. To some extent, this concentration is a function of regulatory reforms that remove disincentives to utility shareholders for investments in DSM programs. A key component of these reforms is recovery of the net lost revenues caused by utility DSM programs. These lost revenues occur between rate cases when a utility encourages its customers to improve energy efficiency and cut demand. The reduction in sales means that the utility has less revenue to cover its fixed costs. This report describes a new method, statistical recoupling (SR), that addresses this net-lost-revenue problem. Like other decoupling approaches, SR breaks the link between electric-utility revenues and sales. Unlike other approaches, SR minimizes changes from traditional regulation. In particular, the risks of revenue swings associated with year-to-year changes in weather and the economy remain with the utility under SR. Statistical recoupling uses statistical models, based on historical data, that explain retail electricity sales as functions of the number of utility customers, winter and summer weather, the condition of the local economy, electricity price, and perhaps a few other key variables. These models, along with the actual values of the explanatory variables, are then used to estimate ``allowed`` electricity sales and revenues in future years.

  10. FORGING THE FUTURE STAY CONNECTED: In This Issue Electricity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    summit. The device, referred to as an adsorption chiller, serves as an alternative to heat pumps and air conditioners. It houses a new sorbent - three times more absorbent than...

  11. New Battery Testing Facility Could Boost Future of Electric Vehicles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat transfer and fluid flow experiments have been used to design battery packs. The laboratory's computer-aided design expertise can project the thermal performance of modules and ...

  12. U.S. Electric Power Futures: Preliminary Results (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.; Logan, J.; Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation shows key findings of an effort to simulate the evolution of the U.S. power sector under a number of policy and technology scenarios using the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) Model.

  13. Options Impacting the Electric System of the Future (ESF); NREL...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    It will also discuss the practical application and possible strategies for utilities and innovators to implement smart technologies that will enable an ultimate 'intelligent' grid ...

  14. FORGING THE FUTURE STAY CONNECTED: In This Issue Electricity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oregon, and determine the site's suitability as an observatory site for enhanced geothermal systems. Read more... Environmental Health and Remediation PNNL Shares Nuclear...

  15. Global Energy Futures Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-01-01

    The Global Energy Futures Model (GEFM) is a demand-based, gross domestic product (GDP)-driven, dynamic simulation tool that provides an integrated framework to model key aspects of energy, nuclear-materials storage and disposition, environmental effluents from fossil and non fossil energy and global nuclear-materials management. Based entirely on public source data, it links oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear and renewable energy dynamically to greenhouse-gas emissions and 13 other measures of environmental impact. It includes historical data frommore » 1990 to 2000, is benchmarked to the DOE/EIA/IEO 2002 [5] Reference Case for 2000 to 2020, and extrapolates energy demand through the year 2050. The GEFM is globally integrated, and breaks out five regions of the world: United States of America (USA), the Peoples Republic of China (China), the former Soviet Union (FSU), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) nations excluding the USA (other industrialized countries), and the rest of the world (ROW) (essentially the developing world). The GEFM allows the user to examine a very wide range of what ir scenarios through 2050 and to view the potential effects across widely dispersed, but interrelated areas. The authors believe that this high-level learning tool will help to stimulate public policy debate on energy, environment, economic and national security issues.« less

  16. North Dakota Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) North Dakota Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 361 374 439 1980's 537 581 629 600 566 569 541 508 541 561 1990's 586 472 496 525 507 463 462 479 447 416 2000's 433 443 471 448 417 453 479 511 541 1,079 2010's 1,667 2,381 3,569 5,420 6,034 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  17. North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Barrels) Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 33 1980's 42 52 53 54 57 59 53 53 40 48 1990's 50 47 54 46 46 44 40 40 41 46 2000's 47 50 41 40 39 45 51 54 51 104 2010's 157 193 297 466 540 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  18. Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Barrels) Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 511 1980's 537 565 667 740 683 731 768 702 686 586 1990's 592 567 566 575 592 605 615 610 613 667 2000's 639 605 601 582 666 697 732 797 870 985 2010's 1,270 1,445 1,452 1,408 1,752 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  19. New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Barrels) Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 465 1980's 478 496 475 495 462 395 514 708 926 863 1990's 915 840 994 925 946 881 998 814 876 896 2000's 804 794 779 824 805 781 804 788 726 715 2010's 764 776 662 679 789 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  20. Alabama (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Barrels) Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Alabama (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 31 1980's 33 25 35 50 48 39 38 34 36 38 1990's 48 35 53 55 51 48 52 34 31 57 2000's 104 32 28 33 29 31 41 32 92 55 2010's 68 68 55 51 59 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  1. Alaska (with Total Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Barrels) Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Alaska (with Total Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 13 1980's 11 10 9 8 0 382 381 418 401 380 1990's 340 360 347 321 301 306 337 631 320 299 2000's 277 405 405 387 369 352 338 325 312 299 2010's 288 288 288 288 241 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  2. Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Barrels) Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 16 1980's 15 15 12 9 10 9 15 15 11 8 1990's 7 3 2 2 3 3 2 3 3 3 2000's 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 2010's 2 3 3 4 5 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next

  3. California (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Barrels) Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) California (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 107 1980's 109 73 146 139 128 124 118 109 1990's 101 87 94 98 86 88 89 92 71 97 2000's 100 75 95 101 121 135 130 126 113 129 2010's 114 94 99 102 112 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  4. California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 334 350 365 1980's 299 306 362 381 265 256 255 238 215 222 1990's 217 216 203 189 194 153 156 164 106 192 2000's 234 177 190 167 189 268 206 205 146 163 2010's 173 165 290 266 261 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  5. California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 255 178 163 1980's 193 154 96 107 156 181 142 148 151 137 1990's 106 115 97 102 103 111 109 141 149 168 2000's 193 187 207 187 174 176 153 144 75 84 2010's 87 97 93 86 80 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  6. California State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) California State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 114 213 231 1980's 164 254 252 241 231 1990's 192 59 63 64 61 59 49 56 44 76 2000's 91 85 92 83 86 90 90 82 57 57 2010's 66 82 66 75 76 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  7. California--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Barrels) Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) California--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 1 2 6 5 2 2 2 3 1990's 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  8. Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Barrels) Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 170 1980's 183 195 174 173 142 155 127 142 162 191 1990's 152 181 193 190 210 243 254 244 235 277 2000's 288 298 329 325 362 386 382 452 612 722 2010's 879 925 705 762 813 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure

  9. Federal Offshore--California Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Barrels) Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Federal Offshore--California Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 10 12 16 19 1990's 13 11 15 20 17 21 19 10 8 0 2000's 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2010's 1 1 1 2 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  10. Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Barrels) Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 6 5 12 17 36 34 36 29 26 21 1990's 21 26 34 34 25 27 27 27 21 24 2000's 27 25 28 17 13 9 9 4 7 0 2010's 0 0 35 41 30 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  11. Florida Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Florida Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 151 119 77 1980's 84 69 64 49 65 55 49 49 51 46 1990's 45 38 47 50 98 92 96 96 88 84 2000's 82 84 91 79 78 77 45 108 1 7 2010's 56 6 16 15 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next

  12. Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Barrels) Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 21 1980's 27 17 11 17 17 14 9 16 10 1990's 8 7 8 9 18 17 22 17 18 16 2000's 11 12 14 17 12 7 3 2 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015

  13. Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Barrels) Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 400 1980's 387 407 300 441 422 370 437 459 342 327 1990's 311 426 442 378 396 367 336 263 331 355 2000's 303 300 261 245 267 218 204 194 175 162 2010's 195 192 174 138 186 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  14. Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Barrels) Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 26 1980's 25 25 35 31 24 27 29 23 24 15 1990's 24 24 32 25 39 42 45 47 53 69 2000's 56 72 65 65 71 69 104 88 96 101 2010's 124 88 81 95 108 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  15. Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Barrels) Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 56 54 116 2010's 132 196 181 169 206 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Liquids Proved

  16. Utah and Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Barrels) and Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Utah and Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 280 1980's 294 363 381 483 577 681 700 701 932 704 1990's 641 580 497 458 440 503 639 680 600 531 2000's 858 782 806 756 765 710 686 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  17. West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Barrels) Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 74 1980's 97 84 78 90 79 86 87 86 92 99 1990's 85 102 96 107 93 61 60 70 71 72 2000's 104 105 98 67 84 84 109 114 97 108 2010's 122 140 199 320 1,229 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  18. Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Barrels) Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 822 887 1,010 2010's 1,001 1,122 1,064 894 881 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Liquids

  19. Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility Industry | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Trends in the Electric Utility Industry Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility Industry Section 1101 of the U.S. Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT)1 calls for a report on the current trends in the workforce of (A) skilled technical personnel that support energy technology industries, and (B) electric power and transmission engineers. It also requests that the Secretary make recommendations (as appropriate) to meet the future labor requirements. PDF icon Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility

  20. Systems for Electrical Power from Coproduced and Low Temperature Geothermal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources | Department of Energy Systems for Electrical Power from Coproduced and Low Temperature Geothermal Resources Systems for Electrical Power from Coproduced and Low Temperature Geothermal Resources Presentation about Systems for Electrical Power from Coproduced and Low Temperature Geothermal Resources includes background, results and discussion, future plans and conclusion. PDF icon systems_for_electrical_power_from_coproduced_and_low_final.pdf More Documents & Publications AAPG

  1. FutureGen -- A Sequestration and Hydrogen Research Initiative | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy FutureGen -- A Sequestration and Hydrogen Research Initiative FutureGen -- A Sequestration and Hydrogen Research Initiative A fact sheet on the Integrated Sequestration and Hydrogen Research Initiative, which is a $1 billion government/industry partnership to design, build and operate a nearly emission-free, coal-fired electric and hydrogen production plant. PDF icon FutureGen -- A Sequestration and Hydrogen Research Initiative More Documents & Publications

  2. Scoping study on trends in the economic value of electricity reliability to the U.S. economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph; Koomey, Jonathan; Lehman, Bryan; Martin, Nathan; Mills, Evan; Webber, Carrie; Worrell, Ernst

    2001-06-01

    During the past three years, working with more than 150 organizations representing public and private stakeholders, EPRI has developed the Electricity Technology Roadmap. The Roadmap identifies several major strategic challenges that must be successfully addressed to ensure a sustainable future in which electricity continues to play an important role in economic growth. Articulation of these anticipated trends and challenges requires a detailed understanding of the role and importance of reliable electricity in different sectors of the economy. This report is intended to contribute to that understanding by analyzing key aspects of trends in the economic value of electricity reliability in the U.S. economy. We first present a review of recent literature on electricity reliability costs. Next, we describe three distinct end-use approaches for tracking trends in reliability needs: (1) an analysis of the electricity-use requirements of office equipment in different commercial sectors; (2) an examination of the use of aggregate statistical indicators of industrial electricity use and economic activity to identify high reliability-requirement customer market segments; and (3) a case study of cleanrooms, which is a cross-cutting market segment known to have high reliability requirements. Finally, we present insurance industry perspectives on electricity reliability as an example of a financial tool for addressing customers' reliability needs.

  3. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A; Hand, Maureen; Blair, Nate; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Hern, Tracy; Miller, Bart; O'Connell, R.

    2008-06-09

    The Wind Energy Deployment System model was used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030. This generation capacity expansion model selects from electricity generation technologies that include pulverized coal plants, combined cycle natural gas plants, combustion turbine natural gas plants, nuclear plants, and wind technology to meet projected demand in future years. Technology cost and performance projections, as well as transmission operation and expansion costs, are assumed. This study demonstrates that producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology is technically feasible, not cost-prohibitive, and provides benefits in the forms of carbon emission reductions, natural gas price reductions, and water savings.

  4. Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Sector

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report examines the potential infrastructure needs of the U.S. interstate natural gas pipeline transmission system across a range of future natural gas demand scenarios that drive increased electric power sector natural gas use. To perform this analysis, the U.S. Department of Energy commissioned Deloitte MarketPoint to examine scenarios in its North American Integrated Model (NAIM), which simultaneously models the electric power and the natural gas sectors. This study concludes that, under scenarios in which natural gas demand from the electric power sector increases, the incremental increase in interstate natural gas pipeline expansion is modest, relative to historical capacity additions. Similarly, capital expenditures on new interstate pipelines in the scenarios considered here are projected to be significantly less than the capital expenditures associated with infrastructure expansion over the last 15 years.

  5. Enabling the Future of Li-Ion Batteries | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enabling the Future of Li-Ion Batteries Title Enabling the Future of Li-Ion Batteries Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2015 Authors Gaines, LL Abstract...

  6. Electric Power Annual 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 | Release Date: February 16, 2016 | Next Release Date: February 2017 | full report Previous issues Year: 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 prior to 2001 Go Electric industry sales to ultimate customers statistics by state State Sales to ultimate customers (million kWh) Revenue (thousand dollars) Customers Alabama 90,494 8,386,390 2,537,927 Alaska 6,165 1,076,133 333,742 Arizona 76,298 7,764,422 2,981,625 Arkansas 47,080 3,720,556 1,566,538 California 262,585

  7. Future City Competition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future City Competition The New Mexico Regional Competition is an unique opportunity for middle school children to combine skills in engineering, environmental science, and art to...

  8. My Amazing Future 2012

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28

    Idaho National Laboratory's My Amazing Future program gives 8th grade women the opportunity to experience careers in science and engineering.

  9. Transportation Energy Futures Snapshot

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This snapshot is a summary of the EERE reports that provide a detailed analysis of opportunities and challenges along the path to a more sustainable transportation energy future.

  10. Growing the Future Bioeconomy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session IA—Conversion Technologies I: Industrial Perspectives on Pathways to Advanced Biofuels Growing the Future Bioeconomy Joel Velasco, Senior Vice President, Amyris, Inc

  11. Electric trade in the United States 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This publication, Electric Trade in the US 1992 (ELECTRA), is the fourth in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Electric Data Systems Branch, Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data, and this report provides information on the electric power industry during 1992. The electric trade data collected and presented in this report furnish important information on the wholesale structure found within the US electric power industry. The patterns of interutility trade in the report support analyses of wholesale power transactions and provide input for a broader understanding of bulk power market issues that define the emerging national electric energy policies. The report includes information on the quantity of power purchased, sold, exchanged, and wheeled; the geographical locations of transactions and ownership classes involved; and the revenues and costs. Information on the physical transmission system are being included for the first time in this publication. Transmission data covering investor-owned electric utilities were shifted from the Financial Statistics of Selected Investor-Owned Electric Utilities to the ELECTRA publication. Some of the prominent features of this year`s report include information and data not published before on transmission lines for publicly owned utilities and transmission lines added during 1992 by investor-owned electric utilities.

  12. Integrating The Non-Electrical Worker Into The Electrical Safety Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, T. David; McAlhaney, John H.

    2012-08-17

    The intent of this paper is to demonstrate an electrical safety program that incorporates all workers into the program, not just the electrical workers. It is largely in response to a paper presented at the 2012 ESW by Lanny Floyd entitled "Facilitating Application of Electrical Safety Best Practices to "Other" Workers" which requested all attendees to review their electrical safety program to assure that non-electrical workers were protected as well as electrical workers. The referenced paper indicated that roughly 50% of electrical incidents involve workers whose primary function is not electrical in nature. It also encouraged all to "address electrical safety for all workers and not just workers whose job responsibilities involve working on or near energized electrical circuits." In this paper, a program which includes specific briefings to non-electrical workers as well as to workers who may need to perform their normal activities in proximity to energized electrical conductors is presented. The program uses a targeted approach to specific areas such as welding, excavating, rigging, chart reading, switching, cord and plug equipment and several other general areas to point out hazards that may exist and how to avoid them. NFPA 70E-2004 was incorporated into the program several years ago and with it the need to include the "other" workers became apparent. The site experience over the years supports the assertion that about half of the electrical incidents involve non-electrical workers and this prompted us to develop specific briefings to enhance the knowledge of the non-electrical worker regarding safe electrical practices. The promotion of "May is Electrical Safety Month" and the development of informative presentations which are delivered to the general site population as well as electrical workers have greatly improved the hazards awareness status of the general worker on site.

  13. OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AVAILABILITY AND IMPROVEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutler, Roy I; Peplov, Vladimir V; Wezensky, Mark W; Norris, Kevin Paul; Barnett, William E; Hicks, Jim; Weaver, Joey T; Moss, John; Rust, Kenneth R; Mize, Jeffery J; Anderson, David E

    2011-01-01

    SNS electrical systems have been operational for 4 years. System availability statistics and improvements are presented for AC electrical systems, DC and pulsed power supplies and klystron modulators.

  14. The house of the future

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01

    Learn what it will take to create tomorrow's net-zero energy home as scientists reveal the secrets of cool roofs, smart windows, and computer-driven energy control systems. The net-zero energy home: Scientists are working to make tomorrow's homes more than just energy efficient -- they want them to be zero energy. Iain Walker, a scientist in the Lab's Energy Performance of Buildings Group, will discuss what it takes to develop net-zero energy houses that generate as much energy as they use through highly aggressive energy efficiency and on-site renewable energy generation. Talking back to the grid: Imagine programming your house to use less energy if the electricity grid is full or price are high. Mary Ann Piette, deputy director of Berkeley Lab's building technology department and director of the Lab's Demand Response Research Center, will discuss how new technologies are enabling buildings to listen to the grid and automatically change their thermostat settings or lighting loads, among other demands, in response to fluctuating electricity prices. The networked (and energy efficient) house: In the future, your home's lights, climate control devices, computers, windows, and appliances could be controlled via a sophisticated digital network. If it's plugged in, it'll be connected. Bruce Nordman, an energy scientist in Berkeley Lab's Energy End-Use Forecasting group, will discuss how he and other scientists are working to ensure these networks help homeowners save energy.

  15. Validating Solar Innovation to Power Our Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Innovation to Power Our Future The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established five Regional Test Centers (RTCs) in New Mexico, Colorado, Florida, Nevada, and Vermont to demonstrate the bankability of new technologies. Funded by DOE's SunShot Initiative, the RTCs are part of a broad national effort to make solar energy cost-competitive with other forms of electricity by 2020. The RTCs validate new solar technologies and systems configurations, demonstrating performance and reliability

  16. Energy Department Selects Global Laser Enrichment for Future...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Energy Department Selects Global Laser Enrichment for Future Operations at Paducah Site Pamela Thompson is retiring from her 37-year federal career. Retiring Procurement Official ...

  17. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7 35 -5.41% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 27 25 -7.41% ↓ Females 10 10 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 SES 1 1 0% / EN 05 1 1 0% / EN 04 11 10 -9.09% ↓ NN (Engineering) 8 8 0% / NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 14 15 7.14% ↑ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 0 -100% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 0 0 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 1 1 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 1 1 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 3 3 0% / Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI,M) 0 0 0% /

  18. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 79 -7.06% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 59 57 -3.39% ↓ Females 26 22 -15.38% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 1 0 -100% ↓ EJ/EK 4 3 -25.00% ↓ EN 05 3 2 -33.33% ↓ EN 04 22 22 0% / EN 03 8 8 0% / NN (Engineering) 16 15 -6.25% ↓ NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 28 26 -7.14% ↓ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 3 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 2 2 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 1 1 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 5 4 -20.00% ↓ African American Female (AA,F) 3 2

  19. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    91 81 -10.99% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 67 56 -16.42% ↓ Females 24 25 4.17% ↑ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 1 2 100% ↑ EJ/EK 9 8 -11.11% ↓ EN 04 25 22 -12.00% ↓ NN (Engineering) 24 20 -16.67% ↓ NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 29 26 -10.34% ↓ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 3 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 2 2 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 3 3 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 0 0 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 0 0 0% / Asian American Pacific Islander

  20. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    21 -4.55% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 10 8 -20.00% ↓ Females 12 13 8.33% ↑ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 10 7 -30.00% ↓ EX 0 2 100% ↑ EJ/EK 1 1 0% / EN 05 0 1 100% ↑ EN 04 0 1 100% ↑ NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 9 8 -11.11% ↓ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 1 0% / ED 00 1 0 -100% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 0 0 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 2 1 -50.00% ↓ African American Male (AA,M) 1 1 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 5 4 -20.00% ↓ Asian

  1. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    41 155 9.93% ↑ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 92 106 15.22% ↑ Females 49 49 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 SES 8 8 0% / EX 1 1 0% / EJ/EK 4 4 0% / EN 05 11 10 -9.09% ↓ EN 04 11 14 27.27% ↑ EN 03 2 5 150% ↑ NN (Engineering) 60 63 5.00% ↑ NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 44 50 13.64% ↑ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 1 1 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 1 1 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 7 10 42.86% ↑ African American Female (AA,F) 13 11 -15.38% ↓ Asian American

  2. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    563 560 -0.53% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 518 514 -0.77% ↓ Females 45 46 2.22% ↑ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 2 2 0% / EJ/EK 2 2 0% / EN 04 1 1 0% / NN (Engineering) 11 11 0% / NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 218 221 1.38% ↑ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 2 100% ↑ NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 328 321 -2.13% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 15 15 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 2 2 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 19 18 -5.26% ↓ African American Female (AA,F) 1 1 0% /

  3. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    97 180 -8.63% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 105 89 -15.24% ↓ Females 92 91 -1.09% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 14 13 -7.14% ↓ EX 1 1 0% / EJ/EK 3 3 0% / EN 05 1 1 0% / EN 04 4 2 -50.00% ↓ EN 03 1 1 0% / EN 00 0 3 100% ↑ NN (Engineering) 35 27 -22.86% ↓ NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 135 126 -6.67% ↓ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 2 0% / GS 15 0 1 100% ↑ GS 13 1 0 -100% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 2 1 -50.00% ↓ American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 0 0 0% /

  4. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    *Total number of Employees 122 112 -8.20% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 90 84 -6.67% ↓ Females 32 28 -12.50% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 26 24 -7.69% ↓ EJ/EK 3 3 0% / EN 05 8 9 12.50% ↑ NN (Engineering) 48 47 -2.08% ↓ NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 30 26 -13.33% ↓ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 7 3 -57.14% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 0 0 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 1 1 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 3 3 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 7 6 -14.29%

  5. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 79 -5.95% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 59 55 -6.78% ↓ Females 25 24 -4.00% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 3 3 0% / EJ/EK 4 4 0% / EN 04 2 1 -50.00% ↓ NN (Engineering) 20 20 0% / NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 55 51 -7.27% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 0 0 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 0 0 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 10 10 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 9 8 -11.11% ↓ Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI,M) 2 2 0% / Asian American Pacific

  6. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 87 -1.14% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 46 46 0% / Females 42 41 -2.38% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 1 0 -100% ↓ EJ/EK 4 2 -50.00% ↓ NN (Engineering) 12 12 0% / NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 68 70 2.94% ↑ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 3 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 0 0 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 2 2 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 5 5 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 5 6 20.00% ↑ Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI,M) 0 0 0% / Asian

  7. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 14 27.27% ↑ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 9 12 33.33% ↑ Females 2 2 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 SES 2 2 0% / EJ/EK 1 1 0% / EN 04 0 1 100% ↑ EN 00 0 1 100% ↑ NN (Engineering) 5 5 0% / NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 3 4 33.33% ↑ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 0 0 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 0 0 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 0 0 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 0 0 0% / Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI,M) 1 1 0% / Asian American Pacific

  8. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    79 164 -8.38% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 100 92 -8.00% ↓ Females 79 72 -8.86% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 8 8 0% / EJ/EK 4 3 -25.00% ↓ EN 04 11 11 0% / EN 03 1 1 0% / EN 00 0 2 100% ↑ NN (Engineering) 39 32 -17.95% ↓ NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 111 104 -6.31% ↓ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 5 3 -40.00% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 1 2 100% ↑ American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 2 1 -50.00% ↓ African American Male (AA,M) 4 3 -25.00% ↓ African American

  9. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    40 36 -10.00% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 18 18 0% / Females 22 18 -18.18% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 3 2 -33.33% ↓ EJ/EK 1 1 0% / EN 03 1 1 0% / NN (Engineering) 3 3 0% / NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 30 27 -10.00% ↓ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 2 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 0 0 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 0 0 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 1 1 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 1 1 0% / Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI,M) 0 0 0% /

  10. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 30 -11.76% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 16 14 -12.50% ↓ Females 18 16 -11.11% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 1 1 0% / EJ/EK 3 1 -66.67% ↓ NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 29 27 -6.90% ↓ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 1 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 1 1 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 2 2 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 3 3 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 7 6 -14.29% ↓ Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI,M) 1 1 0% / Asian American Pacific Islander

  11. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9 209 -8.73% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 76 76 0% / Females 153 133 -13.07% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 9 6 -33.33% ↓ EJ/EK 1 1 0% / NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 208 194 -6.73% ↓ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 11 8 -27.27% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 2 2 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 3 2 -33.33% ↓ African American Male (AA,M) 10 10 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 39 36 -7.69% ↓ Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI,M) 1 1 0% / Asian American

  12. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7 80 -8.05% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 62 57 -8.06% ↓ Females 25 23 -8.00% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 1 1 0% / EJ/EK 3 3 0% / EN 05 1 1 0% / EN 04 27 24 -11.11% ↓ EN 03 1 0 -100% ↓ NN (Engineering) 26 25 -3.85% ↓ NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 26 24 -7.69% ↓ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 2 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 1 1 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 1 1 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 3 2 -33.33% ↓ African American Female (AA,F) 3 3 0% / Asian

  13. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 27 -3.57% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 18 17 -5.56% ↓ Females 10 10 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 SES 1 1 0% / EN 05 1 1 0% / EN 04 4 3 -25.00% ↓ NN (Engineering) 12 12 0% / NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 9 9 0% / NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 1 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 0 0 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 1 1 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 4 4 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 3 4 33.33% ↑ Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI,M) 1 1 0% / Asian

  14. The Hanford Story: Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Future Chapter of the Hanford Story illustrates the potential and possibilities offered by a post-cleanup Hanford. From land use plans and preservation at Hanford to economic development and tourism opportunities, the Future chapter touches on a variety of local economic, cultural and environmental perspectives.

  15. Electric sales and revenue, 1990. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-21

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenues, and average revenue. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1990. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the revenue billed for the amount of kilowatthours sold, revenue from income, unemployment and other State and local taxes, energy or demand charges, consumer services charges, environmental surcharges, franchise fees, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  16. PADUCAH 2015 YEAR IN REVIEW

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PADUCAH 2015 YEAR IN REVIEW "2015 has been a pivotal year at the Paducah Site. Now that we have successfully transitioned the gaseous diffusion plant from NRC oversight to DOE oversight and DOE has the entire site back for the first time in almost 20 years, major deactivation activities are under way to prepare the site for future decontamination and decommissioning. We are fortunate to have a highly skilled federal and contractor workforce in place to safely and successfully continue this

  17. Coal: Energy for the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-01

    This report was prepared in response to a request by the US Department of energy (DOE). The principal objectives of the study were to assess the current DOE coal program vis-a-vis the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), and to recommend the emphasis and priorities that DOE should consider in updating its strategic plan for coal. A strategic plan for research, development, demonstration, and commercialization (RDD and C) activities for coal should be based on assumptions regarding the future supply and price of competing energy sources, the demand for products manufactured from these sources, technological opportunities, and the need to control the environmental impact of waste streams. These factors change with time. Accordingly, the committee generated strategic planning scenarios for three time periods: near-term, 1995--2005; mid-term, 2006--2020; and, long-term, 2021--2040. The report is divided into the following chapters: executive summary; introduction and scope of the study; overview of US DOE programs and planning; trends and issues for future coal use; the strategic planning framework; coal preparation, coal liquid mixtures, and coal bed methane recovery; clean fuels and specialty products from coal; electric power generation; technology demonstration and commercialization; advanced research programs; conclusions and recommendations; appendices; and glossary. 174 refs.

  18. Less electricity use this summer slightly offset by higher power...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8% in their summer electricity bills. EIA forecasts that more electricity will be generated this year by natural gas, solar energy, and wind and less from coal-fired power plants.

  19. Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    Final issue of this report. Provides detailed statistics on existing generating units operated by electric utilities as of December 31, 2000, and certain summary statistics about new generators planned for operation by electric utilities during the next 5 years.

  20. Energy for the Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The nuclear power plants in use around the world today use fission, or the splitting of heavy atoms such as uranium, to release energy for electricity. A fusion power plant, on the ...

  1. Future of Natural Gas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Natural Gas Bill Eisele, CEM SC Electric & Gas Co Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral. Florida Agenda * Gas Facts * ...

  2. Policy Overview and Options for Maximizing the Role of Policy in Geothermal Electricity Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report explores the effectiveness of the historical and current body of policies in terms of increased geothermal electricity development. Insights are provided into future policies that may drive the market to optimize development of available geothermal electricity resources.

  3. Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 Sales data for various models of ...

  4. Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 The purpose of this ...

  5. Technology Roadmap - Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Roadmap - Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technology Roadmap - Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric...

  6. DOE Announces Membership of New Electricity Advisory Committee, April 17,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2008 | Department of Energy Membership of New Electricity Advisory Committee, April 17, 2008 DOE Announces Membership of New Electricity Advisory Committee, April 17, 2008 DOE Press Release announcing membership of the new Electricity Advisory Committee. DOE anounced the members of its newly-established Electricity Advisory Committee. Thirty innaugural members will serve one or two year terms and include some of the nation's top public and private sector leaders in electricity policy,

  7. Average summer electric power bills expected to be lowest in...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    years The average U.S. household is expected to pay 395 for electricity this summer. That's down 2.5% from last year and the lowest residential summer power bill in four years, ...

  8. IEA Wind Task 26: The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy, Work Package 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Wiser, R.; Hand, M.

    2012-05-01

    Over the past 30 years, wind power has become a mainstream source of electricity generation around the world. However, the future of wind power will depend a great deal on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost of energy reductions. In this summary report, developed as part of the International Energy Agency Wind Implementing Agreement Task 26, titled 'The Cost of Wind Energy,' we provide a review of historical costs, evaluate near-term market trends, review the methods used to estimate long-term cost trajectories, and summarize the range of costs projected for onshore wind energy across an array of forward-looking studies and scenarios. We also highlight the influence of high-level market variables on both past and future wind energy costs.

  9. Tampa Electric Company, Polk Power Station IGCC Project: Project Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, T.E.; Shelnut, C.A.; McDaniel, J.E.

    1999-07-01

    Over the last ten years, Tampa Electric Company (TEC) has taken the Polk Power Station from a concept to a reality. The Tampa Electric Company Polk Power Station is a nominal 250 MW (net) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant located to the southeast of Tampa, Florida in Polk County, Florida. This project is being partially funded under the Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology Program pursuant to a Round III award. The Polk Power Station achieved first fire of the gasification system on schedule in mid-July, 1996. It was placed in commercial operation on September 30, 1996. Since start-up in July, 1996, significant advances have occurred in the design and operation of the entire IGCC train. This presentation will feature an up-to-the-minute update of actual performance parameters achieved by the Polk Power Station. These parameters include overall capacity, heat rate, and availability. Several different coal feedstocks have been tested and the resulting performance will be compared to that achieved on the base coal. This paper also provides an update of the general operating experiences and shutdown causes of the gasification facility. Finally, the future plans for improving the reliability and efficiency of the Unit will be addressed, as well as plans for future additional alternate fuel test burns.

  10. Electrical safety guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Electrical Safety Guidelines prescribes the DOE safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety standards and guidance for DOE installations in order to affect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of these guidelines are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  11. DOE handbook electrical safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    Electrical Safety Handbook presents the Department of Energy (DOE) safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety guidance and information for DOE installations to effect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of this handbook are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oregon Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Oregon) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,662 27 Electric ...

  13. Electricity Advisory Committee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Coe Millennium Energy Phyllis Currie Pasadena Water and Power Clark Gellings Electric Power Research Institute Mark Lauby North American Electric Reliability Corporation Janice ...

  14. Electricity Advisory Committee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carlos Coe Millennium Energy Robert Curry Jr. CurryEnergy Clark Gellings Electric Power Research Institute Michael Heyeck American Electric Power (Ret.) Paul Hudson Stratus ...

  15. Electricity Advisory Committee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carlos Coe Millennium Energy Robert Curry Jr. CurryEnergy Clark Gellings Electric Power Research Institute Paul Hudson Stratus Energy Group Mark Lauby North American Electric ...

  16. Edison Electric Institute Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) and the current electricity landscape.

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 26,292 16 Electric ...

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (United States) Item Value Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,068,422 Electric ...

  19. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Update November 28, 2012 Map of Electric System Selected for Daily Peak Demand was replaced with the correct map showing Selected Wholesale Electricity and Natural Gas Locations....

  20. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general...

  1. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Electric Power Sector comprises electricity-only and combined heat and power (CHP) plants within the North American Industrial Classification System 22 category whose...

  2. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See all Electricity Reports Electricity Monthly Update With Data for November 2014 | Release Date: Jan. 26, 2015 | Next Release Date: Feb. 24, 2015 Previous Issues Issue:...

  3. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center ... presents statistics on end-use: retail ratesprices and consumption of electricity. ...

  4. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Retail ratesprices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and ... and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. ...

  5. Building America System Research Plan for Reduction of Miscellaneous Electrical Loads in Zero Energy Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barley, C. D.; Haley, C.; Anderson, R.; Pratsch, L.

    2008-11-01

    This research plan describes the overall scope of system research that is needed to reduce miscellaneous electrical loads (MEL) in future net zero energy homes.

  6. Integrated electrical connector (Patent) | DOEPatents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Integrated electrical connector Title: Integrated electrical connector An electrical ... The opening is also smaller than the diameter of an electrically conductive contact pin. ...

  7. Future Physics | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Physics March 5, 2009 In late January, we held a meeting of our Physics Advisory Committee, PAC34 to be precise. We had two primary goals for the PAC, one related to the ...

  8. Transportation Energy Futures Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transportation accounts for 71% of total U.S. petroleum consumption and 33% of total greenhouse gas emissions. The Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) study examines underexplored oil-savings and...

  9. Recovery Act - Sustainable Transportation: Advanced Electric Drive Vehicle Education Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caille, Gary

    2013-12-13

    The collective goals of this effort include: 1) reach all facets of this society with education regarding electric vehicles (EV) and plug–in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), 2) prepare a workforce to service these advanced vehicles, 3) create web–based learning at an unparalleled level, 4) educate secondary school students to prepare for their future and 5) train the next generation of professional engineers regarding electric vehicles. The Team provided an integrated approach combining secondary schools, community colleges, four–year colleges and community outreach to provide a consistent message (Figure 1). Colorado State University Ventures (CSUV), as the prime contractor, plays a key program management and co–ordination role. CSUV is an affiliate of Colorado State University (CSU) and is a separate 501(c)(3) company. The Team consists of CSUV acting as the prime contractor subcontracted to Arapahoe Community College (ACC), CSU, Motion Reality Inc. (MRI), Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) and Ricardo. Collaborators are Douglas County Educational Foundation/School District and Gooru (www.goorulearning.org), a nonprofit web–based learning resource and Google spin–off.

  10. Electric sales and revenue 1992, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-20

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1992. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the applicable revenue from kilowatthours sold; revenue from income; unemployment and other State and local taxes; energy, demand, and consumer service charges; environmental surcharges; franchise fees; fuel adjustments; and other miscellaneous charges. The revenue does not include taxes, such as sales and excise taxes, that are assessed on the consumer and collected through the utility. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  11. Future City Competition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future City Competition The New Mexico Regional Competition is an unique opportunity for middle school children to combine skills in engineering, environmental science, and art to create a vision for the future. Exercising your imagination and sharing your ideas are not only fun but essential for ensuring sustainable growth for our communities. Students work as a team with an educator and engineer mentor to plan cities using SimCity(tm) software: research and write solutions to an engineering

  12. Future of Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation In the coming decades, transportation in the U.S. is expected to change radically in response to environmental constraints, fluctuating oil availability and economic factors. Future Decision-Makers The transportation systems that emerge in the 21 st century will be defined largely by the choices, skills and imaginations of today's youth. Future Workforce As scientists and engineers, they will develop new vehicle and fuel technologies. As citizens, they will make decisions

  13. Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, Carlos; Oliver, LeAnn; Kronheim, Steve; Gonzalez, Jorge; Woods-Richardson, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity needs.

  14. Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity...

  15. Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Alvarez, Carlos; Oliver, LeAnn; Kronheim, Steve; Gonzalez, Jorge; Woods-Richardson, Kathleen;

    2013-05-29

    Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity needs.

  16. Year Modules

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual photovoltaic module shipments, 2003-2013 (peak kilowatts) Year Modules 2003 80,062 2004 143,274 2005 204,996 2006 320,208 2007 494,148 2008 920,693 2009 1,188,879 2010 2,644,498 2011 3,772,075 2012 4,655,005 2013 4,984,881 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-63B, 'Annual Photovoltaic Cell/Module Shipments Report.' Note: Includes both U.S. Shipments and Exports.

  17. Year Modules

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    dollars per peak watt) Year Modules 2003 $3.17 2004 $2.99 2005 $3.19 2006 $3.50 2007 $3.37 2008 $3.49 2009 $2.79 2010 $1.96 2011 $1.59 2012 $1.15 2013 $0.75 Table 4. Average value of photovoltaic modules, 2003-2013 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-63B, 'Annual Photovoltaic Cell/Module Shipments Report.' Note: Dollars are not adjusted for inflation.

  18. Historical impacts and future trends in industrial cogeneration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bluestein, J.; Lihn, M.

    1999-07-01

    Cogeneration, also known as combined heat and power (CHP), is the combined sequential generation of electricity and thermal or electric energy. The technology has been known essentially since the first commercial generation of electricity as a high efficiency technology option. After a period of decline, its use increased significantly during the 1980s and it is receiving renewed interest lately as a means of increasing efficiency and reducing emissions of air pollutants including carbon emissions. New and developing technology options have added to this potential. Forecasts of future growth and efforts to stimulate cogeneration need to take into account the history of the technology, the factors that have driven it in the past, and factors which could stimulate or retard future growth. This paper reviews and analyzes these factors and looks toward the future potential for cogeneration.

  19. Career Map: Electrical Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Electrical Engineer positions.

  20. Future Power Systems 20: The Smart Enterprise, its Objective and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forecasting. | Department of Energy 0: The Smart Enterprise, its Objective and Forecasting. Future Power Systems 20: The Smart Enterprise, its Objective and Forecasting. Future Power Systems 20: The Smart Enterprise, its Objective and Forecasting. PDF icon Future Power Systems 20: The Smart Enterprise, its Objective and Forecasting. More Documents & Publications Future Power Systems 21 - The Smart Customer Smart Grid R&D Multi-Year Program Plan (2010-2014) - September 2011 Update

  1. Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity: 30 Years of Electricity: 30 Years of Industry Change Industry Change David K. Owens Executive Vice President Edison Electric Institute 30 Years of Energy Information and Analysis April 7, 2008 EIA Key to Policy Development and EIA Key to Policy Development and Advocacy Activities Advocacy Activities EIA Has Kept Pace With an Evolving EIA Has Kept Pace With an Evolving Energy Industry Energy Industry n EIA clearly provides more with less budgetary support l 1979: $347 million l 2007:

  2. Wireless Electric Charging: The Future of Plug-In Electric Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    No need for cords or cards. Just as Wi-Fi has freed consumers of wires when accessing the Internet, wireless charging technology may soon be as widespread, thanks to research ...

  3. Energy Department Names Virginia and Illinois Electric Co-ops the 2013 Wind

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cooperatives of the Year | Department of Energy Virginia and Illinois Electric Co-ops the 2013 Wind Cooperatives of the Year Energy Department Names Virginia and Illinois Electric Co-ops the 2013 Wind Cooperatives of the Year March 6, 2014 - 1:57pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) today recognized Old Dominion Electric Cooperative (ODEC) of Virginia and the Rural Electric Convenience Cooperative (RECC) of Illinois as the

  4. National Electric Transmission Congestion Studies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Section 216(a) of the Federal Power Act, as amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, directs the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct a study every three years on electric transmission congestion and constraints within the Eastern and Western Interconnections. The American Reinvestment and Recovery Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) further directed the Secretary to include in the 2009 Congestion Study an analysis of significant potential sources of renewable energy that are constrained by lack of adequate transmission capacity. Based on this study, and comments concerning it from states and other stakeholders, the Secretary of Energy may designate any geographic area experiencing electric transmission capacity constraints or congestion as a national interest electric transmission corridor (National Corridor).

  5. Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (Electric) - Residential Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AC: 30 Recycling RefrigeratorFreezer: 50 ACDehumidifier: 25 Summary The Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (BGE) offers rebates for residential customers to improve the...

  6. Table 14a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)" ...

  7. PPL Electric Utilities - Custom Energy Efficiency Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0.08 per projected first year kWh savings Summary Prospective applicants should contact their PPL Electric Utilities Key Account Manager before beginning any project. If...

  8. Coordinating Interstate ElectricTransmission Siting: An Introduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Coordinating Interstate ElectricTransmission Siting: An Introduction to the Debate In recent years, experts have started drawing att ention to the need to improve the system that ...

  9. The power grid of the future is a platform that

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    power grid of the future is a platform that delivers reliable, affordable, and clean electricity to American consumers where they want it, when they want it, and how they want it. To jump start the modernization of our nation's aging energy infrastructure, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act invested $4.5 billion in the electric sector -matched by private funding to reach a total of about $9.5 billion- so that Americans could start experiencing the benefits of the future grid sooner. Over

  10. Renewable Electricity in the Annual Energy Outlook 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2014 For Renewable Electricity Working Group AEO2014 Second Meeting September 26, 2013 Christopher Namovicz and Gwen Bredehoeft, Renewable Electricity Analysis Team Agenda Renewable Electricity Analysis Team, September 26, 2013 2 * Status of AEO2014 and future development plans * Data and model updates - PTC expiration update - Capital costs - Transmission - 860 (planned capacity) data - Polysys integration - Spinning reserves - RPS updates * Preliminary Results for the AEO2014 Reference case

  11. Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations June 2015 - Tuesday,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    June 30, 2015 | Department of Energy Tuesday, June 30, 2015 Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations June 2015 - Tuesday, June 30, 2015 The Department of Energy's Electricity Advisory Committee held a meeting on Monday, June 29 and Tuesday, June 30, 2015, at the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, 4301 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA. Tuesday, June 30, 2015 Panel - Microgrids: Current and Future Development - Wanda Reder, moderator James Gallagher, New York State Smart

  12. Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N.L.; Hayhoe, K.; Jin, J.; Auffhammer, M.

    2008-04-01

    Climate projections from three atmosphere-ocean climate models with a range of low to mid-high temperature sensitivity forced by the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change SRES higher, middle, and lower emission scenarios indicate that, over the 21st century, extreme heat events for major cities in heavily air-conditioned California will increase rapidly. These increases in temperature extremes are projected to exceed the rate of increase in mean temperature, along with increased variance. Extreme heat is defined here as the 90 percent exceedance probability (T90) of the local warmest summer days under the current climate. The number of extreme heat days in Los Angeles, where T90 is currently 95 F (32 C), may increase from 12 days to as many as 96 days per year by 2100, implying current-day heat wave conditions may last for the entire summer, with earlier onset. Overall, projected increases in extreme heat under the higher A1fi emission scenario by 2070-2099 tend to be 20-30 percent higher than those projected under the lower B1 emission scenario, ranging from approximately double the historical number of days for inland California cities (e.g. Sacramento and Fresno), up to four times for previously temperate coastal cities (e.g. Los Angeles, San Diego). These findings, combined with observed relationships between high temperature and electricity demand for air-conditioned regions, suggest potential shortfalls in transmission and supply during T90 peak electricity demand periods. When the projected extreme heat and peak demand for electricity are mapped onto current availability, maintaining technology and population constant only for demand side calculations, we find the potential for electricity deficits as high as 17 percent. Similar increases in extreme heat days are suggested for other locations across the U.S. southwest, as well as for developing nations with rapidly increasing electricity demands. Electricity response to recent extreme heat events, such as the July 2006 heat wave in California, suggests that peak electricity demand will challenge current supply, as well as future planned supply capacities when population and income growth are taken into account.

  13. STATEMENT OF PATRICIA HOFFMAN ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND WATER DEVELOPMENT MARCH 30, 2011 Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee, thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss the President's Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 budget request for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE). President Obama has described his vision of how to win the future: out-innovate, out-educate and out-build the rest of the world. We at the Department of

  14. Charting the Future of Energy Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Charting the Future of Energy Storage Charting the Future of Energy Storage August 7, 2013 - 2:53pm Addthis Watch the video above to learn how Urban Electric Power is creating a market for energy storage technology. | Video by Matty Greene, Energy Department. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? As we continue to incorporate more renewable energy into the grid, energy storage technologies will be key to

  15. NREL Launches Interactive Tool for Developing a Cleaner Energy Future -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Releases | NREL Launches Interactive Tool for Developing a Cleaner Energy Future January 9, 2013 The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has created an energy analysis tool to help individuals and educators experiment with future energy use scenarios. The interactive Buildings, Industry, Transportation, Electricity, and Transportation Scenarios (BITES) allows users to explore how changes in energy demand and supply can impact carbon dioxide

  16. Energy futures-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This book covers the proceedings of the Symposium on Energy Futures II. Topics covered include: The National Energy Strategy; The Gas and petroleum industry; energy use in the paper industry; solar energy technology; hydroelectric power; biomass/waste utilization; engine emissions testing laboratories; integrated coal gassification-combined-cycle power plants.

  17. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deichelbohrer, Paul R [Richland, WA

    1986-01-01

    A portable, hand held electric arc saw has a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc to erode a workpiece. Electric current is supplied to the blade by biased brushes and a slip ring which are mounted in the frame. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads stretched between two pulleys are used to facilitate movement of the electric arc saw. The pulleys are formed of dielectric material to electrically insulate the crawler treads from the frame.

  18. Water for future Mars astronauts?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water for future Mars astronauts? Water for future Mars astronauts? Within its first three months on Mars, NASA's Curiosity Rover saw a surprising diversity of soils and sediments ...

  19. 20% wind energy by 2030: Increasing wind energy's contribution to U.S. electricity supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2008-07-01

    Report on the requirements needed to generate twenty percent of the nation's electricity from wind energy by the year 2030.

  20. Electric Efficiency Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In December 2009, the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission's (IURC) ordered utilities to establish demand-side management (DSM) electric savings goals leading to 2.0% reduction of electricity sa...

  1. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    End Use: August 2015 Retail ratesprices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based...

  2. Electric Power Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electric Power Monthly Data for January 2016 | Release Date: March 25, 2016 | Next ... Revisions made to the March 2016 Electric Power Monthly: March 30, 2016 Tables 2.8.A-B ...

  3. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    cheap price of natural gas reduced coals share of electricity production. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power...

  4. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by state Percent Change Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent...

  5. Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > Sq Ft Tables > Table 2a. Electricity Consumption per Sq Ft Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity...

  6. Panasonic Electric Works Ltd formerly Matsushita Electric Works...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Works Ltd (formerly Matsushita Electric Works) Place: Kadoma-shi, Osaka, Japan Zip: 571-8686 Product: Japanese manufacturer of mainly electric appliances including...

  7. Opportunity to Plug Your Car Into the Electric Grid is Arriving

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griego, G.

    2010-06-01

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles are hitting the U.S. market for the first time this year. Similar to hybrid electric vehicles, they feature a larger battery and plug-in charger that allows consumers to replace a portion of their fossil fuel by simply plugging their cars into standard 110-volt outlets at home or wherever outlets are available. If these vehicles become widely accepted, consumers and the environment will benefit, according to a computer modeling study by Xcel Energy and the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Researchers found that each PHEV would cut carbon dioxide emissions in half and save owners up to $450 in annual fuel costs and up to 240 gallons of gasoline. The study also looked at the impact of PHEVs on the electric grid in Colorado if used on a large scale. Integrating large numbers of these vehicles will depend on the adoption of smart-grid technology - adding digital elements to the electric power system to improve efficiency and enable more dynamic communication between consumers and producers of electricity. Using an intelligent monitoring system that keeps track of all electricity flowing in the system, a smart grid could enable optimal PHEV battery-charging much the same way it would enable users to manage their energy use in household appliances and factory processes to reduce energy costs. When a smart grid is implemented, consumers will have many low-cost opportunities to charge PHEVs at different times of the day. Plug-in vehicles could contribute electricity at peak times, such as summer evenings, while taking electricity from the grid at low-use times such as the middle of the night. Electricity rates could offer incentives for drivers to 'give back' electricity when it is most needed and to 'take' it when it is plentiful. The integration of PHEVs, solar arrays and wind turbines into the grid at larger scales will require a more modern electricity system. Technology already exists to allow customers to feed excess power from their own renewable energy systems back to the grid. As more homes and businesses find opportunities to plan power flows to and from the grid for economic gain using their renewable energy systems and PHEVs, more sophisticated systems will be needed. A smart grid will improve the efficiency of energy consumption, manage real-time power flows and provide two-way metering needed to compensate small power producers. Many states are working toward the smart-grid concept, particularly to incorporate renewable sources into their utility grids. According to the Department of Energy, 30 states have developed and adopted renewable portfolio standards, which require up to 20 percent of a state's energy portfolio to come exclusively from renewable sources by this year, and up to 30 percent in the future. NREL has been laying the foundation for both PHEVs and the smart grid for many years with work including modifying hybrid electric cars with plug-in technology; studying fuel economy, batteries and power electronics; exploring options for recharging batteries with solar and wind technologies; and measuring reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. The laboratory participated in development of smart-grid implementation standards with industry, utilities, government and others to guide the integration of renewable and other small electricity generation and storage sources. Dick DeBlasio, principal program manager for electricity programs, is now leading the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standards efforts to connect the dots regarding power generation, communication and information technologies.

  8. The future of energy and climate

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    The talk will review some of the basic facts about the history and present status of the use of energy and its climatic consequences. It is clear that the world will have to change its way of energy production, the sooner the better. Because of the difficulty of storing electric energy, by far the best energy source for the future is thermal solar from the deserts, with overnight thermal storage. I will give some description of the present status of the technologies involved and end up with a pilot project for Europe and North Africa.

  9. Ohio Electricity Restructuring Active

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Restructuring Ohio Restructuring Active Other Links Ohio Electricity Profile Ohio Energy Profile Ohio Web Sites Acronyms for the State of Ohio AEP-American Electric Power CG&E-Cincinnati Gas and Electric Company CRES-Certified Retail Electric Supplier DP&L-Dayton Power and Light Company FERC-Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ISO-Independent System Operator OCC-Ohio Consumers' Counsel PUCO-Public Utilities Commission of Ohio Last Updated: September 2010 08/09: Dominion Energy offered

  10. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.

    1983-08-08

    A portable, hand-held electric arc saw apparatus comprising a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc between the blade and a workpiece of opposite polarity. Electrically conducting means are provided on said frame for transmitting current to said blade. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads are employed to facilitate movement of the apparatus relative to the workpiece.

  11. Annual Power Electric

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Annual Update / Revision Data for 2014 updated: February 16, 2016 February 16, 2016 Table update: The following tables are being withheld pending the availability of additional data: Table 8.5. Revenue and Expense Statistics for U.S. Cooperative Borrower-Owned Electric Utilities Table 8.6.A. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, Actual Table 8.6.B. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation

  12. Electrical utilities relay settings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HACHE, J.M.

    1999-02-24

    This document contains the Hanford transmission and distribution system relay settings that are under the control of Electrical Utilities.

  13. Coordinating Interstate ElectricTransmission Siting: An Introduction to the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Debate | Department of Energy Coordinating Interstate ElectricTransmission Siting: An Introduction to the Debate Coordinating Interstate ElectricTransmission Siting: An Introduction to the Debate In recent years, experts have started drawing att ention to the need to improve the system that transmits electricity from power plants to demand centers. Congestion on existing lines, increased energy demand that suggests a need for new electric transmission and the challenge of connecting

  14. DOE Announces Membership of New Electricity Advisory Committee | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Membership of New Electricity Advisory Committee DOE Announces Membership of New Electricity Advisory Committee April 17, 2008 - 10:50am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the members of its newly-established Electricity Advisory Committee. The 30 inaugural members will serve one- or two-year terms and include some of the nation's top public and private sector leaders in electricity policy, planning and operations. The Committee was

  15. Toward an energy surety future.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatro, Marjorie L.; Jones, Scott A.; Covan, John Morgan; Kuswa, Glenn W.; Menicucci, David F.; Robinett, Rush D. III

    2005-10-01

    Because of the inevitable depletion of fossil fuels and the corresponding release of carbon to the environment, the global energy future is complex. Some of the consequences may be politically and economically disruptive, and expensive to remedy. For the next several centuries, fuel requirements will increase with population, land use, and ecosystem degradation. Current or projected levels of aggregated energy resource use will not sustain civilization as we know it beyond a few more generations. At the same time, issues of energy security, reliability, sustainability, recoverability, and safety need attention. We supply a top-down, qualitative model--the surety model--to balance expenditures of limited resources to assure success while at the same time avoiding catastrophic failure. Looking at U.S. energy challenges from a surety perspective offers new insights on possible strategies for developing solutions to challenges. The energy surety model with its focus on the attributes of security and sustainability could be extrapolated into a global energy system using a more comprehensive energy surety model than that used here. In fact, the success of the energy surety strategy ultimately requires a more global perspective. We use a 200 year time frame for sustainability because extending farther into the future would almost certainly miss the advent and perfection of new technologies or changing needs of society.

  16. Integrating Electricity Subsector

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Integrating Electricity Subsector Failure Scenarios into a Risk Assessment Methodology 3002001181 | DEC 2013 Program Leads Jason D. Christopher Technical Lead, Cyber Security Capabilities & Risk Management Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) Annabelle Lee Senior Technical Executive, Cyber Security Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) For more information on the DOE's cyber security risk management programs, please contact

  17. DOE Electricity Advisory Committee

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electricity Advisory Committee March 2015 1 MEMORANDUM TO: Honorable Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy FROM: Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) Richard Cowart, Chair DATE: March 27, 2015 RE: Recommendations on Smart Grid Research and Development Needs _________________________________________________________________________ Overview The Smart Grid is envisioned to provide the enhancements to ensure higher levels of

  18. RHIC progress and future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montag,C.

    2009-05-04

    The talk reviews RHIC performance, including unprecedented manipulations of polarized beams and recent low energy operations. Achievements and limiting factors of RHIC operation are discussed, such as intrabeam scattering, electron cloud, beam-beam effects, magnet vibrations, and the efficiency of novel countermeasures such as bunched beam stochastic cooling, beam scrubbing and chamber coatings. Future upgrade plans and the pertinent R&D program will also be presented.

  19. Using Maps to Predict Solar Futures | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Using Maps to Predict Solar Futures Using Maps to Predict Solar Futures June 19, 2015 - 1:43pm Addthis Using Maps to Predict Solar Futures Dr. Lidija Sekaric Dr. Lidija Sekaric Solar Energy Technologies Office Director When first exploring the possibility of going solar, many consumers have questions: How many panels will I need for my rooftop? What is this going to cost me? How much will I save on my electricity bills? Awardees of the Energy Department's SunShot Initiative are working to help

  20. Fact #766: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stable than Gasoline Prices All energy prices vary from month to month and year to year. ... (kWh) for residential electricity, the pricing for gasoline is far more volatile. ...