Sample records for years 1949-2011 sum

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2013 Males 27 Females 11 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 8 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 15 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    96 YEAR 2013 Males 69 Females 27 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 9 EN 04 27 NN (Engineering) 26 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 30 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 YEAR 2014 Males 48 Females 33 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 8 EN 04 10 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 27 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 29 NU (TechAdmin Support) 5 YEAR 2014 American Indian...

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2014 Males 18 Females 10 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 9 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska...

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2014 Males 61 Females 24 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 8 EN 04 22 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 28 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska...

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    0 YEAR 2013 Males 48 Females 32 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EJEK 7 EN 04 11 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 33 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska...

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    31 YEAR 2013 Males 20 Females 11 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 12 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,...

  8. Analytic Continuation of Harmonic Sums

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Albino

    2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method for calculating any (nested) harmonic sum to arbitrary accuracy for all complex values of the argument. The method utilizes the relation between harmonic sums and (derivatives of) Hurwitz zeta functions, which allows a harmonic sum to be calculated as an expansion valid for large values of its argument. A program for implementing this method is also provided.

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2014 Males 81 Females 45 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 SL 1 EJEK 25 EN 04 26 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 44 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2014 American Indian...

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    25 Females 10 YEAR 2014 SES 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 8 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 13 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian...

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3 YEAR 2014 Males 59 Females 24 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 4 EN 05 3 EN 04 22 EN 03 8 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 27 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American...

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2013 Males 62 Females 26 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 28 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 25 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 27 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2013 Males 58 Females 27 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 4 EN 05 3 EN 04 21 EN 03 8 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 28 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 Females 25 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 25 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 25 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 25 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native...

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR4 YEAR

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR4 YEAR7

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR43 YEAR

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 20144 YEAR

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR 2013

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR 20138

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR 201387

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR558

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR558563

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR85573380 YEAR

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    YEAR 2012 2013 SES 2 1 -50.00% EN 05 0 1 100.00% EN 04 4 4 0.00% NN (Engineering) 13 12 -7.69% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 13 9 -30.77% NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 1...

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A794826 YEAR

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR 2014

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR 201434

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR4

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR43

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR434

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR43417

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR434170

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR 2012

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR42

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR424

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR4247

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR42478

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861 YEAR

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861 YEAR40

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861 YEAR4096

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111 YEAR

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111 YEAR17

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008748611196 YEAR

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 2014 Males

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 2014 Males16

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 2014

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 20144

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 20144707

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 201447072540

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 563

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 56378

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 5637831

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 56378318

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 28

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 280

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 2801

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 280192

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733

  6. Year

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand Motor444 U.S.Working and.

  7. Summing tree graphs at threshold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.S. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1992-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The solution of the classical field equation generates the sum of all tree graphs. We show that the classical equation reduces to an easily solved ordinary differential equation for certain multiparticle threshold amplitudes and compute these amplitudes.

  8. Sum Frequency Generation for Surface Vibrational Spectroscopy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sum Frequency Generation for Surface Vibrational Spectroscopy Sum Frequency Generation for Surface Vibrational Spectroscopy This customized SFG-VS spectrometer incorporates unique...

  9. Spin Sum Rules and Polarizabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Drechsel

    2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rule and related dispersive integrals connect real and virtual Compton scattering to inclusive photo- and electroproduction. Being based on universal principles as causality, unitarity, and gauge invariance, these relations provide a unique testing ground to study the internal degrees of freedom that hold a system together. The present contribution reviews the spin-dependent sum rules and cross sections of the nucleon. At small momentum transfer, the data sample information on the long range phenomena (Goldstone bosons and collective resonances), whereas the primary degrees of freedom (quarks and gluons) become visible at large momentum transfer (short distance). The rich body of new data covers a wide range of phenomena from coherent to incoherent processes, and from the generalized spin polarizabilities on the low-energy side to higher twist effects in deep inelastic scattering.

  10. Summing Planar Bosonic Open Strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardakci, Korkut

    2006-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In earlier work, planar graphs of massless {phi}{sup 3} theory were summed with the help of the light cone world sheet picture and the mean field approximation. In the present article, the same methods are applied to the problem of summing planar bosonic open strings. They find that in the ground state of the system, string boundaries form a condensate on the world sheet, and a new string emerges from this summation. Its slope is always greater than the initial slope, and it remains non-zero even when the initial slope is set equal to zero. If they assume the initial string tends to a field a theory in the zero slope limit, this result provides evidence for string formation in field theory.

  11. QCD Sum Rules and Compton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Coriano'; Anatoly Radyushkin; George Sterman

    1993-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend QCD sum rule analysis to moderate energy fixed angle Compton scattering. In this kinematic region there is a strong similarity to the sum rule treatment of electromagnetic form factors, although the four-point amplitude requires a modification of the Borel transform. To illustrate our method, we derive the sum rules for helicity amplitudes in pion Compton scattering and estimate their large-$t$ behavior in the local duality approximation.

  12. SEMIDEFINITE PROGRAMMING AND SUMS OF HERMITIAN ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 1, 2009 ... Primary 11E25, 90C22; Secondary 08B20, 13J30. Key words and phrases. noncommutative polynomial, sum of squares, semidefinite program-.

  13. Exact sum rules for inhomogeneous strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amore, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.amore@gmail.com

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive explicit expressions for the sum rules of the eigenvalues of inhomogeneous strings with arbitrary density and with different boundary conditions. We show that the sum rule of order N may be obtained in terms of a diagrammatic expansion, with (N?1)!/2 independent diagrams. These sum rules are used to derive upper and lower bounds to the energy of the fundamental mode of an inhomogeneous string; we also show that it is possible to improve these approximations taking into account the asymptotic behavior of the spectrum and applying the Shanks transformation to the sequence of approximations obtained to the different orders. We discuss three applications of these results. -- Highlights: •We derive an explicit expression for the sum rules of an inhomogeneous string. •We obtain a diagrammatic representation for the sum rules of a given order. •We obtain precise bounds on the lowest eigenvalue of the string.

  14. SU(3) Sum Rules for Charm Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuval Grossman; Dean J Robinson

    2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present flavor SU(3) sum rules for $D \\to PP$ and $D \\to PV$ decay amplitudes, that are valid to second order in symmetry breaking by the strange quark mass spurion. Decay rate sum rules are also computed to this order. Particular attention is given to sum rules arising from the isospin and U-spin subgroups, the former providing sensitive tests for alternative sources of SU(3) breaking. We apply the latter together with the postulated $\\Delta U = 0$ rule for the large penguin picture to predict the ratio and difference of the direct CP asymmetries for $D \\to KK^*$ and $D \\to \\pi \\rho$.

  15. Vibrational sum frequency study on biological interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Soon Mi

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    , which is related to molecular orientation. Since the polarizabilities of molecules in bulk phase will be canceled out, a sum frequency signal can only be generated from interfaces where the inversion symmetry is broken. Because of its interfacial...

  16. A Bayesian analysis of QCD sum rules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gubler, Philipp; Oka, Makoto [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A new technique has recently been developed, in which the Maximum Entropy Method is used to analyze QCD sum rules. This approach has the virtue of being able to directly generate the spectral function of a given operator, without the need of making an assumption about its specific functional form. To investigate whether useful results can be extracted within this method, we have first studied the vector meson channel, where QCD sum rules are traditionally known to provide a valid description of the spectral function. Our results show a significant peak in the region of the experimentally observed {rho}-meson mass, which is in agreement with earlier QCD sum rules studies and suggests that the Maximum Entropy Method is a strong tool for analyzing QCD sum rules.

  17. On a concentration inequality for sums of independent isotropic vectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cranston, Michael Craig; Molchanov, Stanislav Alekseevich

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hoeffding. Probability inequalities for sums of boundedMarek Kanter. Probability inequalities for convex sets andOn a concentration inequality for sums of independent

  18. Physics 214 Winter 2013 The Poisson sum formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Physics 214 Winter 2013 The Poisson sum formula The Poisson sum formula takes on a number will use this version of the Poisson sum formula in solving problem 14.13 of Jackson. To prove this formula sum formula is as follows. Given a function f(t) and its Fourier transform, F() - eit f(t)dt , (7

  19. Physics 214 Winter 2013 The Poisson sum formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Physics 214 Winter 2013 The Poisson sum formula The Poisson sum formula takes on a number of di will use this version of the Poisson sum formula in solving problem 14.13 of Jackson. To prove this formula the desired result announced in eq. (1). Actually, the most common form for the Poisson sum formula

  20. QCD Sum Rules and Virtual Compton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Radyushkin

    1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk I report on recent progress in a few areas closely related to the virtual Compton scattering studies. In particular, I discuss the quark-hadron duality estimate of the $\\gamma^* p \\to \\Delta^+$ transition, QCD sum rule calculation of the $\\gamma \\gamma^* \\to \\pi^0$ form factor, and application of perturbative QCD to deeply virtual Compton scattering at small $t$.

  1. BLEI'S INEQUALITY AND COORDINATEWISE MULTIPLE SUMMING OPERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinnamon, Gordon J.

    BLEI'S INEQUALITY AND COORDINATEWISE MULTIPLE SUMMING OPERATORS DUMITRU POPA AND GORD SINNAMON are proved. When specialized to single-function inequalities they include a pair of inequalities due to Blei and a recent extension of Blei's inequality. The first of these inequalities is applied to give explicit

  2. Sum rule description of color transparency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frankfurt, L. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)); Greenberg, W.R.; Miller, G.A. (Physics Department, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)); Strikman, M. (Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States))

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The assumption that a small pointlike configuration does not interact with nucleons leads to a new set of sum rules that are interpreted as models of the baryon-nucleon interaction. These models are rendered semirealistic by requiring consistency with data for cross section fluctuations in proton-proton diffractive collisions.

  3. On certain sum rules for the hydrogen atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francisco M. Fernández

    2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that some sum rules for the hydrogen atom derived recently are incorrect because the authors did not take into account the continuous part of the spectrum in the sum over intermediate states.

  4. Simplifying additivity problems using direct sum constructions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motohisa Fukuda; Michael M. Wolf

    2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the additivity problems for the classical capacity of quantum channels, the minimal output entropy and its convex closure. We show for each of them that additivity for arbitrary pairs of channels holds iff it holds for arbitrary equal pairs, which in turn can be taken to be unital. In a similar sense, weak additivity is shown to imply strong additivity for any convex entanglement monotone. The implications are obtained by considering direct sums of channels (or states) for which we show how to obtain several information theoretic quantities from their values on the summands. This provides a simple and general tool for lifting additivity results.

  5. Scattering and; Delay, Scale, and Sum Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehman, S K

    2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    How do we see? What is the mechanism? Consider standing in an open field on a clear sunny day. In the field are a yellow dog and a blue ball. From a wave-based remote sensing point of view the sun is a source of radiation. It is a broadband electromagnetic source which, for the purposes of this introduction, only the visible spectrum is considered (approximately 390 to 750 nanometers or 400 to 769 TeraHertz). The source emits an incident field into the known background environment which, for this example, is free space. The incident field propagates until it strikes an object or target, either the yellow dog or the blue ball. The interaction of the incident field with an object results in a scattered field. The scattered field arises from a mis-match between the background refractive index, considered to be unity, and the scattering object refractive index ('yellow' for the case of the dog, and 'blue' for the ball). This is also known as an impedance mis-match. The scattering objects are referred to as secondary sources of radiation, that radiation being the scattered field which propagates until it is measured by the two receivers known as 'eyes'. The eyes focus the measured scattered field to form images which are processed by the 'wetware' of the brain for detection, identification, and localization. When time series representations of the measured scattered field are available, the image forming focusing process can be mathematically modeled by delayed, scaled, and summed migration. This concept of optical propagation, scattering, and focusing have one-to-one equivalents in the acoustic realm. This document is intended to present the basic concepts of scalar scattering and migration used in wide band wave-based remote sensing and imaging. The terms beamforming and (delayed, scaled, and summed) migration are used interchangeably but are to be distinguished from the narrow band (frequency domain) beamforming to determine the direction of arrival of a signal, and seismic migration in which wide band time series are shifted but not to form images per se. Section 3 presents a mostly graphically-based motivation and summary of delay, scale, and sum beamforming. The model for incident field propagation in free space is derived in Section 4 under specific assumptions. General object scattering is derived in Section 5 and simplified under the Born approximation in Section 6. The model of this section serves as the basis in the derivation of time-domain migration. The Foldy-Lax, full point scatterer scattering, method is derived in Section 7. With the previous forward models in hand, delay, scale, and sum beamforming is derived in Section 8. Finally, proof-of-principle experiments are present in Section 9.

  6. Sum rules for polarization-dependent x-ray absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ankudinov, A.; Rehr, J.J. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete set of sum rules is obtained for polarization-dependent x-ray-absorption fine structure and x-ray circular magnetic dichroism (CMD), analogous to those for CMD derived by Thole [ital et] [ital al]. These sum rules relate x-ray-absorption coefficients to the ground-state expectation values of various operators. Problems with applying these sum rules are discussed.

  7. Gauss Optics and Gauss Sum on an Optical Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shigeki Matsutani

    2008-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In the previous article (Found Phys. Lett. {\\bf{16}} 325-341), we showed that a reciprocity of the Gauss sums is connected with the wave and particle complementary. In this article, we revise the previous investigation by considering a relation between the Gauss optics and the Gauss sum based upon the recent studies of the Weil representation for a finite group.

  8. Perturbative Check of the Action and Energy Lattice Sum Rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Feuerbacher

    2003-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Lattice sum rules are checked using lattice perturbation theory. The action sum rule gives a relation between the quark-antiquark potential, its logarithmic derivative with respect to distance and the expectation value of the action; the energy sum rule expresses the potential as the sum of the energy in the gluon fields and of an anomalous term. Two different independent calculations of the quark-antiquark potential are presented, and the transversality of the gluonic vacuum polarization on the lattice is proven. The crucial part of the action sum rule is an identity whose explicit check using perturbation theory provides methods and results which are useful for checking the energy sum rule. Additionally, the gauge invariance of the expectation value of the Wilson loop up to next-to-leading order is proven. The possibility of restricting the expectation value of the action to one fixed time slice is discussed. The energy sum rule is checked perturbatively up to next-to-leading order and shown to be satisfied with good numerical accuracy. The various contributions to the quark-antiquark potential are analyzed, and the restriction of the expectation value of the sum over all spatial plaquettes (the energy in the magnetic fields) to one fixed time slice is examined.

  9. Sum Rules and Cutoff Effects in Wilson Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey B. Meyer

    2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the transfer matrix formalism to derive non-perturbative sum rules in Wilson's lattice QCD with N_f flavours of quarks. The discretization errors on these identities are treated in detail. As an application, it is shown how the sum rules can be exploited to give improved estimates of the continuum spectrum and static potential.

  10. Analytic and algorithmic aspects of generalized harmonic sums and polylogarithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablinger, Jakob; Schneider, Carsten [Research Institute for Symbolic Computation (RISC), Johannes Kepler University, Altenbergerstraße 69, A-4040, Linz (Austria)] [Research Institute for Symbolic Computation (RISC), Johannes Kepler University, Altenbergerstraße 69, A-4040, Linz (Austria); Blümlein, Johannes [Deutsches Elektronen–Synchrotron, DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany)] [Deutsches Elektronen–Synchrotron, DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent three-loop calculations of massive Feynman integrals within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) and, e.g., in recent combinatorial problems the so-called generalized harmonic sums (in short S-sums) arise. They are characterized by rational (or real) numerator weights also different from ±1. In this article we explore the algorithmic and analytic properties of these sums systematically. We work out the Mellin and inverse Mellin transform which connects the sums under consideration with the associated Poincaré iterated integrals, also called generalized harmonic polylogarithms. In this regard, we obtain explicit analytic continuations by means of asymptotic expansions of the S-sums which started to occur frequently in current QCD calculations. In addition, we derive algebraic and structural relations, like differentiation with respect to the external summation index and different multi-argument relations, for the compactification of S-sum expressions. Finally, we calculate algebraic relations for infinite S-sums, or equivalently for generalized harmonic polylogarithms evaluated at special values. The corresponding algorithms and relations are encoded in the computer algebra package HarmonicSums.

  11. QCD sum rules on the complex Borel plane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ken-Ji Araki; Keisuke Ohtani; Philipp Gubler; Makoto Oka

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Borel transformed QCD sum rules conventionally use a real valued parameter (the Borel mass) for specifying the exponential weight over which hadronic spectral functions are averaged. In this paper, it is shown that the Borel mass can be generalized to have complex values and that new classes of sum rules can be derived from the resulting averages over the spectral functions. The real and imaginary parts of these novel sum rules turn out to have damped oscillating kernels and potentially contain a larger amount of information on the hadronic spectrum than the real valued QCD sum rules. As a first practical test, we have formulated the complex Borel sum rules for the phi meson channel and have analyzed them using the maximum entropy method, by which we can extract the most probable spectral function from the sum rules without strong assumptions on its functional form. As a result, it is demonstrated that, compared to earlier studies, the complex valued sum rules allow us to extract the spectral function with a significantly improved resolution and thus to study more detailed structures of the hadronic spectrum than previously possible.

  12. Power Corrections to QCD Sum Rules for Compton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Coriano'

    1993-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend previous work on sum rules for the invariant amplitudes of pion Compton scattering by deriving a complete lowest order perturbative spectral function - and its leading non perturbative power corr ections - for a specific combination of the two helicities $(H_1 + H_2)$ of this process. Using some properties of a modified version of the Borel transform, we develop a method of calculation of the gluonic corrections which can be easily extended to other similar reactions, such as proton Compton scattering. A preliminary comparison of the new sum rule with the pion form factor sum rule is made.

  13. Shear spectral sum rule in a nonconformal gravity dual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, Todd; Gale, Charles; Jeon, Sangyong [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A2T8 (Canada); Lee, Su Houng [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A sum rule which relates a stress-energy tensor correlator to thermodynamic functions is examined within the context of a simple nonconformal gravity dual. Such a sum rule was previously derived using AdS/CFT for conformal N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory, but we show that it does not generalize to the nonconformal theory under consideration. We provide a generalized sum rule and numerically verify its validity. A useful by-product of the calculation is the computation of the spectral density in a strongly coupled nonconformal theory. Qualitative features of the spectral densities and implications for lattice measurements of transport coefficients are discussed.

  14. Sums of Squares Relaxations of Polynomial Semidefinite Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo Institute of Technology. 2-12-1 Oh-Okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 Japan. Sums of ...... 5.2 Linearization leading to an SDP relaxation. Since the ...

  15. An Efficient Global Optimization Algorithm for Nonlinear Sum-of ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    to nonlinear sum-of-ratios problem arising in image processing, engineering and ... 2010 Mathematics subject Classification: 90C26, 90C32, 65K05 ... optimization of the average element shape quality in the finite element method, computer.

  16. Calculation of Massless Feynman Integrals using Harmonic Sums

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Bekavac

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the evaluation of the epsilon expansion of multi-loop massless Feynman integrals is introduced. This method is based on the Gegenbauer polynomial technique and the expansion of the Gamma function in terms of harmonic sums. Algorithms for the evaluation of nested and harmonic sums are used to reduce the expressions to get analytical or numerical results for the expansion coefficients. Methods to increase the precision of numerical results are discussed.

  17. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Adsorbed Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins at Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Solid-Water Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holinga, George J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 2 Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy2.1. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational SpectroscopyIntroduction Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational

  18. Interfacial Water Organization and Ion Distributions Investigated with Vibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy: Answering Fundamental Questions for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sum frequency generation (VSFG) and heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation (HD above their counterions. However, high valency anions exist below their counter cations, #12;iv causing

  19. Polarizability sum rule across real and virtual Compton scattering processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pascalutsa, Vladimir

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a sum rule relating various electromagnetic properties of a spin-1/2 particle and consider its empirical implications for the proton. Given the measured values of the proton anomalous magnetic moment, electric and magnetic charge radii, the slope of the first moment of the spin structure function $g_1$, and the recently determined proton spin polarizability $\\gamma_{E1M2}$, the sum rule yields a constraint on the low-momentum behavior of a generalized polarizability appearing in virtual Compton scattering. With the help of the presently ongoing measurements of different electromagnetic observables at the MAMI, Jefferson Lab, and HI$\\gamma$S facilities, the sum rule will provide a model-independent test of the low-energy spin structure of the nucleon.

  20. Heavy hybrid mesons in the QCD sum rule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng-Zhi Huang; Shi-Lin Zhu

    2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the spectra of the hybrid mesons containing one heavy quark ($q\\bar{Q}g$) within the framework of QCD sum rules in the heavy quark limit. The derived sum rules are stable with the variation of the Borel parameter within their corresponding working ranges. The extracted binding energy for the heavy hybrid doublets $H^h(S^h)$ and $M^h(T^h)$ is almost degenerate. We also calculate the pionic couplings between these heavy hybrid and the conventional heavy meson doublets using the light-cone QCD sum rule method. The extracted coupling constants are rather small as a whole. With these couplings we make a rough estimate of the partial widths of these pionic decay channels.

  1. Testing solar lepton mixing sum rules in neutrino oscillation experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballett, Peter; Luhn, Christoph; Pascoli, Silvia; Schmidt, Michael A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small discrete family symmetries such as S4, A4 or A5 may lead to simple leading-order predictions for the neutrino mixing matrix such as the bimaximal, tribimaximal or golden ratio mixing patterns, which may be brought into agreement with experimental data with the help of corrections from the charged-lepton sector. Such scenarios generally lead to relations among the parameters of the physical leptonic mixing matrix known as solar lepton mixing sum rules. In this article, we present a simple derivation of such solar sum rules, valid for arbitrary neutrino and charged lepton mixing angles and phases, assuming only {\\theta}13^{\

  2. Finite Temperature Sum Rules in Lattice Gauge Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey B. Meyer

    2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive non-perturbative sum rules in SU($N$) lattice gauge theory at finite temperature. They relate the susceptibilities of the trace anomaly and energy-momentum tensor to temperature derivatives of the thermodynamic potentials. Two of them have been derived previously in the continuum and one is new. In all cases, at finite latttice spacing there are important corrections to the continuum sum rules that are only suppressed by the bare coupling $g_0^2$. We also show how the discretization errors affecting the thermodynamic potentials can be controlled by computing these susceptibilities.

  3. Simplex with Sum of Infeasibilities for SMT New York University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Clark W.

    Simplex with Sum of Infeasibilities for SMT Tim King New York University Clark Barrett Bruno reasoning within Satisfiability Modulo Theories (SMT) solvers is the Simplex for DPLL(T) algorithm given convergence on some problems. More traditional Simplex algorithms minimize a global criterion to determine

  4. allelic sums test: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    allelic sums test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Allele age and a test for selection...

  5. A Wave Analysis of the Subset Sum Problem Mark Jelasity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jelasity, Márk

    A Wave Analysis of the Subset Sum Problem M´ark Jelasity Research Group of Artificial Intelligence the wave model, a novel approach on analyzing the behavior of GAs. Our aim is to give techniques that have and effective heuristics on certain problem classes. The wave analysis is the process of building wave models

  6. Computing Partial Eigenvalue Sum in Electronic Structure Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Zhaojun

    and CPU time. In the application of electronic structure calculations in molecular dynamics, the newComputing Partial Eigenvalue Sum in Electronic Structure Calculations Z. Bai M. Faheyy G. Golubz M where computation of the total energy of an electronic structure requires the evaluation of partial

  7. Counter-ions at single charged wall: Sum rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladislav Samaj

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For inhomogeneous classical Coulomb fluids in thermal equilibrium, like the jellium or the two-component Coulomb gas, there exists a variety of exact sum rules which relate the particle one-body and two-body densities. The necessary condition for these sum rules is that the Coulomb fluid possesses good screening properties, i.e. the particle correlation functions or the averaged charge inhomogeneity, say close to a wall, exhibit a short-range (usually exponential) decay. In this work, we study equilibrium statistical mechanics of an electric double layer with counter-ions only, i.e. a globally neutral system of equally charged point-like particles in the vicinity of a plain hard wall carrying a fixed uniform surface charge density of opposite sign. At large distances from the wall, the one-body and two-body counter-ion densities go to zero slowly according to the inverse-power law. In spite of the absence of screening, all known sum rules are shown to hold for two exactly solvable cases of the present system: in the weak-coupling Poisson-Boltzmann limit (in any spatial dimension larger than one) and at a special free-fermion coupling constant in two dimensions. This fact indicates an extended validity of the sum rules and provides a consistency check for reasonable theoretical approaches.

  8. CONTRACTION AND SUM OF SQUARES ANALYSIS OF HCCI ENGINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaver, Gregory M.

    CONTRACTION AND SUM OF SQUARES ANALYSIS OF HCCI ENGINES Gregory M. Shaver , Aleksandar Koji´c , J ignition (HCCI), requires not only precise valve control but also a combustion control strategy, HCCI has no specific event that initiates combustion. Since exhaust gas is re-inducted from

  9. On Stirling numbers and Euler sums Victor Adamchik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamchik, Victor

    On Stirling numbers and Euler sums Victor Adamchik Wolfram Research Inc., 100 Trade Center Dr of Stirling numbers of the first kind for non­integer values of their arguments. We discuss the analytic representations of Stirling numbers through harmonic numbers, the generalized hy­ pergeometric function

  10. On Stirling numbers and Euler sums Victor Adamchik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamchik, Victor

    On Stirling numbers and Euler sums Victor Adamchik Wolfram Research Inc., 100 Trade Center Dr of Stirling numbers of the rst kind for non-integer values of their arguments. We discuss the analytic representations of Stirling numbers through harmonic numbers, the generalized hy- pergeometric function

  11. QCD sum rules and neutron-proton mass difference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, K.; Hwang, W.P. (Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10764 (Taiwan, Province of China)); Henley, E.M. (Department of Physics FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)); Kisslinger, L.S. (Department of Physics, Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States))

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the method of QCD sum rules to investigate the neutron-proton mass difference. We include diagrams consistently up to dimension 9, assuming different [ital up] and [ital down] current-quark masses ([ital m][sub [ital u

  12. Ramanujan sums for signal processing of low frequency noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Planat; H. C. Rosu; S. Perrine

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aperiodic (low frequency) spectrum may originate from the error term in the mean value of an arithmetical function such as M\\"obius function or Mangoldt function, which are coding sequences for prime numbers. In the discrete Fourier transform the analyzing wave is periodic and not well suited to represent the low frequency regime. In place we introduce a new signal processing tool based on the Ramanujan sums c_q(n), well adapted to the analysis of arithmetical sequences with many resonances p/q. The sums are quasi-periodic versus the time n of the resonance and aperiodic versus the order q of the resonance. New results arise from the use of this Ramanujan-Fourier transform (RFT) in the context of arithmetical and experimental signals

  13. QCD sum rules for the baryon octet in nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. L. Kryshen

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The baryon self-energies are expressed in terms of the QCD condensates of the lowest dimension in symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter within the QCD sum-rule approach. The self-energies are shown to satisfy the Gell-Mann--Okubo relations in the linear SU(3) breaking approximation. The results are in qualitative agreement with those obtained by the standard nuclear physics methods.

  14. Transverse quark distribution in mesons: QCD sum rule approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.H.; Hatsuda, T.; Miller, G.A. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washingtion, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States) Department of Physics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of))

    1994-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    QCD sum rules are used to compute the first few moments of the mesonic quark momentum. Transverse, longitudinal, and mixed transverse-longitudinal components are examined. The transverse size of the pion is shown to be dictated by the gluon condensate, even though the mass and the longitudinal distribution are dominated by the quark condensate. The implications of our results for color transparency physics and finite temperature QCD are discussed.

  15. Generic implementations of parallel prefix sums and its applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Tao

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ); } else { // the task should do: // y[i] = x[i]; no need for d d = 0; } new_tasks.push_back( new task_type(taskid, subrange, d, bin_op)); // create a new task with this "taskid" 26 // that will work on this "subrange", // whose task-sepcific data is "d...]. They are one of the most important building blocks for parallel algorithms. The definition of the prefix sums problem is [4]: Given a binary associative operator ?, and an ordered set of n elements 3 [a0, a1, ..., an?1], return the ordered set [a0, (a0?a1...

  16. Sum rule for the double virtual Compton scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. A. Kuraev; S. Bakmaev; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson; V. V. Bytev

    2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The two photon exchange amplitude is investigated in frame of analytic properties of the virtual Compton scattering amplitude as a function of the invariant mass squared of the intermediate hadronic state. A sum rule is built, based on arguments from analyticity. It relates the differential cross section of elastic electron-proton scattering including form factors, and the cross section of inelastic scattering channel, with a contribution of nucleon anti-nucleon pair production arising from the Fermi statistics. The last term is calculated in frame of a simple model of nucleon-pion interaction.

  17. Justifying the Naive Partonic Sum Rule for Proton Spin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiangdong Ji; Jian-Hui Zhang; Yong Zhao

    2015-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a theoretical basis for understanding the spin structure of the proton in terms of the spin and orbital angular momenta of free quarks and gluons in Feynman's parton picture. We show that each term in the Jaffe-Manohar spin sum rule can be related to the matrix element of a gauge-invariant, but frame-dependent operator through a matching formula in large-momentum effective field theory. We present all the matching conditions for the spin content at one-loop order in perturbation theory, which provide a basis to calculate parton orbital angular momentum in lattice QCD at leading logarithmic accuracy.

  18. Justifying the naive partonic sum rule for proton spin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ji, Xiangdong; Zhang, Jian-Hui; Zhao, Yong (ORCID:0000000226886415)

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a theoretical basis for understanding the spin structure of the proton in terms of the spin and orbital angular momenta of free quarks and gluons in Feynman’s parton picture. We show that each term in the Jaffe–Manohar spin sum rule can be related to the matrix element of a gauge-invariant, but frame-dependent operator through a matching formula in large-momentum effective field theory. We present all the matching conditions for the spin content at one-loop order in perturbation theory, which provide a basis to calculate parton orbital angular momentum in lattice QCD at leading logarithmic accuracy.

  19. Communication: Kinetics of scavenging of small, nucleating clusters: First nucleation theorem and sum rules

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Malila, Jussi; McGraw, Robert; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.

    2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite recent advances in monitoring nucleation from a vapor at close-to-molecular resolution, the identity of the critical cluster, forming the bottleneck for the nucleation process, remains elusive. During past twenty years, the first nucleation theorem has been often used to extract the size of the critical cluster from nucleation rate measurements. However, derivations of the first nucleation theorem invoke certain questionable assumptions that may fail, e.g., in the case of atmospheric new particle formation, including absence of subcritical cluster losses and heterogeneous nucleation on pre-existing nanoparticles. Here we extend the kinetic derivation of the first nucleation theorem to give amore »general framework to include such processes, yielding sum rules connecting the size dependent particle formation and loss rates to the corresponding loss-free nucleation rate and the apparent critical size from a naïve application of the first nucleation theorem that neglects them.« less

  20. Communication: Kinetics of scavenging of small, nucleating clusters: First nucleation theorem and sum rules

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Malila, Jussi [Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, Finland; McGraw, Robert [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Laaksonen, Ari [Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, Finland; Finnish Meteorological Institute, Climate Research, Finland; Lehtinen, Kari E. J. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, Finland; Finnish Meteorological Institute, Atmospheric Research Centre of Eastern Finland, Finland

    2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite recent advances in monitoring nucleation from a vapor at close-to-molecular resolution, the identity of the critical cluster, forming the bottleneck for the nucleation process, remains elusive. During past twenty years, the first nucleation theorem has been often used to extract the size of the critical cluster from nucleation rate measurements. However, derivations of the first nucleation theorem invoke certain questionable assumptions that may fail, e.g., in the case of atmospheric new particle formation, including absence of subcritical cluster losses and heterogeneous nucleation on pre-existing nanoparticles. Here we extend the kinetic derivation of the first nucleation theorem to give a general framework to include such processes, yielding sum rules connecting the size dependent particle formation and loss rates to the corresponding loss-free nucleation rate and the apparent critical size from a naïve application of the first nucleation theorem that neglects them.

  1. Dragon Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Can you believe it? It's New Year again. It seems like only yesterday we were celebrating the advent of the year of the Rabbit and now, here it is, the year of the Dragon. January 22nd is New Year's ...

  2. Sum-Frequency Generation from Chiral Media and Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Na

    2006-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Sum frequency generation (SFG), a second-order nonlinear optical process, is electric-dipole forbidden in systems with inversion symmetry. As a result, it has been used to study chiral media and interfaces, systems intrinsically lacking inversion symmetry. This thesis describes recent progresses in the applications of and new insights into SFG from chiral media and interfaces. SFG from solutions of chiral amino acids is investigated, and a theoretical model explaining the origin and the strength of the chiral signal in electronic-resonance SFG spectroscopy is discussed. An interference scheme that allows us to distinguish enantiomers by measuring both the magnitude and the phase of the chiral SFG response is described, as well as a chiral SFG microscope producing chirality-sensitive images with sub-micron resolution. Exploiting atomic and molecular parity nonconservation, the SFG process is also used to solve the Ozma problems. Sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy is used to obtain the adsorption behavior of leucine molecules at air-water interfaces. With poly(tetrafluoroethylene) as a model system, we extend the application of this surface-sensitive vibrational spectroscopy to fluorine-containing polymers.

  3. Direct Sum Theorem for Bounded Round Quantum Communication Complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dave Touchette

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove a direct sum theorem for bounded round entanglement-assisted quantum communication complexity. To do so, we use the fully quantum definition for information cost and complexity that we recently introduced, and use both the fact that information is a lower bound on the communication, and the fact that a direct sum property holds for quantum information complexity. We then give a protocol for compressing a single copy of a protocol down to its quantum information cost, up to terms depending on the number of rounds and the allowed increase in error. Two important tools to derive this protocol are a smooth conditional min-entropy bound for a one-shot quantum state redistribution protocol, and the quantum substate theorem of Jain, Radhakrishnan and Sen (FOCS'02) to transform this bound into a von Neumann conditional entropy bound. This result further establishes the newly introduced notions of quantum information cost and complexity as the correct quantum generalisations of the classical ones in the standard communication complexity setting. Finding such a quantum generalization of information complexity was one of the open problem recently raised by Braverman (STOC'12).

  4. CUDACUDA based Rendering of 3Dbased Rendering of 3DCUDACUDA based Rendering of 3Dbased Rendering of 3DCUDACUDA--based Rendering of 3Dbased Rendering of 3D Minkowski SumsMinkowski Sums

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    CUDACUDA based Rendering of 3Dbased Rendering of 3DCUDACUDA based Rendering of 3Dbased Rendering of 3DCUDACUDA--based Rendering of 3Dbased Rendering of 3D Minkowski SumsMinkowski Sums CUDACUDA--based Rendering of 3Dbased Rendering of 3D Minkowski SumsMinkowski Sums CS267 Projectj Wei Li #12;Background

  5. On the Equivalence of Linear Programming Problems and Zero-Sum ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilan Adler

    2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 18, 2010 ... Abstract: In 1951, Dantzig showed the equivalence of linear programming and two-person zero-sum games. However, in the description of his ...

  6. New Sum Rules from Low Energy Compton Scattering on Arbitrary Spin Target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hovhannes R. Grigoryan; Massimo Porrati

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive two sum rules by studying the low energy Compton scattering on a target of arbitrary (nonzero) spin j. In the first sum rule, we consider the possibility that the intermediate state in the scattering can have spin |j \\pm 1| and the same mass as the target. The second sum rule applies if the theory at hand possesses intermediate narrow resonances with masses different from the mass of the scatterer. These sum rules are generalizations of the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn-Weinberg sum rule. Along with the requirement of tree level unitarity, they relate different low energy couplings in the theory. Using these sum rules, we show that in certain cases the gyromagnetic ratio can differ from the "natural" value g=2, even at tree level, without spoiling perturbative unitarity. These sum rules can be used as constraints applicable to all supergravity and higher-spin theories that contain particles charged under some U(1) gauge field. In particular, applied to four dimensional N=8 supergravity in a spontaneously broken phase, these sum rules suggest that for the theory to have a good ultraviolet behavior, additional massive states need to be present, such as those coming from the embedding of the N=8 supergravity in type II superstring theory. We also discuss the possible implications of the sum rules for QCD in the large-N_c limit.

  7. Surface Studies of Aqueous Methanol Solutions by Vibrational Broad Bandwidth Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surface Studies of Aqueous Methanol Solutions by Vibrational Broad Bandwidth Sum Frequency methanol (CH3OH) and aqueous methanol solutions were investigated using broad bandwidth sum frequency of methanol molecules at the air-liquid interfaces of neat methanol and aqueous methanol solutions. However

  8. Sum rules for inhomogeneous Coulomb fluids, and ideal conductor boundary conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of particles interacting through Coulomb's law plus some short-range interaction (a hard core repulsion389 Sum rules for inhomogeneous Coulomb fluids, and ideal conductor boundary conditions B of an inhomogeneous Coulomb fluid is shown to obey a sum rule involving electrical multipole moments of arbitrary

  9. QCD sum rule determination of the charm-quark mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodenstein, S. [Centre for Theoretical and Mathematical Physics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Bordes, J.; Penarrocha, J. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universitat de Valencia, and Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Centro Mixto Universitat de Valencia-CSIC (Spain); Dominguez, C. A. [Centre for Theoretical and Mathematical Physics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Department of Physics, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch 7600 (South Africa); Schilcher, K. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Staudingerweg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    QCD sum rules involving mixed inverse moment integration kernels are used in order to determine the running charm-quark mass in the MS scheme. Both the high and the low energy expansion of the vector current correlator are involved in this determination. The optimal integration kernel turns out to be of the form p(s)=1-(s{sub 0}/s){sup 2}, where s{sub 0} is the onset of perturbative QCD. This kernel enhances the contribution of the well known narrow resonances, and reduces the impact of the data in the range s{approx_equal}20-25 GeV{sup 2}. This feature leads to a substantial reduction in the sensitivity of the results to changes in s{sub 0}, as well as to a much reduced impact of the experimental uncertainties in the higher resonance region. The value obtained for the charm-quark mass in the MS scheme at a scale of 3 GeV is m{sub c}(3 GeV)=987{+-}9 MeV, where the error includes all sources of uncertainties added in quadrature.

  10. Complex-energy approach to sum rules within nuclear density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nobuo Hinohara; Markus Kortelainen; Witold Nazarewicz; Erik Olsen

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The linear response of the nucleus to an external field contains unique information about the effective interaction, correlations, and properties of its excited states. To characterize the response, it is useful to use its energy-weighted moments, or sum rules. By comparing computed sum rules with experimental values, the information content of the response can be utilized in the optimization process of the nuclear Hamiltonian or EDF. But the additional information comes at a price: compared to the ground state, computation of excited states is more demanding. To establish an efficient framework to compute sum rules of the response that is adaptable to the optimization of the nuclear EDF and large-scale surveys of collective strength, we have developed a new technique within the complex-energy FAM based on the QRPA. To compute sum rules, we carry out contour integration of the response function in the complex-energy plane. We benchmark our results against the conventional matrix formulation of the QRPA theory, the Thouless theorem for the energy-weighted sum rule, and the dielectric theorem for the inverse energy-weighted sum rule. We demonstrate that calculated sum-rule values agree with those obtained from the matrix formulation of the QRPA. We also discuss the applicability of both the Thouless theorem about the energy-weighted sum rule and the dielectric theorem for the inverse energy-weighted sum rule to nuclear density functional theory in cases when the EDF is not based on a Hamiltonian. The proposed sum-rule technique based on the complex-energy FAM is a tool of choice when optimizing effective interactions or energy functionals. The method is very efficient and well-adaptable to parallel computing. The FAM formulation is especially useful when standard theorems based on commutation relations involving the nuclear Hamiltonian and external field cannot be used.

  11. Extending the response of the sum coincidence spectrometer to multiple gamma radiation cascades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helton, Victor Dean

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tubes, and cathode followers, respectively. D. D. Sum represents the differ- ential discriminator of the sum energies. Rl and R2 are resistors and RVI is a potentiometer Consider first a gamma-radiation cascade in which two gamma rays are coincident.... Setting the differential discriminator on the sum of the two gamma-ray energies allows the analyzer to be gated only when the full energy of both gamma rays is absorbed in the detectors. The analyzer may be gated by the absorption of the full energies...

  12. A Note on the Use of Sum in the Logic of Proofs Roman Kuznets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jäger, Gerhard

    A Note on the Use of Sum in the Logic of Proofs Roman Kuznets Institut f¨ur Informatik und angewandte Mathematik Universit¨at Bern Neubr¨uckstrasse 10, 3012 Bern, Switzerland kuznets

  13. Windblow by lump sum online (England and Wales) November 2009 THE FORESTRY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AND CONDITIONS FOR STANDARD PURCHASE OF TREES IN AREAS DAMAGED BY WINDBLOW BY LUMP SUM You have offered, hazardous, toxic, radioactive or dangerous waste whether or not such emission, substance or waste

  14. Windblow by lump sum online (Scotland) November 2009 THE FORESTRY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AND CONDITIONS FOR STANDARD PURCHASE OF TREES IN AREAS DAMAGED BY WINDBLOW BY LUMP SUM You have offered, hazardous, toxic, radioactive or dangerous waste whether or not such emission, substance or waste

  15. Leontief Economies Encode Nonzero Sum Two-Player Games Bruno Codenotti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saberi, Amin

    Leontief Economies Encode Nonzero Sum Two-Player Games Bruno Codenotti Amin Saberi Kasturi@tti-c.org. Department of Management Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305. Email: saberi

  16. Gaussian approximations and multiplier bootstrap for maxima of sums of high-dimensional random vectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chetverikov, Denis

    We derive a Gaussian approximation result for the maximum of a sum of high-dimensional random vectors. Specifically, we establish conditions under which the distribution of the maximum is approximated by that of the maximum ...

  17. Maximizing Sum Rate and Minimizing MSE on Multiuser Downlink: Optimality, Fast Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiang, Mung

    -Input-Single-Output (MISO) channel, where the transmitter (at the base station) is equipped with an antenna array and each, e.g., increasing the total throughput (sum rates) or the total reliability in the system. Joint

  18. QCD Sum Rules for Magnetically Induced Mixing between ?c and J/?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cho, Sungtae [Yonsei Univ., Seoul, (Korea, Rep. of). Inst. of Physics and Applied Physics; Hattori, Koichi [Yonsei Univ., Seoul, (Korea, Rep. of). Inst. of Physics and Applied Physics; RIKEN, Nishina Ceneter, Wako, Saitama (Japan); RIKEN BNL Research Center, Upton, NY (United States); Lee, Su Houng [Yonsei Univ., Seoul, (Korea, Rep. of). Inst. of Physics and Applied Physics; Morita, Kenji [Frankfurt Inst. for Advanced Studies (Germany); Univ. of Wroclaw (Poland). Inst. of Theoretcial Physics; Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Yukawa Inst. for Theoretical Phystics; Ozaki, Sho [Yonsei Univ., Seoul, (Korea, Rep. of). Inst. of Physics and Applied Physics; IPNS, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the properties of charmonia in strong magnetic fields by using QCD sum rules. We show how to implement the mixing effects between ?c and J/? on the basis of field-theoretical approaches, and then show that the sum rules are saturated by the mixing effects with phenomenologically determined parameters. Consequently, we find that the mixing effects are the dominant contribution to the mass shifts of the static charmonia in strong magnetic fields.

  19. Forward Compton Scattering with weak neutral current: constraints from sum rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorchtein, Mikhail

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We generalize forward real Compton amplitude to the case of the interference of the electromagnetic and weak neutral current, formulate a low-energy theorem, relate the new amplitudes to the interference structure functions and obtain a new set of sum rules. We address a possible new sum rule that relates the product of the axial charge and magnetic moment of the nucleon to the 0th moment of the structure function $g_5(\

  20. Decay constants of heavy-light vector mesons from QCD sum rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Gelhausen; Alexander Khodjamirian; Alexei A. Pivovarov; Denis Rosenthal

    2015-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit QCD sum rules for the decay constants of heavy-light mesons. In the sum rules for the vector mesons B^*_(s) and D^*_(s) we improve the accuracy of OPE, taking into account the O(alpha_s^2) terms in the perturbative part and calculating the O(alpha_s) corrections to the quark-condensate contribution. With this accuracy, we obtain the ratios of decay constants: f_B^*/f_B=1.02 +0.07 -0.03, f_D^*/f_D=1.20 +0.10 -0.07. The sum rule predictions for the decay constants of pseudoscalar mesons are updated with the results f_B=(207 +17 -9) MeV, f_B_s=(242 +17 -12) MeV, f_D=(201 +12 -13) MeV, f_D_s=(238 +13 -23) MeV. In order to assess the sensitivity of our calculation to the form of the sum rule, we consider alternative versions such as the power moments and Borel sum rules with different weights of the spectral density. We also investigated the heavy quark limit of the sum rules for vector and pseudoscalar mesons, estimating the violations of the heavy-quark spin and flavour symmetry.

  1. 35 Years of Farming Systems Research in the Texas Blackland.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hipp, Billy W.; Simpson, Benny J.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    increased in recent years. Rainfall limits production of cotton, sorghum, and corn in some years because of low or erratic rainfall dur ing the summer growing period. Small grains are more adaptable to the fall and spring rainfall pattern. A sum mary.... Research was conducted from 1947 to 1982 to study the effects of farming systems and fertilizer practices on crop yield and soil properties. Materials and Methods Studies were initiated in the fall of 1947 and spring of 1948 by Texas Research...

  2. Chiral sum rules and vacuum condensates from tau-lepton decay data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. A. Dominguez; L. A. Hernandez; K. Schilcher; H. Spiesberger

    2015-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    QCD finite energy sum rules, together with the latest updated ALEPH data on hadronic decays of the tau-lepton are used in order to determine the vacuum condensates of dimension $d=2$ and $d=4$. These data are also used to check the validity of the Weinberg sum rules, and to determine the chiral condensates of dimension $d=6$ and $d=8$, as well as the chiral correlator at zero momentum, proportional to the counter term of the ${\\cal{O}}(p^4)$ Lagrangian of chiral perturbation theory, $\\bar{L}_{10}$. Suitable (pinched) integration kernels are introduced in the sum rules in order to suppress potential quark-hadron duality violations. We find no compelling indications of duality violations in the kinematic region above $s \\simeq 2.2$ GeV$^2$ after using pinched integration kernels.

  3. Achievable Secrecy Sum-Rate in a Fading MAC-WT with Power Control and without CSI of Eavesdropper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Shahid M; Sharma, Vinod

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a two user fading Multiple Access Channel with a wire-tapper (MAC-WT) where the transmitter has the channel state information (CSI) to the intended receiver but not to the eavesdropper (eve). We provide an achievable secrecy sum-rate with optimal power control. We next provide a secrecy sum-rate with optimal power control and cooperative jamming (CJ). We then study an achievable secrecy sum rate by employing an ON/OFF power control scheme which is more easily computable. We also employ CJ over this power control scheme. Results show that CJ boosts the secrecy sum-rate significantly even if we do not know the CSI of the eve's channel. At high SNR, the secrecy sum-rate (with CJ) without CSI of the eve exceeds the secrecy sum-rate (without CJ) with full CSI of the eve.

  4. Sum--of--squares results for polynomials related to the Bessis--Moussa--Villani conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Benoit; Torres-Ayala, Francisco

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the polynomial S_{m,k}(A,B), that is the sum of all words in noncommuting variables A and B having length m and exactly k letters equal to B, is not equal to a sum of commutators and Hermitian squares in the algebra R where X^2=A and Y^2=B, for all even values of m and k with 6 when m is even and not a multiple of 4, which implies that the trace of S_{m,4}(A,B) is nonnegative for all Hermitian matrices A and B, for these values of m.

  5. Elliptic Gauss Sums and Hecke L-values at s=1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asai, Tetsuya

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rationality of the elliptic Gauss sum coefficient is shown. The following is a specific case of our argument. Let f(u)=sl((1-i)\\varpi u), where sl() is the Gauss' lemniscatic sine and \\varpi=2.62205... is the real period of the elliptic curve y^2=x^3-x, so that f(u) is an elliptic function relative to the period lattice Z[i]. Let \\pi be a primary prime of Z[i] such that norm(\\pi)\\equiv 13\\mod 16. Let S be the quarter set mod \\pi consisting of quartic residues. Let us define G(\\pi):=\\sum_{\

  6. Charmonium spectra at finite temperature from QCD sum rules with the maximum entropy method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Gubler; Kenji Morita; Makoto Oka

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Charmonia spectral functions at finite temperature are studied using QCD sum rules in combination with the maximum entropy method. This approach enables us to directly obtain the spectral function from the sum rules, without having to introduce any specific assumption about its functional form. As a result, it is found that while J/psi and eta_c manifest themselves as significant peaks in the spectral function below the deconfinement temperature T_c, they quickly dissolve into the continuum and almost completely disappear at temperatures between 1.0 T_c and 1.1 T_c.

  7. Iso-vector form factors of the delta and nucleon in QCD sum rules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, A. [Physics Department, Middle East Technical University, 06800 (Turkey)

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Form factors are important non-perturbative properties of hadrons. They give information about the internal structure of the hadrons. In this work, iso-vector axial-vector and iso-vector tensor form factors of the nucleon and the iso-vector axial-vector {Delta}{yields}N transition form factor calculations in QCD Sum Rules are presented.

  8. Weighted Sum Rate Maximization of Correlated MISO Broadcast Channels under Linear Precoding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Weighted Sum Rate Maximization of Correlated MISO Broadcast Channels under Linear Precoding algorithm proposed by Christensen et al. in large correlated MISO broadcast channels. We propose a novel maximization. I. INTRODUCTION WE consider the multiple-input single-output (MISO) broadcast channel (BC

  9. Weighted Sum Rate Maximization in the Underlay Cognitive MISO Interference Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    Weighted Sum Rate Maximization in the Underlay Cognitive MISO Interference Channel Laurent Gallo) maximization for a K-user Multiple-Input Single-Output (MISO) cognitive Interference Channel (IFC) with linear studied in a non-cognitive scenario for the MISO inter- ference channel (IFC) in [3], where a distributed

  10. Sum-frequency generation of 589 nm light with near-unit efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalibard, Jean

    . Dawson, A. D. Drobshoff, R. J. Beach, M. J. Messerly, S. A. Payne, A. Brown, D. M. Pennington, D. J­3974 (1995). 13. E. Streed, A. Chikkatur, T. Gustavson, M. Boyd, Y. Torii, D. Schneble, G. Campbell, D of sodium resonance radiation," Appl. Opt. 28, 2588­2591 (1989). 3. H. Moosm¨uller and J. D. Vance, "Sum

  11. Crystal Potential Formula for the Calculation of Crystal Lattice Sums1 Don Steiger and Calvin Ahlbrandt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaser, Rainer

    Crystal Potential Formula for the Calculation of Crystal Lattice Sums1 Don Steiger and Calvin; In Final Form: April 7, 1998 A new formula is derived for the determination of the potential energy of the central unit cell of a finite crystal; this formula is called the crystal potential formula. The crystal

  12. Dirichlet L-series with real and complex characters and their application to solving double sums

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. J. Zucker; R. C. McPhedran

    2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A description of the properties of \\L with complex characters is given. By using these, together with the more familiar \\L with real characters, it is shown how certain two dimensional lattice sums, which previously could not be put into closed form, may now be expressed in this way.

  13. Fast Approximations for Sums of Distances, Clustering and the Fermat-Weber Problem 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bose, Prosenjit

    Fast Approximations for Sums of Distances, Clustering and the Fermat-Weber Problem 1 Prosenjit Bose Fermat-Weber problem in any #12;xed dimension. 1 Introduction Let S = fp 1 ; : : : ; p n g be a set roots that can be irrational numbers [1]. A famous problem related to the function w is the Fermat-Weber

  14. Fast Approximations for Sums of Distances, Clustering and the Fermat-Weber Problem 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morin, Pat

    Fast Approximations for Sums of Distances, Clustering and the Fermat-Weber Problem 1 Prosenjit Bose) time deterministic and O(n) time randomized #15;-approximation algorithm for the so called Fermat-Weber numbers [1]. A famous problem related to the function w is the Fermat-Weber problem [4] which asks

  15. Fast Approximations for Sums of Distances, Clustering and the Fermat-Weber Problem y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bose, Prosenjit

    Fast Approximations for Sums of Distances, Clustering and the Fermat-Weber Problem y Prosenjit Bose algorithm for the so called Fermat-Weber problem in any #12;xed dimension. 1 Introduction Let S = fp 1 be irrational numbers [1]. A famous problem related to the function w is the Fermat-Weber problem [4] which asks

  16. Impact of folivory on photosynthesis is greater than the sum of its holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Impact of folivory on photosynthesis is greater than the sum of its holes A. R. Zangerl*, J. G), pp. 135­151.]. An impediment to understanding the effects of leaf damage on photosynthesis has been chlorophyll fluo- rescence and used it to map the effects of caterpillar feeding on whole-leaf photosynthesis

  17. Complex-energy approach to sum rules within nuclear density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinohara, Nobuo; Nazarewicz, Witold; Olsen, Erik

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The linear response of the nucleus to an external field contains unique information about the effective interaction, correlations, and properties of its excited states. To characterize the response, it is useful to use its energy-weighted moments, or sum rules. By comparing computed sum rules with experimental values, the information content of the response can be utilized in the optimization process of the nuclear Hamiltonian or EDF. But the additional information comes at a price: compared to the ground state, computation of excited states is more demanding. To establish an efficient framework to compute sum rules of the response that is adaptable to the optimization of the nuclear EDF and large-scale surveys of collective strength, we have developed a new technique within the complex-energy FAM based on the QRPA. To compute sum rules, we carry out contour integration of the response function in the complex-energy plane. We benchmark our results against the conventional matrix formulation of the QRPA theory...

  18. ccsd-00016701,version2-3May2006 Generalised extreme value statistics and sum of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    random variables with a sum distributed according to one of the three (k-dependent) asymptotic distributions of extreme value statistics, namely the Gumbel, Fr´echet and Weibull distributions. These classes, as well as the limit distributions, are naturally extended to real values of k, thus providing a clear

  19. On The Analysis of Spatially-Coupled GLDPC Codes and The Weighted Min-Sum Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian, Yung-Yih

    2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    system that can approach the channel capacity using iterative HDD. The optimality of a codeword returned by the weighted min-sum (WMS) algorithm, an iterative decoding algorithm which is widely used in practice, is studied as well. The attenuated max...

  20. Surfactant/Water Interactions at the Air/Water Interface Probed by Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    Surfactant/Water Interactions at the Air/Water Interface Probed by Vibrational Sum Frequency and orientation of water molecules at an air/water interface has been measured in the presence of cationic spectrum of both the surfactant and water molecules at the water surface. In the presence of the charged

  1. Sum--of--squares results for polynomials related to the Bessis--Moussa--Villani conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit Collins; Kenneth J. Dykema; Francisco Torres-Ayala

    2010-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the polynomial S_{m,k}(A,B), that is the sum of all words in noncommuting variables A and B having length m and exactly k letters equal to B, is not equal to a sum of commutators and Hermitian squares in the algebra R where X^2=A and Y^2=B, for all even values of m and k with 6 Bessis--Moussa--Villani conjecture, which asks whether the trace of S_{m,k}(A,B)) is nonnegative for all positive semidefinite matrices A and B. These results eliminate the possibility of using "descent + sum-of-squares" to prove the BMV conjecture. We also show that S_{m,4}(A,B) is equal to a sum of commutators and Hermitian squares in R when m is even and not a multiple of 4, which implies that the trace of S_{m,4}(A,B) is nonnegative for all Hermitian matrices A and B, for these values of m.

  2. Sum-of-Product Architectures Computing Just Right F. de Dinechin, Matei Istoan, Abdelbasset Massouri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    (SPC). This paper addresses the automatic construction of low-precision, but high accuracy SPC-processing transforms that can be expressed as a sum of products with constants (SPC). Specifically, a SPC is any Recherche (ANR) SPC architecture generator real coeff. (ai)0i

  3. The Power of Neutrino Mass Sum Rules for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen F. King; Alexander Merle; Alexander J. Stuart

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino mass sum rules relate the three neutrino masses within generic classes of flavour models, leading to restrictions on the effective mass parameter measured in experiments on neutrinoless double beta decay as a function of the lightest neutrino mass. We perform a comprehensive study of the implications of such neutrino mass sum rules, which provide a link between model building, phenomenology, and experiments. After a careful explanation of how to derive predictions from sum rules, we discuss a large number of examples both numerically, using all three global fits available for the neutrino oscillation data, and analytically wherever possible. In some cases, our results disagree with some of those in the literature for reasons that we explain. Finally we discuss the experimental prospects for many current and near-future experiments, with a particular focus on the uncertainties induced by the unknown nuclear physics involved. We find that, in many cases, the power of the neutrino mass sum rules is so strong as to allow certain classes of models to be tested by the next generation of neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. Our study can serve as both a guideline and a theoretical motivation for future experimental studies.

  4. Contact of Oil with Solid Surfaces in Aqueous Media Probed Using Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    Contact of Oil with Solid Surfaces in Aqueous Media Probed Using Sum Frequency Generation is present between the oil and the sapphire substrate. Below the isoelectric point of the sapphire substrate and the attractive van der Waals interactions. INTRODUCTION An oil drop in contact with a solid surface in aqueous

  5. Using or Hiding Private Information? An Experimental Study of Zero-Sum Repeated Games with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Using or Hiding Private Information? An Experimental Study of Zero-Sum Repeated Games the value of private information in strictly competitive interactions in which there is a trade-off between, the empirical use of private information is almost complete when it should be, and decreases in longer

  6. ON THE ORDER OF STIRLING NUMBERS AND ALTERNATING BINOMIAL COEFFICIENT SUMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lengyel, Tamás

    ON THE ORDER OF STIRLING NUMBERS AND ALTERNATING BINOMIAL COEFFICIENT SUMS Ira M. Gessel \\Lambda=p is not an odd integer. Here S(n; k) denotes the Stirling number of the second kind; i.e., the number) denotes the Stirling number of the second kind, and n = a 2 q ; a is odd, and q is sufficiently large (for

  7. ON THE ORDER OF STIRLING NUMBERS AND ALTERNATING BINOMIAL COEFFICIENT SUMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lengyel, Tamás

    ON THE ORDER OF STIRLING NUMBERS AND ALTERNATING BINOMIAL COEFFICIENT SUMS Ira M. Gessel is sufficiently large and kip is not an odd integer. Here S(n, k) denotes the Stirling num- ber of the second kindStirling number of the second kind, and n = alq , a is odd, and q

  8. Off-shell [rho]-[omega] mixing in QCD sum rules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatsuda, T.; Henley, E.M.; Meissner, T.; Krein, G. (Physics Department, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States) Institute for Nuclear Theory, HN-12 University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States) Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Rua Pamplona, 145, 01405-900 Sao Paulo-SP (Brazil))

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The [ital q][sup 2] dependence of the [rho]-[omega] mixing amplitude is analyzed with the use of QCD sum rules and dispersion relations. Going off shell the mixing decreases, changes sign at [ital q][sup 2][congruent]0.4[ital m][sub [rho

  9. SumTime-Turbine: A Knowledge-Based System to Communicate Gas Turbine Time-Series Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Ehud

    SumTime-Turbine: A Knowledge-Based System to Communicate Gas Turbine Time-Series Data Jin Yu of Aberdeen Aberdeen, AB24 3UE, UK {jyu, ereiter, jhunter, ssripada}@csd.abdn.ac.uk Abstract: SumTime-Turbine produces textual summaries of archived time- series data from gas turbines. These summaries should help

  10. Multi-Carrier Multiple Access is Sum-Rate Optimal for Block Transmissions over Circulant ISI Channels*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannakis, Georgios

    Multi-Carrier Multiple Access is Sum-Rate Optimal for Block Transmissions over Circulant ISI to maximizing the sum-rate of circulant inter-symbol interference (ISI) channels, that are assumed available at the transmitter. Cir- culant ISI channels are ensured either with cyclic pre`xed block transmissions

  11. Generalized parton distribution functions and the nucleon spin sum rules in the chiral quark soliton model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakamatsu, M.; Tsujimoto, H. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The theoretical predictions are given for the forward limit of the unpolarized spin-flip isovector generalized parton distribution function (E{sup u}-E{sup d})(x,{xi},t) within the framework of the chiral quark soliton model, with full inclusion of the polarization of Dirac sea quarks. We observe that [(H{sup u}-H{sup d})+(E{sup u}-E{sup d})](x,0,0) has a sharp peak around x=0, which we interpret as a signal of the importance of the pionic qq excitation with large spatial extension in the transverse direction. Another interesting indication given by the predicted distribution in combination with Ji's angular momentum sum rule is that the d quark carries more angular momentum than the u quark in the proton, which may have some relation with the physics of the violation of the Gottfried sum rule.

  12. Sum-Rate Optimal Power Policies for Energy Harvesting Transmitters in an Interference Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tutuncuoglu, Kaya

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper considers a two-user Gaussian interference channel with energy harvesting transmitters. Different than conventional battery powered wireless nodes, energy harvesting transmitters have to adapt transmission to availability of energy at a particular instant. In this setting, the optimal power allocation problem to maximize sum throughput within a given deadline is formulated. The convergence of the proposed iterative coordinate descent method for the problem is proved and the short-term throughput maximizing offline power allocation policy is found. Examples for interference regions with known sum capacities are given with directional water-filling interpretations when possible. Next, stochastic data arrivals are addressed. Finally online and/or distributed near-optimal policies are proposed. Performance of the proposed algorithms are demonstrated through simulations.

  13. Sulfate Adsorption at the Buried Fluorite-Solution Interface Revealed by Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sulfate Adsorption at the Buried Fluorite-Solution Interface Revealed by Vibrational Sum Frequency the adsorption of sulfate at the buried fluorite (CaF2)/Na2SO4 solution surface at pH 7 and 298 K in the presence surface with an average surface free energy of adsorption of -31 ± 3 kJ/mol for pH 7 solutions at 298 K

  14. Dynamic properties of one-component strongly coupled plasmas: The sum-rule approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arkhipov, Yu. V.; Askaruly, A.; Davletov, A. E. [Department of Optics and Plasma Physics, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan); Ballester, D. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Tkachenko, I. M. [Instituto de Matematica Pura y Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Zwicknagel, G. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Erlangen-Nuernberg Universitaet, Staudtstr. 7, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamic characteristics of strongly coupled one-component plasmas are studied within the moment approach. Our results on the dynamic structure factor and the dynamic local-field correction satisfy the sum rules and other exact relations automatically. A quantitative agreement is obtained with numerous simulation data on the plasma dynamic properties, including the dispersion and decay of collective modes. Our approach allows us to correct and complement the results previously found with other treatments.

  15. Single particle sum rules in the nuclear deep-inelastic region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozynek, J.; Wilk, G. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Hoza 69, PL-00-689 Warsaw (Poland)

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have modeled the parton distribution in nuclei using a suitably modified nuclear Fermi motion. The modifications concern the nucleon rest energy which changes the Bjoerken x in a nuclear medium. We also introduce final state interactions between the scattered nucleon and the rest of the nucleus. The energy-momentum sum rule is saturated. Good agreement with experimental data of the EMC effect for x>0.15 and nuclear lepton pair production data has been obtained.

  16. Four-quark condensates in open-charm chiral QCD sum rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Hilger; Thomas Buchheim; Burkhard Kampfer; Stefan Leupold

    2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, in Hilger et al. (2011) [1] QCD sum rules for chiral partners in the open-charm meson sector have been presented at nonzero baryon net density or temperature up to and including mass dimension 5. Referring to this, details concerning the cancelation of infrared divergences are presented and important technical and conceptional ingredients for an incorporation of four-quark condensates beyond factorization and of other mass dimension 6 condensates are collected.

  17. Infrared renormalons and the relations between the Gross-Llewellyn Smith and the Bjorken polarized and unpolarized sum rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. L. Kataev

    2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    It is demonstrated that the infrared renormalon calculus indicates that the QCD theoretical expressions for the Gross-Llewelln Smith sum rules and for the Bjorken polarized and unpolarized ones contain an identical negative twist-4 1/Q^2 correction. This observation is supported by the consideration of the results of calculations of the corresponding twist-4 matrix elements. Together with the indication of the similarity of perturbative QCD corrections to these three sum rules, this observation leads to simple new theoretical relations between the Gross-Llewellyn Smith and Bjorken polarized and unpolarized sum rules in the energy region $Q^2\\geq 1 GeV^2$. The validity of this relation is checked using concrete experimental data for the Gross-Llewellyn Smith and Bjorken polarized sum rules

  18. Absolute frequency measurement of an SF6 two-photon line using a femtosecond optical comb and sum-frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Absolute frequency measurement of an SF6 two-photon line using a femtosecond optical comb and sum laser. The absolute frequency of a CO2 laser stabilized onto an SF6 two-photon line has been measured

  19. Os efeitos da sonegação fiscal na estrutura tributária ótima: experiência brasileira de aplicação das regras de 'lump-sum taxation'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Guardia, Renata

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    da sonegação fiscal. No Brasil, os tributos ‘lump-sum’ sãobusca averiguar se, ao Brasil, aplicam-se as conclusões desonegação fiscal. Claro que o Brasil não passou recentemente

  20. Methods, systems and apparatus for approximation of peak summed fundamental and third harmonic voltages in a multi-phase machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ransom, Ray M. (Big Bear City, CA); Gallegos-Lopez, Gabriel (Torrance, CA); Kinoshita, Michael H. (Redondo Beach, CA)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, system and apparatus are provided for quickly approximating a peak summed magnitude (A) of a phase voltage (Vph) waveform in a multi-phase system that implements third harmonic injection.

  1. Einstein's Miraculous Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasant Natarajan; V Balakrishnan; N Mukunda

    2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    With each passing year, the young Albert Einstein's achievements in physics in the year 1905 seem to be ever more miraculous. We describe why the centenary of this remarkable year is worthy of celebration.

  2. Proof of the the Riemann hypothesis from the strong density hypothesis via a power sum method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuanyou Cheng; S. Albeverio

    2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Riemann hypothesis is equivalent to the $\\varpi$-form of the prime number theorem as $\\varpi(x) =O(x\\sp{1/2} \\log\\sp{2} x)$, where $\\varpi(x) =\\sum\\sb{n\\le x}\\ \\bigl(\\Lambda(n) -1\\big)$ with the sum running through the set of all natural integers. Let ${\\mathsf Z}(s) = -\\tfrac{\\zeta\\sp{\\prime}(s)}{\\zeta(s)} -\\zeta(s)$. We use the classical integral formula for the Heaviside function in the form of ${\\mathsf H}(x) =\\int\\sb{m -i\\infty} \\sp{m +i\\infty} \\tfrac{x\\sp{s}}{s} \\dd s$ where $m >0$, and ${\\mathsf H}(x)$ is 0 when $\\tfrac{1}{2} 1$. However, we diverge from the literature by applying Cauchy's residue theorem to the function ${\\mathsf Z}(s) \\cdot \\tfrac{x\\sp{s}} {s}$, rather than $-\\tfrac{\\zeta\\sp{\\prime}(s)} {\\zeta(s)} \\cdot \\tfrac{x\\sp{s}}{s}$, so that we may utilize the formula for $\\tfrac{1}{2}1$ of ${\\mathsf Z}(s)$, we use induction to reduce the size of the exponent $\\theta$ in $\\varpi(x) =O(x\\sp{\\theta} \\log\\sp{2} x)$, while we also use induction on $x$ when $\\theta$ is fixed. We prove that the Riemann hypothesis is valid under the assumptions of the explicit strong density hypothesis and the Lindel\\"of hypothesis recently proven, via a result of the implication on the zero free regions from the remainder terms of the prime number theorem by the power sum method of Tur\\'an.

  3. Non-interacting KN contribution in the QCD sum rule for the pentaquark Theta^+(1540)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Youngshin Kwon; Atsushi Hosaka; Su Houng Lee

    2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform a QCD sum rule analysis for the pentaquark baryon Theta^+ with the non-interacting $KN$ contribution treated carefully. The coupling of the Theta^+ current to the $KN$ state is evaluated by applying the soft kaon theorem and vacuum saturation. When using a five-quark current including scalar and pseudo-scalar diquarks, the KN contribution turns out not to be very important and the previous result of the negative parity Theta^+ is reproduced again. The Borel analysis of the correlation function for Theta^+ with the KN continuum states subtracted yields the mass of the J^P= 1/2^- Theta^+ around 1.5 GeV.

  4. Friedel sum rule in the presence of topological defects for graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baishali Chakraborty; Kumar S. Gupta; Siddhartha Sen

    2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Friedel sum rule is extended to deal with topological defects for the case of a graphene cone in the presence of an external Coulomb charge. The dependence in the way the number of states change due to both the topological defect as well as the Coulomb charge are studied. Our analysis addresses both the cases of a subcritical as well as a supercritical value of the Coulomb charge. We also discuss the experimental implications of introducing a self-adjoint extension of the system Hamiltonian. We argue that the boundary conditions following from the self-adjoint extension encode the effect of short range interactions present in the system.

  5. Constraints on the Sum of Neutrino Masses from Cosmology and their impact on world neutrino data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Melchiorri; G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; A. Marrone; A. Palazzo; P. Serra; J. I. Silk

    2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive upper limits on the sum of neutrino masses from an updated combination of data from Cosmic Microwave Background experiments and Galaxy Redshifts Surveys. The results are discussed in the context of three-flavor neutrino mixing and compared with neutrino oscillation data, with upper limits on the effective neutrino mass in Tritium beta decay from the Mainz and Troitsk experiments and with the claimed lower bound on the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless double beta decay from the Heidelberg-Moscow experiment.

  6. Completely positive maps within the framework of direct-sum decomposition of state space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longjiang Liu; D. M. Tong

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate completely positive maps for an open system interacting with its environment. The families of the initial states for which the reduced dynamics can be described by a completely positive map are identified within the framework of direct-sum decomposition of state space. They includes not only separable states with vanishing or nonvanishing quantum discord but also entangled states. A general expression of the families as well as the Kraus operators for the completely positive maps are explicitly given. It significantly extends the previous results.

  7. Defining medium-specific condensates in QCD sum rules for $D$ and $B$ mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Buchheim; T. Hilger; B. Kampfer

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    QCD sum rules for $D$ and $B$ mesons in a strongly interacting environment require the decomposition of Gibbs averaged operators related to tensor structures. We present a procedure to decompose these operators into vacuum and medium-specific parts, thus defining plain medium-specific condensates with coefficients vanishing in vacuum. Our decomposition allows for an identification of potential elements of order parameters for chiral restoration, in particular for higher mass-dimension quark-condensates which would be masked otherwise if operators with uncontracted Lorentz indices would be linked to DIS amplitudes.

  8. Bond Energy Sums in Benzene, Cyclohexatriene and Cyclohexane Prove Resonance Unnecessary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raji Heyrovska

    2008-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent new structure of benzene shows that it consists of three C atoms of radii as in graphite alternating with three C atoms with double bond radii. This is different from the hypothetical cyclohexatriene (Kekule structure) involving alternate double and single bonds. It was shown that the difference in the bond energy sum of the atomic structure of benzene from that of the Kekule structure is the energy (erroneously) assumed to be due to resonance. Here it is shown that the present structure of benzene also explains the energy of hydrogenation into cyclohexane and its difference from that of cyclohexatriene.

  9. Year of last Year of last

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herring 2003 2002 Transboundary Resource Assessment Committee Monkfish Northern Monkfish 2003 2003FMP Stock Year of last assessment Year of last data used in last stock assessment Source document for stock assessment Atlantic Sea Scallop Atlantic Sea Scallop 2000 2000 Stock Assessment Workshop (SAW

  10. Up- and down-quark masses from finite-energy QCD sum rules to five loops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominguez, C. A.; Nasrallah, N. F.; Roentsch, R. H.; Schilcher, K. [Centre for Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa) and Department of Physics, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch 7600 (South Africa); Faculty of Science, Lebanese University, Tripoli (Lebanon); Centre for Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Staudingerweg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The up- and down-quark masses are determined from an optimized QCD finite-energy sum rule involving the correlator of axial-vector divergences, to five-loop order in perturbative QCD, and including leading nonperturbative QCD and higher order quark-mass corrections. This finite-energy sum rule is designed to reduce considerably the systematic uncertainties arising from the (unmeasured) hadronic resonance sector, which in this framework contributes less than 3-4% to the quark mass. This is achieved by introducing an integration kernel in the form of a second degree polynomial, restricted to vanish at the peak of the two lowest lying resonances. The driving hadronic contribution is then the pion pole, with parameters well known from experiment. The determination is done in the framework of contour improved perturbation theory, which exhibits a very good convergence, leading to a remarkably stable result in the unusually wide window s{sub 0}=1.0-4.0 GeV{sup 2}, where s{sub 0} is the radius of the integration contour in the complex energy (squared) plane. The results are m{sub u}(Q=2 GeV)=2.9{+-}0.2 MeV, m{sub d}(Q=2 GeV)=5.3{+-}0.4 MeV, and (m{sub u}+m{sub d})/2=4.1{+-}0.2 MeV (at a scale Q=2 GeV)

  11. Finding elementary formulas for theta functions associated to even sums of squares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varma, Ila

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the classical problem of how to calculate $r_n(m)$, the number of ways to represent an integer $m$ by a sum of $n$ squares from a computational efficiency viewpoint. Although this problem has been studied in great detail, there are very few formulas given for the purpose of computing $r_n(m)$ quickly. More precisely, for fixed $n$, we want a formula for $r_n(m)$ that computes in log-polynomial time (with respect to $m$) when the prime factorization of $m$ is given. Restricting to even $n$, we can view $\\theta_n(q)$, the theta function associated to sums of $n$ squares, as a modular form of weight $n/2$ on $\\Gamma_1(4)$. In particular, we show that for only a small finite list of $n$ can $\\theta_n$ be written as a linear combination consisting entirely of Eisenstein series and cusp forms with complex multiplication. These are the only $n$ that give rise to "elementary" formulas for $r_n(m)$, i.e. formulas such that for a prime $p$, $r_n(p)$ can be calculated in $\\cO(\\log(p))$-time. Viewi...

  12. Trigonometrical sums connected with the chiral Potts model, Verlinde dimension formula, two-dimensional resistor network, and number theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chair, Noureddine, E-mail: n.chair@ju.edu.jo

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have recently developed methods for obtaining exact two-point resistance of the complete graph minus N edges. We use these methods to obtain closed formulas of certain trigonometrical sums that arise in connection with one-dimensional lattice, in proving Scott’s conjecture on permanent of Cauchy matrix, and in the perturbative chiral Potts model. The generalized trigonometrical sums of the chiral Potts model are shown to satisfy recursion formulas that are transparent and direct, and differ from those of Gervois and Mehta. By making a change of variables in these recursion formulas, the dimension of the space of conformal blocks of SU(2) and SO(3) WZW models may be computed recursively. Our methods are then extended to compute the corner-to-corner resistance, and the Kirchhoff index of the first non-trivial two-dimensional resistor network, 2×N. Finally, we obtain new closed formulas for variant of trigonometrical sums, some of which appear in connection with number theory. -- Highlights: • Alternative derivation of certain trigonometrical sums of the chiral Potts model are given. • Generalization of these trigonometrical sums satisfy recursion formulas. • The dimension of the space of conformal blocks may be computed from these recursions. • Exact corner-to-corner resistance, the Kirchhoff index of 2×N are given.

  13. Annual Report for the Year 1999-2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge University Library

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    come from sources outside the University. The bulk of the funding was provided by two very generous private gifts, from Dr Gordon E. Moore ($12.5 million) and from a private donor (£6 million), and a further sum of about £2 million formed part of a... to the online catalogue. The number of books fetched continues to rise, this year reaching a record, at 125,391. The online book-request system (OBRS) has rapidly become popular with readers, with over two thirds of requests now being received this way...

  14. Secretary Moniz's First Year

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    We're looking back at some of the biggest moments from Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz's first year in office.

  15. A convex approximation approach to Weighted Sum Rate Maximization of Multiuser MISO Interference Channel under outage constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wei-Chiang; Lin, Che; Chi, Chong-Yung

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper considers weighted sum rate maximization of multiuser multiple-input single-output interference channel (MISO-IFC) under outage constraints. The outage-constrained weighted sum rate maximization problem is a nonconvex optimization problem and is difficult to solve. While it is possible to optimally deal with this problem in an exhaustive search manner by finding all the Pareto-optimal rate tuples in the (discretized) outage-constrained achievable rate region, this approach, however, suffers from a prohibitive computational complexity and is feasible only when the number of transmitter-receive pairs is small. In this paper, we propose a convex optimization based approximation method for efficiently handling the outage-constrained weighted sum rate maximization problem. The proposed approximation method consists of solving a sequence of convex optimization problems, and thus can be efficiently implemented by interior-point methods. Simulation results show that the proposed method can yield near-optim...

  16. Radiative B{yields}K{sub 1} decays in the light-cone sum rules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jong-Phil [Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The weak form factor for B{yields}K{sub 1B} where K{sub 1B} is the {sup 1}P{sub 1} state is calculated in the light-cone sum rules (LCSR). Combining the quark model result for the form factor of B{yields}K{sub 1A} with K{sub 1A} being the {sup 3}P{sub 1} state, we have larger values for B{yields}K{sub 1} form factors than the previous LCSR results. The increased form factors reduce the discrepancy between theory and the experimental data for B{yields}K{sub 1}{gamma}. Some phenomenological meanings are also discussed.

  17. Theoretical study of sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy on limonene surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Ren-Hui, E-mail: zrh@iccas.ac.cn; Liu, Hao; Jing, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Bo-Yang; Shi, Qiang [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory for Structural Chemistry of Unstable and Stable Species, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhongguancun, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory for Structural Chemistry of Unstable and Stable Species, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhongguancun, Beijing 100190 (China); Wei, Wen-Mei [Department of Chemistry, College of Basic Medicine, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230032 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, College of Basic Medicine, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230032 (China)

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    By combining molecule dynamics (MD) simulation and quantum chemistry computation, we calculate the surface sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy (SFVS) of R-limonene molecules at the gas-liquid interface for SSP, PPP, and SPS polarization combinations. The distributions of the Euler angles are obtained using MD simulation, the ?-distribution is between isotropic and Gaussian. Instead of the MD distributions, different analytical distributions such as the ?-function, Gaussian and isotropic distributions are applied to simulate surface SFVS. We find that different distributions significantly affect the absolute SFVS intensity and also influence on relative SFVS intensity, and the ?-function distribution should be used with caution when the orientation distribution is broad. Furthermore, the reason that the SPS signal is weak in reflected arrangement is discussed.

  18. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Pyridine Hydrogenation on Platinum Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyridine hydrogenation in the presence of a surface monolayer consisting of cubic Pt nanoparticles stabilized by tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB) was investigated by sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy using total internal reflection (TIR) geometry. TIR-SFG spectra analysis revealed that a pyridinium cation (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NH{sup +}) forms during pyridine hydrogenation on the Pt nanoparticle surface, and the NH group in the C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NH{sup +} cation becomes more hydrogen bound with the increase of the temperature. In addition, the surface coverage of the cation decreases with the increase of the temperature. An important contribution of this study is the in situ identification of reaction intermediates adsorbed on the Pt nanoparticle monolayer during pyridine hydrogenation.

  19. Molecular states with hidden charm and strange in QCD Sum Rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cong-Feng Qiao; Liang Tang

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This work uses the QCD Sum Rules to study the masses of the $D_s \\bar{D}_s^*$ and $D_s^* \\bar{D}_s^*$ molecular states with quantum numbers $J^{PC} = 1^{+-}$. Interpolating currents with definite C-parity are employed, and the contributions up to dimension eight in the Operator Product Expansion (OPE) are taken into account. The results indicate that two hidden strange charmonium-like states may exist in the energy ranges of $3.83 \\sim 4.13 $ GeV and $4.22 \\sim 4.54 $ GeV, respectively. The hidden strange charmonium-like states predicted in this work may be accessible in future experiments, e.g. BESIII, BelleII and SuperB. Possible decay modes, which may be useful in further research, are predicted.

  20. 8. Neural Networks Over the years, linear regression models have attempted to characterise the 0.2% proof stress and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    30 8. Neural Networks Over the years, linear regression models have attempted to characterise the 0 interact. A more powerful alternative is the use of neural networks [40,42], a non-linear modelling prediction uncertainties. #12;31 In linear regression, the sum of each input xi multiplied with a weight wi

  1. QCD sum-rule results for heavy-light meson decay constants and comparison with lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Lucha; D. Melikhov; S. Simula

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Updated predictions for the decay constants of the D, Ds, B and Bs mesons obtained from Borel QCD sum rules for heavy-light currents are presented and compared with the recent lattice averages performed by the Flavor Lattice Averaging Group. An excellent agreement is obtained in the charm sector, while some tension is observed in the bottom sector. Moreover, available lattice and QCD sum-rule calculations of the decay constants of the vector D*, Ds*, B* and Bs* mesons are compared. Again some tension in the bottom sector is observed.

  2. QCD sum-rule results for heavy-light meson decay constants and comparison with lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucha, W; Simula, S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Updated predictions for the decay constants of the D, Ds, B and Bs mesons obtained from Borel QCD sum rules for heavy-light currents are presented and compared with the recent lattice averages performed by the Flavor Lattice Averaging Group. An excellent agreement is obtained in the charm sector, while some tension is observed in the bottom sector. Moreover, available lattice and QCD sum-rule calculations of the decay constants of the vector D*, Ds*, B* and Bs* mesons are compared. Again some tension in the bottom sector is observed.

  3. Wilson coefficients and four-quark condensates in QCD sum rules for medium modifications of $D$ mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Buchheim; Thomas Hilger; Burkhard Kampfer

    2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Wilson coefficients of light four-quark condensates in QCD sum rules are evaluated for pseudo-scalar $D$ mesons, thus, pushing the sum rules toward mass dimension six. Contrary to the situation for $\\bar{q}q$ mesons the impact of the four-quark condensates for vacuum as well as in-medium situations is found to be rather small within the Borel window used in previous analyses. The complete four-quark condensate contributions enable to identify candidates for an order parameter of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking/restoration as well as to evaluate stability criteria of operator product expansions.

  4. Annual Report Fiscal Year 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Year in Review.............................................................. 8 Academic Accomplishments

  5. Calendar Year 1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    > Year1999NEFINA1.pdf" class"">Inspection Report: INS-O-00-02

  6. HPSS Yearly Network Traffic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    growth in network traffic to storage over the years. Network Traffic Growth Network Distribution 2010 Network Distribution 2010 Network Distribution 2009 Network Distribution...

  7. 468 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION THEORY, VOL. 54, NO. 1, JANUARY 2008 Sum Capacity of One-Sided Parallel Gaussian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    So, Hing-Cheung

    allocation (ppp1;ppp2) by ppp. The sum capacity of a one-sided Gaussian IC was given in [3]. Based be found by solving the following optimization problem: max ppp2P f(ppp1;ppp2) L l=1 Ca p(l) 1; p(l) 2

  8. Uptake and Surface Reaction of Methanol by Sulfuric Acid Solutions Investigated by Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation and Raman Spectroscopies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uptake and Surface Reaction of Methanol by Sulfuric Acid Solutions Investigated by Vibrational SumVised Manuscript ReceiVed: June 4, 2008 The uptake of methanol at the air-liquid interface of 0-96.5 wt % sulfuric methanol and H2SO4 to form methyl hydrogen sulfate. The surface is saturated with the methyl species after

  9. Impact of Salt Purity on Interfacial Water Organization Revealed by Conventional and Heterodyne-Detected Vibrational Sum Frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impact of Salt Purity on Interfacial Water Organization Revealed by Conventional and Heterodyne of the chosen salts and their solutions. This is true not only for the ACS grade salts but also vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) and heterodyne-detected VSFG (HD-VSFG) spectroscopy that salt

  10. The Use of Power Sums to Solve the Harmonic Elimination Equations for Multilevel Converters EPE Journal Vol. 15 no

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    sources (solar cells, fuel cells, the rectified output of wind turbines) to an existing ac power grid of solar cells are dc voltages, and if this energy is to be fed to into an ac power grid, a powerThe Use of Power Sums to Solve the Harmonic Elimination Equations for Multilevel Converters EPE

  11. Sudden structural change at ati air/binary liquid interface: Sum frequency study of the air/acetonitrile-water interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenthal, Kenneth B.

    Sudden structural change at ati air/binary liquid interface: Sum frequency study of the air/acetonitrile change in an air/acetonitrile-water interface as the solution composition varies; the abruptness of which and in the polarization of the signal from the acetonitrile molecules in the interface observed using infrared + visible

  12. Looking at HPM (History and Pedagogy of Mathematics) through an old chestnut: Sum of the angles of a triangle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siu, M.K.

    1 Looking at HPM (History and Pedagogy of Mathematics) through an old chestnut: Sum of the angles example from the perspective of HPM (History and Pedagogy of Mathematics). 1. Introduction In school. The discussion will be related to the wider context of HPM (History and Pedagogy of Mathematics) in Section 4

  13. TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE The maximum benefit (Principal Sum) is $100,000 of Accidental Death and Dismemberment (Age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 46 - TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE CHUBB Benefits The maximum benefit (Principal Sum) is $100 of the accident, the policy will pay as follows: Payment Schedule Injury or Dismemberment Policy Pays Loss of Life to seven days Aggregate Limit of Insurance: $1,000,000 per Accident Coverage y 24-Hour Business Travel y

  14. TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE The maximum benefit (Principal Sum) is $100,000 of Accidental Death and Dismemberment (Age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 53 - TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE CHUBB Benefits The maximum benefit (Principal Sum) is $100 of the accident, the policy will pay as follows: Payment Schedule Injury or Dismemberment Policy Pays Loss of Life to seven days Aggregate Limit of Insurance: $1,000,000 per Accident NOTE: The insurance coverage described

  15. Final Year Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubsch, Tristan [Howard University

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last years of this eighteen-year grant project, the research efforts have focused mostly on the study of off-shell representations of supersymmetry, both on the worldline and on the world- sheet, i.e., both in supersymmetric quantum mechanics and in supersymmetric field theory in 1+1-dimensional spacetime.

  16. 260 IEEE/ACM TRANSACTIONS ON AUDIO, SPEECH, AND LANGUAGE PROCESSING, VOL. 22, NO. 1, JANUARY 2014 Distributed Delay and Sum Beamformer for Speech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distributed Delay and Sum Beamformer for Speech Enhancement via Randomized Gossip Yuan Zeng and Richard C speech enhancement methods from literature, assuming that the steering vector is given. In the simulated--Distributed delay and sum beamformer, ran- domized gossip, speech enhancement, wireless acoustic sensor networks. I

  17. Sum frequency and second harmonic generation from the surface of a liquid microjet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smolentsev, Nikolay; Chen, Yixing; Roke, Sylvie, E-mail: sylvie.roke@epfl.ch [Laboratory for Fundamental Biophotonics (LBP), Institute of Bioengineering (IBI), School of Engineering STI, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Jena, Kailash C. [Laboratory for Fundamental Biophotonics (LBP), Institute of Bioengineering (IBI), School of Engineering STI, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Rupnagar, 140001 (India); Brown, Matthew A. [Laboratory for Surface Science and Technology, Department of Materials, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of a liquid microjet as a possible source of interest for Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) spectroscopy is examined. We measured non-resonant SHG scattering patterns from the air/water interface of a microjet of pure water and observe a strong enhancement of the SHG signal for certain scattering angles. These enhancements can be explained by the optical properties and the shape of the liquid microjet. SFG experiments at the surface of a liquid microjet of ethanol in air show that it is also possible to measure the coherent vibrational SFG spectrum of the ethanol/air interface in this way. Our findings are useful for future far-UV or X-ray based nonlinear optical surface experiments on liquid jets. In addition, combined X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and SHG/SFG measurements are feasible, which will be very useful in improving our understanding of the molecular foundations of electrostatic and chemical surface properties and phenomena.

  18. Thermal behavior of Charmonium in the vector channel from QCD sum rules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominguez, C. A. [Centre for Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Department of Physics, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch 7600 (South Africa); Loewe, M. [Facultad de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Rojas, J. C. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Zhang, Y. [Centre for Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa)

    2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal evolution of the hadronic parameters of charmonium in the vector channel, i.e. the J/{Psi} resonance mass, coupling (leptonic decay constant), total width, and continuum threshold are analyzed in the framework of thermal Hilbert moment QCD sum rules. The continuum threshold s{sub 0} has the same behavior as in all other hadronic channels, i.e. it decreases with increasing temperature until the PQCD threshold s{sub 0} = 4m{sub Q}{sup 2} is reached at T{approx_equal}1.22T{sub c}(m{sub Q} is the charm quark mass). The other hadronic parameters behave in a very different way from those of light-light and heavy-light quark systems. The J/{Psi} mass is essentially constant in a wide range of temperatures, while the total width grows with temperature up to T{approx_equal}1.04T{sub c} beyond which it decreases sharply with increasing T. The resonance coupling is also initially constant beginning to increase monotonically around T{approx_equal}T{sub c}. This behavior of the total width and of the leptonic decay constant is a strong indication that the J/{Psi} resonance might survive beyond the critical temperature for deconfinement, in agreement with some recent lattice QCD results.

  19. Charmonium in the vector channel at finite temperature from QCD sum rules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominguez, C. A. [Centre for Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Department of Physics, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch 7600 (South Africa); Loewe, M. [Facultad de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Rojas, J. C. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Zhang, Y. [Centre for Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal Hilbert moment QCD sum rules are used to obtain the temperature dependence of the hadronic parameters of charmonium in the vector channel, i.e. the J/{psi} resonance mass, coupling (leptonic decay constant), total width, and continuum threshold. The continuum threshold s{sub 0}, which signals the end of the resonance region and the onset of perturbative QCD, behaves as in all other hadronic channels, i.e. it decreases with increasing temperature until it reaches the perturbative QCD threshold s{sub 0}=4m{sub Q}{sup 2}, with m{sub Q} the charm quark mass, at T{approx_equal}1.22T{sub c}. The rest of the hadronic parameters behave very differently from those of light-light and heavy-light quark systems. The J/{psi} mass is essentially constant in a wide range of temperatures, while the total width grows with temperature up to T{approx_equal}1.04T{sub c} beyond which it decreases sharply with increasing T. The resonance coupling is also initially constant and then begins to increase monotonically around T{approx_equal}T{sub c}. This behavior of the total width and of the leptonic decay constant provides a strong indication that the J/{psi} resonance might survive beyond the critical temperature for deconfinement.

  20. Convergence of Weighted Min-Sum Decoding Via Dynamic Programming on Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian, Yung-Yih

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applying the max-product (and belief-propagation) algorithms to loopy graphs is now quite popular for best assignment problems. This is largely due to their low computational complexity and impressive performance in practice. Still, there is no general understanding of the conditions required for convergence and/or the optimality of converged solutions. This paper presents an analysis of both attenuated max-product (AMP) decoding and weighted min-sum (WMS) decoding for LDPC codes which guarantees convergence to a fixed point when a weight parameter, {\\beta}, is sufficiently small. It also shows that, if the fixed point satisfies some consistency conditions, then it must be both the linear-programming (LP) and maximum-likelihood (ML) solution. For (dv,dc)-regular LDPC codes, the weight must satisfy {\\beta}(dv-1) \\leq 1 whereas the results proposed by Frey and Koetter require instead that {\\beta}(dv-1)(dc-1) 1 is also given. Finally, connections are explored with recent work by Arora et al. on the threshold of...

  1. GPU-Based Heuristic Solver for Linear Sum Assignment Problems Under Real-time Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roverso, Roberto; El-Beltagy, Mohammed; El-Ansary, Sameh

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we modify a fast heuristic solver for the Linear Sum Assignment Problem (LSAP) for use on Graphical Processing Units (GPUs). The motivating scenario is an industrial application for P2P live streaming that is moderated by a central node which is periodically solving LSAP instances for assigning peers to one another. The central node needs to handle LSAP instances involving thousands of peers in as near to real-time as possible. Our findings are generic enough to be applied in other contexts. Our main result is a parallel version of a heuristic algorithm called Deep Greedy Switching (DGS) on GPUs using the CUDA programming language. DGS sacrifices absolute optimality in favor of low computation time and was designed as an alternative to classical LSAP solvers such as the Hungarian and auctioning methods. The contribution of the paper is threefold: First, we present the process of trial and error we went through, in the hope that our experience will be beneficial to adopters of GPU programming for...

  2. Theoretical vibrational sum-frequency generation spectroscopy of water near lipid and surfactant monolayer interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, S.; Gruenbaum, S. M.; Skinner, J. L. [Theoretical Chemistry Institute and Department of Chemistry, 1101 University Ave., University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the structure of water near cell membranes is crucial for characterizing water-mediated events such as molecular transport. To obtain structural information of water near a membrane, it is useful to have a surface-selective technique that can probe only interfacial water molecules. One such technique is vibrational sum-frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. As model systems for studying membrane headgroup/water interactions, in this paper we consider lipid and surfactant monolayers on water. We adopt a theoretical approach combining molecular dynamics simulations and phase-sensitive VSFG to investigate water structure near these interfaces. Our simulated spectra are in qualitative agreement with experiments and reveal orientational ordering of interfacial water molecules near cationic, anionic, and zwitterionic interfaces. OH bonds of water molecules point toward an anionic interface leading to a positive VSFG peak, whereas the water hydrogen atoms point away from a cationic interface leading to a negative VSFG peak. Coexistence of these two interfacial water species is observed near interfaces between water and mixtures of cationic and anionic lipids, as indicated by the presence of both negative and positive peaks in their VSFG spectra. In the case of a zwitterionic interface, OH orientation is toward the interface on the average, resulting in a positive VSFG peak.

  3. Thermal modification of bottomonium spectra from QCD sum rules with the maximum entropy method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kei Suzuki; Philipp Gubler; Kenji Morita; Makoto Oka

    2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The bottomonium spectral functions at finite temperature are analyzed by employing QCD sum rules with the maximum entropy method. This approach enables us to extract the spectral functions without any phenomenological parametrization, and thus to visualize deformation of the spectral functions due to temperature effects estimated from quenched lattice QCD data. As a result, it is found that \\Upsilon and \\eta_b survive in hot matter of temperature up to at least 2.3T_c and 2.1T_c, respectively, while \\chi_{b0} and \\chi_{b1} will disappear at T<2.5T_c. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of the vector channel shows that the spectral function in the region of the lowest peak at T=0 contains contributions from the excited states, \\Upsilon(2S) and \\Upsilon(3S), as well as the ground states \\Upsilon (1S). Our results at finite T are consistent with the picture that the excited states of bottomonia dissociate at lower temperature than that of the ground state. Assuming this picture, we find that \\Upsilon(2S) and \\Upsilon(3S) disappear at T=1.5-2.0T_c.

  4. The generalized parton distribution functions and the nucleon spin sum rules in the chiral quark soliton model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Wakamatsu; H. Tsujimoto

    2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The theoretical predictions are given for the forward limit of the unpolarized spin-flip isovector generalized parton distribution function $(E^u - E^d)(x, \\xi, t)$ within the framework of the chiral quark soliton model, with full inclusion of the polarization of Dirac sea quarks. We observe that $[(H^u - H^d) + (E^u - E^d)](x,0,0)$ has a sharp peak around $x=0$, which we interpret as a signal of the importance of the pionic $q \\bar{q}$ excitation with large spatial extension in the transverse direction. Another interesting indication given by the predicted distribution in combination with Ji's angular momentum sum rule is that the $\\bar{d}$-quark carries more angular momentum than the $\\bar{u}$-quark in the proton, which may have some relation with the physics of the violation of the Gottfried sum rule.

  5. Steel characteristics measurement system using Barkhausen jump sum rate and magnetic field intensity and method of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kohn, Gabriel (Omer, IL); Hicho, George (Derwood, MD); Swartzendruber, Lydon (New Carrollton, MD)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A steel hardness measurement system and method of using same are provided for measuring at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic of a ferromagnetic sample as a function of at least one magnetic characteristic of the sample. A magnetic field generator subjects the sample to a variable external magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity of the magnetic field generated by the magnetic field generating means is measured and a signal sensor is provided for measuring Barkhausen signals from the sample when the sample is subjected to the external magnetic field. A signal processing unit calculates a jump sum rate first moment as a function of the Barkhausen signals measured by the signal sensor and the magnetic field intensity, and for determining the at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic as a function of the jump sum rate first moment.

  6. Steel characteristics measurement system using Barkhausen jump sum rate and magnetic field intensity and method of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kohn, G.; Hicho, G.; Swartzendruber, L.

    1997-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A steel hardness measurement system and method of using same are provided for measuring at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic of a ferromagnetic sample as a function of at least one magnetic characteristic of the sample. A magnetic field generator subjects the sample to a variable external magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity of the magnetic field generated by the magnetic field generating means is measured and a signal sensor is provided for measuring Barkhausen signals from the sample when the sample is subjected to the external magnetic field. A signal processing unit calculates a jump sum rate first moment as a function of the Barkhausen signals measured by the signal sensor and the magnetic field intensity, and for determining the at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic as a function of the jump sum rate first moment. 7 figs.

  7. Constraints on the Leading-Twist Pion Distribution Amplitude from A QCD Light-Cone Sum Rule with Chiral Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing-Gang Wu

    2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an improved analysis of the constraints on the first two Gegenbauer moments, $a^\\pi_2$ and $a^\\pi_4$, of the pion's leading-twist distribution amplitude from a QCD light-cone sum rule analysis of $B\\to\\pi$ weak transition form factor $f_{+}(q^2)$. Proper chiral current is adopted in QCD light-cone sum rule so as to eliminate the most uncertain twist-3 contributions to $f_{+}(q^2)$, and then we concentrate our attention on the properties of the leading-twist pion DA. A nearly model-independent $f_+(q^2)$ as shown in Ref.\\cite{pball0} that is based on the spectrum of $B\\to\\pi l\

  8. Constraining spectral functions at finite temperature and chemical potential with exact sum rules in asymptotically free theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, S. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Laboratory for Nuclear Science Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Center for Theoretical Physics, Laboratory for Nuclear Science Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); [Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Lissia, M. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Laboratory for Nuclear Science Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Center for Theoretical Physics, Laboratory for Nuclear Science Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, via Ada Negri 18, I-09127 Cagliari (Italy); [Dipartimento di Fisica dell` Universita di Cagliari I-09124 Cagliari (Italy)

    1995-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the framework of the operator product expansion and the renormalization group equation, we show that the temperature and chemical potential dependence of the zeroth moment of a spectral function (SF) is completely determined by the one-loop structure in an asymptotically free theory, and in particular in QCD. Logarithmic corrections are found to play an essential role in the derivation. This exact result constrains the shape of SF`s, and implies striking effects near phase transitions. Phenomenological parametrizations of the SF, often used in applications such as the analysis of lattice QCD data or QCD sum rule calculations at finite temperature and baryon density, must satisfy these constraints. We also explicitly illustrate in detail the exact sum rule in the Gross-Neveu model.

  9. On the Sum of the Non-Negative Lyapunov Exponents for Some Cocycles Related to the Anderson Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilia Binder; Michael Goldstein; Mircea Voda

    2014-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide an explicit lower bound for the the sum of the non-negative Lyapunov exponents for some cocycles related to the Anderson model. In particular, for the Anderson model on a strip of width $ W $ the lower bound is proportional to $ W^{-\\epsilon} $, for any $ \\epsilon>0 $. This bound is consistent with the fact that the lowest non-negative Lyapunov exponent is conjectured to have a lower bound proportional to $ W^{-1} $.

  10. Kinetic and electron-electron energies for convex sums of ground state densities with degeneracies and fractional electron number

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levy, Mel, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: mlevy@tulane.edu [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States) [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, North Carolina 27411 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States); Anderson, James S. M.; Zadeh, Farnaz Heidar; Ayers, Paul W., E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: mlevy@tulane.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of exact density functionals provide useful constraints for the development of new approximate functionals. This paper focuses on convex sums of ground-level densities. It is observed that the electronic kinetic energy of a convex sum of degenerate ground-level densities is equal to the convex sum of the kinetic energies of the individual degenerate densities. (The same type of relationship holds also for the electron-electron repulsion energy.) This extends a known property of the Levy-Valone Ensemble Constrained-Search and the Lieb Legendre-Transform refomulations of the Hohenberg-Kohn functional to the individual components of the functional. Moreover, we observe that the kinetic and electron-repulsion results also apply to densities with fractional electron number (even if there are no degeneracies), and we close with an analogous point-wise property involving the external potential. Examples where different degenerate states have different kinetic energy and electron-nuclear attraction energy are given; consequently, individual components of the ground state electronic energy can change abruptly when the molecular geometry changes. These discontinuities are predicted to be ubiquitous at conical intersections, complicating the development of universally applicable density-functional approximations.

  11. Modification of hadronic spectral functions under extreme conditions: An approach based on QCD sum rules and the maximum entropy method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Gubler; Kei Suzuki; Kenji Morita; Makoto Oka

    2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of quarkonium spectral functions at finite temperature, based on an approach combining QCD sum rules and the maximum entropy method are briefly reviewed. QCD sum rules for heavy quarkonia incorporate finite temperature effects in form of changing values of gluonic condensates that appear in the operator product expansion. These changes depend on the energy density and pressure at finite temperature, which we extract from quenched lattice QCD calculations. The maximum entropy method then allows us to obtain the most probable spectral function from the sum rules, without having to introduce any specific assumption about its functional form. Our findings suggest that the charmonium ground states of both S-wave and P-wave channels dissolve into the continuum already at temperatures around or slightly above the critical temperature T_c, while the bottomonium states are less influenced by temperature effects, surviving up to about 2.5 T_c or higher for S-wave and up to about 2.0 T_c for P-wave states.

  12. Project Year Project Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey J.

    Project Year 2011-2012 Project Title Using M-Health and GIS Technology in the Field to Improve-specialized, but practically useless skill. Solution One goal of this summer's Applied Geographic Information Systems in Public lessons about observational epidemiology. Technologies Used Geographic Info System (GIS), Blackboard

  13. Effect of surface structure on catalytic reactions: A sum frequency generation surface vibrational spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCrea, Keith R.

    2001-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In the results discussed above, it is clear that Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) is a unique tool that allows the detection of vibrational spectra of adsorbed molecules present on single crystal surfaces under catalytic reaction conditions. Not only is it possible to detect active surface intermediates, it is also possible to detect spectator species which are not responsible for the measured turnover rates. By correlating high-pressure SFG spectra under reaction conditions and gas chromatography (GC) kinetic data, it is possible to determine which species are important under reaction intermediates. Because of the flexibility of this technique for studying surface intermediates, it is possible to determine how the structures of single crystal surfaces affect the observed rates of catalytic reactions. As an example of a structure insensitive reaction, ethylene hydrogenation was explored on both Pt(111) and Pt(100). The rates were determined to be essentially the same. It was observed that both ethylidyne and di-{sigma} bonded ethylene were present on the surface under reaction conditions on both crystals, although in different concentrations. This result shows that these two species are not responsible for the measured turnover rate, as it would be expected that one of the two crystals would be more active than the other, since the concentration of the surface intermediate would be different on the two crystals. The most likely active intermediates are weakly adsorbed molecules such as {pi}-bonded ethylene and ethyl. These species are not easily detected because their concentration lies at the detection limit of SFG. The SFG spectra and GC data essentially show that ethylene hydrogenation is structure insensitive for Pt(111) and Pt(100). SFG has proven to be a unique and excellent technique for studying adsorbed species on single crystal surfaces under high-pressure catalytic reactions. Coupled with kinetic data obtained from gas chromatography measurements, it can give much insight into how the structure of a single crystal surface affects the chemistry of a catalytic reaction by detecting surface species under reaction conditions.

  14. JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATIONS AND NETWORKS, VOL. 14, NO. 2, APRIL 2012 151 Sum-Rate Optimal Power Policies for Energy Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    -filling, energy harvesting net- works, generalized iterative water-filling, interference channel, sum Policies for Energy Harvesting Transmitters in an Interference Channel Kaya Tutuncuoglu and Aylin Yener harvesting transmitters. Different than con- ventional battery powered wireless nodes, energy harvesting

  15. 2008 Year in Review 1 2008 Year in Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    2008 Year in Review 1 2008 Year in Review The Science of Communication Disorders Departmental Research Committee. #12;2 2008 Year in Review Billinghurst, M., Moran, C., Gostomski, P., Basu, A

  16. On the representation of even numbers as the sum and difference of two primes and the representation of odd numbers as the sum of an odd prime and an even semiprime and the distribution of primes in short intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan-Guang Tan

    2014-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The representation of even numbers as the sum of two primes and the distribution of primes in short intervals were investigated and a main theorem was given out and proved, which states: For every number $n$ greater than a positive number $n_{0}$, let $q$ be an odd prime number smaller than $\\sqrt{2n}$ and $d=2n-q$, then there is always at least an odd number $d$ which does not contain any prime factor smaller than $\\sqrt{2n}$ and must be an odd prime number greater than $2n-\\sqrt{2n}$. Then it was proved that for every number $n$ greater than 1, there are always at least a pair of primes $p$ and $q$ which are symmetrical about the number $n$ so that even numbers greater than 2 can be expressed as the sum of two primes. Hence, the Goldbach's conjecture was proved. Also theorems of the distribution of primes in short intervals were given out and proved. By these theorems, the Legendre's conjecture, the Oppermann's conjecture, the Hanssner's conjecture, the Brocard's conjecture, the Andrica's conjecture, the Sierpinski's conjecture and the Sierpinski's conjecture of triangular numbers were proved and the Mills' constant can be determined. The representation of odd numbers as the sum of an odd prime number and an even semiprime was investigated and a main theorem was given out and proved, which states: For every number $n$ greater than a positive number $n_{0}$, let $q$ be an odd prime number smaller than $\\sqrt{2n}$ and $d=2n+1-2q$, then there is always at least an odd number $d$ which does not contain any odd prime factor smaller than $\\sqrt{2n}$ and must be a prime number greater than $2n+1-2\\sqrt{2n}$. Then it was proved that for every number $n$ greater than 2, there are always at least a pair of primes $p$ and $q$ so that all odd integers greater than 5 can be represented as the sum of an odd prime number and an even semiprime. Hence, the Lemoine's conjecture was proved.

  17. 70 Years of Innovations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYou are70 Years of Innovations

  18. 50 Years of Space

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment ofAugustDecember8th MeetingAllocation50 Years of

  19. Allocation Year Rollover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA,Portal Allocation Year

  20. HPSS Yearly Network Traffic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonic EngineHIV and evolution studiedHPSSHPSS Yearly

  1. Bonding distances as Exact Sums of the Radii of the Constituent Atoms in Nanomaterials - Boron Nitride and Coronene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raji Heyrovska

    2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents for the first time the exact structures at the atomic level of two important nanomaterials, boron nitride and coronene. Both these compounds are hexagonal layer structures similar to graphene in two dimensions and to graphite in three-dimensions. However, they have very different properties: whereas graphene is a conductor, h-BN is an electrical insulator and coronene is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon of cosmological interest. The atomic structures presented here for boron nitride, coronene and graphene have been drawn to scale based on bond lengths as sums of the atomic radii.

  2. Backward Clusters, Hierarchy and Wild Sums for a Hard Sphere System in a Low-Density Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Aoki; M. Pulvirenti; S. Simonella; T. Tsuji

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the statistics of backward clusters in a gas of hard spheres at low density. A backward cluster is defined as the group of particles involved directly or indirectly in the backwards-in-time dynamics of a given tagged sphere. We derive upper and lower bounds on the average size of clusters by using the theory of the homogeneous Boltzmann equation combined with suitable hierarchical expansions. These representations are known in the easier context of Maxwellian molecules (Wild sums). We test our results with a numerical experiment based on molecular dynamics simulations.

  3. NUCLEAR ENGINEERING Four Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    ;Nuclear Engineering Four Year Plan Starting Fall 2009 FALL Year 1 Credits WINTER Year 1 Credits SPRINGNUCLEAR ENGINEERING Four Year Plan Fall 2009 Nuclear Engineering (67 hrs) CH Grade Perspectives (15 I NE 452 3 Neutronic Analysis II NE 457 2 Nuclear Reactor Lab Western Culture (3): NE 467 4 Nucl

  4. Projects of the year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, T.

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Peabody Hotel, Orlando, Florida was the site of Power Engineering magazine's 2006 Projects of the Year Awards Banquet, which kicked-off the Power-Gen International conference and exhibition. The Best Coal-fired Project was awarded to Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association Inc., owner of Springenville Unit 3. This is a 400 MW pulverized coal plant in Springeville, AZ, sited with two existing coal-fired units. Designed to fire Powder River Basin coal, it has low NOx burners and selective catalytic reduction for NOx control, dry flue gas desulfurization for SO{sub 2} control and a pulse jet baghouse for particulate control. It has a seven-stage feedwater heater and condensers to ensure maximum performance. Progress Energy-Carolinas' Asheville Power Station FGD and SCR Project was awarded the 2006 coal-fired Project Honorable Mention. This plant in Skyland, NC was required to significantly reduce NOx emissions. When completed, the improvements will reduce NOx by 93% compared to 1996 levels and SO{sub 2} by 93% compared to 2001 levels. Awards for best gas-fired, nuclear, and renewable/sustainable energy projects are recorded. The Sasyadko Coal-Mine Methane Cogeneration Plant near Donezk, Ukraine, was given the 2006 Honorable Mention for Best Renewable/Sustainable Energy Project. In November 2004, Ukraine was among 14 nations to launch the Methane to Markets partnership. The award-winning plant is fuelled by methane released during coal extraction. It generates 42 MW of power. 4 photos.

  5. Endowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1982-2012 Fiscal Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management Company, based on reinvestment of all earnings on a monthly basis. (3) Values have been recastEndowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1982-2012 Fiscal Year Year-end market value (in 000's) Return Market Value of Endowment Funds as of June 30, 2012 Endowment Market Value Market Value % of Total Arts

  6. Endowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1981-2011 Fiscal Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Harvard Management Company, based on reinvestment of all earnings on a monthly basis. (3) Values have beenEndowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1981-2011 Fiscal Year Year-end market value (in 000's) Return REPORTS Market Value of Endowment Funds as of June 30, 2011 Endowment Market Value Market Value % of Total

  7. Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 Migration Year Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 1 #12;Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 NIDS NCCR North-South #12;Book Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 Publishers Nepal Institute of Development Studies (NIDS) G.P.O. Box: 7647, Kathmandu, Nepal Email: nids@mail.com.np Web: www.nids.org.np National Centre of Competence in Research

  8. Year in Review Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    Year in Review 2005-06 Annual Report Center for Latin American Studies University Center for International Studies University of Pittsburgh #12;2005-06 Year in Review 2 Message from the Acting Director

  9. Year in Review Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    Year in Review 2004-05 Annual Report Center for Latin American Studies University Center for International Studies University of Pittsburgh #12;2004-05 Year in Review 2 Message from the Director This has

  10. Year in Review Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    Year in Review 2006-07 Annual Report Center for Latin American Studies University Center for International Studies University of Pittsburgh #12;2006-07 Year in Review 2 Message from the Director Academic

  11. Running sums for 2{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay matrix elements within the quasiparticle random-phase approximation with account for deformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang Dongliang; Faessler, Amand; Rodin, Vadim; Simkovic, Fedor [Institute fuer Theoretische Physik der Universitaet Tuebingen, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Yousef, Mohamed Saleh [Department of Physics, University of Cairo, Cairo (Egypt)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay running sums for {sup 76}Ge and {sup 150}Nd nuclei are calculated within a QRPA approach with account for deformation. A realistic nucleon-nucleon residual interaction based on the Brueckner G matrix (for the Bonn CD force) is used. The influence of different model parameters on the functional behavior of the running sums is studied. It is found that the parameter g{sub pp} renormalizing the G matrix in the QRPA particle-particle channel is responsible for a qualitative change in behavior of the running sums at higher excitation energies. For realistic values of g{sub pp} a significant negative contribution to the total 2{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay matrix element is found to come from the energy region of the giant Gamow-Teller resonance. This behavior agrees with results of other authors.

  12. YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from cofiring coal with waste paper, sunflower hulls, and wood waste showed a broad spectrum of chemical and physical characteristics, according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C618 procedures. Higher-than-normal levels of magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxide were observed for the biomass-coal fly ash, which may impact utilization in cement replacement in concrete under ASTM requirements. Other niche markets for biomass-derived fly ash were explored. Research was conducted to develop/optimize a catalytic partial oxidation-based concept for a simple, low-cost fuel processor (reformer). Work progressed to evaluate the effects of temperature and denaturant on ethanol catalytic partial oxidation. A catalyst was isolated that had a yield of 24 mole percent, with catalyst coking limited to less than 15% over a period of 2 hours. In biodiesel research, conversion of vegetable oils to biodiesel using an alternative alkaline catalyst was demonstrated without the need for subsequent water washing. In work related to biorefinery technologies, a continuous-flow reactor was used to react ethanol with lactic acid prepared from an ammonium lactate concentrate produced in fermentations conducted at the EERC. Good yields of ester were obtained even though the concentration of lactic acid in the feed was low with respect to the amount of water present. Esterification gave lower yields of ester, owing to the lowered lactic acid content of the feed. All lactic acid fermentation from amylose hydrolysate test trials was completed. Management activities included a decision to extend several projects to December 31, 2003, because of delays in receiving biomass feedstocks for testing and acquisition of commercial matching funds. In strategic studies, methods for producing acetate esters for high-value fibers, fuel additives, solvents, and chemical intermediates were discussed with several commercial entities. Commercial industries have an interest in efficient biomass gasification designs but are waiting for economic incentives. Utility, biorefinery, pulp and paper, or o

  13. ATNI Mid-year Convention

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Mid-year Convention will be hosted by the Chehalis Tribe.

  14. Bull. U. S. F. C 1890. Oyster-culture in France. (Toface page 363.j PLATELXVIII. FIGS.1, 2. FLATOYSTER, OSTREA EDULIS. SPECIMEN FROM BELON,TWO AND A HALF YEARS OLD. Natural size.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    required the exercise of but little labor, and all costly methods of cultivation could have proven STATES FISH COMMISSION. natural grounds as state property and the forbidding of general public dredging revenue yearly than the total sum expended in the failures of Coste. Corn- petition, moreover, on the side

  15. Single-particle spectral density of the unitary Fermi gas: Novel approach based on the operator product expansion, sum rules and the maximum entropy method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Gubler; Naoki Yamamoto; Tetsuo Hatsuda; Yusuke Nishida

    2015-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Making use of the operator product expansion, we derive a general class of sum rules for the imaginary part of the single-particle self-energy of the unitary Fermi gas. The sum rules are analyzed numerically with the help of the maximum entropy method, which allows us to extract the single-particle spectral density as a function of both energy and momentum. These spectral densities contain basic information on the properties of the unitary Fermi gas, such as the dispersion relation and the superfluid pairing gap, for which we obtain reasonable agreement with the available results based on quantum Monte-Carlo simulations.

  16. Single-particle spectral density of the unitary Fermi gas: Novel approach based on the operator product expansion, sum rules and the maximum entropy method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gubler, Philipp; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Nishida, Yusuke

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Making use of the operator product expansion, we derive a general class of sum rules for the imaginary part of the single-particle self-energy of the unitary Fermi gas. The sum rules are analyzed numerically with the help of the maximum entropy method, which allows us to extract the single-particle spectral density as a function of both energy and momentum. These spectral densities contain basic information on the properties of the unitary Fermi gas, such as the dispersion relation and the superfluid pairing gap, for which we obtain reasonable agreement with the available results based on quantum Monte-Carlo simulations.

  17. Microprocessors --10 Years Back, 10 Years Gurindar S. Sohi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohi, Guri S.

    Microprocessors -- 10 Years Back, 10 Years Ahead Gurindar S. Sohi Computer Sciences Department computer architects with an increasing number of faster transistors with which to build microprocessors. In the past decade, architects have seized these opportunities to build microprocessors that bear lit- tle

  18. Compost 101Turn this year's trash into next year's treasure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Compost 101Turn this year's trash into next year's treasure Filling and Maintaining Compost Georgia://ceps.georgiasouthern.edu/garden This brochure is funded in part by a grant from a Museums for America Grant. Types of Composting Bins To fill your compost bin, alternate brown and green materials. Keep in mind that the ideal ratio is three

  19. The Analysis of Interference Effects in the Sum Frequency Spectra of Water Interfaces Mac G. Brown, Elizabeth A. Raymond, Heather C. Allen, Lawrence F. Scatena, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    The Analysis of Interference Effects in the Sum Frequency Spectra of Water Interfaces Mac G. Brown, Elizabeth A. Raymond, Heather C. Allen, Lawrence F. Scatena, and Geraldine L. Richmond* Department involve the surface of liquid water. Unfortunately, obtaining spectral fits to vibrational spectra

  20. Vibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Carbon Tetrachloride-Water and 1,2-Dichloroethane-Water Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    and bonding at the carbon tetrachloride-water (CCl4-H2O) and the 1,2-dichloroethane-water (DCE-H2O) liquidVibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Carbon Tetrachloride-Water and 1,2-Dichloroethane-Water Interfaces Dave S. Walker, Fred G. Moore, and Geraldine L

  1. Thermoelectric-power water withdrawals by cooling type, 2005. [Values may not sum to totals because of independent rounding. All values are in million gallons per day

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermoelectric-power water withdrawals by cooling type, 2005. [Values may not sum to totals because,190 5,850 .33 .01 0 273 273 New Mexico.............. 0 0 0 0 0 10.4 0 45.5 0 55.9 New York

  2. Photo: Saba Gul The first MIT Alumni ServiceTrip to the Napo Province in the Amazon Rainforest of Ecuador took place this past sum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reuter, Martin

    of Ecuador took place this past sum producers, building capacity for the organization. Pictured are cocoa ­ a lightweight and portable solar energy device for cooking, heating, and electricity generation ­ won 500 or carry cement-based solar cookers, this is very good news. SolSource was a 2008 IDEAS Competition winner

  3. Structural and kinematic analysis of the Early Paleozoic Ondor Sum-Hongqi mlange belt, eastern part of the Altaids (CAOB) in Inner Mongolia, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    part of the Altaids (CAOB) in Inner Mongolia, China Guanzhong Shi a,b Michel Faureb , Bei Xua,* , Pan mélange and a magmatic arc that form the main elements of the Southern Orogen Belt of Inner Mongolia of the mélange conducted in the Hongqi and Ondor Sum areas (western Inner Mongolia) shows two phrases of ductile

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2012 2013 SES 2 1 -50.00% EJEK 10 9 -10.00% EN 04 27 24 -11.11% NN (Engineering) 28 24 -14.29% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 31 29 -6.45% NU (TechAdmin Support) 4...

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A7948 27069

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A7948

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A794826

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A79482693

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A7948269300

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A794826930002

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A794826930002

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861119

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008748611196

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111969

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111969

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861119695

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008748611196957

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861119695789

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.

  5. University Housing! First Year Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    community -Committed faculty member for academic success -Group Work focused -Learning Community Assistant for academic success -Group Work focused -Learning Community Assistant (LCA) Living Learning Communities (LLCs) + + The choice is yours! First Year Experience Thematic First Year Student Housing focused around development

  6. Outlook: The Next Twenty Years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    2003-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    I present an outlook for the next twenty years in particle physics. I start with the big questions in our field, broken down into four categories: horizontal, vertical, heaven, and hell. Then I discuss how we attack the bigquestions in each category during the next twenty years. I argue for a synergy between many different approaches taken in our field.

  7. Unique determination of the -CN group tilt angle in Langmuir monolayers using sum-frequency polarization null angle and phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Wang, Hongfei

    2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative phase and amplitude ratio between the ssp and ppp polarization combinations of the vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) response can be uniquely and accurately determined by the polarization null angle (PNA) method. In this report we show that PNA measurements of the -CN vibration in the 4-n pentyl-4'-cyanoterphenyl (5CT) Langmuir monolayer at the air/water interface yields ssp and ppp response of the same phase, while those in the 4-n-octyl-4'cyanobiphenyl (8CB) Langmuir monolayer have the opposite phase. Accordingly, the -CN group in the 5CT monolayer is tilted around 25+/-2 from the interface normal, while that in the 8CB is tilted around 57+/-2, consistent with the significant differences in the phase diagrams and hydrogen bonding SFG spectra of the two Langmuir monolayers as reported in the literature. These results also demonstrate that in SFG studies the relative phase information of the different polarization combinations, especially for the ssp and ppp, is important in the unique determination of the tilt angle and conformation of a molecular group at the interface.

  8. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Adsorbed Amino Acids, Peptides and Proteins of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Solid-Water Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holinga IV, G.H.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to investigate the interfacial properties of several amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at the hydrophilic polystyrene solid-liquid and the hydrophobic silica solid-liquid interfaces. The influence of experimental geometry on the sensitivity and resolution of the SFG vibrational spectroscopy technique was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. SFG was implemented to investigate the adsorption and organization of eight individual amino acids at model hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces under physiological conditions. Biointerface studies were conducted using a combination of SFG and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) comparing the interfacial structure and concentration of two amino acids and their corresponding homopeptides at two model liquid-solid interfaces as a function of their concentration in aqueous solutions. The influence of temperature, concentration, equilibration time, and electrical bias on the extent of adsorption and interfacial structure of biomolecules were explored at the liquid-solid interface via QCM and SFG. QCM was utilized to quantify the biological activity of heparin functionalized surfaces. A novel optical parametric amplifier was developed and utilized in SFG experiments to investigate the secondary structure of an adsorbed model peptide at the solid-liquid interface.

  9. Improved f_{D*_(s)}, f_{B*_(s)} and f_{B_c} from QCD Laplace sum rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephan Narison

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anticipating future precise measurements of the D- and B-like (semi-)leptonic and hadronic decays for alternative determinations of the CKM mixing angles, we pursue our program on the D- and B-like mesons by improving the estimates of f_{D*_(s)} and f_{B*_(s)} (analogue to f_\\pi) by using the well-established (inverse) Laplace sum rules (LSR) and / or their suitable ratios less affected by the systematics, which are known to N2LO pQCD and where the complete d = 6 non-perturbative condensate contributions are included. The convergence of the PT series is analyzed by an estimate of the N3LO terms based on geometric growth of the coefficients. In addition to the standard LSR variable {\\tau} and the QCD continuum threshold t_c stability criteria, we extract our optimal results by also requiring stability on the variation of the arbitrary QCD subtraction point {\\mu}. We complete the analysis by a direct estimate of f_{B_c}. Our results summarized in Tables III and IV are compared with some other recent estimates.

  10. Consistency in the Sum Frequency Generation Intensity and Phase Vibrational Spectra of the Air/Neat Water Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Ranran; Guo, Yuan; Lu, Rong; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Wang, Hongfei

    2011-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Tremendous progresses have been made in quantitative understanding and interpretation of the hydrogen bonding and ordering structure at the air/water interface since the first sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) measurement on the neat air/water interface by Q. Du et al. in 1993 (PRL, 70, 2312-2316, 1993.). However, there are still disagreements and controversies on the consistency between the different experiment measurements and the theoretical computational results. One critical problem lies in the inconsistency between the SFG-VS intensity measurements and the recently developed SFG-VS phase spectra measurements of the neat air/water interface, which has inspired various theoretical efforts trying to understand them. In this report, the reliability of the SFG-VS intensity spectra of the neat air/water interface is to be quantitatively examined, and the sources of possible inaccuracies in the SFG-VS phase spectral measurement is to be discussed based on the non-resonant SHG phase measurement results. The conclusion is that the SFG-VS intensity spectra data from different laboratories are now quantitatively converging and in agreement with each other, and the possible inaccuracies and inconsistencies in the SFG-VS phase spectra measurements need to be carefully examined against the properly corrected phase standard.

  11. The Spin Structure Function $g_1^{\\rm p}$ of the Proton and a Test of the Bjorken Sum Rule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adolph, C; Alexeev, M G; Alexeev, G D; Amoroso, A; Andrieux, V; Anosov, V; Austregesilo, A; Azevedo, C; Badelek, B; Balestra, F; Barth, J; Baum, G; Beck, G R; Bedfer, Y; Bernhard, J; Bicker, K; Bielert, E R; Birsa, R; Bisplinghoff, J; Bodlak, M; Boer, M; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Braun, C; Bressan, A; Buechele, M; Burtin, E; Capozza, L; Chang, W -C; Chiosso, M; Choi, I; Chung, S U; Cicuttin, A; Crespo, M L; Curiel, Q; Torre, S Dalla; Dasgupta, S S; Dasgupta, S; Denisov, O Yu; Dhara, L; Donskov, S V; Doshita, N; Duic, V; Dziewiecki, M; Efremov, A; Eversheim, P D; Eyrich, W; Ferrero, A; Finger, M; Fischer, H; Franco, C; von Hohenesche, N du Fresne; Friedrich, J M; Frolov, V; Fuchey, E; Gautheron, F; Gavrichtchouk, O P; Gerassimov, S; Giordano, F; Gnesi, I; Gorzellik, M; Grabmüller, S; Grasso, A; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Grube, B; Grussenmeyer, T; Guskov, A; Haas, F; Hahne, D; von Harrach, D; Hashimoto, R; Heinsius, F H; Herrmann, F; Hinterberger, F; Horikawa, N; d'Hose, N; Hsieh, C -Yu; Huber, S; Ishimoto, S; Ivanov, A; Ivanshin, Yu; Iwata, T; Jahn, R; Jary, V; Jörg, P; Joosten, R; Kabuß, E; Ketzer, B; Khaustov, G V; Khokhlov, Yu A; Kisselev, Yu; Klein, F; Klimaszewski, K; Koivuniemi, J H; Kolosov, V N; Kondo, K; Koenigsmann, K; Konorov, I; Konstantinov, V F; Kotzinian, A M; Kouznetsov, O; Kraemer, M; Kremser, P; Krinner, F; Kroumchtein, Z V; Kuchinski, N; Kunne, F; Kurek, K; Kurjata, R P; Lednev, A A; Lehmann, A; Levillain, M; Levorato, S; Lichtenstadt, J; Longo, R; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Makins, N; Makke, N; Mallot, G K; Marchand, C; Martin, A; Marzec, J; Matousek, J; Matsuda, H; Matsuda, T; Meshcheryakov, G; Meyer, W; Michigami, T; Mikhailov, Yu V; Miyachi, Y; Nagaytsev, A; Nagel, T; Nerling, F; Neyret, D; Nikolaenko, V I; Novy, J; Nowak, W -D; Nunes, A S; Olshevsky, A G; Orlov, I; Ostrick, M; Panzieri, D; Parsamyan, B; Paul, S; Peng, J -C; Pereira, F; Pesek, M; Peshekhonov, D V; Platchkov, S; Pochodzalla, J; Polyakov, V A; Pretz, J; Quaresma, M; Quintans, C; Ramos, S; Regali, C; Reicherz, G; Riedl, C; Rocco, E; Rossiyskaya, N S; Ryabchikov, D I; Rychter, A; Samoylenko, V D; Sandacz, A; Santos, C; Sarkar, S; Savin, I A; Sbrizzai, G; Schiavon, P; Schmidt, K; Schmieden, H; Schoenning, K; Schopferer, S; Selyunin, A; Shevchenko, O Yu; Silva, L; Sinha, L; Sirtl, S; Slunecka, M; Sozzi, F; Srnka, A; Stolarski, M; Sulc, M; Suzuki, H; Szabelski, A; Szameitat, T; Sznajder, P; Takekawa, S; ter Wolbeek, J; Tessaro, S; Tessarotto, F; Thibaud, F; Tosello, F; Tskhay, V; Uhl, S; Veloso, J; Virius, M; Weisrock, T; Wilfert, M; Zaremba, K; Zavertyaev, M; Zemlyanichkina, E; Ziembicki, M; Zink, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New results for the double spin asymmetry $A_1^{\\rm p}$ and the proton longitudinal spin structure function $g_1^{\\rm p}$ are presented. They were obtained by the COMPASS collaboration using polarised 200 GeV muons scattered off a longitudinally polarised NH$_3$ target. The data were collected in 2011 and complement those recorded in 2007 at 160\\,GeV, in particular at lower values of $x$. They improve the statistical precision of $g_1^{\\rm p}(x)$ by about a factor of two in the region $x\\lesssim 0.02$. A next-to-leading order QCD fit to the $g_1$ world data is performed. It leads to a new determination of the quark spin contribution to the nucleon spin, $\\Delta \\Sigma$ ranging from 0.26 to 0.36, and to a re-evaluation of the first moment of $g_1^{\\rm p}$. The uncertainty of $\\Delta \\Sigma$ is mostly due to the large uncertainty in the present determinations of the gluon helicity distribution. A new evaluation of the Bjorken sum rule based on the COMPASS results for the non-singlet structure function $g_1^{\\rm...

  12. Meson mixing in the QCD sum rules and its application to the charge symmetry breaking N-N force

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meissner, T. [Institute for Nuclear Theory, HN-12, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Henley, E.M. [Institute for Nuclear Theory, HN-12, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)]|[Physics Department, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Hatsuda, T. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 (Japan); Chan, C. [Physics Department, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    1995-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the {rho}-{omega} as well as the {pi}-{eta} mixing amplitude using QCD sum rules and the dispersion relation for the vector and the axial vector currents in the corresponding isospin channels, respectively. We find that the {rho}-{omega} mixing amplitude is strongly {ital q}{sup 2} dependent. Going off shell the mixing decreases, changes sign at {ital q}{sup 2}{congruent}0.4{ital m}{sup 2}{sub {rho}}{gt}0 and is negative in the space like region. This is in qualitative agreement with the results of various quark and hadronic models. Implications to the charge symmetry breaking (CSB) nuclear force are discussed. On the other hand the {ital q}{sup 2} dependence of the {pi}-{eta} mixing turns out to be very weak. The value of this amplitude is with about {minus}4000 MeV{sup 2} close to the one obtained in chiral perturbation theory and from the fit to the CSB NN potential. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  13. Budget estimates. Fiscal year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Congress has determined that the safe use of nuclear materials for peaceful purposes is a legitimate and important national goal. It has entrusted the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with the primary Federal responsibility for achieving that goal. The NRC`s mission, therefore, is to regulate the Nation`s civilian use of byproduct, source, and special nuclear materials to ensure adequate protection of public health and safety, to promote the common defense and security, and to protect the environment. The NRC`s FY 1998 budget requests new budget authority of $481,300,000 to be funded by two appropriations - one is the NRC`s Salaraies and Expenses appropriation for $476,500,000, and the other is NRC`s Office of Inspector General appropriation for $4,800,000. Of the funds appropriated to the NRC`s Salaries and Expenses, $17,000,000, shall be derived from the Nuclear Waste Fund and $2,000,000 shall be derived from general funds. The proposed FY 1998 appropriation legislation would also exempt the $2,000,000 for regulatory reviews and other assistance provided to the Department of Energy from the requirement that the NRC collect 100 percent of its budget from fees. The sums appropriated to the NRC`s Salaries and Expenses and NRC`s Office of Inspector General shall be reduced by the amount of revenues received during FY 1998 from licensing fees, inspection services, and other services and collections, so as to result in a final FY 1998 appropriation for the NRC of an estimated $19,000,000 - the amount appropriated from the Nuclear Waste Fund and from general funds. Revenues derived from enforcement actions shall be deposited to miscellaneous receipts of the Treasury.

  14. Visualizing Twenty Years of Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potel, Mike; Wong, Pak C.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications marks the 20th anniversary of the Applications department as a regular feature of the magazine. We thought it might be interesting to look back at the 20 years of Applications department articles to assess its evolution over that time. By aggregating all twenty years of articles and applying a little statistical and visual analytics, we’ve uncovered some interesting characteristics and trends we thought we’d share to mark this 20 year milestone.

  15. Chapeau! First-Year French

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinneen, David A.; Kernen, Madeleine

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapeau! is a first-year college text. Although it may appear, at first glance, o move very fast and introduce a large amount of material early, the vocabulary and grammatical structures that we expect students to control ...

  16. Accountability report - fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the US NRC`s accountability report for fiscal year 1997. Topics include uses of funds, financial condition, program performance, management accountability, and the audited financial statement.

  17. The Subset Sum Game

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 14, 2012 ... weighted items and wants to maximize the total weight of its own ... equilibria and the associated quality measures, namely Price of Anarchy and ... mission Control problem (ACP) which, in a wide sense, refers to the design of.

  18. Nanoscale chemical and mechanical characterization of thin films:sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy at buriedinterfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kweskin, S.J.

    2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) surface vibrational spectroscopy was used to characterize interfaces pertinent to current surface engineering applications, such as thin film polymers and novel catalysts. An array of advanced surface science techniques like scanning probe microscopy (SPM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), gas chromatography (GC) and electron microscopy were used to obtain experimental measurements complementary to SFG data elucidating polymer and catalyst surface composition, surface structure, and surface mechanical behavior. Experiments reported in this dissertation concentrate on three fundamental questions: (1) How does the interfacial molecular structure differ from that of the bulk in real world applications? (2) How do differences in chemical environment affect interface composition or conformation? (3) How do these changes correlate to properties such as mechanical or catalytic performance? The density, surface energy and bonding at a solid interface dramatically alter the polymer configuration, physics and mechanical properties such as surface glass transition, adhesion and hardness. The enhanced sensitivity of SFG at the buried interface is applied to three systems: a series of acrylates under compression, the compositions and segregation behavior of binary polymer polyolefin blends, and the changes in surface structure of a hydrogel as a function of hydration. In addition, a catalytically active thin film of polymer coated nanoparticles is investigated to evaluate the efficacy of SFG to provide in situ information for catalytic reactions involving small mass adsorption and/or product development. Through the use of SFG, in situ total internal reflection (TIR) was used to increase the sensitivity of SFG and provide the necessary specificity to investigate interfaces of thin polymer films and nanostructures previously considered unfeasible. The dynamic nature of thin film surfaces is examined and it is found that the non-equilibrium states contribute to practical applications of acrylates, blends and hydrogels. Lastly, nanoparticle surfaces and the catalytic activity and selectivity of platinum cube nanoparticles are correlated to the surface intermediates in a high pressure flow reactor.

  19. Measurements of the B to Xs gamma Branching Fraction and Spectral Shape from a Sum of Exclusive Final States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Using 88.9 million B{bar B} events collected by the BABAR detector at the {Upsilon}(4S), they measure the branching fraction for the radiative penguin process B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} from the sum of 38 exclusive final states. The inclusive branching fraction above a minimum photon energy E{sub {gamma}} > 1.9 GeV is {Beta}(b {yields} s{gamma}) = (3.27 {+-} 0.18(stat.){sub -0.40}{sup +0.55}(syst.){sub -0.09}{sup +0.04}(theory)) x 10{sup -4}. They also measure the isospin asymmetry between B{sup -} {yields} X{sub s{bar u}}{gamma} and {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} X{sub sd}{gamma} to be {Delta}{sub 0-} = -0.006 {+-} 0.058(stat.) {+-} 0.009(syst.) {+-} 0.024({bar B}{sup 0}/B{sup -}). The photon energy spectrum is measured in the B rest frame, from which moments are derived for different values of the minimum photon energy. They present fits to the photon spectrum and moments which give the heavy-quark parameters m{sub b} and {mu}{sub {pi}}{sup 2}. The fitted parameters are consistent with those obtained from semileptonic B {yields} X{sub c}{ell}{nu} decays, and are useful inputs for the extraction of |V{sub ub}| from measurements of semileptonic B {yields} X{sub u}{ell}{nu} decays.

  20. LNG to the year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davenport, S.T.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By 2000, about 190 MM metric-tpy of LNG will be moving in world trade, with Asia-Pacific as the dominant producer By the year 2000, approximately 190 million metric tons per year of LNG will be moving in worldwide trade. Production of LNG will be spread throughout most of the world, with Asia-Pacific as the dominant producer. LNG will be delivered only to the heavily industrialized areas of North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific. The success of any LNG project will be dependent on its individual economics, market needs, financial planning, and governmental permit processes. We hope industry will be able to put together the LNG projects required to meet the quanitities of production forecast here for the year 2000.

  1. 1992 five year battery forecast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amistadi, D.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Five-year trends for automotive and industrial batteries are projected. Topic covered include: SLI shipments; lead consumption; automotive batteries (5-year annual growth rates); industrial batteries (standby power and motive power); estimated average battery life by area/country for 1989; US motor vehicle registrations; replacement battery shipments; potential lead consumption in electric vehicles; BCI recycling rates for lead-acid batteries; US average car/light truck battery life; channels of distribution; replacement battery inventory end July; 2nd US battery shipment forecast.

  2. Ten Thousand Years of Solitude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benford, G. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) California Univ., Irvine, CA (USA). Dept. of Physics); Kirkwood, C.W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (USA). Coll. of Business Administration); Harry, O. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Pasqualetti, M.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (USA))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the authors work as an expert team advising the US Department of Energy on modes of inadvertent intrusion over the next 10,000 years into the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP) nuclear waste repository. Credible types of potential future accidental intrusion into the WIPP are estimated as a basis for creating warning markers to prevent inadvertent intrusion. A six-step process is used to structure possible scenarios for such intrusion, and it is concluded that the probability of inadvertent intrusion into the WIPP repository over the next ten thousand years lies between one and twenty-five percent. 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Annual Report Fiscal Year 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Kristen L.

    funding to Washington University in FY08 was $548.4M, up 2% from the previous year. Both the dollar amount funding. Funding from the NIH, consistently the University's main contributor of research funding, increased by $1.5M (0.4%) in FY08. Funding from private sources to Washington University actually increased

  4. Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiel, Elizabeth Chilcote

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

  5. Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiel, E.C.; Fuhrman, P.W.

    2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

  6. Fiscal Year 2012 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Nordstrom

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2012 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Actions and Resolutions for each site. Ten disturbed sites were evaluated for this assessment. Six have achieved final stabilization. The remaining four sites not meeting the criteria for final stabilization will be evaluated again in the next fiscal year.

  7. Mid-year market review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite a tumultuous beginning marked by considerable excitement over the amendment to the US/Russian suspension agreement, 1994`s marketplace has been fairly quite so far. During the first half of the year, only thirty-two near-term uranium transactions, involving 10.1 million pounds equivalent U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, have been reported. Compared to the same period in 1993, which saw 16.5 million pounds transacted in fifty deals, 1994`s volume represents a drop of 39 percent. With the amendment initialed in the last days of 1993, many market participants expected the first part of 1994 to be very active, with buyers and sellers rushing to conclude {open_quotes}matched sales.{close_quotes} No such surge materialized, however, and market volume remained below the average of 17.3 million pounds equivalent U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in fifty transactions recorded over the past five years.

  8. Fiscal Year 2013 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Nordstrom

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2013 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: Summary of each site Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location Actions and Resolutions for each site. Six disturbed sites were evaluated for this assessment. One has achieved final stabilization. The remaining five sites not meeting the criteria for final stabilization will be evaluated again in the next fiscal year.

  9. 1991 - The year in review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross, P.S.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A look at the last year shows that utility regulators devoted a large part of their 1991 resources to the task of refining programs put in place over the last decade to push electric, gas and telephone regulation toward a more market-oriented approach. Heightened competition in electric generation, natural gas supply and transmission, and telecommunications markets kept regulators busy running competitive bidding programs, sorting competitive from noncompetitive services, and ensuring access to utility delivery networks.

  10. Earth: 15 Million Years Ago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masataka Mizushima

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In Einstein's general relativity theory the metric component gxx in the direction of motion (x-direction) of the sun deviates from unity due to a tensor potential caused by the black hole existing around the center of the galaxy. Because the solar system is orbiting around the galactic center at 200 km/s, the theory shows that the Newtonian gravitational potential due to the sun is not quite radial. At the present time, the ecliptic plane is almost perpendicular to the galactic plane, consistent with this modification of the Newtonian gravitational force. The ecliptic plane is assumed to maintain this orientation in the galactic space as it orbits around the galactic center, but the rotational angular momentum of the earth around its own axis can be assumed to be conserved. The earth is between the sun and the galactic center at the summer solstice all the time. As a consequence, the rotational axis of the earth would be parallel to the axis of the orbital rotation of the earth 15 million years ago, if the solar system has been orbiting around the galactic center at 200 km/s. The present theory concludes that the earth did not have seasons 15 million years ago. Therefore, the water on the earth was accumulated near the poles as ice and the sea level was very low. Geological evidence exists that confirms this effect. The resulting global ice-melting started 15 million years ago and is ending now.

  11. Fiscal Year 2009 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Lewis

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2009 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Recommendation(s) for each site.

  12. Fiscal Year 2010 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Nordstrom; Mike Lewis

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2010 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Recommendation(s) for each site.

  13. 2014 Year-in-Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment ofCBFO-13-3322(EE)Department ofNow4 Year-in-Review i 2014 YIR May

  14. Hot Dry Rock energy annual report fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winchester, W.W. [ed.; Duchane, D.V.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot Dry Rock technology took a giant leap forward this year as the long-awaited long-term flow test (LTFT) of the Phase 2 HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill got underway. Energy was produced on a twenty-four hour a day basis for a continuous period of nearly four months of steady-state testing. Hot water was brought to the surface at 90--100 gallons per minute (gpm) with temperatures of 180{degrees}C (356{degrees}F) and higher. During that time, the HDR plant achieved an on-line record of 98.8%. Surface temperature measurements and temperature logging deep within the wellbore confirmed that no decline in the average temperature of fluid produced from the reservoir occurred. Tracer experiments indicated that flow paths within the reservoir were undergoing continuous change during the test. Remarkably, it appeared that longer flow paths carried a larger proportion of the flow as the test proceeded, while more direct fluid pathways disappeared or carried a significantly reduced flow. In sum, access to hot rock appeared to improve over the span of the test. Water losses during the test averaged 10--12% and showed a slow long-term decline. These results confirmed what had been previously discovered in static pressurization testing: Water consumption declines significantly during extended operation of an HDR reservoir. In combination with a recent demonstration by the Japanese that water losses can be greatly reduced by the proper placement of multiple production wells, the recent results at Fenton Hill have effectively demonstrated that excessive water consumption should not be an issue for a properly engineered HDR facility at a well chosen site.

  15. Hot Dry Rock energy annual report fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duchane, D.V.; Winchester, W.W.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot Dry Rock technology took a giant leap forward this year as the long-awaited long-term flow test (LTFT) of the Phase II HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill got underway. Energy was produced on a twenty-four hour a day basis for a continuous period of nearly four months of steady-state testing. Hot water was brought to the surface at 90-100 gallons per minute (gpm) with temperatures of 180[degrees]C (356[degrees]F) and higher. During that time, the HDR plant achieved an on-line record of 98.8%. Surface temperature measurements and temperature logging deep within the wellbore confirmed that no decline in the average temperature of fluid produced from the reservoir occurred. Tracer experiments indicated that flow paths within the reservoir were undergoing continuous change during the test. Remarkably, it appeared that longer flow paths carried a larger proportion of the flow as the test proceeded, while more direct fluid pathways disappeared or carried a significantly reduced flow. In sum, access to hot rock appeared to improve over the span of the test. Water losses during the test averaged 10-12% and showed a slow long-term decline. These results confirmed what had been previously discovered in static pressurization testing: Water consumption declines significantly during extended operation of an HDR reservoir. In combination with a recent demonstration by the Japanese that water losses can be greatly reduced by the proper placement of multiple production wells, the recent results at Fenton Hill have effectively demonstrated that excessive water consumption should not be an issue for a properly engineered HDR facility at a well chosen site.

  16. Natural Gas Year-in-Review

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    December 9, 2011 | Next Release Date: December 2012 Previous editions of Natural Gas Year-in-Review Year: 2009 2008 2007 2006 Go Highlights Growing domestic production, rising...

  17. The Geothermal Technologies Office Congratulates this Year's...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Geothermal Technologies Office Congratulates this Year's GEA Honors Awardees The Geothermal Technologies Office Congratulates this Year's GEA Honors Awardees December 11, 2013...

  18. Twenty Years of Tevatron Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay C. Theilacker

    2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The superconducting Tevatron accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) has surpassed twenty years of operation. The Tevatron is still the highest energy particle accelerator in the world and will remain so until the commissioning of the LHC in Europe later this decade. The Tevatron has operated in a Fixed Target mode, accelerating a proton beam into stationary targets/detectors, as well as a Colliding Beam mode, continuously colliding counter rotating beams of protons and antiprotons. Upon completion, the Tevatron cryogenic system became the world's largest helium refrigeration system. In 1993, the Tevatron cryogenic system was given the designation of International Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The operational history, experiences and statistics of the Tevatron, with an emphasis on the cryogenic system, is presented. Improvements, upgrades and current challenges of the cryogenic system are discussed.

  19. Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric Transmission and Distribution Programs. Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric...

  20. Commission for Women Year-End Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    Commission for Women Year-End Report Academic Year 2009-2010 The Commission for Women ­ Knoxville. This year's Commission has been busy. We have accomplished our goals this year, thanks in great measure will be described later in this report. Campus and Community Programs In November the Commission for Women and Women

  1. Absolute frequency measurement of an SF6 two-photon line using a femtosecond optical comb and sum-frequency generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anne Amy-Klein; Andrei Goncharov; Mickael Guinet; Christophe Daussy; Olivier Lopez; Alexander Shelkovnikov; Christian Chardonnet

    2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a new simple technique to measure IR frequencies near 30 THz using a femtosecond (fs) laser optical comb and sum-frequency generation. The optical frequency is directly compared to the distance between two modes of the fs laser, and the resulting beat note is used to control this distance which depends only on the repetition rate fr of the fs laser. The absolute frequency of a CO2 laser stabilized onto an SF6 two-photon line has been measured for the first time. This line is an attractive alternative to the usual saturated absorption OsO4 resonances used for the stabilization of CO2 lasers. First results demonstrate a fractional Allan deviation of 3.10-14 at 1 s.

  2. Absolute frequency measurement of an SF6 two-photon line using a femtosecond optical comb and sum-frequency generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amy-Klein, A; Guinet, M; Daussy, C; López, O; Shelkovnikov, A; Chardonnet, C; Amy-Klein, Anne; Goncharov, Andrei; Guinet, Mickael; Daussy, Christophe; Lopez, Olivier; Shelkovnikov, Alexander; Chardonnet, Christian

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a new simple technique to measure IR frequencies near 30 THz using a femtosecond (fs) laser optical comb and sum-frequency generation. The optical frequency is directly compared to the distance between two modes of the fs laser, and the resulting beat note is used to control this distance which depends only on the repetition rate fr of the fs laser. The absolute frequency of a CO2 laser stabilized onto an SF6 two-photon line has been measured for the first time. This line is an attractive alternative to the usual saturated absorption OsO4 resonances used for the stabilization of CO2 lasers. First results demonstrate a fractional Allan deviation of 3.10-14 at 1 s.

  3. Discrete Quantum Gravity: II. Simplicial complexes, irreps of SL(2,C), and a Lorentz invariant weight in a state sum model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Kramer; M. Lorente

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In part I of [1] we have developed the tensor and spin representation of SO(4) in order to apply it to the simplicial decomposition of the Barrett-Crane model. We attach to each face of a triangle the spherical function constructed from the Dolginov-Biedenharn function. In part II we apply the same technique to the Lorentz invariant state sum model. We need three new ingredients: the classification of the edges and the corresponding subspaces that arises in the simplicial decomposition, the irreps of SL(2,C) and its isomorphism to the bivectors appearing in the 4-simplices, the need of a zonal spherical function from the intertwining condition of the tensor product for the simple representations attached to the faces of the simplicial decomposition.

  4. Program Year 2008 State Energy Program Formula

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) State Energy Program (SEP), SEP Program Guidance Fiscal Year 2008, Program Year 2008, energy efficiency and renewable energy programs in the states, DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  5. Y-12 apprentice programs through the years

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    through the years Apprentice programs have been in existence at Y-12 at various times over the years beginning as early as the 1960's. With only one exception, in 1991 when an...

  6. The Year in Review: Comments from the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    1 The Year in Review: Comments from the Executive Director The President's Diversity Initiative.udel.edu/udaily/2013/oct/historic-diversity-100212.html. Year in Review 1 Staffing and space 1 Disabilities Support 2

  7. the year in review OUR STUDENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carleton University

    the year in review 2011-12 #12;OUR STUDENTS 26,771 total students 81 per cent average entering retired faculty: 39 graduate teaching assistants: 1,773 #12;the year in review 2011-12 #12;We Must

  8. Budget estimates, fiscal year 1997. Volume 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the fiscal year budget justification to Congress. The budget provides estimates for salaries and expenses and for the Office of the Inspector General for fiscal year 1997.

  9. West Virginia University 1 First Year Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 First Year Experience FAQs · What is a First-Year Seminar? · Who must the knowledge and skills necessary for academic success. What are the goals and objectives of FYS? 1. Set

  10. Catalyzed hydrogenation of nitrogen and ethylene on metal (Fe, Pt) single crystal surfaces and effects of coadsorption: A sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westerberg, Staffan Per Gustav

    2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High-pressure catalytic reactions and associated processes, such as adsorption have been studied on a molecular level on single crystal surfaces. Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy together with Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) and Gas Chromatography (GC) were used to investigate the nature of species on catalytic surfaces and to measure the catalytic reaction rates. Special attention has been directed at studying high-pressure reactions and in particular, ammonia synthesis in order to identify reaction intermediates and the influence of adsorbates on the surface during reaction conditions. The adsorption of gases N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} that play a role in ammonia synthesis have been studied on the Fe(111) crystal surface by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy using an integrated Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV)/high-pressure system. SFG spectra are presented for the dissociation intermediates, NH{sub 2} ({approx}3325 cm{sup -1}) and NH ({approx}3235 cm{sup -1}) under high pressure of ammonia (200 Torr) on the clean Fe(111) surface. Addition of 0.5 Torr of oxygen to 200 Torr of ammonia does not significantly change the bonding of dissociation intermediates to the surface. However, it leads to a phase change of nearly 180{sup o} between the resonant and non-resonant second order non-linear susceptibility of the surface, demonstrated by the reversal of the SFG spectral features. Heating the surface in the presence of 200 Torr ammonia and 0.5 Torr oxygen reduces the oxygen coverage, which can be seen from the SFG spectra as another relative phase change of 180{sup o}. The reduction of the oxide is also supported by Auger electron spectroscopy. The result suggests that the phase change of the spectral features could serve as a sensitive indicator of the chemical environment of the adsorbates.

  11. Measurement of the neutron ({sup 3}He) spin structure functions at low Q{sup 2}: A CONNECTION BETWEEN THE BJORKEN AND GERASIMOV-DRELL-HEARN SUM RULE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pibero Djawotho

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents results of experiment E94-010 performed at Jefferson Laboratory (simply known as JLab) in Hall A. The experiment aimed to measure the low Q{sup 2} evolution of the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH) integral from Q{sup 2} = 0.1 to 0.9 GeV{sup 2}. The GDH sum rule at the real photon point provides an important test of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The low Q{sup 2} evolution of the GDH integral contests various resonance models, Chiral Perturbation Theory ({chi}#31;PT) and lattice QCD calculations, but more importantly, it helps us understand the transition between partonic and hadronic degrees of freedom. At high Q{sup 2}, beyond 1 GeV{sup 2}, the difference of the GDH integrals for the proton and the neutron is related to the Bjorken sum rule, another fundamental test of QCD. In addition, results of the measurements for the spin structure functions g{sub 1} and g{sub 2}, cross sections, and asymmetries are presented. E94-010 was the first experiment of its kind at JLab. It used a high-pressure, polarized {sup 3}He target with a gas pressure of 10 atm and average target polarization of 35%. For the first time, the polarized electron source delivered an average beam polarization of 70% with a beam current of 15 {micro}#22;A. The limit on the beam current was only imposed by the target. The experiment required six different beam energies from 0.86 to 5.1 GeV. This was the first time the accelerator ever reached 5.1 GeV. Both High-Resolution Spectrometers of Hall A, used in singles mode, were positioned at 15.5#14;{deg} each.

  12. Secretary Chu Celebrates NNSA's 10-Year Anniversary

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu speaks at NNSA's 10-year anniversary celebration on April 28, 2010.

  13. 1995 shipment review & five year forecast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fetherolf, D.J. Jr. [East Penn Manufacturing Co., Inc., Lyon Station, PA (United States)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the 1995 battery shipment review and five year forecast for the battery market. Historical data is discussed.

  14. A Year in Review BOUNDLESS 20112012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Year in Review BOUNDLESS 2011­2012 #12;­ ­ ­ pg.18 30.03.12 Preparing Global Citizens at Arts & Science pg.26 31.05.12 Spring Reunion Boundless: pg.22 15.04.12 A Year in Review pg.14 31.01.12 29 Afterword pg.71 Volunteer Leadership #12;BOUNDLESS ENGAGEMENT BOUNDLESS COMMITMENT 02 / BOUNDLESS: A Year

  15. Clinical Biochemical Geneticist Two-Year Fellowship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Clinical Biochemical Geneticist Two-Year Fellowship YEAR 1 YEAR 2 MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY A.M. Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research & Clinical Training 8AM Newborn Screen Follow-up conference Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research & Clinical

  16. Clinical Molecular Geneticist Two-Year Fellowship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Clinical Molecular Geneticist Two-Year Fellowship YEAR 1 YEAR 2 MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY A.M. 11-12 DNA Sign- out conference Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research & Clinical Training (includes rotation in Molecular Microbiology lab) Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research

  17. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nation’s site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides that are resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds, dust-devils) along with historically-contaminated soils on the NTS. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (40 Code of Federal Regulations 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent (EDE) to any member of the public. This is the dose limit established for someone living off of the NTS for inhaling radioactive particles that may be carried by wind off of the NTS. This limit assumes that members of the public surrounding the NTS may also inhale “background levels” or radioactive particles unrelated to NTS activities that come from naturally-occurring elements in the environment (e.g., radon gas from the earth or natural building materials) or from other man-made sources (e.g., cigarette smoke). The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires DOE facilities (e.g., the NTS) to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP dose limit by annually estimating the dose to a hypothetical member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI), or the member of the public who resides within an 80-kilometer (50-mile) radius of the facility who would experience the highest annual dose. This dose to a hypothetical person living close to the NTS cannot exceed 10 mrem/yr. C.1 This report has been produced annually for the EPA Region IX, and for the state of Nevada since 1992 and documents that the estimated EDE to the MEI has been, and continues to be, well below the NESHAP dose limit. The report format and level of technical detail has been dictated by the EPA and DOE Headquarters over the years. It is read and evaluated for NESHAP compliance by federal and state regulators. Each section and appendix presents technical information (e.g., NTS emission source estimates, onsite air sampling data, air transport model input parameters, dose calculation methodology, etc.), which supports the annual dose assessment conclusions. In 2005, as in all previous years for which this report has been produced, the estimated dose to the public from inhalation of radiological emissions from current and past NTS activities is shown to be well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. This was demonstrated by air sampling data collected onsite at each of six EPA-approved “critical receptor” stations on the NTS. The sum of measured EDEs from the four stations at the NTS boundaries is 2.5 mrem/yr. This dose is 25 percent of the allowed NESHAP dose limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the NTS boundary, this individual receives only a small fraction of this dose. NESHAP compliance does not require DOE facilities to estimate annual inhalation dose from non-DOE activities. Therefore, this report does not estimate public radiation doses from any other sources or activities (e.g., naturally-occurring radon, global fallout).

  18. TABLE 3.-Comparison of this work with literature values for the concentration of PCB's and DDT residues in surface films and subsurface waters. All values in nanograms per liter, and are the sum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    residues in surface films and subsurface waters. All values in nanograms per liter, and are the sum of filtrate and filter from Table 2 where applicable. PCB's DDT residues Subsurface Subsurface Reference Location Surface films waters Surface films waters Seba and Corcoran Biscayne Bay NO' NO 185-13,710

  19. The FIA BioSum model was used to simulate three fire-hazard-reduction policies in an area comprising northern California. southwestern Oregon. and the east slopes of the Cascade Mountains in Oregon. The policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    The FIA BioSum model was used to simulate three fire-hazard-reduction policies in an area. The policy scenarios. all subject to a stand-scale fire-hazard-reduction effectiveness constraint. included merchantable timber removal (Min Merch). Differences in the area treated under each scenario were considerable

  20. A YEAR IN REVIEW 2012 COLLEGEOFMEDIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    A YEAR IN REVIEW 2012 COLLEGEOFMEDIA 810SOUTHWRIGHTSTREET 119GREGORYHALL URBANA,ILLINOIS61801 #12-accredited. I am happy to report that we just completed the six-year review cycle in November and have been and the education they are receiving." 2 C O L L E G E O F M E D I A Y E A R I N R E V I E W 2 012 3 year in review

  1. EMSL Fiscal Year 2008 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Showalter, Mary Ann

    2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report provides details on the research conducted at EMSL--the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory in Fiscal Year 2008.

  2. BSc Computing Year 3 Graphics Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Gary

    BSc Computing Year 3 Graphics Programming 3D Maze Room Assignment Two by Richard M. Mann: 20032144 .................................................................................7 Figure 4: Controls Key-Map ......................................................................8

  3. Earth: The Early Years We discuss ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earth: The Early Years We discuss ... · What happened to the Earth during the first few billion)? · What is the relationship to (early) life? #12;Age of Earth James Ussher (17th C) biblical account: 6: 20-40 m.y. (million years!) Charles Darwin evolution >300 m.y. Lord Kelvin (1880's) cooling Earth: 50

  4. BIO-OPTICAL PRESENTATIONS YEARS 2000 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    BIO-OPTICAL PRESENTATIONS YEARS 2000 ­ 2004 YEAR 00-01 Armstrong, R.A., F. Gilbes, R. Guerrero. Lopez, and F. Gilbes, 2000, "Apparent Optical Properties at the Caribbean Time Station", Ocean Optics XV, Monaco. Gilbes, F., and R.A. Armstrong, 2000, "Inherent Optical Properties at the Caribbean Time Series

  5. Clinical Cytogenetics Two-Year Fellowship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Clinical Cytogenetics Two-Year Fellowship YEAR 1 MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY A.M. Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research & Clinical Training Cancer genetics conference (4th Monday) CMMG noon

  6. Manufacturing Environment in the Year 2000 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slautterback, W. H.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Manufacturing will change more in the next 15 years than it has in the last 75 years. The reasons are clear ... survival and technology. Unless U.S. companies can compete in a world economy on price, quality, design and delivery, our companies...

  7. Top-Quark Mass Data and the Sum of Quasi-Degenerate Neutrino Masses (One small electroweak-bound e-parameter organizes elementary particle 3-flavor phenomenology)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. M. Lipmanov

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The absolute neutrino masses and type of neutrino mass hierarchy are among the main problems in neutrino physics. Top-quark mass is another topical problem in particle physics. These problems extend the old puzzle of electron-muon mass ratio close to the fine structure constant, which is still not solved by known theory. Here I continue the search for a general flavor pattern that may incorporate these problems. Relations between neutrino/electron and electron/top-quark pole mass ratios are obtained from supposition that realistic elementary particle dimensionless bare flavor quantities are small deviated (measured by universal parameter e) from the values of a stated flavor pattern (at e=0) and experimental data hints. With the world average t-quark mass data the sum of QD-neutrino masses is estimated (0.50 +- 0.003)eV in agreement with cosmological constraints and known QD-neutrino mass estimations from experimental data on neutrino oscillation mass-squared differences.

  8. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy studies of solid-vacuum, solid-air and solid-liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffer, Saskia

    2002-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron based surface probing techniques can provide detailed information about surface structure or chemical composition in vacuum environments. The development of new surface techniques has made possible in situ molecular level studies of solid-gas interfaces and more recently, solid-liquid interfaces. The aim of this dissertation is two-fold. First, by using novel sample preparation, Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) and other traditional ultra high vacuum (UHV) techniques are shown to provide new information on the insulator/vacuum interface. The surface structure of the classic insulator NaCl has been determined using these methods. Second, using sum frequency generation (SFG) surface specific vibrational spectroscopy studies were performed on both the biopolymer/air and electrode/electrolyte interfaces. The surface structure and composition of polyetherurethane-silicone copolymers were determined in air using SFG, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SFG studies of the electrode (platinum, gold and copper)/electrolyte interface were performed as a function of applied potential in an electrochemical cell.

  9. PHMC Year 2000: Status reporting for mission essential Year 2000 projects. Revision 0, Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layfield, K.A.

    1998-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHMC Year 2000 status reporting process is designed to encompass the reporting requirements of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), DOE HQ, RL and the PHMC for mission essential Year 2000 projects. Status reporting is required for all Year 2000 projects. The Year 2000 project list will be maintained current as Year 2000 projects are modified, added or deleted. Reporting is required until a Year 2000 project has completed compliance assurance. Some projects will be identified as DOE HQ reportable. These are projects determined to be the most critical and due the attention of DOE HQ.

  10. TTEDnews_Sum04.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGE Creating a Geologic Play-13, 2004OUR TECHNOLOGIES

  11. Calendar Year 2009 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on the Audit of National Security Technologies, LLC Costs Claimed under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 for Fiscal Year 2007 May 6, 2009 Audit Report: IG-0815...

  12. Residential Refrigerator Recycling Ninth Year Retention Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Residential Refrigerator Recycling Ninth Year Retention Study Study ID Nos. 546B, 563 Prepared RECYCLING PROGRAMS Study ID Nos. 546B and 563 Prepared for Southern California Edison Rosemead, California

  13. Profiling 1366 Technologies: One Year Later

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Last January, we took a look at how ARPA-E performer, 1366 Technologies is working to dramatically reduce the cost of solar energy. A year later, we revisited their headquarters in Lexington, MA to...

  14. 500 Year Documentation Francis T. Marchese

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchese, Francis

    Documentation, Design, Management. Keywords Digital art, conservation, requirements engineering. 1. THE PROBLEM500 Year Documentation Francis T. Marchese Pace University Computer Science Department New York, NY the requirements for creating documentation that will support an artwork's adaptation to future technology

  15. Calendar Year 1997 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    May 1, 1997 Audit Report: CR-FS-97-02 Audit of the Department of Energy's Consolidated Financial Statements for Fiscal Year 1996 April 24, 1997 Audit Report: WR-FS-97-04 Report on...

  16. Fiscal Year 1997 (Summer 1996-Spring 1997)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willson, Stephen J.

    Fiscal Year 1997 (Summer 1996-Spring 1997) A total of 517 students studied abroad; an additional 62) N Am: 36 (10) #12;Oceania: 39 (1) S Am: 100 (2) July, 1997 #12;

  17. Instructionally Related Activities Fiscal Year 20142015 Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    #12; Instructionally Related Activities Fiscal Year 20142015 Budget California State University, Fullerton This budget has been approved by the President ......................................................................................................... ix Budget Policy Statements, Procedures, and Guidelines Role of the Chair, IRA Committee

  18. Titan Student Centers Fiscal Year 20142015 Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    #12; Titan Student Centers Fiscal Year 20142015 Budget California State University, Fullerton This budget has been approved by the ASI Board of Directors, the ASI% Budgeted # of Paying Students 7,500 37,250 34

  19. Five year rollover hedges for agricultural lenders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floyd, John Christopher

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FIVE YEAR ROLLOVER HEDGES FOR AGRICULTURAL LEADERS A Professional Paper by John Christopher Floyd. Jr. Submitted to the College of Agriculture of Texas ARM University In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master... of Agriculture May, 19BB Advisor Or. David J. Leatham Major Subject: Agricultural Economics FIVE YEAR ROLLOVER HEDGE FOR AGRICULTURAL LEMDERS A Professional Paper by John Christopher Floyd, Jr. Approved as to style and content by: an. Advis ry C...

  20. Budget estimates fiscal year 1995: Volume 10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) fiscal year budget justification to Congress. The budget provides estimates for salaries and expenses and for the Office of the Inspector General for fiscal year 1995. The NRC 1995 budget request is $546,497,000. This is an increase of $11,497,000 above the proposed level for FY 1994. The NRC FY 1995 budget request is 3,218 FTEs. This is a decrease of 75 FTEs below the 1994 proposed level.

  1. Adams, JM (Dr) TUTORIAL (YEAR 2) -UG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    (YEA JMA 48 AZ 04 TUTX-PH00-GM1 Sem1: 01-06,08-14 SGT-Grp A1 TUTORIAL (YEAR 3) - UG SP, AL, JLK, PJM BB 03 Sem1: 09,11,13 UCAS JSA, JA, DB, WNC, AD, OH, JLK, PJM, BNM, PHR, RPS, PDS, JAT, PMW, AL, SP LTL EXAMPHY1022mm Sem1: 07, 15 Test TUTORIAL (YEAR 3) SP, AL, JLK, PJM, BNM, JM Room to be advised

  2. YEAR IN REVIEW Los Alamos National Laboratory RESEARCH LIBRARY Research Library Year in Review 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;YEAR IN REVIEW Los Alamos National Laboratory RESEARCH LIBRARY 2008 1 Research Library Year Message from the Library Director 2 #12;YEAR IN REVIEW Los Alamos National Laboratory RESEARCH LIBRARY in Review ­ 2008 Table of Contents Message from the Library Director .....................................2

  3. Advanced reactors transition fiscal year 1996 multi-year program plan WBS 7.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulvey, R.K.

    1995-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes in detail the work to be accomplished in FY 1996 and the out years for the Advanced Reactors Transition (WBS 7.3. ). This document describes specific milestones and funding profiles. Based upon the Fiscal Year 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP), DOE will provide authorization to perform the work outlined in the FY 1996 MYPP

  4. architecture 2-year master of architecture option deadlinesmaster of architecture 3-year master of architecture option

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    master of architecture (M.Arch.) #12;2-year master of architecture option deadlinesmaster of architecture 3-year master of architecture option Taubman College's 2-year master of architecture option is for applicants who hold a bachelor of science degree in architecture or its equivalent. This 60 credit

  5. Approximation of Sums of Experimental Radiative Strength Functions of Dipole Gamma-Transitions in the Region $E_?\\approx B_n$ for the Atomic Masses $40 \\leq a \\leq 200$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Sukhovoj; W. I. Furman; V. A. Khitrov

    2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The sums k(E1)+k(M1) of radiative strength functions of dipole primary gamma-transitions were approximated with high precision in the energy region of $0.5 < E_1 < B_n-0.5$ MeV for nuclei: 40K, 60Co, 71,74Ge, 80Br, 114Cd, 118Sn, 124,125Te, 128I, 137,138,139Ba, 140La, 150Sm, 156,158Gd, 160Tb, 163,164,165Dy, 166Ho, 168Er, 170Tm, 174Yb, 176,177Lu, 181Hf, 182Ta, 183,184,185,187W, 188,190,191,193Os, 192Ir, 196Pt, 198Au, 200Hg by sum of two independent functions. It has been shown that this parameter of gamma-decay are determined by the structure of the decaying and excited levels, at least, up to the neutron binding energy.

  6. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: November...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: November 2014 Update Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: November 2014 Update This Multi-Year Program Plan...

  7. Photovoltaic energy: Contract list, fiscal year 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The federal government has conducted the National Photovoltaics Program since 1975. Its purpose is to provide focus, direction, and funding for the development of terrestrial photovoltaic technology as an energy option for the United States. In the past, a summary was prepared each year to provide an overview of the government-funded activities within the National Photovoltaics Program. Tasks conducted in-house by participating national laboratories or under contract by industrial, academic, and other research institutes were highlighted. This year's document is more concise than the summaries of previous years. The FY 1990 contract overview comprises a list of all subcontracts begun, ongoing, or completed by Sandia National Laboratory or the Solar Energy Research Institute during FY 1990 (October 1, 1989, through September 30, 1990). Under each managing laboratory, projects are listed alphabetically by project area and then by subcontractor name.

  8. Environmental releases for calendar year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, S.P.; Curn, B.L.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents data on radioactive and nonradioactive materials released into the environment during calendar year 1993 from facilities managed by Westinghouse Hanford Company. As part of this executive summary, comprehensive data summaries of air emissions and liquid effluents in 1993 are displayed in tables. These tables represent the following: radionuclide air emissions data; data on radioactive liquid effluents discharged to the soil; radionuclides discharged to the Columbia River; nonradioactive air emissions data; total volumes and flow rates of 200/600 area liquid effluents. Both summary and detailed presentations of these data are given. When appropriate, comparisons to data from previous years are made.

  9. Happy New Year - First Blog Entry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanford LEED&soil HanfordHappy New Year Happy New Year -

  10. $B\\to ?$ transition form factors within the QCD light-cone sum rules and the $?$-meson leading-twist distribution amplitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hai-Bing Fu; Xing-Gang Wu; Hua-Yong Han; Yang Ma

    2015-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The QCD light-cone sum rules (LCSR) provides an effective way for dealing with the heavy-to-light transition form factors (TFFs), whose non-perturbative dynamics are parameterized into the light-meson's light-cone distribution amplitudes (LCDAs) with various twist structures. By taking the chiral correlator as the starting point, we calculate the LCSRs for the $B\\to\\rho$ TFFs up to twist-4 accuracy. As for the TFFs at the large recoil region, we observe that the twist-2 transverse DA $\\phi_{2;\\rho}^\\bot$ provides the dominant contribution, while the contributions from the remaining twist-3 and twist-4 terms are $\\delta^2$-suppressed. Thus, our present improved LCSRs provides a good platform for testing the $\\phi_{2;\\rho}^\\bot$ behavior. For the purpose, we suggest a convenient WH-model for the $\\rho$-meson leading-twist wavefunction, in which the parameter $B_{2;\\rho}^\\bot\\sim a^\\bot_2$ dominantly controls its longitudinal distribution. Typically, its DA $\\phi_{2;\\rho}^\\bot$ is CZ-like as $B_{2;\\rho}^\\bot\\simeq-0.20$, which changes to be asymptotic-like as $B_{2;\\rho}^\\bot\\simeq0.00$. By varying $B_{2;\\rho}^\\bot\\in[-0.20,0.20]$, we present a detailed comparison of the LCSR estimation for the $B\\to\\rho$ TFFs with those of pQCD and Lattice QCD predictions. Furthermore, by using the extrapolated TFFs, we estimate the CKM-matrix element $|V_{\\rm ub}|$ with the help of two $B\\to\\rho$ semi-leptonic decays. The predicted value for $|V_{\\rm ub}|$ increases with the increment of $B_{2;\\rho}^\\bot$, i.e. we have $\\Vub=(2.91\\pm0.19)\\times 10^{-3}$ for $B_{2;\\rho}^\\bot=-0.20$ and $\\Vub=(3.11\\pm0.19)\\times 10^{-3}$ for $B_{2;\\rho}^\\bot=0.00$. If using the BABAR prediction as a criteria, we observe that $B^{\\perp}_{2;\\rho}\\in[-0.2,0.10]$, which indicates that the $\\rho$-meson DA $\\phi_{2;\\rho}^\\bot$ prefers a single-peak behavior rather than a double-humped behavior.

  11. Resolving Two Closely Overlapping -CN Vibrations and Structure in the Langmuir Monolayer of the Long-Chain Nonadecanenitrile by Polarization Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhen; Guo, Yuan; Lu, Zhou; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Wang, Hongfei

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Polarization sum frequency generation vibrational spectra (SFG-VS) reveals that there are two distinctively different but closely overlapping -CN vibrations at 2244.5 cm{sup -1} and 2251.1 cm{sup -1}, respectively, in the Langmuir monolayer of the long-chain nonadecanenitrile (C18CN, CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 17}CN, or C18CN)at the air/water interface. The blue shifted -CN groups at 2251.1 cm{sup -1} peak is about 1.8 times broader than that of the 2244.5 cm{sup -1}. Both the spectral shift and spectral width are consistent with the picture that this blue shifted peak corresponds to the solvated -CN group; while the 2244.5 cm{sup -1} peak is the signature of the less solvated -CN group. Polarization dependence of these two peaks further suggest that the -CN group corresponding to the 2251.1 cm{sup -1} peak is tilted with an average angle of 50{sup o} from interface normal, where that to the 2244.5 cm{sup -1} peak is tilted with an angle around 67{sup o}. The relative population for the -CN groups corresponding to the 2251.1 cm{sup -1} peak is about three times of that of the 2244.5 cm{sup -1} peak. These results suggest that the -CN head groups in the C18CN Langmuir monolayer are not aligned uniformly at slightly different depth, in order to avoid the strong repulsive forces between the strong -CN dipoles. The SFG-VS spectra of the O-H stretches at C18CN Langmuir monolayer is similar to those of the 4''-n-pentyl-4-cyano-p-terphenyl (5CT) monolayer, indicating complete exclusion of the water molecules from the C18CN Langmuir monolayer, but significantly different from those of the 4''-n-octyl-4-p-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) monolayer, as well as those of the air/acetonitrile aqueous solution interface. Different from previous held understandings, these results suggest that the structure of the insoluble long-chain C18CN Langmuir monolayer is significantly different from that of the Gibbs adsorption layer of the short chain soluble acetonitrile or propanenitrile aqueous solution surfaces. These observations not only shed new light on understanding the detailed structure and interactions in the molecular monolayer and films, but also suggest the importance of the polarization and spectral resolution in the SFG studies.

  12. Solid waste program fiscal year 1997 multi-year work plan WBS 1.2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riddelle, J.G.

    1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the technical baseline, work breakdown structure, schedule baseline, cost baseline, and execution year for the solid waste program.

  13. FourYear Academic Plan 20122013 BA in Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FourYear Academic Plan 20122013 BA in Geology Internal Use Version Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4: Total UD Credits: 46 Total Credits: 120 3/19/12 #12;FourYear Academic Plan 20122013 BA in Geology

  14. Profiling 1366 Technologies: One Year Later

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Van Mierlo, Frank; Sachs, Ely;

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Last January, we took a look at how ARPA-E performer, 1366 Technologies is working to dramatically reduce the cost of solar energy. A year later, we revisited their headquarters in Lexington, MA to see the progress they've made.

  15. Value Chain Partnerships Phase III, Year 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.

    interviews conducted with participants of the Pork Niche Market Working Group (PNMWG) and the Regional Food Systems Working Group (RFSWG). The response rate was 100%. The Pork Niche Market Working Group (PNMWG profit partners. More than eight in ten PNMWG participants developed new relationships in the past year

  16. Postdoctoral Researcher, Materials Chemistry (2 year contract)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrys, Mark

    Postdoctoral Researcher, Materials Chemistry (2 year contract) Adaptive Sensors Group Dublin City Foundation Ireland through the CLARITY CSET (www.clarity- centre.org), supplemented by significant project partners. The group's research strategy in materials chemistry research is to closely align activity

  17. The first forty years, 1947-1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.S. (ed.); Cohen, A.; Petersen, B.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report commemorates the fortieth anniversary of Brookhaven National Laboratory by representing a historical overview of research at the facility. The chapters of the report are entitled: The First Forty Years, Brookhaven: A National Resource, Fulfilling a Mission - Brookhaven's Mighty Machines, Marketing the Milestones in Basic Research, Meeting National Needs, Making a Difference in Everyday Life, and Looking Forward.

  18. Fiscal Year 2007 Greenhouse Gas Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Fiscal Year 2007 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Greg Smith Brandon Trelstad OSU Facilities Services June #12;#12;Acknowledgments Due to the broad scope of this inventory, a large number of people from many, geothermal, tidal or sea currents etc. (7) "OUS Method" refers to the inventory for FY07 that is similar

  19. University of California Year 2005 Paper 1571

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the IC chips are going to exceed current cooling techniques [1]. This will necessitate computer case: passive heat spreading and active cooling. In the former technique, one tries to lower the thermalUniversity of California Postprints Year 2005 Paper 1571 On-chip solid-state cooling for integrated

  20. February 2014 CELEBRATING 30 YEARS OF COLLABORATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukai, Tomoki

    institutions, today leading the world in science and technology, were born about one hundred years ago and have back its place as the foremost science and technology institution in Japan under the leadership Federal Minister for Research and Technology, in August 1983, and during his visit Japan first expressed

  1. Final Year Projects Class of 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrys, Mark

    Engineering Page 10 Message from our Sponsor SAP Page 13 Project Areas/Technology Categories Page 15 Operating Systems/Programmes Page 16 Project Index Page 17-18 Projects 1-82 Page 20-101 Companies Sponsoring PrizesFinal Year Projects Class of 2012 schools of computing, electronic engineering and mechanical

  2. UIC Honors College This year represents the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Arie, Jezekiel

    . They are due February 15th. For all the important in- formation, check out the Ball website: http:// uichcab. The sessions cover the process of searching for internal and external awards, highlight upcoming deadlines scholarships (some are in preparation for applying next year). Please visit the OSSP website for more

  3. Biological consequences of Chernobyl: 20 years on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousseau, Timothy A.

    Biological consequences of Chernobyl: 20 years on Anders Pape Møller1 and Timothy A. Mousseau2 1, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA The disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant of the four nuclear reactors of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded on 26 April 1986 as a consequence

  4. Annual Site Environmental Report. Calendar Year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 1997. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring programs.

  5. Academic year 2014-2015 Study Programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    90 3 Radiation Protection Hubert Thierens GE05 3 1 1 1 30 90 4 Nuclear Reactor Theory Peter Baeten MT2CRDT RefNo. Contact StudyLecturer (dept.) 1 Advanced Nuclear Reactor Physics and Technology Hamid Valid as from the academic year 2014-2015 Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering (v2) Language

  6. FIRST YEAR CLINIC ROTATIONS Inpatient unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    FIRST YEAR CLINIC ROTATIONS Inpatient unit The fellow is responsible for the care and supervision weekly. Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Clinic The fellow on the PHO clinic rotation will be scheduled to evaluate scheduled clinic and infusion center patients along with an attending provider. Patients seen

  7. Dissertation Research Progress Report Semester and Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Dissertation Research Progress Report Semester and Year: All doctoral students must meet with their supervisory committee to present their progress, every semester that they register for dissertation credits report. The Dean's office will place a registration hold on students taking dissertation credits

  8. Dissertation Fellowship Award Year 2012 -2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Dissertation Fellowship Award Year 2012 - 2013 Information Sheet Description of Award This fellowship is awarded annually to exceptional UWM doctoral students with dissertator status. If awarded graduate tuition currently valued at $3,390.80 (dissertator level)* A remission of the non-resident portion

  9. Published: 3 January 2013 Egypt's New Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zewail, Ahmed

    1 Published: 3 January 2013 Egypt's New Year Resolution Op-Ed by Ahmed H. Zewail CAIRO -- Egypt, is one of Egypt's largest extremist organizations. "Only when he changes his mind from being a Gamaa Brother to a national leader can we have real progress in Egypt," Mostafa said, adding: "For now

  10. TRINITY HALL ACCOUNTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talbot, James P.

    TRINITY HALL CAMBRIDGE ACCOUNTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 June 2011 #12;TRINITY HALL Index Balance Sheet 19 Cash Flow Statement 20 - 32 Notes to the Accounts #12;TRINITY HALL Governing Body;Status Trinity Hall, or The Master, Fellows and Scholars of the College or Hall of the Holy Trinity

  11. Graphics Recognition: The Last Ten Years and the Next Ten Years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Graphics Recognition: The Last Ten Years and the Next Ten Years Karl Tombre LORIA-INPL, ´Ecole des'05 marked the 10th anniversary of the series of inter- national workshops on graphics recognition to be Drifting Away Looking at the research themes of the groups active in graphics recognition, it appears

  12. End-of-Year ETF Report Fiscal Year 2010-11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    End-of-Year ETF Report Fiscal Year 2010-11 College of Textiles 1. Categorized ETF Expenditure,023 Microscopes for Fiber Science Laboratory $39,555 110 Classroom Upgrades $34,916 Teaching Lab Machines and Supplies $10,000 Knitting Machine $20,487 Supplies for teaching labs (chemicals, sensors, fibers, yarns

  13. End-of-Year ETF Report Fiscal Year 2008-09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    End-of-Year ETF Report Fiscal Year 2008-09 College of Textiles 1. Categorized ETF Expenditure,000 Knitting Machine $12,768 Examolites luminaries $35,216 Supplies for labs (microscopes, chemicals learned from the class. 3. Knitting Machine funds were matched from College resources. This new machine

  14. Planning integration FY 1995 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP)/Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for the Planning Integration Program, Work Breakdown structure (WBS) Element 1.8.2, is the primary management tool to document the technical, schedule, and cost baseline for work directed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL). As an approved document, it establishes a binding agreement between RL and the performing contractors for the work to be performed. It was prepared by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This MYPP provides a picture from fiscal year 1995 through FY 2001 for the Planning Integration Program. The MYPP provides a window of detailed information for the first three years. It also provides `execution year` work plans. The MYPP provides summary information for the next four years, documenting the same period as the Activity Data Sheets.

  15. Sidney W. Bijou: The Illinois Years, 1965–1975

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Edward K.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was the genesis of later home-based parent interventions, notably Shearer and Shearer’s (1972) Portage Early Childhood Education Project (estab- lished in 1969), which Bijou would champion at Illinois. In sum, ac- cording to Kazdin (1978), ‘‘Bijou, Wolf, and Baer... as to the Universidad Nacional Auto´n- oma de Me´xico (1974) and the Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas (1974). He also continued to champion the Portage Project (see Bijou, 1980). Commissions and task forces. Al- though not involved in APA Division 25 governance...

  16. Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document comprises the Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan, and is a follow-up to the `Natural Gas Strategic Plan and Program Crosscut Plans,` dated July 1995. DOE`s natural gas programs are aimed at simultaneously meeting our national energy needs, reducing oil imports, protecting our environment, and improving our economy. The Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan represents a Department-wide effort on expanded development and use of natural gas and defines Federal government and US industry roles in partnering to accomplish defined strategic goals. The four overarching goals of the Natural Gas Program are to: (1) foster development of advanced natural gas technologies, (2) encourage adoption of advanced natural gas technologies in new and existing markets, (3) support removal of policy impediments to natural gas use in new and existing markets, and (4) foster technologies and policies to maximize environmental benefits of natural gas use.

  17. Preliminary year-end market review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is the year-end review of the 1993 uranium market. Through November 1993, a total of 84 near-term transactions have been reported, totalling more than 33.3 Mlb equivalent U3O8. Recent events related to the antidumping investigation and the higher price levels in the restricted markets---where a majority of the total sales volume was transacted---have also influenced the market, causing some buyers to defer additional purchases. Several key elements during the year contributed to perceptions about future market directions, including calls for changes to the antidumping suspension agreements; formalization of the Euratom Supply Agency`s position regarding imports from the Newly Independent States; and the HEU agreement between the USA and Russia.

  18. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the 1988 environmental monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. Two of three tokamak machines, the Princeton Beta Experiment Modification (PBX-M) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), were in operation during the year. The Environmental Committee, which is a standing committee of the Executive Safety Board (ESB), continued to review items of environmental importance. During CY88 no adverse effects to the environment or public resulted from any operational program activities at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental regulations. Over the last two years the Department of Energy conducted major environmental audits at all of its facilities, including PPPL. No significant environmental concerns were noted as a result of the inspection and sampling at PPPL. 43 refs., 25 figs., 33 tabs.

  19. Hydrogen program summary Fiscal Year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual program summary provides stakeholders within the hydrogen community with a snapshop of important advances that have occurred in the National Hydrogen Program over the fiscal year, including industry interactions and cooperation. The document will also be used to encourage additional potential industrial partners to join the Hydrogen Program Team. Fiscal Year 1994 marked a turning point for the Hydrogen Program, with a budget that grew significantly. The focus of the program was broadened to include development of hydrogen production technologies using municipal solid waste and biomass, in addition to an increased emphasis on industrial involvement and near-term demonstration projects. In order to maintain its near- and long-term balance, the Hydrogen Program will continue with basic, fundamental research that provides the long-term, high-risk, high-payoff investment in hydrogen as an energy carrier.

  20. Solid waste 30-year volume summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valero, O.J.; Armacost, L.L.; DeForest, T.J.; Templeton, K.J.; Williams, N.C.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 30-year forecast of the solid waste volumes to be generated or received at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site is described in this report. The volumes described are low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic/transuranic mixed (TRU/TRUM) waste that will require treatment, storage, and disposal at Hanford`s Solid Waste Operations Complex (SWOC) during the 30-year period from FY 1994 through FY 2023. The data used to complete this document were collected from onsite and offsite waste generators who currently, or are planning to, ship solid wastes to the Hanford Site. An analysis of the data suggests that over 300,000 m{sup 3} of LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste will be managed at Hanford`s SWOC over the next 30 years. An extensive effort was made this year to collect this information. The 1993 solid waste forecast was used as a starting point, which identified approximately 100,000 m{sup 3} of LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste to be sent to the SWOC. After analyzing the forecast waste volume, it was determined that additional waste was expected from the tank waste remediation system (TWRS), onsite decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities, and onsite remedial action (RA) activities. Data presented in this report establish a starting point for solid waste management planning. It is recognized that forecast estimates will vary (typically increasing) as facility planning and missions continue to change and become better defined, but the information presented still provides useful insight into Hanford`s future solid waste management requirements.

  1. Characterization of the molecular structure and mechanical properties of polymer surfaces and protein/polymer interfaces by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koffas, Telly Stelianos

    2004-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and other complementary surface-sensitive techniques have been used to study the surface molecular structure and surface mechanical behavior of biologically-relevant polymer systems. SFG and AFM have emerged as powerful analytical tools to deduce structure/property relationships, in situ, for polymers at air, liquid and solid interfaces. The experiments described in this dissertation have been performed to understand how polymer surface properties are linked to polymer bulk composition, substrate hydrophobicity, changes in the ambient environment (e.g., humidity and temperature), or the adsorption of macromolecules. The correlation of spectroscopic and mechanical data by SFG and AFM can become a powerful methodology to study and engineer materials with tailored surface properties. The overarching theme of this research is the interrogation of systems of increasing structural complexity, which allows us to extend conclusions made on simpler model systems. We begin by systematically describing the surface molecular composition and mechanical properties of polymers, copolymers, and blends having simple linear architectures. Subsequent chapters focus on networked hydrogel materials used as soft contact lenses and the adsorption of protein and surfactant at the polymer/liquid interface. The power of SFG is immediately demonstrated in experiments which identify the chemical parameters that influence the molecular composition and ordering of a polymer chain's side groups at the polymer/air and polymer/liquid interfaces. In general, side groups with increasingly greater hydrophobic character will be more surface active in air. Larger side groups impose steric restrictions, thus they will tend to be more randomly ordered than smaller hydrophobic groups. If exposed to a hydrophilic environment, such as water, the polymer chain will attempt to orient more of its hydrophilic groups to the surface in order to minimize the total surface energy. With an understanding of the structural and environmental parameters which govern polymer surface structure, SFG is then used to explore the effects of surface hydrophobicity and solvent polarity on the orientation and ordering of amphiphilic neutral polymers adsorbed at the solid/liquid interface. SFG spectra show that poly(propylene glycol) (PPG) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) adsorb with their hydrophobic moieties preferentially oriented toward hydrophobic polystyrene surfaces. These same moieties, however, disorder when adsorbed onto a hydrophilic silica/water interface. Water is identified as a critical factor for mediating the orientation and ordering of hydrophobic moieties in polymers adsorbed at hydrophobic interfaces. The role of bulk water content and water vapor, as they influence hydrogel surface structure and mechanics, continues to be explored in the next series of experiments. A method was developed to probe the surface viscoelastic properties of hydroxylethyl methacrylate (HEMA) based contact lens materials by analyzing AFM force-distance curves. AFM analysis indicates that the interfacial region is dehydrated, relative to the bulk. Experiments performed on poly(HEMA+MA) (MA = methacrylic acid), a more hydrophilic copolymer with greater bulk water content, show even greater water depletion at the surface. SFG spectra, as well as surface energy arguments, suggest that the more hydrophilic polymer component (such as MA) is not favored at the air interface; this may explain anomalies in water retention at the hydrogel surface. Adsorption of lysozyme onto poly(HEMA+MA) was found to further reduce near-surface viscous behavior, suggesting lower surface water content. Lastly, protein adsorption is studied using a model polymer system of polystyrene covalently bound with a monolayer of bovine serum albumin. SFG results indicate that some amino acid residues in proteins adopt preferred orientations. SFG spectra also show that the phenyl rings of the bare polystyrene substrate in contact with air or

  2. Postoperative Nomogram Predicting the 9-Year Probability of Prostate Cancer Recurrence After Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Using Radiation Dose as a Prognostic Variable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potters, Louis, E-mail: LPotters@nshs.ed [Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Roach, Mack [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Urology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Stock, Richard G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Ciezki, Jay P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Stone, Nelson N. [Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Fearn, Paul A. [Department of Urology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Yu Changhong [Glickman Urological Institute and the Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Shinohara, Katsuto [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Urology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Kattan, Michael W. [Glickman Urological Institute and the Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report a multi-institutional outcomes study on permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) to 9 years that includes postimplant dosimetry, to develop a postimplant nomogram predicting biochemical freedom from recurrence. Methods and Materials: Cox regression analysis was used to model the clinical information for 5,931 patients who underwent PPB for clinically localized prostate cancer from six centers. The model was validated against the dataset using bootstrapping. Disease progression was determined using the Phoenix definition. The biological equivalent dose was calculated from the minimum dose to 90% of the prostate volume (D90) and external-beam radiotherapy dose using an alpha/beta of 2. Results: The 9-year biochemical freedom from recurrence probability for the modeling set was 77% (95% confidence interval, 73-81%). In the model, prostate-specific antigen, Gleason sum, isotope, external beam radiation, year of treatment, and D90 were associated with recurrence (each p < 0.05), whereas clinical stage was not. The concordance index of the model was 0.710. Conclusion: A predictive model for a postimplant nomogram for prostate cancer recurrence at 9-years after PPB has been developed and validated from a large multi-institutional database. This study also demonstrates the significance of implant dosimetry for predicting outcome. Unique to predictive models, these nomograms may be used a priori to calculate a D90 that likely achieves a desired outcome with further validation. Thus, a personalized dose prescription can potentially be calculated for each patient.

  3. Five Years: Retrospective and Prospective Hughes: Five years ago when we started this report,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be entitled "Apocalypse Now." The stock markets posted their third straight year of declines, and SITAR depends on the willingness of businesses and investors to take risks. While heroic consumers have kept

  4. Hanford year 2000 Business Continuity Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROGGENKAMP, S.L.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of Department of Energy Richland Operations (DOE-RL) Year 2000 (Y2K) effort is to ensure that the Hanford site successfully continues its mission as we approach and enter the 21th century. The Y2K Business Continuity Planning process provides a structured approach to identify Y2K risks to the site and to mitigate these risks through Y2K Contingency Planning, ''Zero-Day'' Transition Planning and Emergency Preparedness. This document defines the responsibilities, processes and plans for Hanford's Y2K Business Continuity. It identifies proposed business continuity drills, tentative schedule and milestones.

  5. Pennsylvania company prepares year-end review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Equitable Resources, Inc., in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, reports that consolidated income for calendar year 1989 was $50.9 million, or $2.43 per share, up from 1988's $47.1 million, or $2.27 per share. The difference was primarily due to a general increase in retail rates which became effective in January 1989 for distribution customers in the state. A December 1989 settlement of a pipeline subsidiary's rate increase also added to the increase. The rate increase had been in effect since 1986, but the full effect had been reserved pending the outcome of regulatory proceedings, the company stated.

  6. Accountability report. Fiscal Year 1996, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consolidates several performance-related reports into a single financial management report. Information in this report includes information previously reported in the following documents: (1) US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) annual financial statement, (2) NRC Chairman`s annual report to the President and the Congress, and (3) NRC Chairman`s semiannual report to Congress on management decisions and final actions on Office of Inspector General audit recommendations. This report also contains performance measures. The report is organized into the following subtopics: information about the US NRC, program performance, management accountability, and the audited financial statement for Fiscal Year 1996. 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY83 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. Besides the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) and Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX), PPPL's largest tokamak, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) had a full year of operation. A phased approach has been planned to assure the proper level of monitoring to coincide with the TFTR program. During CY83 there were no adverse effects to the environment resulting from any operational program at PPPL and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations.

  8. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY84 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The Princeton Large Torus (PLT), Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX), and PPPL's largest tokamak, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) had a complete year of run time. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak was in operation and the RF Test Facility came on-line. The phased approach of TFTR environmental monitoring continued with the addition of neutron monitors. During CY84 there were no adverse effects to the environment resulting from any operational program at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations.

  9. Tropical Western Pacific: A Year in Darwin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z SiteManhattanPacific: A Year in Darwin C.

  10. Calendar Year 2001 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 Building America UpdateCX-001638:6 Categorical1 Calendar Year

  11. Calendar Year 2002 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 Building America UpdateCX-001638:6 Categorical1 Calendar Year2

  12. Calendar Year 2003 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 Building America UpdateCX-001638:6 Categorical1 Calendar Year23

  13. Calendar Year 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 Building America UpdateCX-001638:6 Categorical13 Calendar Year

  14. Calendar Year 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 Building America UpdateCX-001638:6 Categorical13 Calendar Year4

  15. Secretary Moniz's First Year | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015ParentsMiddle SchoolPhysicsDeliveryforDepartmentAcademy ofFirst Year

  16. New Years Revolutions | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDynNet-ZeroNew Wave Power ProjectTom WalshYears

  17. Property:EndYear | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,PillarPublicationType JumpDOEInvolveRtoSpp Jump to:Ease of ApplicationEndYear Jump

  18. Working Gas Volume Change from Year Ago

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1(MillionExtensionsThousand Cubic%perYear Jan Feb Marper3

  19. Ten Year Site Plans | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS SeptemberRenewable Energy, U.S. DepartmentTechnology Ten Year Site Plans Ten

  20. Allocation Year 2014 Ends January 12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA,Portal Allocation Year 2014

  1. Happy New Year! | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | Open Energy Information Hanergy HoldingsHansatronic GmbHNew Year!

  2. A System Degradation Study of 445 Systems Using Year-Over-Year Performance Index Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This graphic summarizes the results of a study conducted by the SunPower Corporation, to assess the median degradation of a large number of systems. This is important because solar investors need proof of low degradation. The study, a project under DOE's SunShot Initiative, makes use of year-over-year performance index change analysis, a powerful and practical technique for assessing the median degradation of a large fleet of systems, which in this case includes a sample of 445.

  3. Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3 Year-End Summary Report Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year 2013 Year-End Summary Report LTS-O&M is at the core of LM efforts to fulfill a strategy that...

  4. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: July 2014...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: July 2014 Update Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: July 2014 Update This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP)...

  5. Wind Farms through the Years | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the Years 1975 Start Slow Stop Year Wind Farms Homes Powered Added Current Year 833 Wind Farms Online. Enough to Power 15 M Homes Data provided by the EIA. The number of...

  6. Exploring our world. Second year report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Prince George`s Community College (PGCC), in collaboration with the Prince George`s County Public School System (PGCPS) modified the Exploring Our World, a mathematics, science, and technology program, during the spring of 1996. The second year of that program was delivered to twenty-six rising seventh and eighth grade, students, and one rising ninth grader during the period July 9, 1996 to August 2, 1996. As in 1995, Dr. Baldwin coordinated and supervised the program; Charles Hoffman was the teacher, Patricia Crosson was the counselor; Kishma Brown was the paid college mentor; and Dante Brown was a volunteer high school mentor. Exploring Our World met six hours per day, four days each week, for four weeks. One day each week was devoted to a field trip, while the other three days were spent on-campus in a variety of classroom,library, computer laboratory, and science laboratory activities. Each student was randomly assigned to one of six groups. Each group conducted a research project and presented project results to parents, staff, and other participants on the night before the last day of the program. This report contain a summary of second year of this program.

  7. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 5.0 Systems Integration Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development,...

  8. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan The Fuel...

  9. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Appendix C: Hydrogen Quality Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan -...

  10. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: July 2014...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    July 2014 Update -- Sections Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: July 2014 Update -- Sections This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) sets forth the goals and...

  11. Ten Years of Development Experience with Advanced Light Truck...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ten Years of Development Experience with Advanced Light Truck Diesel Engines Ten Years of Development Experience with Advanced Light Truck Diesel Engines 2004 Diesel Engine...

  12. Publication of "Year in Review 2010: Energy Infrastructure Events...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Publication of "Year in Review 2010: Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions" Publication of "Year in Review 2010: Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions" August 31, 2011...

  13. Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Year-in-Review 2011...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Events and Expansions Year-in-Review 2011 Available (April 2012) Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Year-in-Review 2011 Available (April 2012) May 1, 2012 -...

  14. Year-in-Review: 2014 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Year-in-Review: 2014 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Report Now Available (May 2015) Year-in-Review: 2014 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Report Now...

  15. Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Management Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: Program Management The Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year...

  16. Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: Program Analysis The Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research,...

  17. Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cover Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: Cover The Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and...

  18. Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: Program Challenges The Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research,...

  19. Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Foreword Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: Foreword The Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and...

  20. Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appendices Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: Appendices The Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...

  1. Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems Integration Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: Systems Integration The Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year...

  2. Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Table of Contents Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: Table of Contents The Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year...

  3. Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Coordination Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: Program Coordination The Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research,...

  4. Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Executive Summary Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: Executive Summary The Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year...

  5. Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technical Plan Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: Technical Plan The Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research,...

  6. Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Introduction Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: Introduction The Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research,...

  7. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan The...

  8. Memorandum of Understanding for Hydropower Two Year Progress...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Memorandum of Understanding for Hydropower Two Year Progress Report Memorandum of Understanding for Hydropower Two Year Progress Report On March 24, 2010, the Department of the...

  9. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cover Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Cover Cover of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development,...

  10. Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Kayser-Ames Laboratory

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 2007. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring activities. Ames Laboratory is located on the campus of Iowa State University (ISU) and occupies 11 buildings owned by the Department of Energy (DOE). See the Laboratory's Web page at www.external.ameslab.gov for locations and Laboratory overview. The Laboratory also leases space in ISU owned buildings. In 2007, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of waste under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. All waste is handled according to all applicable EPA, State, Local and DOE Orders. In 2006 the Laboratory reduced its generator status from a Large Quantity Generator (LQG) to a Small Quantity Generator (SQG). EPA Region VII was notified of this change. The Laboratory's RCRA hazardous waste management program was inspected by EPA Region VII in April 2006. There were no notices of violations. The inspector was impressed with the improvements of the Laboratory's waste management program over the past ten years. The Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, local and DOE regulations and orders in 2007. There were no radiological air emissions or exposures to the general public due to Laboratory activities in 2007. See U.S. Department of Energy Air Emissions Annual Report in Appendix B. As indicated in prior SERs, pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs have been in practice since 1990, with improvements implemented most recently in 2003. Included in these efforts were battery and CRT recycling, waste white paper and green computer paper-recycling. Ames Laboratory also recycles/reuses salvageable metal, used oil, styrofoam peanuts, batteries, fluorescent lamps and telephone books. Ames Laboratory reported to DOE-Ames Site Office (AMSO), through the Laboratory's Self Assessment Report, on its Affirmative Procurement Performance Measure. A performance level of 'A' was achieved in 2007 for Integrated Safety, Health, and Environmental Protection. As reported in Site Environmental Reports for prior years, the Laboratory's Environmental Management System has been integrated into the Laboratory's Integrated Safety Management System since 2005. The integration of EMS into the way the Laboratory does business allows the Laboratory to systematically review, address and respond to the Laboratory's environmental impacts.

  11. Consolidated financial statements for fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following overview and accompanying audited financial statements have been prepared for Fiscal Year (FY) 1996 to report the financial position and the results of operations of the Department of Energy. These statements include the consolidated Statement of Financial Position and the consolidated Statement of Operations and Changes in Net Position. The statements have been prepared in accordance with the Office of Management and Budget Bulletin No. 94-01, Form and Content for Agency Financial Statements, and were developed in accordance with the hierarchy of accounting standards described therein. The overview provides a narrative on the Department of Energy`s mission, activities, and accomplishments. Utilizing performance measures as the primary vehicle for communicating Departmental accomplishments and results, this overview discusses the most significant measures while others are discussed in the supplemental information to the financial statements.

  12. A Dark Year for Tidal Disruption Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillochon, James

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disruption of a main-sequence star by a supermassive black hole results in the initial production of an extended debris stream that winds repeatedly around the black hole, producing a complex three-dimensional figure that may self-intersect. Both analytical work and simulations have shown that typical encounters generate streams that are extremely thin. In this paper we show that this implies that even small relativistic precessions attributed to black hole spin can induce deflections that prevent the stream from self-intersecting even after many windings. Additionally, hydrodynamical simulations have demonstrated that energy is deposited very slowly via hydrodynamic processes alone, resulting in the liberation of very little gravitational binding energy in the absence of stream-stream collisions. This naturally leads to a "dark period" in which the flare is not observable for some time, persisting for up to a dozen orbital periods of the most bound material, which translates to years for disruptions arou...

  13. Two years of ALMA bibliography - lessons learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meakins, Silvia; Bishop, Marsha J; Stoehr, Felix; Tatematsu, Ken

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Telescope bibliographies are integral parts of observing facilities. They are used to associate the published literature with archived observational data, to measure an observatory's scientific output through publication and citation statistics, and to define guidelines for future observing strategies. The ESO and NRAO librarians as well as NAOJ jointly maintain the ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array) bibliography, a database of refereed papers that use ALMA data. In this paper, we illustrate how relevant articles are identified, which procedures are used to tag entries in the database and link them to the correct observations, and how results are communicated to ALMA stakeholders and the wider community. Efforts made to streamline the process will be explained and evaluated, and a first analysis of ALMA papers published after two years of observations will be given.

  14. Routine environmental monitoring schedule, calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, J.W.; Markes, B.M.; McKinney, S.M.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) a schedule of monitoring and sampling routines for the Operational Environmental Monitoring (OEM) program during calendar year (CY) 1995. Every attempt will be made to consistently follow this schedule; any deviation from this schedule will be documented by an internal memorandum (DSI) explaining the reason for the deviation. The DSI will be issued by the scheduled performing organization and directed to Near-Field Monitoring. The survey frequencies for particular sites are determined by the technical judgment of Near-Field Monitoring and may depend on the site history, radiological status, use and general conditions. Additional surveys may be requested at irregular frequencies if conditions warrant. All radioactive wastes sites are scheduled to be surveyed at least annually. Any newly discovered wastes sites not documented by this schedule will be included in the revised schedule for CY 1995.

  15. Threats from space: 20 years of progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remo, J L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been 20 years since planning began for the 1995 United Nations International Conference on Near-Earth Objects. The conference proceedings established the scientific basis for an international organizational framework to support research and collective actions to mitigate a potential near-Earth object (NEO) threat to the planet. Since that time, researchers have conducted telescope surveys that should, within the coming decade, answer many questions about the size, number, and Earth impact probability of these objects. Space explorations to asteroids and comets have been successfully carried out, including sample recovery. Laboratory experiments and computer simulations at Sandia National Laboratories have analyzed the effects of soft X-ray radiation on meteorites - which might help researchers develop a way to redirect an incoming asteroid by vaporizing a thin layer of its surface. An Action Team on NEOs, established in 2001 in response to recommendations of the Third United Nations Conference on the E...

  16. Environmental monitoring report for Calendar Year 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the 1986 environmental monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. Two of three large tokamak machines, the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) were in operation during the year. The Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX) was shut down in December 1985 to undergo major modifications, and will recommence operations in 1987. PLT was shut down in December 1986. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak and the Radio-Frequency Test Facility (RFTF) were operated on a limited basis in 1986. The Environmental Committee became a standing committee of the Executive Safety Board (ESB) and continued to review items of environmental importance. During CY86 no adverse effects to the environment or public resulted from any operational program activities at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental regulations.

  17. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the 1987 environmental monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. Two of three large tokamak machines, the Princeton Beta Experiment Modification (PBX-M) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) were in operation during the year. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak and the Radio-Frequency Test Facility (RFTF) were operated on a limited basis in 1987. The Environmental Committee which is a standing committee of the Executive Safety Board (ESB) continued to review items of environmental importance. During CY87 no adverse effects to the environment or public resulted from any operational program activities at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations. 41 refs., 24 figs., 34 tabs.

  18. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY85 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. All of the tokamak machines, the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX), and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), has a full year of run time. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak and the RF Test Facility were in operation. The phased approach to TFTR environmental monitoring continued with the establishment of locations for off-site monitoring. An environmental committee established in December 1984 reviewed items of environmental importance. During CY85 no adverse effects to the environmental resulted from any operational program activities at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations.

  19. Environmental releases for calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report fulfills the annual environmental release reporting requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. This report provides supplemental information to the Hanford Site Environmental Report. The Hanford Site Environmental Report provides an update on the environmental status of the entire Hanford Site. The sitewide annual report summarizes the degree of compliance of the Hanford Site with applicable environmental regulations and informs the public about the impact of Hanford operations on the surrounding environment. Like the Hanford Site Environmental Report, this annual report presents a summary of the environmental releases from facilities managed by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and monitored by Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated (BHI). In addition to the summary data, this report also includes detailed data on air emissions, liquid effluents, and hazardous substances released to the environment during calendar year 1994 from these facilities.

  20. The First Ten Years of Swift Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Peter J; Milne, Peter A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Swift Gamma Ray Burst Explorer has proven to be an incredible platform for studying the multiwavelength properties of supernova explosions. In its first ten years, Swift has observed over three hundred supernovae. The ultraviolet observations reveal a complex diversity of behavior across supernova types and classes. Even amongst the standard candle type Ia supernovae, ultraviolet observations reveal distinct groups. When the UVOT data is combined with higher redshift optical data, the relative populations of these groups appear to change with redshift. Among core-collapse supernovae, Swift discovered the shock breakout of two supernovae and the Swift data show a diversity in the cooling phase of the shock breakout of supernovae discovered from the ground and promptly followed up with Swift. Swift observations have resulted in an incredible dataset of UV and X-ray data for comparison with high-redshift supernova observations and theoretical models. Swift's supernova program has the potential to dramaticall...

  1. THE 10,000 YEAR PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Srisuro

    2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Pharkya, a Ph.D. candidate in materials science and engineering, works in the area of corrosion science, predicting how materials will perform over extended periods of time. Her particular focus is a nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy called C-22, a highly corrosion-resistant metal. Pharkya's aim is to help determine whether containers made from C-22 can be used to store high-energy nuclear waste--for 10,000 years and longer. Pharkya's work is part of a plan by the U.S. Department of Energy to consolidate the country's nuclear waste in a single proposed repository. The proposed repository is in Yucca Mountain located in a remote Nevada desert. Currently about 70,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste are divided between approximately 100 sites around the country. The undertaking, Pharkya emphasizes, is massive. To study just the corrosion aspects of the packaging, Case is collaborating with eight other universities, five national labs and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Even with so many players, the study will likely take several years to complete. Heading the entire group is Joe Payer, a professor of materials science and engineering at Case and Pharkya's mentor. ''I came here to have the opportunity to work with Dr. Payer, an expert in corrosion, but I didn't know specifically what I would be working on'', Pharkya recalls. ''I was pretty thrilled when I learned about the vastness of the project--my research would be just a small part of this huge topic--and the impact of the research we would be doing''.

  2. The 10,000 Year Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.Srisaro

    2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Pallavi Pharkya thinks a lot about the future. Pharkya, a Ph.D. candidate in materials science and engineering, works in the area of corrosion science, predicting how materials will perform over extended periods of time. Her particular focus is a nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy called C-22, a highly corrosion-resistant metal. Pharkya's aim is to help determine whether containers made from C-22 can be used to store high-energy nuclear waste--for 10,000 years and longer. Pharkya's work is part of a plan by the U.S. Department of Energy to consolidate the country's nuclear waste in a single proposed repository. The proposed repository is in Yucca Mountain located in a remote Nevada desert. Currently about 70,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste are divided between approximately 100 sites around the country. The undertaking, Pharkya emphasizes, is massive. To study just the corrosion aspects of the packaging, Case is collaborating with eight other universities, five national labs and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Even with so many players, the study will likely take several years to complete. Heading the entire group is Joe Payer, a professor of materials science and engineering at Case and Pharkya's mentor. ''I came here to have the opportunity to work with Dr. Payer, an expert in corrosion, but I didn't know specifically what I would be working on'', Pharkya recalls. ''I was pretty thrilled when I learned about the vastness of the project--my research would be just a small part of this huge topic--and the impact of the research we would be doing''.

  3. Environmental report for calendar year 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.; Turrin, R.P.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for Calendar Year 1989 (CY89). The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations. The objective of the environmental report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health. During CY89, there were no accidents, incidents, or occurrences that had a significant impact on PPPL facilities or program operations. The accidental overfilling of an underground storage tank (UST) during 1988, along with the discovery of residual hydrocarbons in the soil of an area used for unloading fuel oil trucks over the last 30 years, has the potential for a minor environmental impact and has resulted in a costly clean up in this area. Surface water analyses for both radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants have shown nothing above normally expected background values. Ambient tritium levels at less than 100 pCi/liter (3.7 Bq/liter) were measured in D-site well water. New groundwater monitoring wells were added in 1989 as a requirement for the groundwater part of our New Jersey Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NJPDES) permit. Initial sampling of these wells indicated the presence of lead in two shallow wells next to the detention basin. Radiation exposure via airborne effluents into the environment is still at insignificant levels; however, a stack monitor for tritium is planned for 1990 to ensure compliance with new EPA regulations. Off-site surface water, soils, and biota continued to be analyzed for radioactive baselines in CY89. 51 refs., 27 figs., 40 tabs.

  4. Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayser, Dan

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 2010. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring activities. In 2010, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of waste under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. All waste is handled according to all applicable EPA, State, Local regulations and DOE Orders. In 2006 the Laboratory reduced its generator status from a Large Quantity Generator (LQG) to a Small Quantity Generator (SQG). EPA Region VII was notified of this change. The Laboratory's RCRA hazardous waste management program was inspected by EPA Region VII in April 2006. There were no notices of violations. The inspector was impressed with the improvements of the Laboratory's waste management program over the past ten years. The Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, local and DOE regulations and orders in 2010. There were no radiological air emissions or exposures to the general public due to Laboratory activities in 2010. See U.S. Department of Energy Air Emissions Annual Report in Appendix B. As indicated in prior SERs, pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs have been in practice since 1990, with improvements implemented most recently in 2010. Included in these efforts were battery and CRT recycling, miscellaneous electronic office equipment, waste white paper and green computer paper-recycling and corrugated cardboard recycling. Ames Laboratory also recycles/reuses salvageable metal, used oil, foamed polystyrene peanuts, batteries, fluorescent lamps and telephone books. Ames Laboratory reported to DOE-Ames Site Office (AMSO), through the Laboratory's Performance Evaluation Measurement Plan, on its Affirmative Procurement Performance Measure. A performance level of 'A-' was achieved in 2010 for Integrated Safety, Health and Environmental Protection. As reported in Site Environmental Reports for prior years, the Laboratory's Environmental Management System (EMS) has been integrated into the Laboratory's Integrated Safety Management System since 2005. The integration of EMS into the way the Laboratory does business allows the Laboratory to systematically review, address and respond to the Laboratory's environmental impacts. The Laboratory's EMS was audited in April 2009 by DOE-CH. There were four 'Sufficiently in Conformity' findings as a result of the audit. All four findings were tracked in the Laboratory's corrective action database for completion. Beryllium was used routinely at Ames Laboratory in the 1940's and 1950's in processes developed for the production of highly pure uranium and thorium in support of the historic Manhattan Project. Laboratory metallurgists also worked on a process to produce pure beryllium metal from beryllium fluoride. In the early 1950's, beryllium oxide powder was used to produce shaped beryllium and crucibles. As a result of that work, beryllium contamination now exists in many interstitial spaces (e.g., utility chases) and ventilation systems in Wilhelm, Spedding and Metals Development buildings. Extensive characterization and remediation efforts have occurred in 2009 and 2010 in order to better understand the extent of the contamination. Analysis of extensive sampling data suggests that a fairly wide dispersion of beryllium occurred (most likely in the 1950's and 60's) in Wilhelm Hall and in certain areas of Spedding Hall and Metals Development. Area air-sampling results and work-area surface characterizations indicate the exposure potential to current workers, building visitors and the public remains extremely low. This information is now used to guide cleaning efforts and to provide worker protection during remodeling and maintenance activities. Results were shared with the DOE's Former Worker Program to support former worker medical test

  5. Routine environmental monitoring schedule, calendar year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinney, S.M.

    1997-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the Environmental Restorations Contractor (ERC) and the Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC) a schedule in accordance with the HNF-PRO-454, Inactive Waste Sites` HNF-PRO-455, Solid Waste 3 Management4 and BHI-EE-02, Environmental Requirements, of monitoring and sampling, routines for the near-facility environmental monitoring program during calendar year (CY) 1998. Every attempt will be made to consistently follow this schedule; any deviation from this schedule will be documented by an internal memorandum (DSI) explaining the reason for the deviation. The DSI will be issued by the scheduled performing organization and directed to Environmental Monitoring and Investigations. The survey frequencies for particular sites are determined by the technical judgment of Environmental Monitoring and investigations and may depend on the site history, radiological status, use, and general conditions. Additional surveys may be requested at irregular frequencies if conditions warrant. All radioactive wastes sites are scheduled to be surveyed at least annually. Any newly discovered wastes sites not documented by this schedule will be included in the revised schedule for CY 1999. The outside perimeter road surveys of 200 East and West Area and the rail survey from the 300 Area to Columbia Center will be performed in the year 2000 per agreement with Department of Energy, Richland Field Office. This schedule does not discuss staffing needs, nor does it list the monitoring equipment to be used in completing specific routines. Personnel performing routines to meet this schedule shall communicate any need for 1332 assistance in completing these routines to Radiological Control management and Environmental Monitoring and Investigations. After each routine survey is completed, a copy of the survey record, maps, and data sheets will be forwarded to Environmental Monitoring and Investigations. These routine surveys will not be considered complete until this documentation is received. At the end of each month, the ERC and PHMC radiological control organizations shall forward a copy of the Routine Signoff Sheet and a DSI validating the completion of the scheduled routine surveys for that month.

  6. Required Courses for the HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT Major Freshman Year Credits Sophomore Year Credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Year Credits Fall Semester CO 150 College Composition FSHN 150 Survey of Human Nutrition MATH 117 Hotel Operations Foundations and Perspectives (Cat. 3-B,D,E)** Spring Semester ACT 205* Fundamentals of Accounting RRM 310 Food Service Systems-Operations SPCM 200 Public Speaking STAT 204 Statistics for Business

  7. Thirty Years of Turnstiles and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. D. Meiss

    2015-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    To characterize transport in a deterministic dynamical system is to compute exit time distributions from regions or transition time distributions between regions in phase space. This paper surveys the considerable progress on this problem over the past thirty years. Primary measures of transport for volume-preserving maps include the exiting and incoming fluxes to a region. For area-preserving maps, transport is impeded by curves formed from invariant manifolds that form partial barriers, e.g., stable and unstable manifolds bounding a resonance zone or cantori, the remnants of destroyed invariant tori. When the map is exact volume preserving, a Lagrangian differential form can be used to reduce the computation of fluxes to finding a difference between the action of certain key orbits, such as homoclinic orbits to a saddle or to a cantorus. Given a partition of phase space into regions bounded by partial barriers, a Markov tree model of transport explains key observations, such as the algebraic decay of exit and recurrence distributions.

  8. Water resources data, Kentucky. Water year 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClain, D.L.; Byrd, F.D.; Brown, A.C.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Water resources data for the 1991 water year for Kentucky consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and lakes; and water-levels of wells. This report includes daily discharge records for 115 stream-gaging stations. It also includes water-quality data for 38 stations sampled at regular intervals. Also published are 13 daily temperature and 8 specific conductance records, and 85 miscellaneous temperature and specific conductance determinations for the gaging stations. Suspended-sediment data for 12 stations (of which 5 are daily) are also published. Ground-water levels are published for 23 recording and 117 partial sites. Precipitation data at a regular interval is published for 1 site. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurement and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the US Geological Survey and cooperation State and Federal agencies in Kentucky.

  9. FY 1987 current fiscal year work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Current Year Work Plan presents a detailed description of the activities to be performed by the Joint Integration Office during FY87. It breaks down the activities into two major work areas: Program Management and Program Analysis. Program Management is performed by the JIO by providing technical planning and guidance for the development of advanced TRU waste management capabilities. This includes equipment/facility design, engineering, construction, and operations. These functions are integrated to allow transition from interim storage to final disposition. JIO tasks include program requirements identification, long-range technical planning, budget development, program planning document preparation, task guidance, task monitoring, information gathering and task reporting to DOE, interfacing with other agencies and DOE lead programs, integrating public involvement with program efforts, and preparation of program status reports for DOE. Program Analysis is performed by the JIO to support identification and assessment of alternatives, and development of long-term TRU waste program capabilities. This work plan includes: system analyses, requirements analyses, interim and procedure development, legislative and regulatory analyses, dispatch and traffic analyses, and data bases.

  10. PHENIX: Beyond 15 years of discovery

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Morrison, D.; Nagle, J. L.

    2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHENIX experiment at BNL’s Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was designed to uncover properties of the quark–gluon plasma (QGP) via rare penetrating probes. Over the past 15 years, the collaboration has delivered on its promised measurements, often with exciting results beyond those originally foreseen. That the QGP behaves as a nearly perfect fluid and that non-photonic electrons are substantially suppressed has led to the use of heavy quarks as probes of the medium. The PHENIX silicon vertex detectors are opening a new arena for QGP studies, and the MPC-EX, a novel forward calorimeter with silicon readout, accesses low-x physicsmore »via direct photons with unprecedented precision. PHENIX has proposed sPHENIX, a major upgrade using the recently acquired BaBar solenoid and full calorimetric coverage and high rate capabilities. sPHENIX will reconstruct jets and extend observables to higher transverse momentum, where comparisons to results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) heavy-ion program will provide the most insightful. Following the RHIC program, the nuclear physics community has identified an electron ion collider (EIC) as crucial to the next generation of QCD investigations. The BaBar magnet and sPHENIX calorimetry will be an excellent foundation for a new collaborative pursuit of discovery.« less

  11. Site Environmental Report-Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Kayser

    2002-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Laboratory's mission is to conduct fundamental research in the physical, chemical, materials, mathematical sciences and engineering which underlie energy generating, conversion, transmission and storage technologies, environmental improvement, and other technical areas essential to national needs. These efforts will be maintained so as to contribute to the achievement of the Department of Energy's Missions and Goals; more specifically, to increase the general levels of scientific knowledge and capabilities, to prepare engineering and physical sciences students for future scientific endeavors, and to initiate nascent technologies and practical applications arising from our basic scientific programs. The Laboratory will approach all its operations with the safety and health of all workers as a constant objective and with genuine concern for the environment. Ames Laboratory does not conduct classified research. The primary purpose of this report is to summarize the performance of Ames Laboratory's environmental programs, present highlights of significant environmental activities, and confirm compliance with environmental regulations and requirements for calendar year 2001. This report is a working requirement of Department of Energy Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting''.

  12. 60 Years of duplex stainless steel applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsson, J.; Liljas, M. [Avesta Sheffield AB, Avesta (Sweden)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the history of wrought duplex stainless steel development and applications is described. Ferritic-austenitic stainless steels were introduced only a few decades after stainless steels were developed. The paper gives details from the first duplex stainless steels in the 1930`s to the super duplex stainless steel development during the 1980`s. During the years much effort has been devoted to production and welding metallurgy as well as corrosion research of the duplex stainless steels. Therefore, duplex stainless steels are to-day established in a wide product range. Numerous important applications are exemplified. In most cases the selection of a duplex steel has been a result of the combination high strength excellent corrosion resistance. In the pulp and paper industry the most interesting use is as vessel material in digesters. For chemical process industry, the duplex steels are currently used in heat exchangers. The largest application of duplex steels exists in the oil and gas/offshore industry. Hundreds of kms of pipelines are installed and are still being installed. An increased use of duplex steels is foreseen in areas where the strength is of prime importance.

  13. 1995 Solid Waste 30-year volume summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valero, O.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); DeForest, T.J.; Templeton, K.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document, prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), provides a description of the annual low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic/transuranic mixed solid waste (TRU-TRUM) volumes expected to be managed by Hanford`s Solid Waste Central Waste Complex (CWC) over the next 30 years. The waste generation sources and waste categories are also described. This document is intended to be used as a reference for short- and long-term planning of the Hanford treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) activities over the next several decades. By estimating the waste volumes that will be generated in the future, facility planners can determine the timing of key waste management activities, evaluate alternative treatment strategies, and plan storage and disposal capacities. In addition, this document can be used by other waste sites and the general public to gain a better understanding of the types and volumes of waste that will be managed at Hanford.

  14. DURABLE GLASS FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C.

    2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The durability of natural glasses on geological time scales and ancient glasses for thousands of years is well documented. The necessity to predict the durability of high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses on extended time scales has led to various thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. Advances in the measurement of medium range order (MRO) in glasses has led to the understanding that the molecular structure of a glass, and thus the glass composition, controls the glass durability by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. During the early stages of glass dissolution, a 'gel' layer resembling a membrane forms through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer ages into clay or zeolite minerals by Ostwald ripening. Zeolite mineral assemblages (higher pH and Al{sup 3+} rich glasses) may cause the dissolution rate to increase which is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in the environment. Thermodynamic and structural approaches to the prediction of glass durability are compared versus Ostwald ripening.

  15. Our 50-year odyssey with fission: Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nix, J.R.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On the occasion of this International Conference on Fifty Years Research in Nuclear Fission, we summarize our present understanding of the fission process and the challenges that lie ahead. The basic properties of fission arise from a delicate competition between disruptive Coulomb forces, cohesive nuclear forces, and fluctuating shell and pairing forces. These static forces are primarily responsible for such experimental phenomena as deformed ground-state nuclear shapes, fission into fragments of unequal size, sawtooth neutron yields, spontaneously fissioning isomers, broad resonances and narrow intermediate structure in fission cross sections, and cluster radioactivity. However, inertial and dissipative forces also play decisive roles in the dynamical evolution of a fissioning nucleus. The energy dissipated between the saddle and scission points is small for low initial excitation energy at the saddle point and increases with increasing excitation energy. At moderate excitation energies, the dissipation of collective energy into internal single-particle excitation energy proceeds largely through the interaction of nucleons with the mean field and with each other in the vicinity of the nuclear surface, as well as through the transfer of nucleons between the two portions of the evolving dumbell-like system. These unique dissipation mechanisms arise from the Pauli exclusion principle for fermions and the details of the nucleon-nucleon interaction, which make the mean free path of a nucleon near the Fermi surface at low excitation energy longer than the nuclear radius. With its inverse process of heavy-ion fusion reactions, fission continues to yield surprises in the study of large-amplitude collective nuclear motion. 87 refs., 12 figs.

  16. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: May 2013...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: May 2013 Update Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: May 2013 Update This is the May 2013 Update to the...

  17. Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success October 3, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured here is...

  18. State Energy Program Program Year 2014 Administrative and Legal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Center State Energy Program (SEP) Program Year 2014 Formula Awards SEP-ALRD-2014 CFDA Number: 81.041, State Energy Program Issue Date: 3192014 SEP Program Year Ending...

  19. EM Exceeds Fiscal Year 2013 Small Business Goals | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fiscal Year 2013 Small Business Goals EM Exceeds Fiscal Year 2013 Small Business Goals November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Employees with Swift & Staley Inc., a Paducah site small...

  20. Year-in-Review: 2011 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions (April 2012) Year-in-Review: 2011 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions (April 2012) The 2011 Year-in-Review (YIR) provides a...

  1. Year in Review Letter from the President 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Year in Review 2010 #12;#12;Contents Letter from the President 2 Open for Business 4 Community one filled with success and promise for Old Dominion University. As you'll see in this Year in Review

  2. Engineering Research Division publication report, calendar year 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, E.K.; Livingston, P.L.; Rae, D.C. (eds.)

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year the Engineering Research Division of the Electronics Engineering Department at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has issued an internal report listing all formal publications produced by the Division during the calendar year. Abstracts of 1980 reports are presented.

  3. Los Alamos achieves 20-year low on radioactive air emissions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANL achieves 20-year low on radioactive air emissions Los Alamos achieves 20-year low on radioactive air emissions The Lab measures air emissions through a comprehensive system of...

  4. FIRST YEAR APPRENTICES Name (15) @uchicago.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, J. Peter

    FIRST YEAR APPRENTICES Name (15) @uchicago.edu Ian Alevy ianalevy Joshua Bosshardt jbosshardt Xin Hamming Zhang Hanmingzyy[gmail] SECOND and THIRD YEAR APPRENTICES Name (16) @uchicago.edu Aashirwad Anand

  5. Energy Secretary Highlights One-Year Anniversary of the Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Highlights One-Year Anniversary of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 at Iowa Wind Turbine Facility Energy Secretary Highlights One-Year Anniversary of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 at...

  6. Northwest Power and Conservation Council FISCAL YEAR 2007 BUDGET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Power and Conservation Council FISCAL YEAR 2007 BUDGET AND FISCAL YEAR 2006 REVISIONS...................................... 1 B. STABILIZING LONG-TERM FUNDING.................................. 2 BUDGET HISTORY (FIGURE 1)............................................................ 5 BUDGET BY FUNCTION (FIGURE 2) .................................................... 6 BUDGET

  7. Council Document 2012-5 Fiscal Year 2014 Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May 2012 Council Document 2012-5 Fiscal Year 2014 Budget and Fiscal Year 2013 Revisions #12;ii B. Budget History.............................................................................................. 2 Budget History by Function (Figure 1) ............................................... 4 Budget

  8. Council Document 2011-08 Fiscal Year 2013 Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    July 2011 Council Document 2011-08 Fiscal Year 2013 Budget and Fiscal Year 2012 Revisions #12;ii B. Budget History.............................................................................................. 2 Budget History by Function (Figure 1) ............................................... 4 Budget

  9. Northwest Power and Conservation Council FISCAL YEAR 2008 BUDGET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Power and Conservation Council FISCAL YEAR 2008 BUDGET AND FISCAL YEAR 2007 REVISIONS...................................... 1 B. STABILIZING LONG-TERM FUNDING.................................. 2 BUDGET HISTORY (FIGURE 1)............................................................ 5 BUDGET BY FUNCTION (FIGURE 2) .................................................... 6 BUDGET

  10. EIS-0380: Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EIS-0380: Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report for the 2008 Los Alamos Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0380: Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan...

  11. Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Kayser

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 2005. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring activities. Ames Laboratory is located on the campus of Iowa State University (ISU) and occupies 11 buildings owned by the Department of Energy (DOE). See the Laboratory's Web page at www.external.ameslab.gov for locations and Laboratory overview. The Laboratory also leases space in ISU owned buildings. In 2005, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of waste under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. All waste is handled accordingly to all applicable EPA, State, Local and DOE Orders. The most recent RCRA inspection was conducted by EPA Region VII in January 1999. The Laboratory received a notice of violation (NOV) which included five citations. There have been no inspections since then. The citations were minor and were corrected by the Laboratory within the time allocated by the EPA. See correspondence in Appendix D. The Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, local and DOE regulations and orders in 2005. There were no radiological air emissions or exposures to the general public due to Laboratory activities in 2005. See U.S. Department of Energy Air Emissions Annual Report in Appendix B. Pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs were implemented in 1990 and updated in 2003. Included in these efforts were battery and CRT recycling, waste white paper and green computer paper-recycling. Ames Laboratory also recycles/reuses salvageable metal, used oil, styrofoam peanuts, batteries, CRTs, fluorescent lamps and telephone books. Ames Laboratory reported to DOE-CH, through the Laboratory's Self Assessment Report, on its Affirmative Procurement Performance Measure. A performance level of ''outstanding'' was achieved in 2005. The Laboratory underwent a voluntary Environmental Management Review (EMR) in 2003. Members of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region VII and Iowa Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) conducted the EMR in November 2003. The EMR was conducted as part of the process for developing and implementing an Environmental Management System (EMS) at the Laboratory. The final EMR report was received on June 19, 2003. Most of the recommendations were implemented to fulfill the EMS requirements for the ISO 14001:1996 standard. In 2004, the Laboratory ''Self Declared'' that it had fully integrated an EMS with its Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) and met the requirements of Executive Order 13148. In November of 2005 DOE-CH conducted a self-declaration assessment of the Laboratory's EMS. The assessment found two nonconformities that the Laboratory promptly corrected, allowing the DOE-CH Ames Site Office to accept the Laboratory's self-declaration (See EMS Assessment letter, December 21, 2005 in Appendix D).

  12. Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poston, Ted M.; Hanf, Robert W.; Dirkes, Roger L.; Morasch, Launa F.

    2002-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes environmental information for the Hanford Site in Washington State for the calendar year 2001.

  13. WEST VALLEY DEMONSTRATION PROJECT SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CALENDARY YEAR 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    THE ANNUAL (CALENDAR YEAR 2001) SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT FOR THE WEST VALLEY DEMONSTRATION PROJECT NUCLEAR WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITY.

  14. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides information on the status of groundwater monitoring at the Hanford Site during fiscal year 2001.

  15. Semester, Academic Year and Short Term SUNY Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Semester, Academic Year and Short Term SUNY Programs: Asia #12;1 Table of Contents How to Use Year 10 Japan Short-term 12 Korea Semester & Academic Year 13 Korea Short-term 17 Programs in Other Contact Information 23 How to Use this Booklet This handout contains listings of all the programs offered

  16. 2007-2008 Communication Studies Curriculum Year Hours PREREQUISITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    2007-2008 Communication Studies Curriculum Year Hours PREREQUISITES First Year Communication and Information 150 3 ___ Communication Studies 201 3 ___ Communication and Information 150 English 101, 102 6 Arts and Humanities Elective 3 ___ General Elective 1 ___ TOTAL 30 Second Year Communication Studies

  17. Year in Review WE'RE ALL ABOUT STUDENTS!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    2012-2013 Year in Review WE'RE ALL ABOUT STUDENTS! #12;"What does it mean to be an Owl University · Division of Student Affairs · Year in Review 2012/2013 #12;Greetings, Owls! It is my privilege University · Division of Student Affairs · Year in Review 2012/2013 page 3 #12;page 4 Florida Atlantic

  18. Stellenbosch University first embarked on its journey to integrated reporting a few years ago. Global discourse on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    . These, and more, make up the sum total of things with which we create and sustain value. And integrated­2018. This focus on value accords with the principles provided by the International Framework

  19. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as those from the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Because this report is intended to discuss radioactive air emissions during calendar year 2010, data on radionuclides in air from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant releases are not presented but will be included in the report for calendar year 2011. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE, 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001(EPA, 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR, 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2010, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 17 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000032 mrem/yr, more than 300,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

  20. FIVE-YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE OBSERVATIONS: SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, E. L.; Chen, X. [UCLA Physics and Astronomy, P.O. Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Odegard, N.; Hill, R. S.; Weiland, J. L. [Adnet Systems, Inc., 7515 Mission Dr., Suite A100, Lanham, MD 20706 (United States); Bennett, C. L.; Gold, B.; Larson, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Hinshaw, G.; Wollack, E.; Kogut, A. [Code 665, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Jarosik, N.; Page, L.; Dunkley, J. [Department of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-0708 (United States); Komatsu, E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, 2511 Speedway, RLM 15.306, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Nolta, M. R. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Spergel, D. N. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Halpern, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Limon, M. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550 W. 120th St., Mail Code 5247, New York, NY 10027-6902 (United States); Meyer, S. S. [Departments of Astrophysics and Physics, KICP and EFI, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)], E-mail: wright@astro.ucla.edu (and others)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the list of point sources found in the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) five-year maps. The technique used in the first-year and three-year analyses now finds 390 point sources, and the five-year source catalog is complete for regions of the sky away from the Galactic plane to a 2 Jy limit, with SNR >4.7 in all bands in the least covered parts of the sky. The noise at high frequencies is still mainly radiometer noise, but at low frequencies the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy is the largest uncertainty. A separate search of CMB-free V-W maps finds 99 sources of which all but one can be identified with known radio sources. The sources seen by WMAP are not strongly polarized. Many of the WMAP sources show significant variability from year to year, with more than a 2:1 range between the minimum and maximum fluxes.