Sample records for year-6 year-7 year-8

  1. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Denver Area: Year 6,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Denver Area: Year 6, January 2007 Gary A 80208 June 2007 #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Denver Area: Year 6 1-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Denver Area: Year 6 2 INTRODUCTION Many cities

  2. A Ten-Year, $7 Million Energy Initiative Marching on: Texas A&M University Campus Energy Systems CC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, S.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Bruner, H. L.; Williams, L.; Riley, J. G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The $35 million in measured savings for the ten-year, $7 million continuous commissioning (CC) program at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) makes the decision to continue easy. In today's energy environment and with the volatilities...

  3. Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Re-Exports to Japan (Million Cubic...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 2,822 2,741 5,037 0...

  4. Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Re-Exports to Spain (Million Cubic...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 2010's 4,117 5,918...

  5. U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Indonesia (Million Cubic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,669 1990's 0 0 0 2000's 2,760 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's...

  6. Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's -- -- -- 3.46 3.74 2.63 3.03 2000's 3.53 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2010's...

  7. Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Norway (Dollars...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- 9.56 4.45 2010's 5.21 5.97 2.83 14.85 4.47...

  8. Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Egypt (Dollars...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- -- 10.88 6.80 6.83 9.01 3.94 2010's 4.82 5.85 2.52 --...

  9. U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Egypt (Million Cubic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 72,540 119,528 114,580 54,839 160,435 2010's 72,990 35,120 2,811 0...

  10. Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology: A Summary Report of Activities Completed at the National Center for Hydrogen Technology - Year 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, Michael

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology? (NCHT?) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research on hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT?s inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding for hydrogen-related projects ($24 million for projects in the NCHT, which includes federal and corporate partner development funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT Program?s nine activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan that refers to realistic testing of technologies at adequate scale, process intensification, and contaminant control. A number of projects have been completed that range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in Year 6 of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

  11. Regmi Research Series ,Year 8, December 1, 1976

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regmi, Mahesh C

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the products of people of an Ind~ -Aryan cultural backgro und Hho came to Xath- ' . mand u Valley from the sout h . It 10 perr.?ps too much to expect - these authors t o hcve possessed an aqcura te knowledge of the ethnology of this region. Ther used tne... the products of people of an Ind~ -Aryan cultural backgro und Hho came to Xath- ' . mand u Valley from the sout h . It 10 perr.?ps too much to expect - these authors t o hcve possessed an aqcura te knowledge of the ethnology of this region. Ther used tne...

  12. Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8

  13. Regmi Research Series ,Year 6, December 1, 1974

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regmi, Mahesh C

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S follows:- . . u 1) 14 IS 16 •• ••• , ' ... ;. .. " ... • • • • •• • •• Rate of !..ani TaX (ptJr bigna) .4 annas 6 annas, 8 BOOBS 12 annas Rate prevail~ng on e1jolnln5 Lin1a". Cont1 ••• 3. B. In eu.:;e _my pt::rson fu... S follows:- . . u 1) 14 IS 16 •• ••• , ' ... ;. .. " ... • • • • •• • •• Rate of !..ani TaX (ptJr bigna) .4 annas 6 annas, 8 BOOBS 12 annas Rate prevail~ng on e1jolnln5 Lin1a". Cont1 ••• 3. B. In eu.:;e _my pt::rson fu...

  14. Regmi Research Series ,Year 7, December 1, 1975

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regmi, Mahesh C

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .J. Shah. Damod .. . .:: P;:-nde , brother o f vameha Raj PEinde, ' -,1; 10 wae then tl m1n1$ter, W3S sen~ to ilivC,",de Parbat. :-i~ \\oF"! :) ~,)_ ~;o entrusted "/itil th:"!: t a.sk of s ubjugc:tin9 the kingdoms 0 :': t : l,; west . ,similarly I .\\bhima...

  15. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Chicago Area: Year 6,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    in combustion. Mass emissions per mass or volume of fuel can also be determined. The system used in this study and 2004. The remote sensor used in this study is capable of measuring the ratios of CO, HC, and NO to CO2 in motor vehicle exhaust. From these ratios, we calculate the percent concentrations of CO, CO2, HC

  16. CenSSIS Year 7 Project Report Project ID: S4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    ; · Underwater unmanned vehicles are used for monitoring habitats in depths exceeding 20 m. By improving

  17. Year 6 Post-Remediation Biomonitoring and Phase II Source Investigation at the United Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, Nancy P.; Evans, Nathan R.

    2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heckathorn Superfund Site in Richmond, California, encompasses the property of the former United Heckathorn pesticide packaging plant and the adjacent waterway, Lauritzen Channel. The site was used from 1945 to 1966 by several operators to produce various agricultural chemicals. The site was placed on the National Priorities List of Superfund sites in 1990, which resulted in the removal of pesticide-contaminated soil from the upland portion of the site and dredging the marine portion of the site. Post-remediation marine monitoring and associated studies conducted through 2002 indicate that the contamination in the channel continues to pose a significant risk to biota and human health. This report documents continued marine monitoring and source investigation studies conducted in 2003.

  18. Extended Operations of the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne Pilot-Scale Compact Reformer Year 6 - Activity 3.2 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almlie, Jay

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. and global demand for hydrogen is large and growing for use in the production of chemicals, materials, foods, pharmaceuticals, and fuels (including some low-carbon biofuels). Conventional hydrogen production technologies are expensive, have sizeable space requirements, and are large carbon dioxide emitters. A novel sorbent-based hydrogen production technology is being developed and advanced toward field demonstration that promises smaller size, greater efficiency, lower costs, and reduced to no net carbon dioxide emissions compared to conventional hydrogen production technology. Development efforts at the pilot scale have addressed materials compatibility, hot-gas filtration, and high-temperature solids transport and metering, among other issues, and have provided the basis for a preliminary process design with associated economics. The process was able to achieve a 93% hydrogen purity on a purge gasfree basis directly out of the pilot unit prior to downstream purification.

  19. Distributed H{sub 2} Supply for Fuel Cell Utility Vehicles Year 6 - Activity 3.5 - Development fo a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almlie, Jay

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has developed a high-pressure hydrogen production system that reforms a liquid organic feedstock and water at operating pressures up to 800 bar (~12,000 psig). The advantages of this system include the elimination of energy-intensive hydrogen compression, a smaller process footprint, and the elimination of gaseous or liquid hydrogen transport. This system could also potentially enable distributed hydrogen production from centralized coal. Processes have been investigated to gasify coal and then convert the syngas into alcohol or alkanes. These alcohols and alkanes could then be easily transported in bulk to distributed high-pressure water-reforming (HPWR)-based systems to deliver hydrogen economically. The intent of this activity was to utilize the EERC’s existing HPWR hydrogen production process, previously designed and constructed in a prior project phase, as a basis to improve operational and production performance of an existing demonstration unit. Parameters to be pursued included higher hydrogen delivery pressure, higher hydrogen production rates, and the ability to refill within a 5-minute time frame.

  20. Hydrogen Production and Purification from Coal and Other Heavy Feedstocks Year 6 - Activity 1.4 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunham, Grant

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., is developing the sour pressure swing adsorption (PSA) technology which can be used to reject acid gas components (hydrogen sulfide [H{sub 2}S] and carbon dioxide [CO{sub 2}]) from sour syngas streams such as coal gasification syngas. In the current work, tests were conducted to investigate the impact of continuous exposure of real sour syngas and dilute levels of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) on the preferred adsorbent of that process. The results show a modest (~10%–15%) decrease in CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity after sour syngas exposure, as well as deposition of metals from carbonyl decomposition. Continuous exposure to HCl and NH{sub 3} yield a higher degree of CO{sub 2} capacity degradation (up to 25%). These tests represent worst-case approaches since the exposure is continuous and the HCl and NH{sub 3} levels are relatively high compare to an industrial sour syngas stream. Long-term PSA tests are needed to unequivocally evaluate the impact of cyclic exposure to these types of streams.

  1. Material Testing of Coated Alloys in a Syngas Combustion Environment Year 6 - Activity 1.13 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, Michael

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modifications were made to the inlet of the existing Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) thermal oxidizer to accommodate side-by-side coupon holders for exposure testing. Two 5-day tests with over 200 hours of total exposure time were completed. The first week of testing was conducted in enriched air-blown mode, with coupon temperatures ranging from 128° to 272°F. Carbonyl sampling was conducted, but it was discovered after the fact that the methodology used was producing very low recoveries of iron and nickel carbonyl. Therefore, the data generated during this week of testing were not considered accurate. The second week of testing was conducted in oxygen-blown mode, with coupon temperatures ranging from 220° to 265°F. Two improved methods were used to measure carbonyl concentration during this week of testing. These methods produced results closer to equilibrium calculations. Since both weeks of testing mostly produced a product gas with approximately 15%–18% carbon monoxide, it was felt that actual carbonyl concentrations for Week 1 should be very similar to those measured during Week 2. The revised carbonyl sampling methodology used during the second week of testing greatly improved the recovery of iron and nickel carbonyl in the sample. Even though the sampling results obtained from the first week were inaccurate, the results from the second week can be used as an estimate for the periods during which the gasifier was operating under similar conditions and producing similar product gas compositions. Specifically, Test Periods 2 and 3 from the first week were similar to the conditions run during the second week. For a product gas containing roughly 15%–18% CO and a coupon temperature of approximately 220°–270°F, the nickel carbonyl concentration should be about 0.05–0.1 ppm and the iron carbonyl concentration should be about 0.1–0.4 ppm. After each week of testing the coupons were recovered from the coupon holder, weighed, and shipped back to Siemens for analysis.

  2. Coal Ash Behavior in Reducing Environments (CABRE) III Year 6 - Activity 1.10 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanislowski, Joshua; Azenkeng, Alexander; McCollor, Donald; Galbreath, Kevin; Jensen, Robert; Lahr, Brent

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has been conducting research on gasification for six decades. One of the objectives of this gasification research has been to maximize carbon conversion and the water–gas shift process for optimal hydrogen production and syngas quality. This research focus and experience were a perfect fit for the National Center for Hydrogen Technology ® (NCHT®) Program at the EERC for improving all aspects of coal gasification, which ultimately aids in the production and purification of hydrogen. A consortia project was developed under the NCHT Program to develop an improved predictive model for ash formation and deposition under the project entitled “Coal Ash Behavior in Reducing Environments (CABRE) III: Development of the CABRE III Model.” The computer-based program is now applicable to the modeling of coal and ash behavior in both entrained-flow and fluidized-bed gasification systems to aid in overall gasification efficiency. This model represents a significant improvement over the CABRE II model and runs on a Microsoft Windows PC platform. The major achievements of the CABRE III model are partitioning of inorganic transformations between various phases for specific gas cleanup equipment; slag property predictions, including standard temperature–viscosity curves and slag flow and thickness; deposition rates in gasification cleanup equipment; provision for composition analysis for all input and output streams across all process equipment, including major elements and trace elements of interest; composition analysis of deposit streams for various deposit zones, including direct condensation on equipment surfaces (Zone A), homogeneous particulate deposition (Zone B), and entrained fly ash deposition (Zone C); and physical removal of ash in cyclones based on D50 cut points. Another new feature of the CABRE III model is a user-friendly interface and detailed reports that are easily exportable into Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, or as pdf files. The user interface provides stepwise guides with built-in checks for efficient entry of required input data on fuels of interest to allow a successful execution of the model. The model was developed with data from several fuels selected by the sponsors, including bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, lignite, and petroleum coke (petcoke). The data from these fuels were obtained using small pilot-scale entrained-flow and fluidized-bed gasifiers at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). The CABRE III model is expected to further advance the knowledge base for the NCHT® Program and, more importantly, allow for prediction of the slagging and fouling characteristics of fuels in reducing environments. The information obtained from this program will potentially also assist in maintaining prolonged gasifier operation free from failure or facilitate troubleshooting to minimize downtime in the event of a problem.

  3. Fluid-Bed Testing of Greatpoint Energy's Direct Oxygen Injection Catalytic Gasification Process for Synthetic Natural Gas and Hydrogen Coproduction Year 6 - Activity 1.14 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, Michael; Henderson, Ann

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The GreatPoint Energy (GPE) concept for producing synthetic natural gas and hydrogen from coal involves the catalytic gasification of coal and carbon. GPE’s technology “refines” coal by employing a novel catalyst to “crack” the carbon bonds and transform the coal into cleanburning methane (natural gas) and hydrogen. The GPE mild “catalytic” gasifier design and operating conditions result in reactor components that are less expensive and produce pipeline-grade methane and relatively high purity hydrogen. The system operates extremely efficiently on very low cost carbon sources such as lignites, subbituminous coals, tar sands, petcoke, and petroleum residual oil. In addition, GPE’s catalytic coal gasification process eliminates troublesome ash removal and slagging problems, reduces maintenance requirements, and increases thermal efficiency, significantly reducing the size of the air separation plant (a system that alone accounts for 20% of the capital cost of most gasification systems) in the catalytic gasification process. Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale gasification facilities were used to demonstrate how coal and catalyst are fed into a fluid-bed reactor with pressurized steam and a small amount of oxygen to “fluidize” the mixture and ensure constant contact between the catalyst and the carbon particles. In this environment, the catalyst facilitates multiple chemical reactions between the carbon and the steam on the surface of the coal. These reactions generate a mixture of predominantly methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. Product gases from the process are sent to a gas-cleaning system where CO{sub 2} and other contaminants are removed. In a full-scale system, catalyst would be recovered from the bottom of the gasifier and recycled back into the fluid-bed reactor. The by-products (such as sulfur, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2}) would be captured and could be sold to the chemicals and petroleum industries, resulting in near-zero hazardous air or water pollution. This technology would also be conducive to the efficient coproduction of methane and hydrogen while also generating a relatively pure CO{sub 2} stream suitable for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) or sequestration. Specific results of bench-scale testing in the 4- to 38-lb/hr range in the EERC pilot system demonstrated high methane yields approaching 15 mol%, with high hydrogen yields approaching 50%. This was compared to an existing catalytic gasification model developed by GPE for its process. Long-term operation was demonstrated on both Powder River Basin subbituminous coal and on petcoke feedstocks utilizing oxygen injection without creating significant bed agglomeration. Carbon conversion was greater than 80% while operating at temperatures less than 1400°F, even with the shorter-than-desired reactor height. Initial designs for the GPE gasification concept called for a height that could not be accommodated by the EERC pilot facility. More gas-phase residence time should allow the syngas to be converted even more to methane. Another goal of producing significant quantities of highly concentrated catalyzed char for catalyst recovery and material handling studies was also successful. A Pd–Cu membrane was also successfully tested and demonstrated to produce 2.54 lb/day of hydrogen permeate, exceeding the desired hydrogen permeate production rate of 2.0 lb/day while being tested on actual coal-derived syngas that had been cleaned with advanced warm-gas cleanup systems. The membranes did not appear to suffer any performance degradation after exposure to the cleaned, warm syngas over a nominal 100-hour test.

  4. Transport Reactor Development Unit Modification to Provide a Syngas Slipstream at Elevated Conditions to Enable Separation of 100 LB/D of Hydrogen by Hydrogen Separation Membranes Year - 6 Activity 1.15 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlasner, Steven

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasification of coal when associated with carbon dioxide capture and sequestration has the potential to provide low-cost as well as low-carbon hydrogen for electric power, fuels or chemicals production. The key element to the success of this concept is inexpensive, effective separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide in synthesis gas. Many studies indicate that membrane technology is one of the most, if not the most, economical means of accomplishing separation; however, the advancement of hydrogen separation membrane technology is hampered by the absence of experience or demonstration that the technology is effective economically and environmentally at larger scales. While encouraging performance has been observed at bench scale (less than 12 lb/d hydrogen), it would be imprudent to pursue a largescale demonstration without testing at least one intermediate scale, such as 100 lb/d hydrogen. Among its many gasifiers, the Energy & Environmental Research Center is home to the transport reactor demonstration unit (TRDU), a unit capable of firing 200—500 lb/hr of coal to produce 400 scfm of synthesis gas containing more than 200 lb/d of hydrogen. The TRDU and associated downstream processing equipment has demonstrated the capability of producing a syngas over a wide range of temperatures and contaminant levels — some of which approximate conditions of commercial-scale gasifiers. Until this activity, however, the maximum pressure of the TRDU’ s product syngas was 120 psig, well below the 400+ psig pressures of existing large gasifiers. This activity installed a high-temperature compressor capable of accepting the range of TRDU products up to 450°F and compressing them to 500 psig, a pressure comparable to some large scale gasifiers. Thus, with heating or cooling downstream of the TRDU compressor, the unit is now able to present a near-raw to clean gasifier synthesis gas containing more than 100 lb/d of hydrogen at up to 500 psig over a wide range of temperatures to hydrogen separation membranes or other equipment for development and demonstration.

  5. Outcomes in Patients Treated With Mastectomy for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, Dawn [Radiation Therapy Program, Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)] [Radiation Therapy Program, Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott, E-mail: styldesl@bccancer.bc.ca [Radiation Therapy Program, Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia (Canada) [Radiation Therapy Program, Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit of the British Columbia Cancer Agency and University of British Columbia, Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Alexander, Cheryl; Speers, Caroline [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit of the British Columbia Cancer Agency and University of British Columbia, Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)] [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit of the British Columbia Cancer Agency and University of British Columbia, Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Truong, Pauline; Nichol, Alan; Wai, Elaine S. [Radiation Therapy Program, Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia (Canada) [Radiation Therapy Program, Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit of the British Columbia Cancer Agency and University of British Columbia, Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To examine, in a large, population-based cohort of women, the risk factors for recurrence after mastectomy for pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and to identify which patients may benefit from postmastectomy radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Data were analyzed for 637 subjects with pure DCIS, diagnosed between January 1990 and December 1999, treated initially with mastectomy. Locoregional relapse (LRR), breast cancer-specific survival, and overall survival were described using the Kaplan-Meier method. Reported risk factors for LRR (age, margins, size, Van Nuys Prognostic Index, grade, necrosis, and histologic subtype) were analyzed by univariate (log-rank) and multivariate (Cox modeling) methods. Results: Median follow-up was 12.0 years. Characteristics of the cohort were median age 55 years, 8.6% aged ?40 years, 30.5% tumors >4 cm, 42.5% grade 3 histology, 37.7% multifocal disease, and 4.9% positive margins. At 10 years, LRR was 1.0%, breast cancer-specific survival was 98.0%, and overall survival was 90.3%. All recurrences (n=12) involved ipsilateral chest wall disease, with the majority being invasive disease (11 of 12). None of the 12 patients with recurrence died of breast cancer; all were successfully salvaged (median follow-up of 4.4 years). Ten-year LRR was higher with age ?40 years (7.5% vs 1.5%; P=.003). Conclusion: Mastectomy provides excellent locoregional control for DCIS. Routine use of postmastectomy radiation therapy is not justified. Young age (?40 years) predicts slightly higher LRR, but possibly owing to the small number of cases with multiple risk factors for relapse, a subgroup with a high risk of LRR (ie, approximately 15%) was not identified.

  6. Renewable Energy Project Development and Financing: Commercial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Most costly for Tribedeveloper to acquire long-term ownership of project (large cash infusion year 7) * Tribedeveloper operates the project * Requires largest equity...

  7. Clean Transportation Program | 919-515-3480 | www.ncsc.ncsu.edu How to tell if your vehicle is E85 compatible...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUEL VEHICLES FORD MOTOR COMPANY CONTINUED Make, Model, & Engine Size Year(s) 8th VIN Character Lincoln.6L 2007-2011 V GENERAL MOTORS *2008 & 2009 FFV models have yellow fuel caps to identify them as E85 Motors CONTINUED Make, Model, & Engine Size Year(s) 8th VIN Character Chevy Malibu 2.4L 2.4L fleet

  8. CEC-300-2007-003-CMF Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), which has a goal of obtaining 20 percent of the state's electricity from renewable resources by the year....................................................................................6 3. CONSUMER EDUCATION

  9. Taking advanTage of a Missed opporTuniTy: Contacting Past Career Fair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holliday, Mark A.

    of the year 7 Jobcat: a User's Guide 8 NEw: FOCUS 2 Online System Briton Bennet Named Co-op/Intern Student of the Year Bennet, a senior professional writing major, wins the 2012 award following an internship

  10. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - NETL CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DESIGNATIO...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    31 May 2011 UND EERC, Grand Forks, North Dakota Material Testing of Coated Alloys in a Syngas Combustion Environment. (Note: This activity is part of a Year 6 Proposal made by the...

  11. DOE/EA-1170 J A

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    25-year, 6-hour storm to an appropriately sized culvert under the 5-01 R o d to daylight on the east side of the road in an existing swale. 2.2 The No Action Alternative of...

  12. LANL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lost during the rise-240 gigatons, or roughly the amount that melts from the entire Greenland ice sheet each year. 6 1663 January 2015 At the same time, the Colorado River-which...

  13. Asymmetric growth in micelles containing oil Peter H. Nelson,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Peter Hugo

    applications range from drug delivery to providing understanding of basic bio- logical processes. Recently was not in- vestigated. Extensive equilibrium studies of oil­water­surfactant systems have been conducted by Larson in recent years8­12 using a lattice model. The rich phase behavior of mainly ordered condensed

  14. Clean Transportation Program | 919-515-3480 | www.ncsc.ncsu.edu How to tell if your vehicle is E85 compatible...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUEL VEHICLES FORD MOTOR COMPANY CONTINUED Make, Model, & Engine Size Year(s) 8th VIN Character Mercury Sable, 3.0L 2002-2004 2 Mercury Grand Marquis (2-valve), 4.6L 2007-2011 V GENERAL MOTORS *2008 & 2009 VEHICLES GENERAL MOTORS CONTINUED *2008 & 2009 FFV models have yellow fuel caps to identify them as E85

  15. Clean Transportation Program | 919-515-3480 | www.ncsc.ncsu.edu How to tell if your vehicle is E85 compatible...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .cleantransportation.org #12;E85 CAPABLE FLEX FUEL VEHICLES General Motors CONTINUED Make, Model, & Engine Size Year(s) 8th VIN Marquis (2-valve), 4.6L 2007-2011 V GENERAL MOTORS *2008 & 2009 FFV models have yellow fuel caps compatible... Check to see if your vehicle is listed below. Be certain to check the ENGINE SIZE

  16. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timeframe10-Year Study Timeframe Focus: Common Case "TEPPC 2022 Common Case represents an "expected" future 10-year studies" Primarily Wind and Gas Added in Next 10-Years 8 #12;2/11/2014 5 The Common Case and questions 2 #12;2/11/2014 2 2011 2012 Biennial study cycle that culminates in a transmission plan 2011 2012

  17. Parallel implementation and one year experiments with the Danish Euleian Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimov, Ivan

    -page: http://www.dmu.dk/AtmosphericEnvironment Abstract. Large scale air pollution models are powerful tools for air pollution modelling has been studied for years [8, 15]. An air pollution model is generally of chemical species (pollutants and other components of the air that interact with the pollutants) in a large

  18. Sample Interview Questions Questions about Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biasutti, Michela

    significant piece of scholarship that you have read in the last year? 8. What is the cutting edge in your funds. How do you feel about that as a limiting factor? (Will you continue to go and pay your own way

  19. By Daniel L. Edelstein Mine production of recoverable copper in the United States United States retained its position as both the largest producer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in During the year, 8 primary and 4 secondary smelters, 8 1995, after having fallen by more than 300, copper availability remained tight and average annual smelter and an electrolytic refinery in Michigan in 1995, because capacity expansion at smelter/refinery, but contr

  20. Memorandum of Understanding between the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doering, Tamara

    Memorandum of Understanding between the Ministry of Education, Republic of China (Taiwan. Joint selection of scholars will be made by MOE and WUSTL before the end of March each year. 8) Costs and administration The total costs of each scholarship will be divided in the ratio 1:1 between MOE and WUSTL. MOE

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF WILMINGTON AND NEW HANOVER COUNTY WATERSHEDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    , total nitrogen, orthophosphate and total phosphorus. Several water quality parameters indicatedENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF WILMINGTON AND NEW HANOVER COUNTY WATERSHEDS 2004-2005 by Michael A Hanover County Tidal Creeks Project and Year 7 of the Wilmington Watersheds Project. Water quality data

  2. OxCORT v4 Quick Guide Tutorial Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    the appropriate option from the drop-down. 6. Select the appropriate Term and Year. 7. Enter the usernames into four further topics: · Search for reports pg 2 · To view or edit a report pg 2 · To complete a Tutorial will allow you to search for, view, edit, submit, delete, clone, print, email from, and export data from both

  3. Smart-grid Electricity Allocation via Strip Packing with Slicing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Timothy M.

    ,biedl,tmchan,alubiw,keshav,vpathak}@uwaterloo.ca 2 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA elyot@mit.edu 3 University of Guelph, Guelph in Massachusetts was used less than 88 hours per year [7]. Reducing the infrastructure size is not practical since that future smart grids would obtain (at each substation) daily "demand schedules" for appliance use from

  4. Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell System Break-Out Session

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W Residential/CHP 1 ­ 10 kW Reversible FC TBD APU 20 kW #12;Near Term Fuel Cell Requirements (3-5 years (7-12 years) · Hydrogen fuel · Transportation & Residential/CHP application · 1 ­ 100 kW · Durability

  5. Heart. Author manuscript Cardiorespiratory risk factors as predictors of 40-year mortality in women

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Heart. Author manuscript Page /1 13 Cardiorespiratory risk factors as predictors of 40-year.7) mortality, while associations between 2-hour­ ­ glucose and all-cause 1.15 (1.1 1.2), coronary heart disease ; Cause of Death ; Cohort Studies ; Female ; Heart Diseases ; mortality ; physiopathology ; Humans ; Male

  6. COPPER--1998 22.1 By Daniel L. Edelstein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from 93% to 90%, the lowest level since 1995. During the year, 7 primary and 3 secondary smelters, 8 mine and one secondary smelter and associated electrolytic refinery had closed, and closure of a primary smelter in the first quarter of 1999 had been announced. Startup plans for several electrowinning

  7. Experience Ancient Egypt Uncover the secrets of the ancient world...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Travis, Adrian

    Experience Ancient Egypt Uncover the secrets of the ancient world... A day event for Children in Care in school years 7 - 9 Discover the secrets of Ancient Egypt at this FREE taster day. Explore the incredible Ancient Egypt Gallery at the Fitzwilliam Museum and create some Egyptian artwork. Plus enjoy

  8. Apparent and inherent optical properties of turbid estuarine waters: measurements, empirical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    constituents). Such data could significantly limit the number of costly field campaigns necessary to estab zones that are directly affected by human activities (global warming, pollution, dredg- ing of at least several years).6 To develop an operational use of ocean color remote-sensing data in turbid waters

  9. PROJECT INFORMATION Project Number: S61268-583

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    ANALYSIS Narrative summary Expected results Performance measurement Assumptions and level of risk Goal and decision-makers with tools for developing IWRM policies in three DC's (Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica) by Year 6, Grenada and Guyana are committed to achieving and sustaining project results. Level of Risk: Low 2

  10. Rhaglen Ynni Gwynt Wind Energy Programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    power the average Welsh household electricity consumption of over 448,000 homes each year. The Welsh to make approximately 160 cups of tea per day per person." The aim of the Welsh Government is to have 4 (commercial scale) turbine, on a reasonable site, will generate 6.5 million units of electricity each year (6

  11. University of Michigan College of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    publication 2006-2007 Michigan Entrepreneur Year-in-Review. Also in the picture, which was taken..... 4 Jenkins Alumni of Year ...... 6 Zurbuchen Directing CEP.. 9 Space Comic Books......... 13 First:// www.bayweekly.com/year07/issuexv40/ leadxv40_2.html. SPRL Director and AOSS Professor Christopher Ruf

  12. Computational Science and Engineering Field of Specialisation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang, Annika

    Computational Science and Engineering Field of Specialisation: Chemistry and Biology Contact Person: the tradeoff · Computing power: Moore's law 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 year 6 9 12 log[flop] IBM 7090 CDC 6000 of success e.g. modeling in industry: drug design, protein engineering, stock market predictions (banks

  13. Engi 9614: Renewable Energy and Resource Conservation, Assignment #1, Oct. 4th 2013, "Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Cynthia

    ) 4. The need for air conditioning 5. Wadis are low lying areas or channels that fill with water in the rainy season but are dry the rest of the year 6. Battery efficiency, cycle life, capital cost, operating and maintenance costs, disposal costs, refurbishment costs, environmental costs 7. It is how much of the battery

  14. A set of Formulae and Tables for the Actuarial Examinations is required.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorov, Nikita

    Markov model with constant transition rates is used to model three states of a pension scheme. The transition rates are: Active to Retired: 0.03 Active to Dead: 0.02 No other states or transitions of death from the active state in one year. [6 marks] (b) The employer wishes to grant a benefit of a whole

  15. NATIONAL CENTER FOR GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION AND ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    played a key role in the award of funding for the Alexandria Digital Library at UC Santa Barbara, one NATIONAL CENTER FOR GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION AND ANALYSIS ANNUAL REPORT Year 6 (December 1, 1993 University of Maine 14 May 1995 #12; NATIONAL CENTER FOR GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION AND ANALYSIS ANNUAL REPORT

  16. The Future of Transportation Networks and Their

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    invest in? How to Prosper in the Coming Collapse of the Gas Tax · The rising price of gasoline along,000,000 40,000,000 50,000,000 60,000,000 70,000,000 80,000,000 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 Year.8 0.9 1 1800 1820 1840 1860 1880 1900 1920 1940 1960 1980 2000 Year Proportion of Maximum Extent

  17. New Houston NOx Rules: Implications and Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cascone, R.

    Capex $MM NOx Reduction Tons/yr Net Cost NPV10 $MM Case 1 4 50 3.6 a. Defer 1 year 4.2 loss due to delay 0.6 b. Defer 2 years 5.4 loss due to delay 1.7 c. Defer 3 years 8.5 loss due to delay 4.8 Case 2 35 750 31.8 a. Defer 1 year 42...

  18. MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES AND FOOD-I FIS~ERIEBL\\BRARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of pack-ice in the ?cur year8 1957 to 1960. In 1957 there wse conalderable pack-ice snd in 1958 very in f i f t y yeam. Many of the ioeberga ara brought aouth embedded in the pack-ice. When the pack bre Bo. I B E I F O U B D L A B D F I S H I I G 1. Introduction 2. Hydrography and Ice 3 Cod - Stoc

  19. New retaining wall design criteria based on lateral earth pressure measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, William Vincent

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on full scale retaining walls. The first year ( 3 ) was devoted to selecting earth pressure cells which would provide both accuracy and long term reliability. Nine cell types were considered. Four types were field tested. Two types, Terra Tec... and Geonor, were selected for installa- tion in the cantilever test wall during the second year ( 4 ) of the study. Terra Tec cells were selected for installation in the precast panel wall during the third year ( 7 ) of the study. The instrumenta- tion...

  20. Improved FGD dewatering process cuts solid wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moer, C.; Fernandez, J.; Carraro, B. [Duke Energy (United States)

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2007, Duke Energy's W.H. Zimmer Station set out to advance the overall performance of its flue gas desulfurization (FGD) dewatering process. The plant implemented a variety of measures, including upgrading water-solids separation, improving polymer program effectiveness and reliability, optimizing treatment costs, reducing solid waste sent to the landfill, decreasing labor requirements, and maintaining septic-free conditions in clarifiers. The changes succeeded in greatly reducing solid waste generation and achieving total annual savings of over half a million dollars per year. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Managing Energy in San Antonio Public Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    al R etr ofi ts: Im pac t Pro jec ts c om ple ted /un der wa y ( 5 y ear s) Total Projects 398 Total Facility Sites Improved 180 Capital Investment $36,127,097 Avoided Cost, $/yr $4,219,509 Rebates Received $5,427,701 Simple Payback, years 8... PC Energy Mgmnt • Software solution • 6,500 devices • $200K annual savings Pool Pump Control • Stop over-circulating • 24 Public Pools • $70K annual savings LED Street Lighting • Replace high wattage fixt. • 25,000 fixtures • $, kWh annually Chillers...

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR 2013

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR 20138

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR 201387

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR558

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR558563

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8

  9. North Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousandWithdrawals (MillionNine8 2.415 -CubicYear8 1,029

  10. North Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousandWithdrawals (MillionNine8 2.415 -CubicYear8

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR4 YEAR7

  12. Origin State Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand Cubic Feet) DecadeYear7. Estimated truck

  13. Origin State Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand Cubic Feet) DecadeYear7. Estimated truck8.

  14. Origin State Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand Cubic Feet) DecadeYear7. Estimated

  15. Origin State Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand Cubic Feet) DecadeYear7. Estimated4.

  16. Origin State Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand Cubic Feet) DecadeYear7. Estimated4.5.

  17. Origin State Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand Cubic Feet) DecadeYear7. Estimated4.5.6.

  18. Origin State Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand Cubic Feet) DecadeYear7.

  19. Origin State Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand Cubic Feet) DecadeYear7.8. Estimated rail

  20. Origin State Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Alabama

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand Cubic Feet) DecadeYear7.8. Estimated

  1. Origin State Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Alabama

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand Cubic Feet) DecadeYear7.8. EstimatedState

  2. Questions about Groundwater Conservation Districts in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Silvy, Valeen

    2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    legal advice, please consult with an attorney. Contents 1 Introduction 1 Water use in Texas 2 Groundwater 2 Surface water 5 Movement of groundwater in aquifers 5 Are all Texas aquifers alike? 5 How much water do Texas aquifers provide each year? 6 How... does water get into an aquifer? How is an aquifer replenished? 7 Does water discharge from an aquifer naturally? 7 If aquifers recharge, why is there a problem with pumping? 7 What is a cone of depression? 7 What is well interference? 8 What is aquifer...

  3. The Food Supply of Texas Rural Families.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitacre, Jessie (Jessie Opal)

    1943-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Percent, families owning. .. 46 Range, n~~niber owned. ... 1-100 Average nlirnb~r owned. .. 13.1 Poultry Percentfamilie~eatinglfryers 96 Rang0 tiumber fryers/year 6-180 Av, no. frgers/fan~ily/yr. . Y I'erceut fami!ies entirip hens 1 F Range number... than of those butchered by white families. Fryers were eaten by the great majority of families. Owners and renters had fairly similar records for the average number of fryers eaten during the year, owner groups consuming from 35 to 72 fryers, renter...

  4. Office of Secure Transportation Activities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartmentGas and Oil ResearchEnergy Office of Oil2 -One-Year6th, 2012

  5. Alaska Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6

  6. Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreases (Billion CubicYearDecadeYear6,393 6,810

  7. Utah Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreases (Billion CubicYearDecadeYear6,393

  8. Utah Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreases (Billion CubicYearDecadeYear6,393Year

  9. Natural Gas Delivered to Industrial Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Million Cubic(Million Cubic Feet) Year6,167,371

  10. 6 New Things Happening with Biofuels | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment ofAugustDecember8th MeetingAllocation50 Years6 New

  11. Petroleum marketing monthly: September 1996, with data for June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. Detailed statistics for crude oil, including the price of imported crude oil by country of origin, by gravity, and by crude stream. To aid the reader in determining the market changes, the majority of the tables show data for the report month and previous months for the current year, and the report month for the previous year. 7 figs., 50 tabs.

  12. Simulations of Design Modifications in Military Health Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiss, Christopher William

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    the military population. Civilian medical 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 50+ 40-49 30-39 20-29 1-19 N u m b e r o f Faci litie s Age (years) 6 leadership, such as former Assistant Secretaries of Defense for Health Affairs, Dr. W... --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ENGLISH MULTIPLIED BY GIVES METRIC MULTIPLIED BY GIVES ENGLISH 1 1.000000 1.000000 2 1.000000 1.000000 3 BTU 0.293000 WH 3.412969 BTU 4 BTU/HR 0.293000 WATT 3.412969 BTU/HR 5 BTU/LB-F 4183.830078 J/KG-K 0.000239 BTU/LB-F 6 BTU/HR-SQFT-F 5.678260 W/M2-K 0...

  13. CRADA Final Report: Ionically Conductive Membranes Oxygen Separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visco, Steven J.

    2001-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientists at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in a collaborative effort with Praxair Corporation developed a bench-top oxygen separation unit capable of producing ultra-high purity oxygen from air. The device is based on thin-film electrolyte technology developed at LBNL as part of a solid oxide fuel cell program. The two teams first demonstrated the concept using planar ceramic disks followed by the development of tubular ceramic structures for the bench-top unit. The highly successful CRADA met all technical milestones on time and on budget. Due to the success of this program the industrial partner and the team at LBNL submitted a grant proposal for further development of the unit to the Advanced Technology Program administered by the National Institute of Standar~s. This proposal was selected for funding, and now the two teams are developing a precommercial oxygen separation unit under a 3-year, $6 million dollar program.

  14. Effects of Multiple Stressors on Eelgrass Restoration Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Williams, Greg D.; Southard, John A.; Blanton, Susan L.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Droscher, Toni

    2001-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We have been monitoring several restored eelgrass meadows in Puget Sound and in the Northwest, and have found variable success in terms of the systems achieving identified goals. The monitoring has shown (1) early transplant survival is moderate, and no greater than 80% under optimal circumstances; (2) spread of eelgrass transplants is slow, and under optimal (mesocosm) conditions may take 2 years to occur; (3) spread may depend on below-ground organic matter and processes, as well as on grazers and predators; (4) as the meadow matures, plant size may increase as density decreases, indicating that measures in addition to shoot density should be used; (5) higher than normal summer temperatures, seaweed blooms, bioturbator activity, propeller scars, anchor chain drag, and boat wakes may act as cumulative multiple stressors of eelgrass transplants; (6) sites with marginal conditions for eelgrass may support eelgrass in''good'' years but may be unsuitable during other years; (7) site assessments and experimental plantings are useful in evaluating a site prior to full transplanting; (8) monitoring should be conducted for at least 5 years following planting to understand long-term sustainability of the system; and, (9) reference sites are critical to interpreting results.

  15. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Marathon Battery Company site, Cold Spring, Putnam County, New York, September 1986. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Marathon Battery Company (MBC) site, located in the Village of Gold Spring, Putnam County, NY, has two components: the East Foundry Cove Marsh (EFCM), and Constitution Marsh. The site began as a battery-manufacturing plant in 1952, producing military and commercial batteries for a period of 27 years. Approximately 50,000 kg of cadmium were discharged into the EFCM as a result of MBC's wastewater-treatment system. In 1965 the New York State Department of Health ordered the plant to disconnect its industrial discharge from the Village's sanitary sewer upon concluding that the battery plant's process effluent could not be managed by a new proposed sewage-treatment system. The primary contaminants of concern include: cadmium, cobalt, and nickel. The remedial action for the EFCM component of the site includes hydraulic dredging of sediments; sediment chemical fixation; dredging, water treatment and disposal, marsh restoration, and long-term monitoring. The estimated capital cost for both remedial components is $16,640,000 with OandM costs of $3,530,000 for the first year; $180,000 for years 2-5; and $127,000 for years 6-30.

  16. Applying for and using CMAQ funds: Putting the pieces together. A Clean Cities guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide provides the basic concepts to aid in an alternative fuel vehicle market development program developing an application for Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program funding. The US Department of Energy`s Clean Cities Program is an aggressive, forward-thinking alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) market development program. The stakeholders in any Clean Cities Program subscribe to the common philosophy that, through participation in a team-oriented coalition, steady progress can be made toward achieving the critical mass necessary to propel the AFV market into the next century. An important component in the successful implementation of Clean Cities Program objectives is obtaining and directing funding to the capital-intensive AFV market development outside of the resources currently offered by the Department of Energy. Several state and local funding sources have been used over the past decade, including Petroleum Violation Escrow funds, vehicle registration fees, and state bond programs. However, federal funding is available and can be tapped to implement AFV market development programs across the nation. Historically, opportunities to use federal funding for AFV projects have been limited; however, the one remaining federal program that must be tapped into by Clean Cities Programs is the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program. CMAQ is a 6-year, $6 billion federal program formed by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA).

  17. Final Report on the Operation and Maintenance Improvement Program for Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen Gilbert E.; Kearney, David W.; Kolb, Gregory J.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of a six-year, $6.3 million project to reduce operation and maintenance (O&M) costs at power plants employing concentrating solar power (CSP) technology. Sandia National Laboratories teamed with KJC Operating Company to implement the O&M Improvement Program. O&M technologies developed during the course of the program were demonstrated at the 150-MW Kramer Junction solar power park located in Boron, California. Improvements were made in the following areas: (a) efficiency of solar energy collection, (b) O&M information management, (c) reliability of solar field flow loop hardware, (d) plant operating strategy, and (e) cost reduction associated with environmental issues. A 37% reduction in annual O&M costs was achieved. Based on the lessons learned, an optimum solar- field O&M plan for future CSP plants is presented. Parabolic trough solar technology is employed at Kramer Junction. However, many of the O&M improvements described in the report are also applicable to CSP plants based on solar power tower or dish/engine concepts.

  18. Search for Early Gamma-ray Production in Supernovae Located in a Dense Circumstellar Medium with the Fermi LAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supernovae (SNe) exploding in a dense circumstellar medium (CSM) are hypothesized to accelerate cosmic rays in collisionless shocks and emit GeV gamma rays and TeV neutrinos on a time scale of several months. We perform the first systematic search for gamma-ray emission in Fermi LAT data in the energy range from 100 MeV to 300 GeV from the ensemble of 147 SNe Type IIn exploding in dense CSM. We search for a gamma-ray excess at each SNe location in a one year time window. In order to enhance a possible weak signal, we simultaneously study the closest and optically brightest sources of our sample in a joint-likelihood analysis in three different time windows (1 year, 6 months and 3 months). For the most promising source of the sample, SN 2010jl (PTF10aaxf), we repeat the analysis with an extended time window lasting 4.5 years. We do not find a significant excess in gamma rays for any individual source nor for the combined sources and provide model-independent flux upper limits for both cases. In addition, we de...

  19. Nuclear Winter: The implications for civil defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, C.V.; Perry, A.M.; Hobbs, B.F.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ''Nuclear Winter'' is the term given to hypothesized cooling in the northern hemisphere following a nuclear war due to injection of smoke from burning cities into the atmosphere. The voluminous literature on this subject produced since the original paper in 1983 by Turco, Toon, Ackerman, Pollack, and Sagen (TTAPS) has been reviewed. The widespread use of 3-dimensional global circulation models have resulted in reduced estimates of cooling; 15 to 25/sup 0/C for a summer war and a few degrees for a winter war. More serious may be the possibility of suppression of convective precipitation by the altered temperature profiles in the atmosphere. However, very large uncertainties remain in input parameters, the models, and the results of calculations. We believe the state of knowledge about nuclear winter is sufficiently developed to conclude: Neither cold nor drought are likely to be direct threats to human survival for populations with the wherewithal to survive normal January temperatures; The principal threat from nuclear winter is to food production, and could present problems to third parties without food reserves; and Loss of a crop year is neither a new nor unexpected threat from nuclear war to the US and the Soviet Union. Both have at least a year's food reserve at all times. Both face formidable organizational problems in distributing their reserves in a war-damaged environment. The consequences of nuclear winter could be expected to fall more heavily on the Soviet Union than the US due to its higher latitude and less productive agriculture. This may be especially true if disturbances of rainfall amounts and distribution persist for more than a year. 6 refs.

  20. DEMONSTRATION OF LEACHXS/ORCHESTRA CAPABILITIES BY SIMULATING CONSTITUENT RELEASE FROM A CEMENTITIOUS WASTE FORM IN A REINFORCED CONCRETE VAULT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Meeussen, J.; Sloot, H.

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the work described in this report is to demonstrate the capabilities of the current version of LeachXS{trademark}/ORCHESTRA for simulating chemical behavior and constituent release processes in a range of applications that are relevant to the CBP. This report illustrates the use of LeachXS{trademark}/ORCHESTRA for the following applications: (1) Comparing model and experimental results for leaching tests for a range of cementitious materials including cement mortars, grout, stabilized waste, and concrete. The leaching test data includes liquid-solid partitioning as a function of pH and release rates based on laboratory column, monolith, and field testing. (2) Modeling chemical speciation of constituents in cementitious materials, including liquid-solid partitioning and release rates. (3) Evaluating uncertainty in model predictions based on uncertainty in underlying composition, thermodynamic, and transport characteristics. (4) Generating predominance diagrams to evaluate predicted chemical changes as a result of material aging using the example of exposure to atmospheric conditions. (5) Modeling coupled geochemical speciation and diffusion in a three layer system consisting of a layer of Saltstone, a concrete barrier, and a layer of soil in contact with air. The simulations show developing concentration fronts over a time period of 1000 years. (6) Modeling sulfate attack and cracking due to ettringite formation. A detailed example for this case is provided in a separate article by the authors (Sarkar et al. 2010). Finally, based on the computed results, the sensitive input parameters for this type of modeling are identified and discussed. The chemical speciation behavior of substances is calculated for a batch system and also in combination with transport and within a three layer system. This includes release from a barrier to the surrounding soil as a function of time. As input for the simulations, the physical and chemical properties of the materials are used. The test cases used in this demonstration are taken from Reference Cases for Use in the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (Langton et al. 2009). Before it is possible to model the release of substances from stabilized waste or radioactive grout through a cement barrier into the engineered soil barrier or natural soil, the relevant characteristics of such materials must be known. Additional chemical characteristics are needed for mechanistic modeling to be undertaken, not just the physical properties relevant for modeling of transport. The minimum required properties for modeling are given in Section 5.0, 'Modeling the chemical speciation of a material'.

  1. Plutonium-238 alpha-decay damage study of the ceramic waste form.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, S M [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415; Barber, T L [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415; Cummings, D G [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415; DiSanto, T [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415; Esh, D W [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001; Giglio, J J [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415; Goff, K M [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415; Johnson, S G [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415; Kennedy, J R [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415; Jue, J-F [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415; Noy, M [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415; O'Holleran, T P [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415; Sinkler, W [UOP LLC, 25 E Algonquin Road, Des Plaines, IL 60017

    2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An accelerated alpha-decay damage study of a glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form has recently been completed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the physical and chemical durability of the waste form after significant exposure to alpha decay. This accelerated alpha-decay study was performed by doping the ceramic waste form with {sup 238}Pu which has a much greater specific activity than {sup 239}Pu that is normally present in the waste form. The alpha-decay dose at the end of the four year study was approximately 1 x 10{sup 18} alpha-decays/gram of material. An equivalent time period for a similar dose of {sup 239}Pu would require approximately 1100 years. After four years of exposure to {sup 238}Pu alpha decay, the investigation observed little change to the physical or chemical durability of the ceramic waste form (CWF). Specifically, the {sup 238}Pu-loaded CWF maintained it's physical integrity, namely that the density remained constant and no cracking or phase de-bonding was observed. The materials chemical durability and phase stability also did not change significantly over the duration of the study. The only significant measured change was an increase of the unit-cell lattice parameters of the plutonium oxide and sodalite phases of the material and an increase in the release of salt components and plutonium of the waste form during leaching tests, but, as mentioned, these did not lead to any overall loss of waste form durability. The principal findings from this study are: (1) {sup 238}Pu-loaded CWF is similar in microstructure and phase composition to referenced waste form. (2) Pu was observed primarily as oxide comprised of aggregates of nano crystals with aggregates ranging in size from submicron to twenty microns in diameter. (3) Pu phases were primarily found in the intergranular glassy regions. (4) PuO phase shows expected unit cell volume expansion due to alpha decay damage of approximately 0.7%, and the sodalite phase unit cell volume has expanded slightly by 0.3% again, presumably due to alpha-decay damage. (5) No bulk sample swelling was observed. (6) No amorphization of sodalite or actinide bearing phases was observed after four years of alpha-decay damage. (7) No microcracks or phase de-bonding were observed in waste form samples aged for four years. (8) In some areas of the {sup 238}Pu doped ceramic waste form material bubbles and voids were found. Bubbles and voids with similar size and density were also found in ceramic waste form samples without actinide. These bubbles and voids are interpreted as pre-existing defects. However, some contribution to these bubbles and voids from helium gas can not be ruled out. (9) Chemical durability of {sup 238}Pu CWF has not changed significantly after four years of alpha-decay exposure except for an increase in the release of salt components and Pu. Still, the plutonium release from CWF is very low at less than 0.005 g/m{sup 2}.

  2. Multiyear Program Plan: Reducing Friction and Wear in Heavy Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.R. Fessler; G.R. Fenske

    1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    As described in its multiyear program plan for 1998-2000, the Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) envisions the development of a fuel-flexible, energy-efficient, near-zero-emissions, heavy-duty U.S. diesel engine technology devolving into all truck classes as a real and viable strategy for reducing energy requirements for commercial transport services and the rapidly growing multipurpose vehicle market (pickups, vans, and sport utility vehicles). Implementation of the OHVT program plan will have significant national benefits in energy savings, cleaner air, more jobs, and increased gross domestic product (GDP). Successful implementation will reduce the petroleum consumption of Class 1-8 trucks by 1.4 million barrels of oil per day by 2020 and over 1.8 million by 2030, amounting to a reduction in highway petroleum consumption of 13.2% and 18.6%, respectively. All types of regulated emissions will be reduced, that is, 20% drop in PM10 emissions (41,000 metric tons per year) by 203 0, 17% reduction in CO2 greenhouse gases (205 million metric tons per year), 7% reduction in NOx, 20% reduction in NMHC, and 30% reduction in CO. An increase of 15,000 jobs by 2020 is expected, as is an increase of $24 billion in GDP. The strategy of OHVT is to focus primarily on the diesel engine since it has numerous advantages. It has the highest efficiency of any engine today, 45% versus 30% for production gasoline engines; and it can be made more efficient at least to 55% and possibly up to 63%. It is the engine of choice for heavy vehicles (trucks), because it offers power, efficiency, durability, and reliability and is used extensively in rail, marine, and off-road applications. Its emission can be ultra-low to near zero, and the production infrastructure is already in place. The primary goals of OHVT are as follows: (1) Develop by 2002 the diesel-engine enabling technologies to support large-scale industry dieselization of light trucks, achieving a 35% fuel efficiency improvement over equivalent gasoline-fueled trucks. (2) Develop by 2004 the enabling technology for a Class 7-8 truck with a fuel efficiency of 10 mpg (at 65 mph) that will meet prevailing emission standards, using either diesel or a liquid alternative fuel. (3) Develop by 2006 diesel engines with fuel flexibility and a thermal efficiency of 55% with liquid alternative fuels, and a thermal efficiency of 55% with dedicated gaseous fuels. (4) Develop a methodology for analyzing and evaluating the operation of a heavy vehicle as an integrated system, considering such factors as engine efficiency; emissions; rolling resistance; aerodynamic drag; friction, wear, and lubrication effects; auxiliary power units; material substitutions for reducing weight; and other sources of parasitic energy losses. Overarching these considerations is the need to preserve system functionality, cost, competitiveness, reliability, durability, and safety.

  3. Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Zhou, Nan; Fuqiu , Zhou; Huawen, Xiong; Xuemin, Zeng; Lan, Wang

    2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool (BEST) Cement is a process-based tool based on commercially available efficiency technologies used anywhere in the world applicable to the cement industry. This version has been designed for use in China. No actual cement facility with every single efficiency measure included in the benchmark will likely exist; however, the benchmark sets a reasonable standard by which to compare for plants striving to be the best. The energy consumption of the benchmark facility differs due to differences in processing at a given cement facility. The tool accounts for most of these variables and allows the user to adapt the model to operational variables specific for his/her cement facility. Figure 1 shows the boundaries included in a plant modeled by BEST Cement. In order to model the benchmark, i.e., the most energy efficient cement facility, so that it represents a facility similar to the user's cement facility, the user is first required to input production variables in the input sheet (see Section 6 for more information on how to input variables). These variables allow the tool to estimate a benchmark facility that is similar to the user's cement plant, giving a better picture of the potential for that particular facility, rather than benchmarking against a generic one. The input variables required include the following: (1) the amount of raw materials used in tonnes per year (limestone, gypsum, clay minerals, iron ore, blast furnace slag, fly ash, slag from other industries, natural pozzolans, limestone powder (used post-clinker stage), municipal wastes and others); the amount of raw materials that are preblended (prehomogenized and proportioned) and crushed (in tonnes per year); (2) the amount of additives that are dried and ground (in tonnes per year); (3) the production of clinker (in tonnes per year) from each kiln by kiln type; (4) the amount of raw materials, coal and clinker that is ground by mill type (in tonnes per year); (5) the amount of production of cement by type and grade (in tonnes per year); (6) the electricity generated onsite; and, (7) the energy used by fuel type; and, the amount (in RMB per year) spent on energy. The tool offers the user the opportunity to do a quick assessment or a more detailed assessment--this choice will determine the level of detail of the energy input. The detailed assessment will require energy data for each stage of production while the quick assessment will require only total energy used at the entire facility (see Section 6 for more details on quick versus detailed assessments). The benchmarking tool provides two benchmarks--one for Chinese best practices and one for international best practices. Section 2 describes the differences between these two and how each benchmark was calculated. The tool also asks for a target input by the user for the user to set goals for the facility.

  4. Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modro, S.M.; Fisher, J.E.; Weaver, K.D.; Reyes, J.N.; Groome, J.T.; Babka, P.; Carlson, T.M.

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) project was conducted under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The primary project objectives were to develop the conceptual design for a safe and economic small, natural circulation light water reactor, to address the economic and safety attributes of the concept, and to demonstrate the technical feasibility by testing in an integral test facility. This report presents the results of the project. After an initial exploratory and evolutionary process, as documented in the October 2000 report, the project focused on developing a modular reactor design that consists of a self-contained assembly with a reactor vessel, steam generators, and containment. These modular units would be manufactured at a single centralized facility, transported by rail, road, and/or ship, and installed as a series of self-contained units. This approach also allows for staged construction of an NPP and ''pull and replace'' refueling and maintenance during each five-year refueling cycle. Development of the baseline design concept has been sufficiently completed to determine that it complies with the safety requirements and criteria, and satisfies the major goals already noted. The more significant features of the baseline single-unit design concept include: (1) Thermal Power--150 MWt; (2) Net Electrical Output--35 MWe; (3) Steam Generator Type--Vertical, helical tubes; (4) Fuel UO{sub 2}, 8% enriched; (5) Refueling Intervals--5 years; (6) Life-Cycle--60 years. The economic performance was assessed by designing a power plant with an electric generation capacity in the range of current and advanced evolutionary systems. This approach allows for direct comparison of economic performance and forms a basis for further evaluation, economic and technical, of the proposed design and for the design evolution towards a more cost competitive concept. Applications such as cogeneration, water desalination or district heating were not addressed directly in the economic analyses since these depend more on local conditions, demand and economy and can not be easily generalized. Current economic performance experience and available cost data were used. The preliminary cost estimate, based on a concept that could be deployed in less than a decade, is: (1) Net Electrical Output--1050 MWe; (2) Net Station Efficiency--23%; (3) Number of Power Units--30; (4) Nominal Plant Capacity Factor--95%; (5) Total capital cost--$1241/kWe; and (6) Total busbar cost--3.4 cents/kWh. The project includes a testing program that has been conducted at Oregon State University (OSU). The test facility is a 1/3-height and 1/254.7 volume scaled design that will operate at full system pressure and temperature, and will be capable of operation at 600 kW. The design and construction of the facility have been completed. Testing is scheduled to begin in October 2002. The MASLWR conceptual design is simple, safe, and economical. It operates at NSSS parameters much lower than for a typical PWR plant, and has a much simplified power generation system. The individual reactor modules can be operated as on/off units, thereby limiting operational transients to startup and shutdown. In addition, a plant can be built in increments that match demand increases. The ''pull and replace'' concept offers automation of refueling and maintenance activities. Performing refueling in a single location improves proliferation resistance and eliminates the threat of diversion. Design certification based on testing is simplified because of the relatively low cost of a full-scale prototype facility. The overall conclusion is that while the efficiency of the power generation unit is much lower (23% versus 30%), the reduction in capital cost due to simplification of design more than makes up for the increased cost of nuclear fuel. The design concept complies with the safety requirements and criteria. It also satisfies the goals for modularity, standard plant design, certification before construction, c