Sample records for year-3 year-4 year-5

  1. BSc Computing Year 3 Graphics Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Gary

    BSc Computing Year 3 Graphics Programming 3D Maze Room Assignment Two by Richard M. Mann: 20032144 .................................................................................7 Figure 4: Controls Key-Map ......................................................................8

  2. YEAR4YEAR3YEAR2YEAR1 In 1997, UBC became Canada's first university to develop a sustainability policy. UBC's Sustainability Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    . Jill takes Earth and Ocean Sciences 110 and learns about climate change by studying natural processes Sciences Building, which is LEED (Leadership in Energy and Design) Gold certified. Curious about green buildings, she reads www.sustain. ubc.ca/greenbuilding.html and tracks energy use of select buildings

  3. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 4,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 4, November 2002 Gary A Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 4 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The University of Denver #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 4 2 by 5 years

  4. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Denver Area: Year 5,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Denver Area: Year 5, January 2005 Gary A, Suite 140 Alpharetta, Georgia 30022 Contract No. E-23-9 #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile campaigns.13 #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Denver Area: Year 5 2 INTRODUCTION

  5. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 5,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 5, November 2004 Gary A, Suite 140 Alpharetta, Georgia 30022 Contract No. E-23-9 #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile campaigns.14 #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 5 2 INTRODUCTION

  6. Year 5 Post-Remediation Biomonitoring of Pesticides and other Contaminants in Marine Waters near the United Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, Nancy P.; Kropp, Roy K.

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine sediment remediation at the United Heckathorn Superfund Site in Richmond, California, was completed in April 1997. The Record of Decision included a requirement for five years of post-remediation monitoring be conducted in the waterways near the site. The present monitoring year, 2001? 2002, is the fifth and possibly final year of post-remediation monitoring. In March 2002, water and mussel tissues were collected from the four stations in and near Lauritzen Channel that have been routinely monitored since 1997-98. A fifth station in Parr Canal was sampled in Year 5 to document post-remediation water and tissue concentrations there. Dieldrin and dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane (DDT) were analyzed in water samples and in tissue samples from resident (i.e., naturally occurring) mussels. As in Years 3 and 4, mussels were not transplanted to the study area in Year 5. Year 5 concentrations of dieldrin and total DDT in water and total DDT in tissue were compared with those from Years 1 through 4 of post-remediation monitoring, and with preremediation data from the California State Mussel Watch Program and the Ecological Risk Assessment for the United Heckathorn Superfund Site. Year 5 water samples and mussel tissues were also analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), which were detected in sediment samples during Year 2 monitoring and were added to the water and mussel tissue analyses in 1999. Contaminants of concern in Year 5 water samples were analyzed in both bulk (total) phase and dissolved phase, as were total suspended solids, to evaluate the contribution of particulates to the total contaminant concentration.

  7. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Chicago Area: Year 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    of the internal combustion engine and causes of pollutants in the exhaust see Heywood2 . Properly operating modern for water and any excess oxygen not involved in combustion. Mass emissions per mass or volume of fuel canOn-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Chicago Area: Year 4 Sajal S. Pokharel, Gary

  8. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 3 Sajal S. Pokharel, Gary Alpharetta, Georgia 30022 Contract No. E-23-4 #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions a slight negative dependence on #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area

  9. Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Re-Exports to Japan (Million Cubic...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 2,822 2,741 5,037 0...

  10. Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Re-Exports to Spain (Million Cubic...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 2010's 4,117 5,918...

  11. U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Indonesia (Million Cubic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,669 1990's 0 0 0 2000's 2,760 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's...

  12. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey 88 Lipman Drive, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8525

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    for savings. In some cases it may be economically beneficial to pay for a professional energy audit. SelectingRutgers, The State University of New Jersey 88 Lipman Drive, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8525 Phone: 732.932.5000 Energy Consumption Electric Petroleum Natural Gas Gas Year 1 Year 4Year 3Year 2 Year 5

  13. Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's -- -- -- 3.46 3.74 2.63 3.03 2000's 3.53 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2010's...

  14. Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Norway (Dollars...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- 9.56 4.45 2010's 5.21 5.97 2.83 14.85 4.47...

  15. Dollars and Sense: Will Your Idea Make Money?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    · Requirement for BPC Competition #12;www.va.umd.edu Components: Assumptions · Sales Projections ­ Pricing #12;www.va.umd.edu Income Statement · Top Line (Revenues) ­ Price ­ Units Sold ­ Product Lines ­ Goods ­ Costs = Profits Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Price 100$ 105$ 110$ 116$ 122$ Units Sold 2000 10000

  16. 2014 Chevron North Sea Limited Chevron University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    -Watt University have a relationship stretching back over 30 years covering recruitment, research and knowledge, manufacturing, marketing and transportation, chemicals manufacturing and sales, geothermal energy, and power will receive £1,000 in year 3, £2,000 in year 4 and £3,000 in year 5 of their chosen MEng degree programme

  17. Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Egypt (Dollars...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- -- 10.88 6.80 6.83 9.01 3.94 2010's 4.82 5.85 2.52 --...

  18. U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Egypt (Million Cubic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 72,540 119,528 114,580 54,839 160,435 2010's 72,990 35,120 2,811 0...

  19. 24 Fall 2011 Year 2 Year 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Jing

    of south america, bahiagrass can be thought of as kudzu without the bad rap. since 1938, when a variety

  20. Onboarding Year 3 | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Well in advance of the end of your appointment, you and your advisor andor division management should discuss career opportunities available to you at the completion of your...

  1. Year: 4 No.: 180 Thursday, November 20, 2003 Independent Opinion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with this he said that timber companies will be encouraged to employ some of the chainsaw operators to assist Fobih, has disclosed that a recent study has shown that out of the 2.7 million cubic metres of timber in the timber industry organised by Tropenbos International, a Netherlands based NGO. He said chainsaw operators

  2. Regmi Research Series ,Year 4, January 1, 1972

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regmi, Mahesh C

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , (,ddi.tlond · troop~ t' nd dt'lfond tba "Wrrltory. RepOrt· the u ~ , Aft p.r t h .. · lnVlltll on 1:> repui8ed, pey :s.11aries nnd dismiss t hem. 1'h:l uecl.tssary f!xptlClsc, shall: .' . ' '... ,, ' , ' p' .' ' ' .": . .. - • ) . E>-pbtion fo)' oft... ,000 flint s there. While hPnding ov(;r chnrgc, entrust reservp.s of ~ctl ammunition mnintained Cl t different f orts t o the: Amil and obtBin e r ecGipt. Remissions shcmi Re...

  3. Connecticut Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5

  4. Connecticut Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5Year

  5. Alaska Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6

  6. Alaska Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5

  7. Alaska Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5Year Jan

  8. Alaska Natural Gas Summary

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5Year

  9. Virginia Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5

  10. Virginia Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5Decade

  11. Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8

  12. Growing Up in Scotland: Year 3 - Food and Activity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marryat, Louise; Valeria, Skafida; Webster, Catriona

    2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report uses data from the Growing Up in Scotland study to explore the prevalence of, and many issues related to, food and activity in Scotland specifically in relation to young children....

  13. Growing Up in Scotland: Year 3 - Non-resident Parents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marryat, Louise; Reid, Susan; Wasoff, Fran

    2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report uses data from the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) to explore the prevalence of, and many issues related to, non-resident parenthood in Scotland specifically in relation to young and very young children. ...

  14. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Chicago Area: Year 5,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    for water and any excess oxygen not involved in combustion. Mass emissions per mass or volume of fuel can of CO, HC, and NO to CO2 in motor vehicle exhaust. From these ratios, we calculate the percent concentrations of CO, CO2, HC and NO in the exhaust that would be observed by a tailpipe probe, corrected

  15. Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Project (CSMEP) - Year 5 : Annual Report for FY 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marmorek, David R.; Porter, Marc; Pickard, Darcy; Wieckowski, Katherine

    2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Project (CSMEP) is a coordinated effort to improve the quality, consistency, and focus of fish population and habitat data to answer key monitoring and evaluation questions relevant to major decisions in the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP was initiated by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) in October 2003. The project is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program (NPCC). CSMEP is a major effort of the federal state and Tribal fish and wildlife managers to develop regionally integrated monitoring and evaluation (M&E) across the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP has focused its work on five monitoring domains: status and trends monitoring of populations and action effectiveness monitoring of habitat, harvest, hatcheries, and the hydrosystem. CSMEP's specific goals are to: (1) interact with federal, state and tribal programmatic and technical entities responsible for M&E of fish and wildlife, to ensure that work plans developed and executed under this project are well integrated with ongoing work by these entities; (2) document, integrate, and make available existing monitoring data on listed salmon, steelhead, bull trout and other fish species of concern; (3) critically assess strengths and weaknesses of these data for answering key monitoring questions; and (4) collaboratively design, implement and evaluate improved M&E methods with other programmatic entities in the Pacific Northwest. During FY2008 CSMEP biologists continued their reviews of the strengths and weaknesses (S&W) of existing subbasin inventory data for addressing monitoring questions about population status and trends at different spatial and temporal scales. Work was focused on Lower Columbia Chinook and steelhead, Snake River fall Chinook, Upper Columbia Spring Chinook and steelhead, and Middle Columbia River Chinook and steelhead. These FY2008 data assessments and others assembled over the years of the CSMEP project can be accessed on the CBFWA public website. The CSMEP web database (http://csmep.streamnet.org/) houses metadata inventories from S&W assessments of Columbia River Basin watersheds that were completed prior to FY2008. These older S&W assessments are maintained by StreamNet, but budget cutbacks prevented us from adding the new FY2008 assessments into the database. Progress was made in FY2008 on CSMEP's goals of collaborative design of improved M&E methods. CSMEP convened two monitoring design workshops in Portland (December 5 and 6, 2007 and February 11 and 12, 2008) to continue exploration of how best to integrate the most robust features of existing M&E programs with new approaches. CSMEP continued to build on this information to develop improved designs and analytical tools for monitoring the status and trends of fish populations and the effectiveness of hatchery and hydrosystem recovery actions within the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP did not do any new work on habitat or harvest effectiveness monitoring designs in FY2008 due to budget cutbacks. CSMEP presented the results of the Snake Basin Pilot Study to the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) in Portland on December 7, 2008. This study is the finalization of CSMEP's pilot exercise of developing design alternatives across different M&E domains within the Snake River Basin spring/summer Chinook ESU. This work has been summarized in two linked reports (CSMEP 2007a and CSMEP 2007b). CSMEP participants presented many of the analyses developed for the Snake Basin Pilot work at the Western Division American Fisheries Society (AFS) conference in Portland on May 4 to 7, 2008. For the AFS conference CSMEP organized a symposium on regional monitoring and evaluation approaches. A presentation on CSMEP's Cost Integration Database Tool and Salmon Viability Monitoring Simulation Model developed for the Snake Basin Pilot Study was also given to the Pacific Northwest Aquatic monitoring Partnership (PNAMP) stee

  16. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Denver Area: Year 4,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    is capable of measuring the ratios of CO, HC and NO to CO2 in motor vehicle exhaust. From these ratios, we calculate the percent concentrations of CO, CO2, HC and NO in the exhaust that would be observed by a tailpipe probe, corrected for water and excess oxygen not involved in combustion. Mass emissions per mass

  17. Arrow Lakes Reservoir Fertilization Experiment; Years 4 and 5, Technical Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schindler, E.

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the fourth and fifth year (2002 and 2003, respectively) of a five-year fertilization experiment on the Arrow Lakes Reservoir. The goal of the experiment was to increase kokanee populations impacted from hydroelectric development on the Arrow Lakes Reservoir. The impacts resulted in declining stocks of kokanee, a native land-locked sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), a key species of the ecosystem. Arrow Lakes Reservoir, located in southeastern British Columbia, has undergone experimental fertilization since 1999. It is modeled after the successful Kootenay Lake fertilization experiment. The amount of fertilizer added in 2002 and 2003 was similar to the previous three years. Phosphorus loading from fertilizer was 52.8 metric tons and nitrogen loading from fertilizer was 268 metric tons. As in previous years, fertilizer additions occurred between the end of April and the beginning of September. Surface temperatures were generally warmer in 2003 than in 2002 in the Arrow Lakes Reservoir from May to September. Local tributary flows to Arrow Lakes Reservoir in 2002 and 2003 were generally less than average, however not as low as had occurred in 2001. Water chemistry parameters in select rivers and streams were similar to previous years results, except for dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations which were significantly less in 2001, 2002 and 2003. The reduced snow pack in 2001 and 2003 would explain the lower concentrations of DIN. The natural load of DIN to the Arrow system ranged from 7200 tonnes in 1997 to 4500 tonnes in 2003; these results coincide with the decrease in DIN measurements from water samples taken in the reservoir during this period. Water chemistry parameters in the reservoir were similar to previous years of study except for a few exceptions. Seasonal averages of total phosphorus ranged from 2.11 to 7.42 {micro}g/L from 1997 through 2003 in the entire reservoir which were indicative of oligo-mesotrophic conditions. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations have decreased in 2002 and 2003 compared to previous years. These results indicate that the surface waters in Arrow Lakes Reservoir were approaching nitrogen limitation. Results from the 2003 discrete profile series indicate nitrate concentrations decreased significantly below 25 {micro}g/L (which is the concentration where nitrate is considered limiting to phytoplankton) between June and July at stations in Upper Arrow and Lower Arrow. Nitrogen to phosphorus ratios (weight:weight) were also low during these months indicating that the surface waters were nitrogen deficient. These results indicated that the nitrogen to phosphorus blends of fertilizer added to the reservoir need to be fine tuned and closely monitored on a weekly basis in future years of nutrient addition. Phytoplankton results shifted during 2002 and 2003 compared to previous years. During 2002, there was a co-dominance of potentially 'inedible' diatoms (Fragilaria spp. and Diatoma) and 'greens' (Ulothrix). Large diatom populations occurred in 2003 and these results indicate it may be necessary to alter the frequency and amounts of weekly loads of nitrogen and phosphorus in future years to prevent the growth of inedible diatoms. Zooplankton density in 2002 and 2003, as in previous years, indicated higher densities in Lower Arrow than in Upper Arrow. Copepods and other Cladocera (mainly tiny specimens such as Bosmina sp.) had distinct peaks, higher than in previous years, while Daphnia was not present in higher numbers particularly in Upper Arrow. This density shift in favor to smaller cladocerans was mirrored in a weak biomass increase. In Upper Arrow, total zooplankton biomass decreased from 1999 to 2002, and in 2003 increased slightly, while in Lower Arrow the biomass decreased from 2000-2002. In Lower Arrow the majority of biomass was comprised of Daphnia throughout the study period except in 2002, while in Upper Arrow the total biomass was comprised of copepods from 2000-2003.

  18. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in west Los Angeles: Year 4,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    emission inventory.1 For a description of the internal combustion engine and causes of pollutants excess oxygen not involved in combustion. Mass emissions per mass or volume of fuel can also (or completely) converting engine-out CO, HC and NO emissions to carbon dioxide (CO2), water

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - Lubin.ARM_Year4_Talk.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand RetrievalsFinalModule8.ppt MicrosoftDOE'sR.G. VanIn thisMagnitude

  20. Growing Up in Scotland: Year 3 - The Impact of Children's Early Activities of Cognitive Development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradshaw, Paul; Wasoff, Fran

    2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond. The study is funded by ...

  1. Growing Up in Scotland: Year 3 - Multiple Childcare Provision and its Effects on Child Outcomes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradshaw, Paul; Wasoff, Fran

    2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report uses data from the first three waves of the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) to explore families’ experiences of using childcare for children under the age of 5 years old. The report focuses particularly ...

  2. Growing Up in Scotland: Year 3 - Parenting and the Neighbourhood Context 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradshaw, Paul; Sharp, Clare; Webster, Catriona; Jamieson, Lynn

    2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report uses data from the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) to explore families’ experiences of living in Scotland’s neighbourhoods, to examine parents’ views on different aspects of their local area and to consider ...

  3. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the La Brea Area: Year 3,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    for water and any excess oxygen not involved in combustion. Mass emissions per mass or volume of fuel can of CO, HC, and NO to CO2 in motor vehicle exhaust. From these ratios, we calculate the percent concentrations of CO, CO2, HC and NO in the exhaust that would be observed by a tailpipe probe, corrected

  4. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Chicago Area: Year 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    for water and any excess oxygen not involved in combustion. Mass emissions per mass or volume of fuel can, HC, and NO to CO2 in motor vehicle exhaust. From these ratios, we calculate the percent concentrations of CO, CO2, HC and NO in the exhaust that would be observed by a tailpipe probe, corrected

  5. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Denver Area: Year 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    oxygen not involved in combustion. Mass emissions per mass or volume of fuel can also be determined and NO to CO2 in motor vehicle exhaust. From these ratios, we calculate the percent concentrations of CO, CO2 measurements for CO and CO2, and 20,361 records contained valid measurements for HC and NO as well

  6. Kootenay Lake Fertilization Experiment, Year 15 (North Arm) and Year 3 (South Arm) (2006) Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schindler, E.U.; Sebastian, D.; Andrusak, G.F. [Fish and Wildlife Science and Allocation, Ministry of Environment, Province of British Columbia

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results from the fifteenth year (2006) of nutrient additions to the North Arm of Kootenay Lake and three years of nutrient additions to the South Arm. Experimental fertilization of the lake has been conducted using an adaptive management approach in an effort to restore lake productivity lost as a result of nutrient uptake in upstream reservoirs. The primary objective of the experiment is to restore kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations, which are the main food source for Gerrard rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus). The quantity of agricultural grade liquid fertilizer (10-34-0, ammonium polyphosphate and 28-0-0, urea ammonium nitrate) added to the North Arm in 2006 was 44.7 tonnes of P and 248.4 tonnes of N. The total fertilizer load added to the South Arm was 257 tonnes of nitrogen; no P was added. Kootenay Lake has an area of 395 km{sup 2}, a maximum depth of 150 m, a mean depth of 94 m, and a water renewal time of approximately two years. Kootenay Lake is a monomictic lake, generally mixing from late fall to early spring and stratifying during the summer. Surface water temperatures generally exceed 20 C for only a few weeks in July. Results of oxygen profiles were similar to previous years with the lake being well oxygenated from the surface to the bottom depths at all stations. Similar to past years, Secchi disc measurements at all stations in 2006 indicate a typical seasonal pattern of decreasing depths associated with the spring phytoplankton bloom, followed by increasing depths as the bloom gradually decreases by the late summer and fall. Total phosphorus (TP) ranged from 2-7 {micro}g/L and tended to decrease as summer advanced. Over the sampling season dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations decreased, with the decline corresponding to nitrate (the dominant component of DIN) being utilized by phytoplankton during summer stratification. Owing to the importance of epilimnetic nitrate that is required for optimal phytoplankton growth discrete depth water sampling occurred in 2006 to measure more accurately changes in the nitrate concentrations. As expected there was a seasonal decline in nitrate concentrations, thus supporting the strategy of increasing the nitrogen loading in both arms. These in-season changes emphasize the need for an adaptive management approach to ensure the nitrogen to phosphorus (N:P) ratio does not decrease below 15:1 (weight:weight) during the fertilizer application period. Phytoplankton composition determined from the integrated samples (0-20m) was dominated by diatoms, followed by cryptophytes and chrysophytes. The contribution of cryptophytes to total biomass was higher in 2006 than in 2005. Cryptophytes, considered being edible biomass for zooplankton and Daphnia spp., increased in 2006. Phytoplankton in the discrete depth samples (2, 5, 10, 15 and 20m) demonstrated a clear north to south gradient in average phytoplankton density and biomass among the three stations sampled, with highest values at the North Arm station (KLF 2) and lowest values in the most southern station in the South Arm (KLF 7). Populations were dominated by flagellates at all stations and depths in June and July, then dominated by diatoms in August and September in the North and South arms of the lake. There were no large bluegreen (cyanobacteria) populations in either arm of the lake in 2006. Seasonal average zooplankton abundance and biomass in both the main body of the lake and in the West Arm increased in 2006 compared to 2005. Zooplankton density was numerically dominated by copepods and biomass was dominated by Daphnia spp. The annual average mysid biomass data at deep stations indicated that the North Arm of Kootenay Lake was more productive than the South Arm in 2006. Mysid densities increased through the summer and declined in the winter; mean whole lake values remain within prefertilization densities. Kokanee escapement to Meadow Creek declined in 2006 to approximately 400,000 spawners. The Lardeau River escapement also declined wit

  7. WTS Safe Project of the Year 3.9.12 FINAL1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE AwardsD Contract No.List of Exclusions WIPP

  8. Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Indonesia (Dollars...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Indonesia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Indonesia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

  9. FONDECYT NATIONAL RESEARCH FUNDING COMPETITION 2009 REGULAR COMPETITION FFOONNDDEECCYYTT 22000099

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigny, Christophe

    Chilean $ (1000 CHP) Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Total Staff 10500 10500 10500 31500 Travel 2600 3850 3850/enterprises interested in the proposal results. Please attach certifying letters. INSTITUTION(S) CONTRIBUTION (1000 CHP

  10. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal reservoir simulation: final task report (year 4). Final report, 1 August 1979-31 July 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonald, R.C.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Ohkuma, H.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the short-term production tests run on the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well are summarized. These tests were analyzed using conventional pressure test analysis methods. The effects of reservoir heterogeneties onm production behavior and, in particular, permeability distribution and faulting of reservoir sand were studied to determine the sensitivity of recovery to these parameters. A study on the effect of gas buildup around a producing well is reported. (MHR)

  11. Year 4 Post-Remediation Biomonitoring of Pesticides and Other Contaminants in Marine Waters Near the United Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, Nancy P.; Kropp, Roy

    2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is fourth in a series of annual reports describing the results of biomonitoring following remediation of the United Heckathorn Superfund Site.

  12. Development and testing of an aerosol/stratus cloud parameterization scheme for middle and high latitudes. Year 3 technical progress report, November 1, 1996--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreidenweis, S.M.; Cotton, W.R.

    1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    At the present time, general circulation models (GCMs) poorly represent clouds, to the extent that they cannot be relied upon to simulate the climatic effects of increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases, or of anthropogenic perturbations to concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN). The net radiative forcing of clouds varies strongly with latitude. Poleward of 30 degrees in both hemispheres, low-level clouds create a net cooling effect corresponding to radiative divergences of {minus}50 to {minus}100 W/m{sup 2}. It is likely that a combination of fogs, boundary-layer stratocumulus, and stratus clouds are the main contributors to this forcing. Models of the response of the microphysical and radiative properties of clouds to changes in aerosol abundance, for a variety of large-scale meteorological forcings, are important additions to GCMs used for the study of the role of Arctic systems in global climate. The overall objective of this research is the development of an aerosol/cloud microphysics parameterization of mixed-phase stratus and boundary-layer clouds which responds to variations in CCN and IN. The parameterization is to be designed for ultimate use in GCM simulations as a tool in understanding the role of CCN, IN, and Arctic clouds in radiation budgets. Several versions of the CSU RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) will be used during the course of this work. The parameterizations developed in this research are intended for application in a single-column cloud model, designed as an adaptive grid model which can interface into a GCM vertical grid through distinct layers of the troposphere where the presence of layer clouds is expected.

  13. Development and Delivery of Ecologically-based IPM Packages in Central Asia Central Asia Regional IPM Program Year 3 Work plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /World Vegetable Center Potato IPM Package Dr. Murat Aitmatov, IPM CRSP Coordinator/Research Fellow, Kyrgyzstan Dr countries include Tajikistan, Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan. The technical objectives of the Central Asia and technologies for IPM packages for wheat, potatoes and tomatoes in three host countries (Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan

  14. Optimization algorithms for new computer architectures with application to routing and scheduling (Year 3). Final report, 1 May 1989-30 September 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennington, J.L.; Helgason, R.V.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important computer architecture innovations to appear in the market place during the last ten years is parallel processing on a shared memory multicomputer. This report presents new algorithms for a variety of network models along with empirical analysis on both sequential and parallel computers. An empirical study on the AT and T KORBX system is also presented. This system uses eight processors each of which has vector capability. Our research program objective is to develop and empirically test new parallel algorithms and software for a wide variety of optimization problems. The problems studied this past year include the shortest path problem, the assignment problem, the semi-assignment problem, the transportation problem, and the generalized network problem. Algorithms for all of these models have been developed and empirically tested on a variety of computers. In addition, we worked with the Military Airlift Command to test the ATT KORBX system located at Scott Air Force Base.

  15. PSM IN BIOINFORMATICS Program of Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    525 Molecular Genetics (3 cr) MAT 541 Computational Genomics (3 cr) Spring First Year (5 cr) BMB 525 Functional Genomics (4 cr) INT601 Responsible Conduct of Research (1 cr) Summer First Year (3 cr) Plus and display concepts applied to genome data · systems for data integration · statistical genetics

  16. FourYear Academic Plan 20122013 BA in Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FourYear Academic Plan 20122013 BA in Geology Internal Use Version Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4: Total UD Credits: 46 Total Credits: 120 3/19/12 #12;FourYear Academic Plan 20122013 BA in Geology

  17. Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kourai, Kenichi

    Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering Architecture Course Civil and Environmental Engineering4 5 Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering 1st Year School of Engineering Department of Mechanical and Control Engineering 2nd Year 3rd Year 4th Year 1st Year of Master's Program 1st

  18. 2014 Chevron North Sea Limited Chevron University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    -Watt University have a relationship stretching back over 30 years covering recruitment, research and knowledge, manufacturing, marketing and transportation, chemicals manufacturing and sales, geothermal energy, and power,000. · Recipients of a scholarship will receive £1,000 in year 3 and £1,000 in year 4 of their chosen degree

  19. School of Biology Timeline of Academic Reviews for Faculty Information on Tenure and Promotion Criteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaucher, Eric

    materials due Spring semester Decision on 3rd year critical review Year 4: 1st week February: re Critical Review. Materials include: · CV · Candidate's statement of teaching and research accomplishments-appointment materials due Year 2: 1st Week October re-appointment materials due Spring semester DOTE is conducted Year 3

  20. New Houston NOx Rules: Implications and Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cascone, R.

    Capex $MM NOx Reduction Tons/yr Net Cost NPV10 $MM Case 1 4 50 3.6 a. Defer 1 year 4.2 loss due to delay 0.6 b. Defer 2 years 5.4 loss due to delay 1.7 c. Defer 3 years 8.5 loss due to delay 4.8 Case 2 35 750 31.8 a. Defer 1 year 42...

  1. New retaining wall design criteria based on lateral earth pressure measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, William Vincent

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on full scale retaining walls. The first year ( 3 ) was devoted to selecting earth pressure cells which would provide both accuracy and long term reliability. Nine cell types were considered. Four types were field tested. Two types, Terra Tec... and Geonor, were selected for installa- tion in the cantilever test wall during the second year ( 4 ) of the study. Terra Tec cells were selected for installation in the precast panel wall during the third year ( 7 ) of the study. The instrumenta- tion...

  2. Energy Efficiency/ Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Preliminary Report: Intergrated Nox Emissions Savings from EE/RE Programs Statewide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Lewis, C.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mukhopadhyay, J..; Degelman, L.; McKelvey, K.; Clardige, D.; Ellis, S.; Kim, H.; Zilbershtein. G.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the integrated total electricity savings from all programs are: ? Annual electricity savings is 13,354,918 MWh/year (3,723 tons-NOx/year) and ? OSD electricity savings is 36,079 MWh/day, which would be a 1,503 MW average hourly load reduction during the OSD... period (9.89 tons-NOx/day). By 2013, the integrated total electricity savings from all programs are: ? Annual electricity savings will be 15,391,293 MWh/year (4,296 tons-NOx/year) and ? OSD electricity savings will be 41,691 MWh/day, which would be a...

  3. Connecticut Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4

  4. Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4

  5. Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4Year Jan Feb

  6. Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4Year Jan

  7. Alaska Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4Year JanDecade

  8. Alaska Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4Year

  9. Alaska Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4YearWellhead

  10. U.S. Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb MarDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4

  11. Virginia Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4

  12. Virginia Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4Feet)

  13. Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4

  14. North Dakota Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousandDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-55,5810 0

  15. Wyoming Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-533 1,036 1,043 1,041

  16. Singer, M. (Vitae) -1-Last updated June 11, 2014 MICHAEL SINGER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Michael

    Modeling)', ~5 students, Year 4, 2 × 4 hr practical. · `Advanced Debates (Fracking)', ~35 students, Year 4

  17. Singer, M. (Vitae) -1-Last updated December 10, 2014 MICHAEL SINGER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Michael

    , Year 4, 2 × 4 hr practical. · `Advanced Debates (Fracking)', ~35 students, Year 4, 1 × 4 hr practical

  18. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest Mancini

    2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 3 (Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation) objectives are to provide an analysis of the Smackover petroleum system in Years 4 and 5 of the project and to transfer effectively the research results to producers through workshops and topical reports. Work Accomplished (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - Basin flow modeling has been completed and the modeling results are being interpreted for report writing (Table 1). Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum source rocks has been integrated into the basin flow model. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum reservoirs continues. The cores to be described have been identified and many of the cores for the eastern part of the basin have been described. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Work on reservoir diagenesis has been initiated. Samples from the cores selected for the reservoir characterization are being used for this task. Work Planned (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - The report on basin flow will be completed. Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Petroleum source rock data will be reviewed in light of the basin flow model results. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Characterization of petroleum reservoirs will continue through core studies. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Characterization of reservoir diagenesis will continue through petrographic analysis.

  19. Basin Analysis of Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest Mancini

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 3 (Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation) objectives are to provide an analysis of the Smackover petroleum system in Years 4 and 5 of the project and to transfer effectively the research results to producers through workshops and topical reports. Work Accomplished (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - Basin flow modeling has been completed and the topical report has been submitted to the U.S. DOE for review. Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum source rocks has been integrated into the basin flow model. The information on the source rocks is being prepared for inclusion in the final report. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum reservoirs continues. The cores to be described have been identified and many of the cores for the eastern and western parts of the basin have been described. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Work on reservoir diagenesis continues. Samples from the cores selected for the reservoir characterization are being used for this task. Task 5 - Underdeveloped Reservoirs - Two underdeveloped Smackover reservoirs have been identified. They are the microbial reef and shoal reservoirs. Work Planned (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - This task has been completed and the topical report has been submitted to the U.S. DOE. Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Petroleum source rock information will continue to be prepared for the final report. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Characterization of petroleum reservoirs will continue through core studies. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Characterization of reservoir diagenesis will continue through petrographic analysis. Task 5 - Underdeveloped Reservoirs - Study of Smackover underdeveloped reservoirs will continue with focus on the microbial reef and shoal reservoirs.

  20. Monitoring Based Commissioning: Benchmarking Analysis of 24 UC/CSU/IOU Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Evan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peak electrical demand savings were 0.2 W/sf-year (4%), withPeak electrical demand savings were 0.2 W/sf-year (4%), with

  1. Engineering Physics: Challenge Yourself! Presented by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    and Economics Complementary Studies #12;p.11 Courses in Eng. Phys Options 4th year4th year4th year4th year of the future. To provided an understanding of the principles underlying modern and next- generation existing engineering models. However, to make device smaller, more efficient, more powerful, you need

  2. All Students Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    ) (Rank) (Rank) (1 Year) (5 Years) #12;Bosnia-Herzegovina 3 2 0 +50.0 -(90) (100) - Botswana 0 3 4 -100

  3. Strategy & Planning Division Imperial College Statistics Pocket Guide 2002-03

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    over 1 year 5 years Faculty of Engineering Aeronautics 278 41 21.5 340.5 1.8 25.2 Bioengineering 38 14

  4. Strategy & Planning Division Imperial College Statistics Pocket Guide 2001-02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    year 5 years Faculty of Engineering Aeronautics 272 39 23.5 334.5 13.2 18.8 Bioengineering 4 15.5 20

  5. Fall 2012 College of engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    be used in automobiles #12;Green Energy A powerhouse in green technologies in second year .........................................4 Discovering green energy conversion and storage

  6. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    stationary storage for - one year of high value T&D upgrade deferral; - then wholesale electricity price arbitrage; - plus a generation capacity credit in all years 4....

  7. Feedbacks Between Hydrological Heterogeneity and Bioremediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Feedbacks Between Hydrological Heterogeneity and Bioremediation Induced Biogeochemical, intensively studied over the last 20 years (4), has potential to further impact bioremediation efforts

  8. Simulations of Turbulent Flows with Strong Shocks and Density Variations: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanjiva Lele

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The target of this SciDAC Science Application was to develop a new capability based on high-order and high-resolution schemes to simulate shock-turbulence interactions and multi-material mixing in planar and spherical geometries, and to study Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov turbulent mixing. These fundamental problems have direct application in high-speed engineering flows, such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule implosions and scramjet combustion, and also in the natural occurrence of supernovae explosions. Another component of this project was the development of subgrid-scale (SGS) models for large-eddy simulations of flows involving shock-turbulence interaction and multi-material mixing, that were to be validated with the DNS databases generated during the program. The numerical codes developed are designed for massively-parallel computer architectures, ensuring good scaling performance. Their algorithms were validated by means of a sequence of benchmark problems. The original multi-stage plan for this five-year project included the following milestones: 1) refinement of numerical algorithms for application to the shock-turbulence interaction problem and multi-material mixing (years 1-2); 2) direct numerical simulations (DNS) of canonical shock-turbulence interaction (years 2-3), targeted at improving our understanding of the physics behind the combined two phenomena and also at guiding the development of SGS models; 3) large-eddy simulations (LES) of shock-turbulence interaction (years 3-5), improving SGS models based on the DNS obtained in the previous phase; 4) DNS of planar/spherical RM multi-material mixing (years 3-5), also with the two-fold objective of gaining insight into the relevant physics of this instability and aiding in devising new modeling strategies for multi-material mixing; 5) LES of planar/spherical RM mixing (years 4-5), integrating the improved SGS and multi-material models developed in stages 3 and 5. This final report is outlined as follows. Section 2 shows an assessment of numerical algorithms that are best suited for the numerical simulation of compressible flows involving turbulence and shock phenomena. Sections 3 and 4 deal with the canonical shock-turbulence interaction problem, from the DNS and LES perspectives, respectively. Section 5 considers the shock-turbulence inter-action in spherical geometry, in particular, the interaction of a converging shock with isotropic turbulence as well as the problem of the blast wave. Section 6 describes the study of shock-accelerated mixing through planar and spherical Richtmyer-Meshkov mixing as well as the shock-curtain interaction problem In section 7 we acknowledge the different interactions between Stanford and other institutions participating in this SciDAC project, as well as several external collaborations made possible through it. Section 8 presents a list of publications and presentations that have been generated during the course of this SciDAC project. Finally, section 9 concludes this report with the list of personnel at Stanford University funded by this SciDAC project.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: SAND2013-7238P

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manufacturing Initiative (AMI) is a multiple-year, 3-way collaboration among TPI Composites, Iowa State University, and Sandia National Laboratories. The goal of this...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: NEPTCO glass fiber RodPack

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manufacturing Initiative (AMI) is a multiple-year, 3-way collaboration among TPI Composites, Iowa State University, and Sandia National Laboratories. The goal of this...

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: BASF latent curing epoxy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manufacturing Initiative (AMI) is a multiple-year, 3-way collaboration among TPI Composites, Iowa State University, and Sandia National Laboratories. The goal of this...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Manufacturing Initiative

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manufacturing Initiative (AMI) is a multiple-year, 3-way collaboration among TPI Composites, Iowa State University, and Sandia National Laboratories. The goal of this...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: AMI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manufacturing Initiative (AMI) is a multiple-year, 3-way collaboration among TPI Composites, Iowa State University, and Sandia National Laboratories. The goal of this...

  14. Connecticut Light & Power- ZREC and LREC Long Term Contracts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: Year 3 of the competitive solicitation for the program ended on February 2015, next round is anticipated to be opened on April, 2015. 

  15. Management of Fleet Inventory

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In fulfillment of Executive Order 13514, DOE began a 3-year, 3-phase strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and decrease petroleum use.

  16. Integrating Machine Learning and Physician Knowledge to Improve the Accuracy of Breast Biopsy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shavlik, Jude W.

    the age of 20 years3 have an annual breast biopsy utilization rate of 62.6 per 10,000 women, translating

  17. Research Start-up Request Form Please use this form for all start-up requests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    Research Start-up Request Form Please use this form for all start-up requests. All requests must: Department: College: Date of Offer: Start Date: Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Fiscal Year: Equipment: Amount of Start-up of Start-up Provided by Dept. or College Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Amount: Planned Use: EVP/Provost Signature

  18. Academic Program College(s) Course(s) Topics Estimated Annual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    of abuse across the lifespan. 210 NURS 113: Nursing Care During Childbearing Years (3) Domestic violence including child abuse- recognition; interventions. 240 NURS 114: Nursing Care During Childrearing Years (3) Child abuse-definitions; sign, symptoms; interventions; reporting. 245 NURS 214W: Nursing Care

  19. Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Reinhard

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    deliver 1,500 MW of installed capacity from RES by the year5 Projected capacity (MW/period) Installed capacity cum (MW) Installed capacity (MW/period) Figure 10. Capacities

  20. DOE Tour of Zero: The MassDevelopment Production House by Transformati...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    credit of 1,600 a year. 5 of 7 The entire home's heating and cooling is provided by ultra-efficient (23 SEER; 10.6 HSPF) ductless heat pumps. 6 of 7 The use of lowno-VOC...

  1. Countries Commit to White Roofs, Potentially Offsetting the Emissions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the road for 11 years. This is also equivalent to offsetting the annual emissions of 700 medium sized coal-fired power plants, operating 6,000 hours per year.5 I am happy to...

  2. Building Retrofits: Energy Conservation and Employee Retention Considerations in Medium-Size Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Janice

    2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    foot per year ($5.60 per square meter per year ) in energy costs (Booz Allen Hamilton, 2009). There is considerable research into building efficiency and expected energy savings resulting from building retrofits: Rocky Mountain Institute estimates...

  3. Quarterly Program Progress Report April 1, 2002-June 30, 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palafox, Neal A., MD, MPH

    2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE B188 DOE/PHRI Special Medical Care Program in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI)Quarterly Program Progress Report The DOE/PHRI Special Medical Care Program continues to provide, on a year round basis, a broad spectrum of medical care to the DOE patient population. During the fourth quarter of Year 4, the following medical services were provided: (1) Annual medical examinations for the DOE patient population (see Exhibit 1 for details). (2) Medications for the DOE patient population. (3) Preventive and primary medical care to the DOE patient population in the RMI as time and resources permit. (4) Additional manpower for the outpatient clinics at Ebeye and Majuro Hospitals (see Exhibit 2 for details). (5) Ancillary services such as labs, radiology and pharmacy in coordination with Kwajalein Hospital, Majuro Hospital and the 177 Health Care Program (177 HCP). (6) Referrals to Ebeye Hospital, Majuro Hospital and Kwajalein Hospital as necessary. (7) Referrals to Straub Clinic and Hospital in Honolulu as necessary (for details see Exhibit 1). (8) Monitored and adjusted monthly annual examination schedules based on equipment failure at Kwajalein. In addition to the above, the program was also involved in the following activities during this quarter: (1) Organized and conducted continuing medical education (CME) talks for the program's RMI staff and other RMI healthcare workers. (2) Held meetings with RMI government officials and Local Atoll government officials. (3) Input past medical records into the Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system. (4) Made adjustments to and created more templates for the EMR system. (5) Coordinated with the Public Health Departments on Majuro and Ebeye. (6) Met with PEACESAT to discuss possible collaboration on high speed Internet access. (7) Looked for opportunities to expand the program's telehealth capabilities. (8) Participated in the DOE-RMI Meeting in Honolulu. (9) Finalized the agreement with the RMI Ministry of Health and Environment (MOHE) and Majuro Hospital to hire Dr. Marie Lanwi on a part-time basis. (10) Held a Community Advisory Group (CAG) Meeting and Community Meeting on Majuro. (11) Negotiated with Kwajalein with regards to the increase in laboratory and procedure costs and continuing Mammography services for the DOE patient population. (12) Met with DOE in Honolulu to discuss the next year's program and budget. (13) Trained new residents in the use of the electronic medical record system. (14) Conducted electronic medical record audits. (15) Participated in a training session for the appointment scheduler module by Physician Micro System, Inc. on the EMR system. (16) Worked on the Year 5 Continuation Application and Budget. (17) Finalized the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with 177. (18) Worked with DOE and Bechtel Nevada (BN) to reduce PHRI program costs to meet an increase in referral costs paid by Bechtel. This report details the additions and changes to the program for the April 1, 2002-June 30, 2002 period.

  4. Slide 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Small Business Award Dollars by Fiscal Year 4 ADDX CORPORATION 8,498,236 LOGISTICS APPLICATIONS INC. 39,222,540.95 ANALYTICAL RESEARCH, LLC 3,942,497 EXCALIBUR...

  5. DATE

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    by March 15 for the preceding year. 4. Chemical Use and Storage - Chemicals, such as petroleum products, grout, and other concrete products will be used in support of the proposed...

  6. 2014-2015 INCOMING STUDENT HOUSING AND BOARD CONTRACT THIS CONTRACT IS BINDING FOR THE FALL AND SPRING SEMESTERS OF THE ACADEMIC YEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogaerts, Steven

    in the CDR) and 100 Bonus Points: SEMESTER-$2,387, TOTAL YEAR-$4,774 ( ) 225 Flex Meal Plan (average of 14 meals per week) and 100 Bonus Points: SEMESTER-$2,088, TOTAL YEAR- $4,176 Each bonus point is valued and snacks plus 100 Bonus Points, or the 225 Flex Plan plus 100 Bonus Points, which is an average of 14 meals

  7. Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Zhou, Nan; Fuqiu , Zhou; Huawen, Xiong; Xuemin, Zeng; Lan, Wang

    2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool (BEST) Cement is a process-based tool based on commercially available efficiency technologies used anywhere in the world applicable to the cement industry. This version has been designed for use in China. No actual cement facility with every single efficiency measure included in the benchmark will likely exist; however, the benchmark sets a reasonable standard by which to compare for plants striving to be the best. The energy consumption of the benchmark facility differs due to differences in processing at a given cement facility. The tool accounts for most of these variables and allows the user to adapt the model to operational variables specific for his/her cement facility. Figure 1 shows the boundaries included in a plant modeled by BEST Cement. In order to model the benchmark, i.e., the most energy efficient cement facility, so that it represents a facility similar to the user's cement facility, the user is first required to input production variables in the input sheet (see Section 6 for more information on how to input variables). These variables allow the tool to estimate a benchmark facility that is similar to the user's cement plant, giving a better picture of the potential for that particular facility, rather than benchmarking against a generic one. The input variables required include the following: (1) the amount of raw materials used in tonnes per year (limestone, gypsum, clay minerals, iron ore, blast furnace slag, fly ash, slag from other industries, natural pozzolans, limestone powder (used post-clinker stage), municipal wastes and others); the amount of raw materials that are preblended (prehomogenized and proportioned) and crushed (in tonnes per year); (2) the amount of additives that are dried and ground (in tonnes per year); (3) the production of clinker (in tonnes per year) from each kiln by kiln type; (4) the amount of raw materials, coal and clinker that is ground by mill type (in tonnes per year); (5) the amount of production of cement by type and grade (in tonnes per year); (6) the electricity generated onsite; and, (7) the energy used by fuel type; and, the amount (in RMB per year) spent on energy. The tool offers the user the opportunity to do a quick assessment or a more detailed assessment--this choice will determine the level of detail of the energy input. The detailed assessment will require energy data for each stage of production while the quick assessment will require only total energy used at the entire facility (see Section 6 for more details on quick versus detailed assessments). The benchmarking tool provides two benchmarks--one for Chinese best practices and one for international best practices. Section 2 describes the differences between these two and how each benchmark was calculated. The tool also asks for a target input by the user for the user to set goals for the facility.

  8. UltraLight Technical Report 28 February 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Light Annual Report for 2004 ­ 2005 The UltraLight Collaboration NSF Grant 0427110 Director: Harvey Newman ...........................................................................................................11 2.5 Year 3 and 4 outlook .................................................................................................................13 3 High Energy Physics Application Services

  9. A View of Manufacturing Through 3D Glasses | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from machining and casting technologies to materials science, welding, and yes, 3D printing. In the past few years, 3D printing, or additive as we call it in our labs, has...

  10. Federal Register Volume 74 Number 48; Friday, March 13, 2009

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and 100 mmyear (0.39 and 3.9 in. year). (3) DOE must assess the effects of general corrosion on engineered barriers. DOE may use a constant representative corrosion rate...

  11. Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fuels (biogas or LPG) for cooking and heating, and promotionBiogas and LPG stoves 0 and 20 years 3.3.8 Main heating and11.2%), and biogas (1.9%). We created a heating fuel

  12. Greening the U.S. House of Representatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond,, Rick

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    o Provide energy efficiency and sustainability materials forsustainability In addition to improving the way the House consumes energy,energy consumption by 50% in 10 years 3. Make the House operations a model of sustainability.

  13. Adams, JM (Dr) TUTORIAL (YEAR 2) -UG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    (YEA JMA 48 AZ 04 TUTX-PH00-GM1 Sem1: 01-06,08-14 SGT-Grp A1 TUTORIAL (YEAR 3) - UG SP, AL, JLK, PJM BB 03 Sem1: 09,11,13 UCAS JSA, JA, DB, WNC, AD, OH, JLK, PJM, BNM, PHR, RPS, PDS, JAT, PMW, AL, SP LTL EXAMPHY1022mm Sem1: 07, 15 Test TUTORIAL (YEAR 3) SP, AL, JLK, PJM, BNM, JM Room to be advised

  14. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  15. Energy Efficiency/ Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) Preliminary Report: Integrated Nox Emissions Savings from EE/RE Programs Statewide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Zilbershtein, G.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Clardige, D.; Parker, P.; Ellis, S.; Kim, H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for this purpose. In 2012, the integrated total electricity savings from all programs are: ? Annual electricity savings is 16,413,917 MWh/year (4,609 tons-NOx/year) and ? OSD electricity savings is 44,366 MWh/day, which would be a 1,849 MW average hourly... load reduction during the OSD period (12.35 tons-NOx/day). By 2013, the integrated total electricity savings from all programs are: ? Annual electricity savings will be 17,661,268 MWh/year (4,959 tons-NOx/year) and ? OSD electricity savings...

  16. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1100 4000 4000 Usage (percent of capacity) 80 0 80 0 Capital cost (million 2010) 0.80 0.5 1.0 1.0 Capital recovery (years) 5 10 5 10 Weighted average cost of capital (rate) 0.10...

  17. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4000 4000 Usage (percent of capacity) 80 60 80 60 Capital cost (million 2010) 0.80 0.5 1.0 1.0 Capital recovery (years) 5 10 5 10 Weighted average cost of capital (rate) 0.10...

  18. Gas supplies of interstate/natural gas pipeline companies 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides information on the interstate pipeline companies' supply of natural gas during calendar year 1989, for use by the FERC for regulatory purposes. It also provides information to other Government agencies, the natural gas industry, as well as policy makers, analysts, and consumers interested in current levels of interstate supplies of natural gas and trends over recent years. 5 figs., 18 tabs.

  19. ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal Separate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    , 2013 to June 30, 2014 (Year 5) The University of California at Santa Cruz's Storm Water Management improvements are referred to as Best Management Practices (BMPs). BMPs will be updated as appropriate1 ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal Separate

  20. SMITHSONIAN DIRECTIVE 212, Federal Personnel Handbook, Chapter 431

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Officials throughout the year. 5. Employees and Rating Officials receive regular and recurring training performance. References: (a) Title 5, United States Code (U.S.C.), Chapter 43 (Performance Appraisal) and (b) Title 5, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR): Part 430 (Performance Management). Coverage The provisions

  1. x0000 -xx xxxx 2006 metrologia Spectral Analysis of Clock Noise: A Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Percival, Don

    x0000 - xx xxxx 2006 metrologia Spectral Analysis of Clock Noise: A Primer Donald B Percival fifty years [4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 13, 15, 18, 19, 23, 25, 26, 27, 35, 37, 41, 42, 49]. Given Metrologia of the major characterizations 2 Metrologia, submitted, xx xxxx 2006, 1-29 #12;Spectral Analysis of Clock Noise

  2. Advanced Review High efficiency photovoltaics: on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    and market electricity sales is often covered by substantial government subsidies. Using the United States PV and a substantial PV electricity share. It is found that--with considerable government support--PV's electricity.57% of the world electricity consumption in the same year.4 Although still in the early stages of its development

  3. Decision Strategies and Susceptibility to Phishing Julie S. Downs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    how and why people fall for them. This study reports preliminary analysis of interviews with 20 non year [4]. Computer security attacks can be classified as physical, syntactic, or semantic. Physical attacks target the physical infrastructure of computer systems and networks, while syntactic attacks

  4. October 27, 2008 1 Abstract--The use of Mixed Integer Programming (MIP) within

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    of MIP within the electric industry is growing. Recently, PJM switched from a Lagrangian Relaxation (LR look- ahead [5]. These changes are estimated to save PJM over 150 million dollars per year [4], [5]. Published in 2005, [9] discusses the tradeoffs between LR and MIP for PJM and a recent presentation, [10

  5. B.A. M.C.M. Plan (154 credits) Year 1(32 -33 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technology (3) ENGR 357 Engineering Economics (3) ARCH 530 Environmental Systems I (3) Certificate Program (2) Year 4 (30 credits) Fall (15 credits) Spring (15 credits) ARCH 531 Environmental Systems II (3 Management (3) CMGT 704 Const Estimating and Bidding (3) CMGT 805 Const Accounting and Financing (3) CMGT 705

  6. DO NOT MAIL ORIGINAL REQUISITION IF FAXED TO PURCHASING THIS IS NOT A PURCHASE ORDER NUMBER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (CONTINUED) TOTAL 13 ESTIMATED TOTAL OF THE REQUISITION / PO BU(2) ORG (5) FUND (4) ACTIVITY (5) PROJECT (8) FUND (4) ACTIVITY (5) PROJECT (8) ACCOUNT (5) A/U(1) YEAR(4 UNIT MEASURE ESTIMATED UNIT PRICE UNIT PRICE EXTENDED PRICE CATEGORY DESCRIPTION (VENDOR CATALOG

  7. insight review articles 680 NATURE | VOL 415 | 7 FEBRUARY 2002 | www.nature.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -term climate changes such as more pronounced El Niño cycles and global warming. Furthermore, resistance burden5 . This has been attributed to several causes, including population movements into malarious years4 . Global transmission patterns The malaria burden is not evenly distributed. The global pattern

  8. State University of New York at Binghamton Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    General Ed Elective (A) Mus/Art/Thea/Cinema General Ed Elective (N) Any social science *Electrical and Applied Science BS in Computer Engineering-Four-Year Program Rockland Community College Elective (H) ENG/THEA/ART/PHIL/CINEMA EECE 382 EECE Seminar II Year 4 Fall Spring BU Course # Course Name

  9. State University of New York at Binghamton Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    203 Professional Elec II General Ed Elec A) Mus/Art/Thea/Cinema General Ed Elec (N) Any social science and Applied Science BS in Electrical Engineering-Four-Year Program Rockland Community College Communication Systems EECE 382 EECE Seminar II General Ed Elective (H) ENG/THEA/ART/PHIL/CINEMA Year 4 Fall

  10. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for the first half of Year 3 of the project has been resource assessment. Emphasis has been on estimating the total volume of hydrocarbons generated and the potential amount of this resource that is classified as deep (>15,000 ft) gas in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, the Manila Subbasin and the Conecuh Subbasin. The amount of this resource that has been expelled, migrated and entrapped is also the focus of the first half of Year 3 of this study.

  11. Updated 7/2014Post-MS Program Plan DNP Program Course Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    and Health Informatics 3 Total 3 Total 3 Total 3 Year2 Advanced Practice Nursing Theory* (N722 or N741 or N751) 3 N761 Program Planning, Evaluation and Quality Improvement 3 N708 Ethics for Advanced Practice in Health Care 2 Elective (can be taken any semester) 3 Total 6 Total 3 Total 2 Year3 N828 Clinical

  12. Updated 7/2014Post-BS Full-Time Program Plan DNP Program Course Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    and Application of Evidence- Based Practice 3 Total 12 Total 12 Total 6 Year2 N726 Foundations for APN Clinical761 Program Planning, Evaluation and Quality Improvement 3 N772 Leadership and Organizational Decision Making in Health Care 3 Elective (can be taken any semester) 3 Total 12 Total 12 Total 2 Year3 N826

  13. Rev. sci. tech. Off. int. Epiz., 2008, 27 (2), 00-00 Predicted climate changes for the years to come

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rev. sci. tech. Off. int. Epiz., 2008, 27 (2), 00-00 Predicted climate changes for the years 3PU, United Kingdom. E-mail: stoned@atm.ox.ac.uk (2) Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research community to produce predictions of future climate change. Predictions for the next few decades

  14. J U N E 2 0 0 7 Somebody is always doing what somebody else said couldn't be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selmic, Sandra

    on how high-temperature thermal spray conditions affected the quality of thermal barrier coatings $ Awarded Glenn Beer Establishing LaCAMPS-Year 3 DOE/LaSPACE 253,936 G. Beer/D.Basinger LaTech/LA GEAR UP

  15. PROJECT SUMMARY ITR: COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH-(ASE)-(DMC-INT): NEW METHODS FOR EXPLORATION OF DEEP-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitcomb, Louis L.

    PROJECT SUMMARY ITR: COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH-(ASE)-(DMC-INT): NEW METHODS FOR EXPLORATION OF DEEP technology research problems which will advance the science and engineering of deep-ocean exploration-engineering as required based on field trial results. Expedition web site. Publications. Year 3: Expedition deploying

  16. FINAL YEAR PROJECT TECHNICAL PAPER PAGE 2222 DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Reynold Cheng Chun

    FINAL YEAR PROJECT TECHNICAL PAPER PAGE 2222 DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING by Mr. Cheng Chun Kong, a year 3 Computer Engineering student from the Electrical and Electronic AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING THE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG 2. DEFINITIONS, ACRONYMS & ABBREVIATIONS The followings

  17. Energy Procedia 00 (2008) 000000 www.elsevier.com/locate/XXX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    , accounting for almost 70% of the total energy consumption, but India still faces serious electricity (56%) do not have electricity, and women and girls spend a total of 80 billion hours each year [3]. The Indian government plans to invest heavily in the rural sectors, seeking to achieve more than

  18. TransForumNews from Argonne's Transportation Research Program www.transportation.anl.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    page 10 A revolutionary advance in our understanding of how diesel engines work may unlock new at the local and regional level. 16 How Might Increased Biofuel Production Affect Midwest Water Supplies Laboratory recently won a three-year, $3.44 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced

  19. Characterization and Simulation of ECBM: History Matching of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    injection target of 20,000 short tons with current pressure will take longer than two years, as projected,000 short tons of CO2 over 2 years. 3. Injection pressure is 700 psig 4. 27 short tons of CO2 20, 600 short tons of CO2 #12;Scenario 2 (Medium Permeability) 12/8/2010 WVU PNGE 14 20, 713 short

  20. This is archived information. Please visit http://www.maths.manchester.ac.uk for current course unit information.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorov, Nikita

    unit information. On-line course materials MATH37012 - Markov Processes Year: 3 - Semester: 2 - Credit Rating: 10 Requisites Prerequisites MATH20701 Probability 2 Aims To develop the idea that processes this course unit The material of this course may be helpful in understanding the 4th year courses

  1. This is archived information. Please visit http://www.maths.manchester.ac.uk for current course unit information.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorov, Nikita

    unit information. On-line course materials MATH39522 - Contingencies 2 Year: 3 - Semester: 2 - Credit Rating: 10 Aims Provide further mathematical instruction in models using cashflows which depend upon survival, death and other uncertain factors. Brief Description Learning Outcomes Appreciate how

  2. LBNL-48380, CBP Note-396 UPDATED ELECTRON-CLOUD SIMULATION RESULTS FOR THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furman, Miguel

    LBNL-48380, CBP Note-396 UPDATED ELECTRON-CLOUD SIMULATION RESULTS FOR THE LARGE HADRON COLLIDER LHC M. A. Furman and M. Pivi, LBNL, Berkeley, CA94720, USA Abstract This paper presents new simulation-cloud effect (ECE) code that has been developed at LBNL over the past five years [3]. We are particularly

  3. Infrasound, the Ear and Wind Turbines Alec N. Salt, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salt, Alec N.

    Infrasound, the Ear and Wind Turbines Alec N. Salt, Ph.D. Department of Otolaryngology there happens to be a castle nearby). #12;Wind turbines haveWind turbines have been getting biggerbeen getting MegaWatts(MW) Total Installed Change by year 3% of US Energy Needs Wind turbines are "green" and areWind

  4. UK Education Abroad 315 Bradley Hall (859) 257-4067 http://www.uky.edu/educationabroad Degree Requirements for the MAT Major

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    , MAT 120 Year 2: US Citizenship, ACC 201, ECO 201, FAM 350, MAT 237, Arts & Creativity, ACC 202, STA 210, ECO 202, MAT 247 Year 3: MKT 300, MAT 340, MAT 315, MAT 350, Professional Support, MAT Elective- ship opportunities in areas such as Marketing, Business, Event Planning/PR, Fashion Business, Fashion

  5. Vehicle Rental Procedure Outline the procedure for renting motor pool vehicles at University of Michigan (U-M).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    Vehicle Rental Procedure Objective Outline the procedure for renting motor pool vehicles at University of Michigan (U-M). Procedure 1. All policies pertaining to U-M vehicles also pertain to motor pool rental vehicles. 2. Motor pool vehicles can be reserved for a period of a few hours up to one year. 3

  6. HEALTHY PLANTS START HERE Crop Rotation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaye, Jason P.

    Cabbage,Broccoli Lettuces Legumes Peas Beans Pole beans Year2 Squash /Corn Cucumbers Squash, Corn Pumpkins Peas Beans Pole beans #12;Year3 Legumes Peas Beans Pole beans Squash /Corn Cucumbers Squash, Corn4 Greens Cauliflower Cabbage,Broccoli Lettuces Legumes Peas Beans Pole beans Squash /Corn Cucumbers

  7. SOFTWARE ENGINEERING January Entry, 120 credit program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doedel, Eusebius

    to Formal Methods for Software Engineering 3 SOEN 341 Software Process 3 Basic Science Year 3 Fall Course Principles and Economics 3 ENGR 391 Numerical Methods in Engineering 3 Note: A minimum of 7 credits from COENSOFTWARE ENGINEERING January Entry, 120 credit program Real-Time, Embedded, and Avionics Software

  8. SOFTWARE ENGINEERING January Entry, 120 credit program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doedel, Eusebius

    Methods for Software Engineering 3 SOEN 341 Software Process 3 Basic Science Year 3 Fall Course Number Project 4 ENGR 301 Engineering Management Principles and Economics 3 SOEN 321 Information Systems SecuritySOFTWARE ENGINEERING January Entry, 120 credit program Computer Games Option Last revised: March

  9. Introduction to the Oak Ridge Reservation 1-1 1. Introduction to the Oak Ridge Reservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    of Anderson and Roane in eastern Tennessee. ORR is home to two major US Department of Energy (DOE) operating reported during the year, (3) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and (4) highlight significant program activities. The report fulfills the requirement contained in DOE O 231.1b

  10. Introduction to the Oak Ridge Reservation 1-1 1. Introduction to the Oak Ridge Reservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    of Anderson and Roane in eastern Tennessee. ORR is home to two major US Department of Energy (DOE) operating the year, (3) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and (4) highlight significant program activities. The report fulfills the requirement contained in DOE O 231.1B, Environment

  11. University of New Hampshire at Manchester connections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Student Employee of theYear. . . . . . . . . 3 Library News . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MAY 2012 WHAT'S INSIDE Constanza Valdés: Inspirational Role Model "June 2, 2006 was the day my Manchester team will now advance to the SIFE USA National Exposition to be held in May in Kansas City, MO

  12. In A. Kuijper, K. Bredies, T. Pock, H. Bischof (Eds.): Scale-Space and Variational Methods in Computer Vision. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 7893, pp.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Computer Vision. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 7893, pp. 319-330, Springer, Berlin, 2013 Image Analysis Group Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Campus E1.7 Saarland University, 66041 years, 3D cinema technology has become increasingly popular. In the corresponding so called multi

  13. State University of New York at Binghamton Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Science BS in Mechanical Engineering-Four-Year Program Rockland Community College-Application curriculum ENR 203 ME 274 Engineering Dynamics ENR 204* General Ed Elective (A) THEA/MUSIC/ART/CINEMA EECE 260 Circuits (with lab) ENR 206 General Ed Elective (N) ANY SOCIAL SCIENCE Year 3---Point of Transfer Fall

  14. 34th Annual International Conference of the IEEE EMBS San Diego, California USA, 28 August -1 September, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhihai "Henry"

    . INTRODUCTION Each year in the United States, over one third of seniors over the age of 65 suffer a fall,2], and the rate of deaths caused by falls in this population has risen substantially in recent years [3]. Since. Rantz Ahstract- Falls are a significant cause of injury and accidental death among persons over the age

  15. Catalytic hydrogenation of an aromatic sulfonyl chloride into thiophenol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rouckout, Nicolas Julien

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    to the facile oxidation by air into disulfides [3]. Many aliphatic thiols are important starting materials for the synthesis of crop- protection agents, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and polysulfides. They are also widely used as polymerization regulators... for the preparation of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, dyes, pigments, rubber, plastics and metal finishing [3]. The current market volume for aromatic thiols was determined to be more than 10 million pounds per year [4]. Aromatic thiols are commonly synthesized...

  16. Immobilized phage proteins for specific detection of staphylococci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter, Yves-Alain

    in hospitals are now due to methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), which is resistant to b-lactams.2,3 It is estimated that at least 3.4 million hospital patients in the U.S. are infected by MRSA each year.4 Community-acquired MRSA is showing a very rapid rise and now accounts for 14% of MRSA infections;5 these infections

  17. Freezing precipitation in the Southeastern United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, William Robert

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    $S million W Tenn Occ 1975 Central and We, c. N Caro U. na $4 ' 5 million over $100, 000 over 5 cm on ground 16 traffic deaths worst in area in 30 year ) 4 killedc 11 injured Jan 1977 (2-3) N Texn Arkc Lac Nisse Ala and Gaa over $6... Bo D ~ F ~ General discussion . . ~ ~ ~ Surface parameters~ 1 ~ Temperature ~ . ~ ~ . . . . . . . ~ . . . ~ 2i D;w poants ~ ~ 3 ~ &inde ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0 4 Pressure . ~ . 5~ Visibility ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 6, Typical surface plot:s...

  18. National Environmental Research Institute Department of Coastal Zone Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -line investigations of birds in relation to an offshore wind farm at Horns Rev, and results from the year.4.1 Potential impacts of offshore wind farms on birds 11 1.5 Base-line investigations 12 2 Methods 13 2.1 Study wind farm at Horns Rev, and results from the year of construction NERI Report 2003, April 10th edition

  19. Class Entering 2012 University of Tennessee Health Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    -7) NSG 642 CNL Seminar 1 (1-0) NSG 618 Quality Management 2 (2-0) Total for Spring Term Year 3 10 (3 (1-0) NSG 630 Transition to Professional Nursing 3 (3-0) Total for Summer Term Year 1 6 (6-0) Fall 1 NSG 621 Pathophysiology 3 (3-0) PHAR 699 Pharmacology 3 (3-0) Total for Fall Term Year 1 6 (6

  20. Wal-Mart could explore the option to sell generated electricity to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yu

    -Benefit Analysis on two types of renewable energy projects 3. Cost-Benefit Analysis considering FIT Financial,000 $400,000 $600,000 $800,000 $1,000,000 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 Year 3 x 50 kW Wind Turbines Cost than wind ·No major overhaul cost ·Lower annual maintenance cost 5. Solar is the Winner! 7. References

  1. Optimization Measures for Sporting and Special Event Facilities: Design and Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giebler, T.; Wei, G.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    television, large video and scoreboard displays, varieties of restaurants and concessions, and large banquet facilities [4]. TV studios and production offices, ticket offices, facility and team offices, practice courts, and team stores are common as well... air quality (IAQ) requirements when thousands of people are in attendance, but this is likely to be the case only 500 to 800 hours a year [3]. In the design of the systems at the Alexander Memorial Coliseum at McDonald's Center, on the Georgia...

  2. Commodity Price Volatility and the Sources of Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavalcanti, Tiago V. de V.; Mohaddes, Kamiar; Raissi, Mehdi

    2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    -2000, show that higher levels of exchange rate volatility can stunt growth, especially in countries with thin capital markets. Bleaney and Greenaway (2001) estimate a panel data model for a sample of 14 sub-Saharan African countries over 1980-1995 and show... countries, we set t0 to this year.5 Furthermore, we assume a depreciation rate, #14;, of six percent and compute the subsequent values of the capital stock as: Kit = (1#0; #14;)Kit#0;1 + Iit: (6) 3.3 Human Capital Stock To calculate the level of human...

  3. FY 2015 EM Budget Rollout Presentation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721Energy 3_adv_battery.pdf More Documents & FYFY-2024 Ten Year5 EM

  4. TS Power Plant, Eureka County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peltier, R. [DTE Energy Services (United States)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Not all coal-fired power plants are constructed by investor-owned utilities or independent power producers selling to wholesale markets. When Newmont Mining Corp. recognised that local power supplies were inadequate and too expensive to meet long-term electricity needs for its major gold- and copper-mining operations in northern Nevada, it built its own generation. What is more, Newmont's privately owned 200-MW net coal-fired plant features power plant technologies that will surely become industry standards. Newmont's investment in power and technology is also golden: the capital cost will be paid back in about eight years. 4 figs.

  5. Waste to Energy: Biogas CHP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fuel to generate electricity, DWU?s Biogas has the potential to reduce the City of Dallas? total grid derived electricity consumption by almost 4% DWU 7% Reduction (30,000,000 kWh/Year) 430,000,000 kWh / Year 60% Reduction (30,000,000 kWh/Year...) 50,000,000 kWh / Year CITY 790,000,000 kWh/Year 4% Reduction (30,000,000 kWh / Year) SOUTHSIDE WWTP Benefits of the Project to the City ? The City will reduce its grid derived electricity needs by approximately 30,000,000 kWh per year...

  6. Calendar Year 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 Building America UpdateCX-001638:6 Categorical13 Calendar Year4

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR4 YEAR

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR4 YEAR7

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR4

  10. Untitled Document

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalThe Outlook269,023Year69,023USWNCFeet) Year4

  11. New Jersey Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawalsYear Jan1 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.22009Year4,450

  12. Alcoa Can't Wait for Tomorrow: Taking Energy Efficiency to the Next Level 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brockway, W.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alcoa Can?t Wait For Tomorrow Taking Energy Efficiency to the next level IETC May 23, 2013 ESL-IE-13-05-26 Proceedings of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 21-24, 2013 Alcoa at a Glance ? Founded..., including the original aluminum process 2 ESL-IE-13-05-26 Proceedings of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 21-24, 2013 The Aluminum Leader for 125 Years 3 F Upstream Bauxite mining Alumina refining...

  13. United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries. Annuary report, February 1, 2004 - June 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehrhart, Susan M.

    2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Three events of significance to the U. S. Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) occurred during this reporting period: 1. The search for a new Associate Director was successful in that Dr. Anthony C. (Tony) James was appointed to the position, 2. A five-year grant for the operation of the USTUR was approved by the U. S. Department of Energy; the previous grant cycles were for three years, 3. I retired from the USTUR Directorship on July 1, 2005 and Tony James became the new Director.

  14. Energy Efficiency/ Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) Volume II - Technical Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Zilbershtein, G.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Clardige, D.; Parker, P.; Ellis, S.; Kim, H.; Gilman, D.; Degelman, L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    &M University System Figure 1: OSD NOx Emissions Reduction Projections through 2020 (Base Year 2008) In 2012, (Table 1) the total integrated annual savings from all programs is 16,413,917 MWh/year. The integrated annual electricity savings... from all the different programs is: ? Savings from code-compliant residential and commercial construction is 498,883 MWh/year (3.0% of the total electricity savings), ? Savings from the PUC’s Senate Bill 7 program is 1,831,318 MWh/year (11...

  15. Alcoa Can't Wait for Tomorrow: Taking Energy Efficiency to the Next Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brockway, W.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alcoa Can?t Wait For Tomorrow Taking Energy Efficiency to the next level IETC May 23, 2013 ESL-IE-13-05-26 Proceedings of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 21-24, 2013 Alcoa at a Glance ? Founded..., including the original aluminum process 2 ESL-IE-13-05-26 Proceedings of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 21-24, 2013 The Aluminum Leader for 125 Years 3 F Upstream Bauxite mining Alumina refining...

  16. T-R Cycle Characterization and Imaging: Advanced Diagnostic Methodology for Petroleum Reservoir and Trap Detection and Delineation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; William C. Parcell; Bruce S. Hart

    2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is to classify the known petroleum reservoirs in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin by using a sequence stratigraphic framework based on T-R sequence terminology, to formulate exploration strategies for identifying specific facies with reservoir potential and for identifying possible stratigraphic traps using a sequence stratigraphic model in combination with the discovered reservoir classification, and to use these exploration strategies to assess the potential for underdeveloped and undiscovered petroleum resources in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  17. Iowa Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building FloorspaceThousandWithdrawals0.0Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3

  18. Iowa Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building FloorspaceThousandWithdrawals0.0Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3Year

  19. Maryland Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0Nov-14Year3,677

  20. EcoCAR 2 races to the finish line | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrack graphics4DimitriJune 30, 2015Vehicles|EcoCAR 2:Year 3

  1. Sumas, WA Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per Thousand

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3

  2. Sumas, WA Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per Thousand

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3Cubic

  3. Tennessee Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet)4. U.S.Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3

  4. Babb, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3Year

  5. Champlain, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear JanDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3

  6. Havre, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3

  7. Arizona Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14 Dec-14Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3

  8. California Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321 2,590FuelDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3

  9. Connecticut Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4487,320

  10. Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3

  11. Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3Thousand Cubic

  12. Connecticut Prices, Sales Volumes & Stocks

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3Thousand Cubic- - -

  13. Connecticut Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3Thousand Cubic- -

  14. Connecticut Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3Thousand Cubic- -1

  15. Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users Prices

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3Thousand Cubic-

  16. Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3Thousand

  17. Corsby, ND Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3ThousandYear Jan

  18. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3ThousandYear Jan

  19. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3ThousandYear Jan

  20. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3ThousandYear Jan

  1. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3ThousandYear Jan

  2. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3ThousandYear Jan

  3. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3ThousandYear

  4. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3ThousandYear 1994

  5. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3ThousandYear 1994

  6. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3ThousandYear 1994

  7. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3ThousandYear 1994

  8. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3ThousandYear

  9. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3ThousandYear 1995

  10. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3ThousandYear 1995

  11. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3ThousandYear 1995

  12. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3ThousandYear 1995

  13. Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3ThousandYear

  14. District of Columbia Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0CubicCubic Feet) Year3,132 3,222

  15. District of Columbia Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0CubicCubic Feet) Year3,132

  16. District of Columbia Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0CubicCubic Feet) Year3,132Cubic

  17. Alaska Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessedDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3

  18. Alaska Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3

  19. Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3Reserves (Billion

  20. Alaska Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3Reserves

  1. Alaska Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3ReservesYear Jan Feb

  2. Alaska Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3ReservesYear Jan

  3. Alaska Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3ReservesYear

  4. Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3ReservesYearGross

  5. U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb MarDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3

  6. U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Other (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb MarDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3Other

  7. U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Propane Air (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb MarDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3OtherPropane

  8. Virginia Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3

  9. Virginia Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3Withdrawals (Million

  10. Virginia Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3Withdrawals

  11. Virginia Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3Withdrawalsand Plant

  12. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3Withdrawalsand

  13. Mexico-U

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUndergroundCubic Feet) Year3: "Meeting the

  14. Mexico-U

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUndergroundCubic Feet) Year3: "Meeting

  15. Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUndergroundCubic Feet) Year3:

  16. Michigan Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUndergroundCubic Feet) Year3:Production

  17. Michigan Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUndergroundCubic Feet) Year3:ProductionProved

  18. Michigan Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUndergroundCubic Feet) Year3:ProductionProved+

  19. Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUndergroundCubicDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3

  20. Natural Gas Citygate Price in Nevada (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Jan Feb MarDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3

  1. A 3-Year Climatology of Cloud and Radiative Properties Derived from GOES-8 Data Over the Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1 Q2 Q3 Ut NOTICE20-Year3-Year

  2. A 3D Superconductor in 1D Clothing | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1 Q2 Q3 Ut NOTICE20-Year3-YearA

  3. South Carolina Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan FebDecadeDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3DecadeInput

  4. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W 1999 January

  5. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W 1999 January

  6. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W 1999 January

  7. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W 1999

  8. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W 199975

  9. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W 199975

  10. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W 1999755

  11. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W 19997557

  12. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W 199975579

  13. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W 19997557911

  14. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W 199975579115

  15. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W

  16. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W

  17. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 393

  18. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 Year

  19. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 Year1

  20. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932

  1. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  2. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  3. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  4. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  5. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  6. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  7. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  8. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  9. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  10. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  11. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  12. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  13. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  14. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  15. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  16. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  17. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  18. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  19. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  20. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  1. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  2. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  3. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  4. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932 2000

  5. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 3932

  6. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 393268.2

  7. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2 393268.22

  8. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W2

  9. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W267.3 64.1

  10. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W267.3

  11. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W267.368.2

  12. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 W267.368.211.1

  13. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7

  14. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 2000 January

  15. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 2000

  16. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 200063.7 64.8

  17. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7 200063.7

  18. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7

  19. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7641.1 33,642.8

  20. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7641.1 33,642.86

  1. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7641.1

  2. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-420093,458.7741.1520.7641.12,720.9

  3. X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3

  4. Microsoft Word - S10873_WCR.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year3 Well Completion Report for

  5. Microsoft Word - S11889_Strategy-Final.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year3 Well Completion Report

  6. Microsoft Word - S11979_1Q14 report.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year3 Well Completion

  7. Microsoft Word - S12161_AltAnalysis 25AUG2014.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year3 Well CompletionAlternatives

  8. Microsoft Word - S12552_2014_Annual_LUC_Report_elh.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year3 Well

  9. Microsoft Word - SHP 2008-final.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year3 WellShiprock, New Mexico Page

  10. Microsoft Word - SHP 2009-draft_final.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year3 WellShiprock, New Mexico

  11. Microsoft Word - SHP-2012_Final.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year3 WellShiprock, New Mexico2

  12. Microsoft Word - SHP_2011_final

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year3 WellShiprock, New

  13. Microsoft Word - Section 5 September 2007.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year3 WellShiprock, NewProject

  14. Microsoft Word - TOC&Units.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year3 WellShiprock, NewProjectTable

  15. Microsoft Word - TR01-15.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year3 WellShiprock,

  16. Microsoft Word - TR01-18.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year3 WellShiprock,Report for the

  17. Microsoft Word - TR02-23.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year3 WellShiprock,Report for

  18. Microsoft Word - TR05-11.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year3 WellShiprock,Report for1

  19. Microsoft Word - TR05-24.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year3 WellShiprock,Report for1Site

  20. Microsoft Word - TR05-28.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year3 WellShiprock,Report

  1. Microsoft Word - TR06-03.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year3 WellShiprock,ReportSite A/Plot

  2. Microsoft Word - TR06-04.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year3 WellShiprock,ReportSite

  3. Microsoft Word - TR06-06.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year3 WellShiprock,ReportSiteSite

  4. Microsoft Word - TR06-12.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year3

  5. Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-42009 2010 2011 2012DecadeDecadeYear

  6. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.

  7. Canadian Seismic Agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basham, P.W.; Lyons, J.A.; Drysdale, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Andersen, F.; Hayman, R.B.; Wetmiller, R.J.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ECTN network has remained stable over the past year; progress on the new concentrator software has been slow. Major developments have taken place in the Ottawa Data Laboratory including the installation of a new VAX system and further development of the Seismic Analysis Monitor software. A new initiative has been the development of hardware and software for the Sudbury Local Telemetered Network, which can be considered a prototype for a smart outstation. The performance of the ECTN over the past year is described along with a summary of eastern Canadian seismicity during the reporting period and a list of EPB research publications on eastern Canadian seismicity during the past year. 4 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Data Collection for Current U.S. Wind Energy Projects: Component Costs, Financing, Operations, and Maintenance; January 2011 - September 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin-Tretton, M.; Reha, M.; Drunsic, M.; Keim, M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DNV Renewables (USA) Inc. (DNV) used an Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Cost Model to evaluate ten distinct cost scenarios encountered under variations in wind turbine component failure rates. The analysis considers: (1) a Reference Scenario using the default part failure rates within the O&M Cost Model, (2) High Failure Rate Scenarios that increase the failure rates of three major components (blades, gearboxes, and generators) individually, (3) 100% Replacement Scenarios that model full replacement of these components over a 20 year operating life, and (4) Serial Failure Scenarios that model full replacement of blades, gearboxes, and generators in years 4 to 6 of the wind project. DNV selected these scenarios to represent a broad range of possible operational experiences. Also in this report, DNV summarizes the predominant financing arrangements used to develop wind energy projects over the past several years and provides summary data on various financial metrics describing those arrangements.

  9. Science and Technology Review March 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolic, R J

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Honoring a Legacy of Service to the Nation - The nation pays tribute to George Miller, who retired in December 2011 as the Laboratory's tenth director; (2) Life-Extension Programs Encompass All Our Expertise - Commentary by Bruce T. Goodwin; (3) Extending the Life of an Aging Weapon - Stockpile stewards have begun work on a multiyear effort to extend the service life of the aging W78 warhead by 30 years; (4) Materials by Design - Material microstructures go three-dimensional with improved additive manufacturing techniques developed at Livermore; (5) Friendly Microbes Power Energy-Producing Devices - Livermore researchers are demonstrating how electrogenic bacteria and microbial fuel cell technologies can produce clean, renewable energy and purify water; and (6) Chemical Sensor Is All Wires, No Batteries - Livermore's 'batteryless' nanowire sensor could benefit applications in diverse fields such as homeland security and medicine.

  10. Summary of Research through Phase II/Year 2 of Initially Approved 3 Phase/3 Year Project - Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Grammer

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This final scientific/technical report covers the first 2 years (Phases I and II of an originally planned 3 Year/3 Phase program). The project was focused on evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin. The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs was the major focus of our efforts in Phases I and II of the project. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault-related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in these 2 studied intervals (based upon fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. In the Niagaran (Silurian), there is a general trend of increasing dolomitization shelfward, with limestone predominant in more basinward positions. A major finding is that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, are directly related to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites which increases the predictability of reservoir quality in these units. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point that the results should be exportable throughout the basin. Much of the data synthesis and modeling for the project was scheduled to be part of Year 3/Phase III, but the discontinuation of funding after Year 2 precluded those efforts. Therefore, the results presented in this document are not final, and in many cases represent a report of 'progress to date' as numerous tasks were scheduled to extend into Year 3.

  11. Letting the Sun Shine on Solar Costs: An Empirical Investigation of Photovoltaic Cost Trends in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.; Cappers, P.; Margolis, R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a comprehensive analysis of grid-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) cost trends in California, which is by far the largest PV market in the United States. The findings of this work may help stakeholders to understand important trends in the California PV market, and policymakers to design more effective solar incentive programs--a particularly important objective given the recent announcement from the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) to establish an 11-year, $3.2 billion incentive program for customer-sited solar. The study statistically analyzes the installed cost of grid-connected PV systems funded by the state's two largest solar rebate programs, overseen by the California Energy Commission (CEC) [operating since 1998] and the CPUC [operating since 2001].

  12. Technical Report (Final): Development of Solid State Reagents for Preparing Radiolabeled Imaging Agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kabalka, George W

    2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research was on the development of new, rapid, and efficient synthetic methods for incorporating short-lived radionuclides into agents of use in measuring dynamic processes. The initial project period (Year 1) was focused on the preparation of stable, solid state precursors that could be used to efficiently incorporate short-lived radioisotopes into small molecules of use in biological applications (environmental, plant, and animal). The investigation included development and evaluation of new methods for preparing carbon-carbon and carbon-halogen bonds for use in constructing the substrates to be radiolabeled. The second phase (Year 2) was focused on developing isotope incorporation techniques using the stable, boronated polymeric precursors. The final phase (Year 3), was focused on the preparation of specific radiolabeled agents and evaluation of their biodistribution using micro-PET and micro-SPECT. In addition, we began the development of a new series of polymeric borane reagents based on polyethylene glycol backbones.

  13. A Collaborative Proposal: Simulating and Understanding Abrupt Climate-Ecosystem Changes During Holocene with NCAR-CCSM3.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhengyu Liu, Bette Otto-Bliesner

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have made significant progress in our proposed work in the last 4 years (3 years plus 1 year of no cost extension). In anticipation of the next phase of study, we have spent time on the abrupt changes since the last glacial maximum. First, we have performed further model-data comparison based on our baseline TRACE-21 simulation and made important progress towards the understanding of several major climate transitions. Second, we have made a significant effort in processing the model output of TRACE-21 and have put this output on a website for access by the community. Third, we have completed many additional sensitivity experiments. In addition, we have organized synthesis workshops to facilitate and promote transient model-data comparison for the international community. Finally, we have identified new areas of interest for Holocene climate changes.

  14. US DOE-AECL cooperative program for development of high-level radioactive waste container fabrication, closure, and inspection techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, E.W.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) plan to initiate a cooperative research program on development of manufacturing processes for high-level radioactive waste containers. This joint program will benefit both countries in the development of processes for the fabrication, final closure in a hot-cell, and certification of the containers. Program activity objectives can be summarized as follows: to support the selection of suitable container fabrication, final closure, and inspection techniques for the candidate materials and container designs that are under development or are being considered in the US and Canadian repository programs; and to investigate these techniques for alternate materials and/or container designs, to be determined in future optimization studies relating to long-term performance of the waste packages. The program participants will carry out this work in a conditional phased approach, and the scope of work for subsequent years will evolve subject to developments in earlier years. The overall term of this cooperative program is planned to run roughly three years. 5 refs., 2 tabs.

  15. Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy in Prostate Glands <20 cm{sup 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayadev, Jyoti [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.or [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Reed, Joshua R.; Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Allen, Zachariah A. [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Health Care System, Group Health Cooperative, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetry, treatment-related morbidity, and biochemical outcomes for brachytherapy in patients with prostate glands <20 cm{sup 3}. Methods and Materials: From November 1996 to October 2006, 104 patients with prostate glands <20 cm{sup 3} underwent brachytherapy. Multiple prostate, urethral, and rectal dosimetric parameters were evaluated. Treatment-related urinary and rectal morbidity were assessed from patient questionnaires. Cause-specific survival, biochemical progression-free survival, and overall survival were recorded. Results: The median patient age, follow up, and pre-treatment ultrasound volume was 64 years, 5.0 years and 17.6cm{sup 3}, respectively. Median day 0 dosimetry was significant for the following: V100 98.5%, D90 126.1% and R100 <0.5% of prescription dose. The mean urethral and maximum urethral doses were 119.6% and 133.8% of prescription. The median time to International Prostate Symptom Score resolution was 4 months. There were no RTOG grade III or IV rectal complications. The cause-specific survival, biochemical progression-free survival, and overall survival rates were 100%, 92.5%, and 77.8% at 9 years. For biochemically disease-free patients, the median most recent postbrachytherapy PSA value was 0.02 ng/mL. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that brachytherapy for small prostate glands is highly effective, with an acceptable morbidity profile, excellent postimplant dosimetry, acceptable treatment-related morbidity, and favorable biochemical outcomes.

  16. Clean coal technology: The new coal era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Coal Technology Program is a government and industry cofunded effort to demonstrate a new generation of innovative coal processes in a series of full-scale showcase`` facilities built across the country. Begun in 1986 and expanded in 1987, the program is expected to finance more than $6.8 billion of projects. Nearly two-thirds of the funding will come from the private sector, well above the 50 percent industry co-funding expected when the program began. The original recommendation for a multi-billion dollar clean coal demonstration program came from the US and Canadian Special Envoys on Acid Rain. In January 1986, Special Envoys Lewis and Davis presented their recommendations. Included was the call for a 5-year, $5-billion program in the US to demonstrate, at commercial scale, innovative clean coal technologies that were beginning to emerge from research programs both in the US and elsewhere in the world. As the Envoys said: if the menu of control options was expanded, and if the new options were significantly cheaper, yet highly efficient, it would be easier to formulate an acid rain control plan that would have broader public appeal.

  17. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

    2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second quarterly progress report for Year-4 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between October 1, 2002 and December 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks. (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System, Task 4: Addition of a Pipe Rotation System. (b) New research project (Task 9b): ''Development of a Foam Generator/Viscometer for Elevated Pressure and Elevated Temperature (EPET) Conditions''. (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b). (f) New Research project (Task 13): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (g) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (h) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  18. U.S. Council for Energy Awareness 1992-1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report of the US Council for Energy Awareness covers the following main topics. (1) Electricity and Economic growth: growth of these has been roughly parallel. New electric generating capacity will be needed if the US is to sustain economic growth. All resources - coal, oil, natural gas, renewables, energy efficiency, and nuclear energy - have a role to play. (2) Nuclear Energy and the Environment: Nuclear energy is one of the cleanest sources of electric power. (3) Nuclear Power and Energy Independence: Nuclear energy is partly responsible for the dramatic reduction in oil use by electric utilities over the past 20 years. (4) Nuclear Energy: Insurance for the future: As US utilities plan to meet the growing need for electric power, they face major uncertainties (increased competion; the extent that demand-side management and efficiency can reduce need; future price and supply of natural gas; impact of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments; possibility of increased fossil fuel restrictions) Nuclear energy represents prudent, strategic planning against these uncertainties.

  19. Creation and destruction of C{sub 60} and other fullerene solids. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huffman, D.R.

    1996-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 announcement of the Huffman-Kratschmer fullerene-production technique set off a world-wide explosion of research into the properties and potential applications of C{sub 60} and C{sub 70}. In the last five years, 4,000+ fullerene articles have appeared in the scientific literature dealing with these fascinating molecules and their condensed phases. They possess a complex chemistry reminiscent of the alkenes, and this has led to the syntheses of numerous new compounds and fullerene-based materials, with suggested applications ranging from medicine to photo-conducting polymers to rocket fuel. The work summarized in this report focused on the creation and destruction of fullerene-based materials, for the purpose of producing new materials of interest. This three year project was supported by a grant from the Advanced Energy Projects Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FG03-93ER12133). Following are outlines of the work completed in each of the three years, a section devoted to the professional and educational development of those involved, a brief section on the outlook for fullerene-based materials, and an appendix listing the publications resulting from this project.

  20. Fusion Energy Advisory Committee (FEAC): Panel 7 report on Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, R.; Ripin, B.; Abdou, M.; Baldwin, D.E.; Commisso, R.; Dean, S.O.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.; Lee, E.; Lindl, J.; McCrory, R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The charge to FEAC Panel 7 on inertial fusion energy (IFE) is encompassed in the four articles of correspondence. To briefly summarize, the scope of the panel`s review and analysis adhered to the following guidelines. (1) Consistent with previous recommendations by the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee (FPAC) and the National Academy of Science (NAS) panel on inertial fusion, the principal focus of FEAC Panel 7`s review and planning activities for next-generation experimental facilities in IFE was limited to heavy ions. (2) The panel considered the three budget cases: $5M, $10M, and $15M annual funding at constant level-of-effort (FY92 dollars), with a time horizon of about five years. (3) While limiting the analysis of next-generation experimental facilities to heavy ions, the panel assessed both the induction and rf linac approaches, and factored European plans into its considerations as well. (4) Finally, the panel identified high-priority areas in system studies and supporting IFE technologies, taking into account how IFE can benefit from related activities funded by the Office of Fusion Energy and by Defense Programs. This report presents the technical assessment, findings, and recommendations on inertial fusion energy prepared by FEAC Panel 7.

  1. Gilliam County Riparian Buffers; 2003-2004 Annual Reports.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coiner, Josh (Gilliam Soil and Water Conservation District, Condon, OR)

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interest appears to be at an all-time high for riparian conservation programs in Gilliam County. With the recently added Herbaceous Buffer and the already established CREP program interest is booming. However, more and more people are turning towards the herbaceous buffer because of expense. The riparian forest buffer is becoming too expensive. Even with the excellent cost share and incentives landowners are having trouble with Farm Service Agency's payment limitation. Because of this payment limitation landowners are not receiving their full rental and incentive payments, usually in year one. This has cooled the installation of riparian forest buffers and peaked interest in the CP-29 (Herbaceous Buffer for Wildlife). Either way, riparian lands are being enhanced and water quality is being improved. Year three should be very similar to the accomplishments of year 2. There has already been several projects proposed that may or may not be approved during year 3. I am currently working on three projects that are all over 2.5 miles long on each side and total anywhere from 60 to 250 acres in size. Along with these three projects there at least seven small projects being proposed. Four of those projects are riparian forest buffers and the remaining are herbaceous buffers.

  2. A preliminary review of energy savings from EADC plant audits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilfert, G.L.; Kinzey, B.R.; Kaae, P.S.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the long-term energy savings attributed to industrial plant energy audits conducted under the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADC) Program. By the end of FY91, this program is expected to have performed over 3600 plant energy audits since it began in late 1976. During FY91, 500 of the 3600 are expected to be completed. Currently, 18 universities participate in the program. DOE's expansion plan, as specified in the National Energy Strategy, calls for adding three universities to the program during FY92. This review, requested by the OIT as part of their program planning effort, is preliminary and limited in scope. The primary purpose of this paper is to independently assess the accuracy of past energy savings reporting, specifically: whether a 2-year assessment horizon for identifying implemented ECOs captures all the ECOs implemented under the program whether the number of implemented ECOs and thus, the energy savings associated with program audits, significantly decrease in years 3 through 7 after the audit.

  3. A preliminary review of energy savings from EADC plant audits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilfert, G.L.; Kinzey, B.R.; Kaae, P.S.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the long-term energy savings attributed to industrial plant energy audits conducted under the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADC) Program. By the end of FY91, this program is expected to have performed over 3600 plant energy audits since it began in late 1976. During FY91, 500 of the 3600 are expected to be completed. Currently, 18 universities participate in the program. DOE`s expansion plan, as specified in the National Energy Strategy, calls for adding three universities to the program during FY92. This review, requested by the OIT as part of their program planning effort, is preliminary and limited in scope. The primary purpose of this paper is to independently assess the accuracy of past energy savings reporting, specifically: whether a 2-year assessment horizon for identifying implemented ECOs captures all the ECOs implemented under the program whether the number of implemented ECOs and thus, the energy savings associated with program audits, significantly decrease in years 3 through 7 after the audit.

  4. Three-dimensional Analytical Description of Magnetised Winds from Oblique Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tchekhovskoy, Alexander; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rotating neutron stars, or pulsars, are plausibly the source of power behind many astrophysical systems, such as gamma-ray bursts, supernovae, pulsar wind nebulae and supernova remnants. In the past several years, 3D numerical simulations made it possible to compute pulsar spindown luminosity from first principles and revealed that oblique pulsar winds are more powerful than aligned ones. However, what causes this enhanced power output of oblique pulsars is not understood. In this work, using time-dependent 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and force-free simulations, we show that, contrary to the standard paradigm, the open magnetic flux, which carries the energy away from the pulsar, is laterally non-uniform. We argue that this non-uniformity is the primary reason for the increased luminosity of oblique pulsars. To demonstrate this, we construct simple analytic descriptions of aligned and orthogonal pulsar winds and combine them to obtain an accurate 3D description of the pulsar wind for any obliquity. Our appro...

  5. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2010 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to: (1) Characterize site environmental management performance. (2) Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year. (3) Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements. (4) Highlight significant environmental accomplishments, including progress toward the DOE Environmental Sustainability Goals made through implementation of the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS). The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the management and operating contractor (MOC), Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS), maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the WIPP. DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and workers, and preservation of the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, which requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Chief Health, Safety, and Security Officer. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number NM4890139088-TSDF (Permit) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED).

  6. Large-scale solar cycle features of solar photospheric magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Song

    2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well accepted that the solar cycle originates from a magnetohydrodynamics dynamo deep inside the Sun. Many dynamo models have long been proposed based on a lot of observational constraints. In this paper, using 342 NSO/Kitt Peak solar synoptic charts we study the solar cycle phases in different solar latitudinal zones to set further constraints. Our results can be summarized as follows. (1) The variability of solar polar regions' area has a correlation with total unsigned magnetic flux in advance of 5 years. (2) The high-latitude region mainly appears unipolar in the whole solar cycle and its flux peak time lags sunspot cycle for 3 years. (3) For the activity belt, it is not surprised that its phase be the same as sunspot's. (4) The flux peak time of the low-latitude region shifts forward with an average gradient of 32.2 $day/deg$. These typical characteristics may provide some hints for constructing an actual solar dynamo.

  7. Benefit/cost framework for evaluating modular energy storage : a study for the DOE energy storage systems program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA); Schoenung, Susan M. (Longitude 122 West, Inc., Menlo Park, CA)

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work documented in this report represents another step in the ongoing investigation of innovative and potentially attractive value propositions for electricity storage by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Program. This study uses updated cost and performance information for modular energy storage (MES) developed for this study to evaluate four prospective value propositions for MES. The four potentially attractive value propositions are defined by a combination of well-known benefits that are associated with electricity generation, delivery, and use. The value propositions evaluated are: (1) transportable MES for electric utility transmission and distribution (T&D) equipment upgrade deferral and for improving local power quality, each in alternating years, (2) improving local power quality only, in all years, (3) electric utility T&D deferral in year 1, followed by electricity price arbitrage in following years; plus a generation capacity credit in all years, and (4) electric utility end-user cost management during times when peak and critical peak pricing prevail.

  8. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY FROM UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER CARBONATES THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES AT WOMACK HILL OIL FIELD, CHOCTAW AND CLARKE COUNTIES, EASTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates are undertaking a focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling and an integrated field demonstration project at Womack Hill Oil Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The principal research efforts for Year 3 of the project have been recovery technology analysis and recovery technology evaluation. The research focus has primarily been on well test analysis, 3-D reservoir simulation, microbial core experiments, and the decision to acquire new seismic data for the Womack Hill Field area. Although Geoscientific Reservoir Characterization and 3-D Geologic Modeling have been completed and Petrophysical and Engineering Characterization and Microbial Characterization are essentially on schedule, a no-cost extension until September 30, 2003, has been granted by DOE so that new seismic data for the Womack Hill Field can be acquired and interpreted to assist in the determination as to whether Phase II of the project should be implemented.

  9. Plants, Weathering, and the Evolution of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Oxygen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berner, Robert A

    2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past six years we have published 24 papers that can be divided into three sections: (1) Study of plants and weathering, (2) modeling the evolution of atmospheric CO2 over Phanerozoic time (past 550 million years). (3) Modeling of atmospheric O2 over Phanerozoic time. References to papers published acknowledging this grant can be found at the end of this report and almost all are supplied in pdf form. (1) In the temperate forests of the Cascade Mountains, USA, calcium and magnesium meet vastly different fates beneath angiosperms vs gymnosperms. Calcium is leached beneath both groves of trees, but leached 20-40% more beneath the angiosperms. Magnesium is retained in the forest system beneath the angiosperms and leached from beneath the gymnosperms. (2) We have shown that climate and CO2, based on both carbon cycle modeling and hundreds of independent proxies for paleo-CO2, correlate very well over the past 550 million year. In a recent paper we use this correlation to deduce the sensitivity of global mean temperature to a doubling of atmospheric CO2, and results are in excellent agreement with the results of climatologists based on the historical record and on theoretical climate models (GCM’s).(3) We have shown that concentrations of atmospheric oxygen, calculated by a combined carbon-sulfur cycle model, over the past 550 million years have varied with and influenced biological evolution.

  10. Fundamentals of Mercury Oxidation in Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JoAnn S. Lighty; Geoffrey Silcox; Andrew Fry; Joseph Helble; Balaji Krishnakumar

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to understand the importance of and the contribution of gas-phase and solid-phase coal constituents in the mercury oxidation reactions. The project involves both experimental and modeling efforts. The team is comprised of the University of Utah, Reaction Engineering International, and the University of Connecticut. The objective is to determine the experimental parameters of importance in the homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation reactions; validate models; and, improve existing models. Parameters to be studied include HCl, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2} concentrations, ash constituents, and temperature. This report summarizes Year 3 results for the experimental and modeling tasks. Experiments have been completed on the effects of chlorine. However, the experiments with sulfur dioxide and NO, in the presence of water, suggest that the wet-chemistry analysis system, namely the impingers, is possibly giving erroneous results. Future work will investigate this further and determine the role of reactions in the impingers on the oxidation results. The solid-phase experiments have not been completed and it is anticipated that only preliminary work will be accomplished during this study.

  11. Final Scientific Report (FSR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Granzin

    2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Flambeau River Papers �Manufacturing Conversion for Energy Efficiency� Project has identified the following goals and objectives: 1. A low pressure accumulator tank will be installed to capture low pressure gases for reuse. The estimated cost is $2.1 million with an energy savings of $500,000 annually or enough natural gas savings to heat 590 average Wisconsin homes. 2. Replace the steam turbine and upgrade Paper Machine #3, the largest of Flambeau River Papers machines, at a cost of $6.265 million. The result will save enough natural gas to heat 141 average homes, or about $1.2-million each year. 3. Install a new cyclonic and cell fracturing technology dryer to reduce moisture in both sludge and biomass wastes. The estimated cost of this task is $1.5-million with an annual energy savings of $700,000. It will also eliminate all coal burning at Flambeau River Papers (7,200 tons of coal annually).

  12. Environmental data and analyses for the proposed management of spent nuclear fuel on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Socolof, M.L.; Curtis, A.H.; Blasing, T.J. [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE needs to continue the safe and efficient management of SNF on ORR, based on the requirement for future SNF storage capacity and implementation of the ROD for the PEIS. DOE is proposing to implement the ROD through proper management of SNF on ORR, including the possible construction and operation of a dry cask storage facility. This report describes the potentially affected environment and analyzes impacts on various resources due to the proposed action. The information provided in this report is intended to support the Environmental Assessment being prepared for the proposed activities. Construction of the dry cask storage facility would result in minimal or no impacts on groundwater, surface water, and ecological resources. Contaminated soils excavated during construction would result in negligible risk to human health and to biota. Except for noise from trucks and equipment, operation of the dry cask storage facility would not be expected to have any impact on vegetation, wildlife, or rare plants or animals. Noise impacts would be minimal. Operation exposures to the average SNF storage facility worker would not exceed approximately 0.40 mSv/year (40 mrem/year). The off-site population dose within an 80-km (50-mile) radius of ORR from SNF operations would be less than 0.052 person-Sv/year (5.2 person-rem/year). Impacts from incident-free transportation on ORR would be less than 1.36 X 10{sup -4} occupational fatal cancers and 4.28 X 10{sup -6} public fatal cancers. Credible accident scenarios that would result in the greatest probable risks would cause less than one in a million cancer fatalities to workers and the public.

  13. Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical background briefing report is the first step in the preparation of a plan for engineering research oriented toward Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. A five-year leasing schedule for the ice-prone waters of the Arctic offshore is presented, which also shows the projected dates of the lease sale for each area. The estimated peak production rates for these areas are given. There is considerable uncertainty for all these production estimates, since no exploratory drilling has yet taken place. A flow chart is presented which relates the special Arctic factors, such as ice and permafrost, to the normal petroleum production sequence. Some highlights from the chart and from the technical review are: (1) in many Arctic offshore locations the movement of sea ice causes major lateral forces on offshore structures, which are much greater than wave forces; (2) spray ice buildup on structures, ships and aircraft will be considerable, and must be prevented or accommodated with special designs; (3) the time available for summer exploratory drilling, and for deployment of permanent production structures, is limited by the return of the pack ice. This time may be extended by ice-breaking vessels in some cases; (4) during production, icebreaking workboats will service the offshore platforms in most areas throughout the year; (5) transportation of petroleum by icebreaking tankers from offshore tanker loading points is a highly probable situation, except in the Alaskan Beaufort; and (6) Arctic pipelines must contend with permafrost, making instrumentation necessary to detect subtle changes of the pipe before rupture occurs.

  14. SALTSTONE 4QCY11 TCLP RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives waste from Tank 50H for treatment. In the fourth quarter of the 2011 calendar year (4QCY11), Tank 50H accepted transfers of approximately 10 kgal from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), approximately 4 kgal from 211H, approximately 573 kgal from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU) Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSS-HT), and approximately 5 kgal from other sources. The Saltstone Grout Sampling plan provides the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) with the chemical and physical characterization strategy for the salt solution which is to be disposed of in the Z-Area Solid Waste Landfill (SWLF). During operation, samples were collected from Tank 50H and grout samples prepared to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout to meet the requirements of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24(b) and R.61-79.268.48(a). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to prepare saltstone from samples of Tank 50H obtained Oct. 12, 2011 during 4QCY11 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&W TSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) 2 and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals - arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver - analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. B&W TSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the UHCs benzene, phenols and total and amenable cyanide.

  15. Digging for Treasure - Unique Fate and Transport Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Zirker; M. K. Adler-Flitton; G. A. Beitel

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1970, scientists at the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), now called the National Institute of Standards and Testing (NIST), implemented the most ambitious and comprehensive long-term corrosion behavior test for stainless steels in soil environments. This study had historic significance since the NBS 1957 landmark corrosion textbook compiled by Romanoff did not include stainless steels, and this 1970 research set forth to complete the missing body of knowledge. To conduct the test, NIST scientists buried 6,324 coupons from stainless steel types, specialty alloys, composite configurations, multiple material forms, and treatment conditions at six distinctive soil-type sites throughout the country. Between 1971 and 1980, four sets of coupons were removed from the six sites to establish 1-year, 2-year, 4-year, and 8- year corrosion rates data sets for different soil environments. The fifth and last set of coupons (approximately 200 at each site) remains undisturbed after 32-years, providing a virtual buried treasure of material and subsurface scientific data. These buried coupons and the surrounding soils represent an analog to the condition of buried waste and containers. Heretofore, the samples were simply pulled from the soil, measured for mass loss and the corrosion rate determined while the subsurface/fate and transport information was not considered nor gathered. Funded through an Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) proposal, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Bechtel-BWXT Idaho, LLC (BBWI), is chartered to restart this corrosion test and concurrently capture the available subsurface/fate and transport information. Since the work of retrieving the buried metal coupons is still in the planning stage, this paper outlines the interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers and defines the benefits of this research to long-term stewardship, subsurface science, and infrastructure protection programs.

  16. Digging for Treasure - Unique Fate and Transport Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zirker, L.R.; Adler-Flitton, M.K.; Beitel, G.A.

    2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1970, scientists at the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), now called the National Institute of Standards and Testing (NIST), implemented the most ambitious and comprehensive long-term corrosion behavior test for stainless steels in soil environments. This study had historic significance since the NBS 1957 landmark corrosion textbook compiled by Romanoff did not include stainless steels, and this 1970 research set forth to complete the missing body of knowledge. To conduct the test, NIST scientists buried 6,324 coupons from stainless steel types, specialty alloys, composite configurations, multiple material forms, and treatment conditions at six distinctive soil-type sites throughout the country. Between 1971 and 1980, four sets of coupons were removed from six sites to establish 1-year, 2-year, 4-year, and 8-year corrosion rates data sets for different soil environments. The fifth and last set of coupons (approximately 200 at each site) remains undisturbed after 32-years, providing a virtual buried treasure of material and subsurface scientific data. These buried coupons and the surrounding soils represent an analog to the condition of buried waste and containers. Heretofore, the samples were simply pulled from the soil, measured for mass loss and the corrosion rate determined while the subsurface/fate and transport information was not considered nor gathered. Funded through an Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) proposal, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Bechtel-BWXT Idaho, LLC (BBWI), is chartered to restart this corrosion test and concurrently capture the available subsurface/fate and transport information. Since the work of retrieving the buried metal coupons is still in the planning stage, this paper outlines the interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers and defines the benefits of this research to long-term stewardship, subsurface science, and infrastructure protection programs.

  17. Past challenges faced: An overview of current educational activities of IUTOX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dybing, Erik [Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, NO-0403 Oslo (Norway)]. E-mail: erik.dybing@fhi.no; MacGregor, Judith [Toxicology Consulting Services, Arnold, MD 21012 (United States); Malmfors, Torbjoern [Malmfors Consulting AB, Johanneshov (Sweden); Chipman, J. Kevin [University of Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Wright, Paul [RMIT University, Bundoora, Melbourne (Australia)

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past decade, educational programmes have been the main focus of the activities of the International Union of Toxicology (IUTOX). The IUTOX educational programmes are dynamic and have been growing in scope and frequency each year. It is envisaged that this growth will continue with guidance from our member societies and the continuing support of our sponsors. Presently, IUTOX is engaged in the following educational programmes: (1) International congresses that provide the opportunity for direct communication of current toxicological information. Fellowships are sponsored to facilitate attendance at these congresses for toxicologists in need. (2) Workshops that permit interaction on a more localised level of topics of more regional interest. Workshops have served to help stimulate formation of toxicology societies by bringing together sufficient scientists to facilitate these discussions. (3) Continuing educational (CE) programmes at member society meetings. Topics are prioritised based on input received from the local societies. Programmes often are those from CE courses given at meetings, such as conferences of the US Society of Toxicology (US SOT) and EUROTOX from the previous year. (4) Biennial Risk Assessment Summer School (RASS), an intensive week-long interaction between senior toxicologists who serve as faculty with attendees providing individual training. (5) Dissemination of donated printed toxicological books from publishers and syllabi from continuing education courses to regional locations. (6) Web-based interactive training programmes in regions where formal toxicological educational programmes are limited or lacking. (7) Preparation and distribution of monographs on selected topics of very current interest. Monographs on environmental oestrogens and genetically-modified foods have been published. The recent activities in each of these programmes are reviewed in this paper.

  18. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling that utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling, testing of the geologic-engineering model, and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of seismic attributes, (2) petrophysical characterization, (3) data integration, (4) the building of the geologic-engineering model, (5) the testing of the geologic-engineering model and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 3. Progress on the project is as follows: geoscientific reservoir characterization is completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been completed. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The models represent an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic models served as the framework for the simulations. The geologic-engineering models of the Appleton and Vocation Field reservoirs have been developed. These models are being tested. The geophysical interpretation for the paleotopographic feature being tested has been made, and the study of the data resulting from drilling of a well on this paleohigh is in progress. Numerous presentations on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been made at professional meetings and conferences and a short course on microbial reservoir characterization and modeling based on these fields has been prepared.

  19. Transformation of Resources to Reserves: Next Generation Heavy-Oil Recovery Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanford University; Department of Energy Resources Engineering Green Earth Sciences

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report and technical progress report describes work performed from October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2007 for the project 'Transformation of Resources to Reserves: Next Generation Heavy Oil Recovery Techniques', DE-FC26-04NT15526. Critical year 3 activities of this project were not undertaken because of reduced funding to the DOE Oil Program despite timely submission of a continuation package and progress on year 1 and 2 subtasks. A small amount of carried-over funds were used during June-August 2007 to complete some work in the area of foamed-gas mobility control. Completion of Year 3 activities and tasks would have led to a more thorough completion of the project and attainment of project goals. This progress report serves as a summary of activities and accomplishments for years 1 and 2. Experiments, theory development, and numerical modeling were employed to elucidate heavy-oil production mechanisms that provide the technical foundations for producing efficiently the abundant, discovered heavy-oil resources of the U.S. that are not accessible with current technology and recovery techniques. Work fell into two task areas: cold production of heavy oils and thermal recovery. Despite the emerging critical importance of the waterflooding of viscous oil in cold environments, work in this area was never sanctioned under this project. It is envisioned that heavy oil production is impacted by development of an understanding of the reservoir and reservoir fluid conditions leading to so-called foamy oil behavior, i.e, heavy-oil solution gas drive. This understanding should allow primary, cold production of heavy and viscous oils to be optimized. Accordingly, we evaluated the oil-phase chemistry of crude oil samples from Venezuela that give effective production by the heavy-oil solution gas drive mechanism. Laboratory-scale experiments show that recovery correlates with asphaltene contents as well as the so-called acid number (AN) and base number (BN) of the crude oil. A significant number of laboratory-scale tests were made to evaluate the solution gas drive potential of West Sak (AK) viscous oil. The West Sak sample has a low acid number, low asphaltene content, and does not appear foamy under laboratory conditions. Tests show primary recovery of about 22% of the original oil in place under a variety of conditions. The acid number of other Alaskan North Slope samples tests is greater, indicating a greater potential for recovery by heavy-oil solution gas drive. Effective cold production leads to reservoir pressure depletion that eases the implementation of thermal recovery processes. When viewed from a reservoir perspective, thermal recovery is the enhanced recovery method of choice for viscous and heavy oils because of the significant viscosity reduction that accompanies the heating of oil. One significant issue accompanying thermal recovery in cold environments is wellbore heat losses. Initial work on thermal recovery found that a technology base for delivering steam, other hot fluids, and electrical heat through cold subsurface environments, such as permafrost, was in place. No commercially available technologies are available, however. Nevertheless, the enabling technology of superinsulated wells appears to be realized. Thermal subtasks focused on a suite of enhanced recovery options tailored to various reservoir conditions. Generally, electrothermal, conventional steam-based, and thermal gravity drainage enhanced oil recovery techniques appear to be applicable to 'prime' Ugnu reservoir conditions to the extent that reservoir architecture and fluid conditions are modeled faithfully here. The extent of reservoir layering, vertical communication, and subsurface steam distribution are important factors affecting recovery. Distribution of steam throughout reservoir volume is a significant issue facing thermal recovery. Various activities addressed aspects of steam emplacement. Notably, hydraulic fracturing of horizontal steam injection wells and implementation of steam trap control that limits steam entry into hor

  20. Observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: A reappraisal after WMAP-3y and first MINOS results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; A. Marrone; A. Melchiorri; A. Palazzo; P. Serra; J. Silk; A. Slosar

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In the light of recent neutrino oscillation and non-oscillation data, we revisit the phenomenological constraints applicable to three observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: The effective neutrino mass in single beta decay (m_beta); the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless double beta decay (m_2beta); and the sum of neutrino masses in cosmology (Sigma). In particular, we include the constraints coming from the first Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) data and from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) three-year (3y) data, as well as other relevant cosmological data and priors. We find that the largest neutrino squared mass difference is determined with a 15% accuracy (at 2-sigma) after adding MINOS to world data. We also find upper bounds on the sum of neutrino masses Sigma ranging from ~2 eV (WMAP-3y data only) to ~0.2 eV (all cosmological data) at 2-sigma, in agreement with previous studies. In addition, we discuss the connection of such bounds with those placed on the matter power spectrum normalization parameter sigma_8. We show how the partial degeneracy between Sigma and sigma_8 in WMAP-3y data is broken by adding further cosmological data, and how the overall preference of such data for relatively high values of sigma_8 pushes the upper bound of Sigma in the sub-eV range. Finally, for various combination of data sets, we revisit the (in)compatibility between current Sigma and m_2beta constraints (and claims), and derive quantitative predictions for future single and double beta decay experiments.

  1. Interim operations report for atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion conversion at Northern States Power Company

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thimsen, D. (Hamilton Maurer International, Inc., Falcon Heights, MN (USA))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Northern States Power Company converted its Black Dog Station Unit No. 2 boiler from a front wall fired pulverized coal boiler to a bubbling atmospheric fluidized bed combustor (AFBC) boiler. The resulting unit was uprated from 85 MWe to 130 MWe burning western subbituminous coal. This report describes the AFBC operating and maintenance experience in the startup period from initial operation in June 1986 through March 1989 when a turbine oil fire caused a forced outage of 8 months. A brief review of the construction history is given in Section 1. Section 2 chronicles the AFBC operation. Section 3 describes how the boiler is restarted under several conditions. The performance history of the systems in the AFBC that are peculiar to the AFBC process or directly impacted by the AFBC process are described in detail in Section 4. The AFBC conversion at the Black Dog station has met nearly all of the original design objectives: (1) The unit can operate at rated output of 130 MWe burning western subbituminous coal, (2) The design life of the unit has been extended 25 years, (3) It has been shown that the EPA New Source Performance Standards for NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} can be met with no flue gas treatment, (4) Operators have conducted over 200 routine daily unit restarts confirming the ability of the unit to serve in daily cycling mode, and (5) A variety of fuels have been successfully burned in the AFBC. The only objective that remains partially achieved is routine operation at full load. The boiler/turbine/generator have been shown to be fully capable of operation at full load, but the electrostatic precipitators (which were largely unchanged during the retrofit) have been inadequate to allow full load operation while remaining within permitted opacity and particulate emissions. The unit is currently dispatched in daily cycling service and is limited to operation below 106 MWe by its emissions control permit. 12 refs., 34 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Longitudinal Investigation of Adaptive Functioning Following Conformal Irradiation for Pediatric Craniopharyngioma and Low-Grade Glioma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Netson, Kelli L. [Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Kansas University School of Medicine—Wichita, Kansas (United States)] [Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Kansas University School of Medicine—Wichita, Kansas (United States); Conklin, Heather M. [Department of Psychology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Psychology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping [Department of Biostatistics, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Merchant, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Children treated for brain tumors with conformal radiation therapy experience preserved cognitive outcomes. Early evidence suggests that adaptive functions or independent-living skills may be spared. This longitudinal investigation prospectively examined intellectual and adaptive functioning during the first 5 years following irradiation for childhood craniopharyngioma and low-grade glioma (LGG). The effect of visual impairment on adaptive outcomes was investigated. Methods and Materials: Children with craniopharyngioma (n=62) and LGG (n=77) were treated using conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy. The median age was 8.05 years (3.21-17.64 years) and 8.09 years (2.20-19.27 years), respectively. Serial cognitive evaluations including measures of intelligence quotient (IQ) and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS) were conducted at preirradiation baseline, 6 months after treatment, and annually through 5 years. Five hundred eighty-eight evaluations were completed during the follow-up period. Results: Baseline assessment revealed no deficits in IQ and VABS indices for children with craniopharyngioma, with significant (P<.05) longitudinal decline in VABS Communication and Socialization indices. Clinical factors associated with more rapid decline included females and preirradiation chemotherapy (interferon). The only change in VABS Daily Living Skills correlated with IQ change (r=0.34; P=.01) in children with craniopharyngioma. Children with LGG performed below population norms (P<.05) at baseline on VABS Communication, Daily Living Indices, and the Adaptive Behavior Composite, with significant (P<.05) longitudinal decline limited to VABS Communication. Older age at irradiation was a protective factor against longitudinal decline. Severe visual impairment did not independently correlate with poorer adaptive outcomes for either tumor group. Conclusions: There was relative sparing of postirradiation functional outcomes over time in this sample. Baseline differences in functional abilities before the initiation of irradiation suggested that other factors influence functional outcomes above and beyond the effects of irradiation.

  3. Prognostic Impact of External Beam Radiation Therapy in Patients Treated With and Without Extended Surgery and Intraoperative Electrons for Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer: 16-Year Experience in a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvo, Felipe A. [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Institute of Research Investigation, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Sole, Claudio V., E-mail: cvsole@uc.cl [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Institute of Research Investigation, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Service of Radiation Oncology, Instituto de Radiomedicina, Santiago (Chile); Alvarez de Sierra, Pedro [Service of General Surgery, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Gómez-Espí, Marina [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Service of Radiation Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Institute of Research Investigation, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Blanco, Jose [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Institute of Research Investigation, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); and others

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To analyze prognostic factors associated with survival in patients after intraoperative electrons containing resective surgical rescue of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Methods and Materials: From January 1995 to December 2011, 60 patients with LRRC underwent extended surgery (n=38: multiorgan [43%], bone [28%], soft tissue [38%]) or nonextended (n=22) surgical resection, including a component of intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT) to the pelvic recurrence tumor bed. Twenty-eight (47%) of these patients also received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (range, 30.6-50.4 Gy). Survival outcomes were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 2-189 months), and the 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year rates for locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) were 86%, 52%, and 44%; and 78%, 53%, 43%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, R1 resection, EBRT at the time of pelvic rerecurrence, no tumor fragmentation, and non-lymph node metastasis retained significance with regard to LRR. R1 resection and no tumor fragmentation showed a significant association with OS after adjustment for other covariates. Conclusions: EBRT treatment integrated for rescue, resection radicality, and not involved fragmented resection specimens are associated with improved LRC in patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer. Additionally, tumor fragmentation could be compensated by EBRT. Present results suggest that a significant group of patients with LRRC may benefit from EBRT treatment integrated with extended surgery and IOERT.

  4. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research; 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, Andre E.; Taki, Doug (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall, ID); Griswold, Robert G. (Biolines, Stanley, ID)

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 1990, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes petitioned the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to list the Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered. As a result of that petition the Snake River sockeye salmon was officially listed as endangered in November 1991 under the Endangered Species Act (56 FR 58619). In 1991, the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research Program was implemented (Project Number 91-71, Intergovernmental Contract Number DE-BI79-91bp22548). This project is part of an interagency effort to prevent the extinction of the Redfish Lake stock of O. nerka. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides funding for this interagency recovery program through the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program (Council). Collaborators in the recovery effort include the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), the University of Idaho (UI), U.S. Forest Service (USFS), and the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe (SBT). This report summarizes activities conducted by Shoshone-Bannock Tribal Fisheries Department personnel during the 2001 calendar year. Project objectives include: (1) monitor over-winter survival and emigration of juvenile anadromous O. nerka stocked from the captive rearing program; (2) fertilize Redfish Lake, fertilization of Pettit and Alturas lakes was suspended for this year; (3) conduct kokanee (non-anadromous O. nerka) population surveys; (4) monitor spawning kokanee escapement and estimate fry recruitment on Fishhook, Alturas Lake, and Stanley Lake creeks; (5) evaluate potential competition and predation interactions between stocked juvenile O. nerka and a variety of fish species in Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes; (6) monitor limnological parameters of Sawtooth Valley lakes to assess lake productivity.

  5. SALTSTONE 3QCY10 TCLP RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives waste from Tank 50H for treatment. In the third quarter of the 2010 calendar year (3QCY10), Tank 50H accepted transfers of approximately 76 kgal from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), approximately 7 kgal from Tank 710 - the HCanyon General Purpose Evaporator, approximately 57 kgal from the H-Canyon Super Kukla campaign, approximately 58 kgal from the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSS-HT), and approximately 6 kgal from other sources. The Saltstone Grout Sampling plan provides the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) with the chemical and physical characterization strategy for the salt solution which is to be disposed of in the Z-Area Solid Waste Landfill (ISWLF). During operation, samples were collected from Tank 50H and grout samples prepared to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout to meet the requirements of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24(b) and R.61-79.268.48(a). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to prepare saltstone from samples of Tank 50H obtained July 1, 2010 during 3QCY10 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&W TSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals - arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver - analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. B&W TSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the UHCs benzene, phenols and total and amenable cyanide.

  6. The mixed waste management facility. Project baseline revision 1.2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Streit, R.D.; Throop, A.L.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Revision 1.2 to the Project Baseline (PB) for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) is in response to DOE directives and verbal guidance to (1) Collocate the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) and MWMF into a single complex, integrate certain and overlapping functions as a cost-saving measure; (2) Meet certain fiscal year (FY) new-BA funding objectives ($15.3M in FY95) with lower and roughly balanced funding for out years; (3) Reduce Total Project Cost (TPC) for the MWMF Project; (4) Include costs for all appropriate permitting activities in the project TPC. This baseline revision also incorporates revisions in the technical baseline design for Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) and Mediated Electrochemical Oxidation (MEO). Changes in the WBS dictionary that are necessary as a result of this rebaseline, as well as minor title changes, at WBS Level 3 or above (DOE control level) are approved as a separate document. For completeness, the WBS dictionary that reflects these changes is contained in Appendix B. The PB, with revisions as described in this document, were also the basis for the FY97 Validation Process, presented to DOE and their reviewers on March 21-22, 1995. Appendix C lists information related to prior revisions to the PB. Several key changes relate to the integration of functions and sharing of facilities between the portion of the DWTF that will house the MWMF and those portions that are used by the Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) Division at LLNL. This collocation has been directed by DOE as a cost-saving measure and has been implemented in a manner that maintains separate operational elements from a safety and permitting viewpoint. Appendix D provides background information on the decision and implications of collocating the two facilities.

  7. PSA Nadir of <0.5 ng/mL Following Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Prostate Adenocarcinoma is Associated With Freedom From Prostate-Specific Antigen Failure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ko, Eric C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Stone, Nelson N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Department of Urology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Stock, Richard G., E-mail: Richard.Stock@mountsinai.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Because limited information exists regarding whether the rate or magnitude of PSA decline following brachytherapy predicts long-term clinical outcomes, we evaluated whether achieving a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir (nPSA) <0.5 ng/mL following brachytherapy is associated with decreased PSA failure and/or distant metastasis. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed our database of early-stage prostate adenocarcinoma patients who underwent brachytherapy, excluding those receiving androgen-deprivation therapy and those with <2 years follow-up. Median and mean pretreatment PSA were 6 ng/mL and 7.16 ng/mL, respectively. By clinical stage, 775 were low risk ({<=}T2a), 126 were intermediate risk (T2b), and 20 were high risk (>T2b). By Gleason score, 840 were low risk ({<=}6), 71 were intermediate risk (7), and 10 were high risk (>7). Patients were treated with brachytherapy only (I-125, n = 779, or Pd-103, n = 47), or brachytherapy + external-beam radiation therapy (n = 95). Median follow-up was 6.3 years. We noted whether nPSA <0.5 ng/mL was achieved and the time to achieve this nadir and tested for associations with pretreatment risk factors. We also determined whether this PSA endpoint was associated with decreased PSA failure or distant metastasis. Results: Absence of high-risk factors in clinical stage ({<=}T2b), Gleason score ({<=}7), and pretreatment PSA ({<=}20 ng/mL) was significantly associated with achieving nPSA <0.5 ng/mL. By Kaplan-Meier analysis, patients achieving nPSA <0.5 ng/mL had significantly higher long-term freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) than nonresponders (5-year FFBF: 95.2 {+-} 0.8% vs. 71.5 {+-} 6.7%; p < 0.0005). Among responders, those who achieved nPSA <0.5 ng/mL in {<=}5 years had higher FFBF than those requiring >5 years (5-year FFBF: 96.7 {+-} 0.7% vs. 80.8 {+-} 4.6%; p < 0.0005). On multivariate analysis, patients who achieved nPSA <0.5 ng/mL in {<=}5 years had significantly higher FFBF than other patients. Conclusions: Pretreatment risk factors (clinical tumor stage, Gleason score, pretreatment PSA) strongly predict for patients achieving nPSA <0.5 ng/mL following brachytherapy, and this cohort had significantly higher long-term FFBF.

  8. SALTSTONE 4QCY08 TCLP RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozzi, A.

    2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives waste from Tank 50H for treatment. In the fourth quarter of the 2008 calendar year (4QCY08), Tank 50 accepted transfers of approximately 15 kgal from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP) waste, approximately 12 kgal from Tank 710-the H-Canyon General Purpose Evaporator, approximately 5 kgal from the H-Canyon Super Kukla campaign, and approximately 34 kgal from the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSS-HT). The Saltstone Grout Sampling plan provides the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) with the chemical and physical characterization strategy for the salt solution which is to be disposed of in the Z-Area Solid Waste Landfill (ISWLF).1 During operation, samples were collected from Tank 50H and grout samples prepared to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout to meet the requirements of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24(b) and R.61-79.268.48(a). SRNL was asked to prepare saltstone from a sample of Tank 50H obtained October 29, 2008 during 4QCY08 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&WTSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP)2 and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals-arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver-analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge.3 B&WTSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the UHCs benzene, phenols and total and amenable cyanide. A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the fourth quarter of calendar year 2008 (4QCY08). After the prescribed 28 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846.

  9. Basic Research Needs for Solar Energy Utilization. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solar Energy Utilization, April 18-21, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, N. S.; Crabtree, G.; Nozik, A. J.; Wasielewski, M. R.; Alivisatos, P.; Kung, H.; Tsao, J.; Chandler, E.; Walukiewicz, W.; Spitler, M.; Ellingson, R.; Overend, R.; Mazer, J.; Gress, M.; Horwitz, J.; Ashton, C.; Herndon, B.; Shapard, L.; Nault, R. M.

    2005-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    World demand for energy is projected to more than double by 2050 and to more than triple by the end of the century. Incremental improvements in existing energy networks will not be adequate to supply this demand in a sustainable way. Finding sufficient supplies of clean energy for the future is one of society?s most daunting challenges. Sunlight provides by far the largest of all carbon-neutral energy sources. More energy from sunlight strikes the Earth in one hour (4.3 ? 1020 J) than all the energy consumed on the planet in a year (4.1 ? 1020 J). We currently exploit this solar resource through solar electricity ? a $7.5 billion industry growing at a rate of 35?40% per annum ? and solar-derived fuel from biomass, which provides the primary energy source for over a billion people. Yet, in 2001, solar electricity provided less than 0.1% of the world's electricity, and solar fuel from modern (sustainable) biomass provided less than 1.5% of the world's energy. The huge gap between our present use of solar energy and its enormous undeveloped potential defines a grand challenge in energy research. Sunlight is a compelling solution to our need for clean, abundant sources of energy in the future. It is readily available, secure from geopolitical tension, and poses no threat to our environment through pollution or to our climate through greenhouse gases. This report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solar Energy Utilization identifies the key scientific challenges and research directions that will enable efficient and economic use of the solar resource to provide a significant fraction of global primary energy by the mid 21st century. The report reflects the collective output of the workshop attendees, which included 200 scientists representing academia, national laboratories, and industry in the United States and abroad, and the U.S. Department of Energy?s Office of Basic Energy Sciences and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  10. The Russian Federation's Ministry of Atomic Energy: Programs and Developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CM Johnson

    2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews select programs driving the Ministry of Atomic Energy of the Russian Federation's (Minatom) efforts to raise funds, comments on their potential viability, and highlights areas likely to be of particular concern for the US over the next three to five years. The paper's findings are: (1) Despite numerous cabinet displacements throughout the Yeltsin administration, Yevgeny Adamov was reappointed Minister on four occasions. With Boris Yeltsin's January 1, 2000 resignation, Adamov's long-term position as the head of the Ministry is more tenuous, but he will likely retain his position until at least the March 2000 elections. Acting President Vladimir Putin is unlikely to reorganize his cabinet prior to that date and there are no signs that Putin is dissatisfied with Adamov's leadership of Minatom. (2) Adamov's chief priorities are downsizing Minatom's defense sector, increasing the oversight of subsidiary bodies by the central bureaucracy and consolidating commercial elements of the Ministry within an umbrella organization called Atomprom. (3) Viktor Mikhaylov, Adamov's predecessor and critic of his reform efforts, has been relieved of his duties as First Deputy Minister. While he retains his positions as Chief of the Science Councils and Chief Scientist at Arzamas-16, his influence on Minatom's direction is greatly diminished. Adamov will likely continue his efforts to further marginalize Mikhaylov in the coming year. (4) Securing extra-budgetary sources of income continues to be the major factor guiding Minatom's international business dealings. The Ministry will continue to aggressively promote the sale of nuclear technology abroad, often to countries with questionable nonproliferation commitments. (5) Given the financial difficulties in Russia and Minatom's client states, however, few nuclear development programs will come to fruition for a number of years, if ever. Nevertheless, certain peaceful nuclear cooperation agreements should be carefully monitored--particularly those negotiated with Cuba, Iran, Libya and Syria. (6) Waste management has also risen in importance for Minatom. Opportunities for raising funds by reprocessing, storing and permanently disposing of spent fuel from foreign states are being explored. Although currently prohibited by federal law, the Russian Parliament will likely pass legislation in support of this program.

  11. WEEE and portable batteries in residual household waste: Quantification and characterisation of misplaced waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigum, Marianne, E-mail: mkkb@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljøvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Petersen, Claus, E-mail: claus_petersen@econet.dk [Econet A/S, Strandboulevarden 122, 5, 2100 København Ø (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H., E-mail: thho@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljøvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Scheutz, Charlotte, E-mail: chas@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljøvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • We analyse 26.1 Mg of residual waste from 3129 Danish households. • We quantify and characterise misplaced WEEE and portable batteries. • We compare misplaced WEEE and batteries to collection through dedicated schemes. • Characterisation showed that primarily small WEEE and light sources are misplaced. • Significant amounts of misplaced batteries were discarded as built-in WEEE. - Abstract: A total of 26.1 Mg of residual waste from 3129 households in 12 Danish municipalities was analysed and revealed that 89.6 kg of Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE), 11 kg of batteries, 2.2 kg of toners and 16 kg of cables had been wrongfully discarded. This corresponds to a Danish household discarding 29 g of WEEE (7 items per year), 4 g of batteries (9 batteries per year), 1 g of toners and 7 g of unidentifiable cables on average per week, constituting 0.34% (w/w), 0.04% (w/w), 0.01% (w/w) and 0.09% (w/w), respectively, of residual waste. The study also found that misplaced WEEE and batteries in the residual waste constituted 16% and 39%, respectively, of what is being collected properly through the dedicated special waste collection schemes. This shows that a large amount of batteries are being discarded with the residual waste, whereas WEEE seems to be collected relatively successfully through the dedicated special waste collection schemes. Characterisation of the misplaced batteries showed that 20% (w/w) of the discarded batteries were discarded as part of WEEE (built-in). Primarily alkaline batteries, carbon zinc batteries and alkaline button cell batteries were found to be discarded with the residual household waste. Characterisation of WEEE showed that primarily small WEEE (WEEE directive categories 2, 5a, 6, 7 and 9) and light sources (WEEE directive category 5b) were misplaced. Electric tooth brushes, watches, clocks, headphones, flashlights, bicycle lights, and cables were items most frequently found. It is recommended that these findings are taken into account when designing new or improving existing special waste collection schemes. Improving the collection of WEEE is also recommended as one way to also improve the collection of batteries due to the large fraction of batteries found as built-in. The findings in this study were comparable to other western European studies, suggesting that the recommendations made in this study could apply to other western European countries as well.

  12. SALTSTONE 3QCY09 TCLP RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.

    2010-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the third quarter of calendar year 2009 (3QCY09). After the prescribed 28 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846. The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives waste from Tank 50H for treatment. In the third quarter of the 2009 calendar year (3QCY09), Tank 50H accepted transfers of approximately 37 kgal from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP) waste, approximately 5 kgal from Tank 710 - the H-Canyon General Purpose Evaporator, approximately 26 kgal from Tank 221H, approximately 319 kgal from the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSS-HT), and approximately 358 kgal from Tank 23H. The Saltstone Grout Sampling plan provides the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) with the chemical and physical characterization strategy for the salt solution which is to be disposed of in the Z-Area Solid Waste Landfill (ISWLF). During operation, samples were collected from Tank 50H and grout samples prepared to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout to meet the requirements of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24(b) and R.61-79.268.48(a). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to prepare saltstone from a sample of Tank 50H obtained August 5, 2009 during 3QCY09 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&WTSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals-arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver-analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. B&WTSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the UHCs benzene, phenols and total and amenable cyanide.

  13. SALTSTONE 3QCY09 TCLP RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the third quarter of calendar year 2009 (3QCY09). After the prescribed 28 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846. The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives waste from Tank 50H for treatment. In the third quarter of the 2009 calendar year (3QCY09), Tank 50H accepted transfers of approximately 37 kgal from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP) waste, approximately 5 kgal from Tank 710 - the H-Canyon General Purpose Evaporator, approximately 26 kgal from Tank 221H, approximately 319 kgal from the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSS-HT), and approximately 358 kgal from Tank 23H. The Saltstone Grout Sampling plan provides the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) with the chemical and physical characterization strategy for the salt solution which is to be disposed of in the Z-Area Solid Waste Landfill (ISWLF). During operation, samples were collected from Tank 50H and grout samples prepared to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout to meet the requirements of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24(b) and R.61-79.268.48(a). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to prepare saltstone from a sample of Tank 50H obtained August 5, 2009 during 3QCY09 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&WTSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals - arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver - analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. B&WTSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the UHCs benzene, phenols and total and amenable cyanide.

  14. SALTSTONE 3QCY11 TCLP RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.

    2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the third quarter of calendar year 2011 (3QCY11). After the prescribed 32 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846. The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives waste from Tank 50H for treatment. In the third quarter of the 2011 calendar year (3QCY11), Tank 50H accepted transfers of approximately 20 kgal from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), approximately 236 kgal from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU) Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSS-HT), and approximately 25 kgal from other sources. The Saltstone Grout Sampling plan provides the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) with the chemical and physical characterization strategy for the salt solution which is to be disposed of in the Z-Area Solid Waste Landfill (SWLF). During operation, samples were collected from Tank 50H and grout samples prepared to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout to meet the requirements of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24(b) and R.61-79.268.48(a). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to prepare saltstone from samples of Tank 50H obtained July 7, 2011 during 3QCY11 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&W TSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals - arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver - analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. B&W TSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the UHCs benzene, phenols and total and amenable cyanide.

  15. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report for 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report is prepared animally and presents summary environmental data to (1) characterize environmental performance, (2) summarize environmental occurrences reported during the year, (3) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and (4) highlight significant program activities. The report fulfills the requirement contained in DOE Order 231.1 A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting (DOE 2004) that an integrated annual site environmental report be prepared. The results summarized in this report are based on data collected prior to and through 2009. This report is not intended to nor does it present the results of all environmental monitoring associated with the ORR. Data collected for other site and regulatory purposes, such as environmental restoration/remedial investigation reports, waste management characterization sampling data, and environmental permit compliance data, are presented in other documents that have been prepared in accordance with applicable DOE guidance and/or laws and are referenced herein as appropriate. Appendix A to this report identifies corrections to the 2008 report. Appendix B contains a glossary of technical terms that may be useful for understanding the terminology used in this document. Environmental monitoring on the ORR consists primarily of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring involves the collection and analysis of samples or measurements of liquid and gaseous effluents at the points of release to the environment; these measurements allow the quantification and official reporting of contaminant levels, assessment of radiation and chemical exposures to the public, and demonstration of compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements. Environmental surveillance consists of direct measurements and collection and analysis of samples taken from the site and its environs exclusive of effluents; these activities provide information on contaminant concentrations in air, water, groundwater, soil, foods, biota, and other media. Environmental surveillance data support determinations regarding environmental compliance and, when combined with data from effluent monitoring, support chemical and radiation dose and exposure assessments regarding the potential effects of ORR operations, if any, on the local environment.

  16. ADVANCING THE SCIENCE OF NATURAL AND ENHANCED ATTENUATION FOR CHLORINATED SOLVENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B; TOM O. EARLY, T; TYLER GILMORE, T; FRANCIS H. CHAPELLE, F; NORMAN H. CUTSHALL, N; JEFF ROSS, J; MARK ANKENY, M; Michael Heitkamp, M; DAVID MAJOR, D; CHARLES J. NEWELL, C; W. JODY WAUGH, W; GARY WEIN, G; Karen Vangelas, K; Karen-M Adams, K; CLAIRE H. SINK, C

    2006-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a three-year program that addressed key scientific and technical aspects related to natural and enhanced attenuation of chlorinated organics. The results from this coordinated three-year program support a variety of technical and regulatory advancements. Scientists, regulators, engineers, end-users and stakeholders participated in the program, which was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC). The overarching objective of the effort was to examine environmental remedies that are based on natural processes--remedies such as Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) or Enhanced Attenuation (EA). A key result of the recent effort was the general affirmation of the approaches and guidance in the original U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) chlorinated solvent MNA protocols and directives from 1998 and 1999, respectively. The research program did identify several specific opportunities for advances based on: (1) mass balance as the central framework for attenuation based remedies, (2) scientific advancements and achievements during the past ten years, (3) regulatory and policy development and real-world experience using MNA, and (4) exploration of various ideas for integrating attenuation remedies into a systematic set of ''combined remedies'' for contaminated sites. These opportunities are summarized herein and are addressed in more detail in referenced project documents and journal articles, as well as in the technical and regulatory documents being developed within the ITRC. Natural attenuation processes occur in all soil and groundwater systems and act, to varying degrees, on all contaminants. Thus, a decision to rely on natural attenuation processes as part of a site-remediation strategy does not depend on the occurrence of natural attenuation, but on its effectiveness in meeting site-specific remediation goals. Meeting these goals typically requires low risk, plume stability, and documentation of accepted and sustainable attenuation processes. Plume stability and sustainability depend on the balance between contaminant loading into the plume and contaminant attenuation within the plume. This ''mass balance'' is a simple and powerful idea that developed into the central framework for all aspects of the DOE MNA/EA program. The centrality of mass balance has been advocated by Chapelle and others (e.g., 1995) for several years, and the concepts proved to be critical to conceptualizing natural attenuation remedies, designing enhancements, developing characterization and monitoring strategies, and developing regulatory decision frameworks that encourage broader use of MNA/EA with clarified technical responsibility.

  17. Technology for Increasing Geothermal Energy Productivity. Computer Models to Characterize the Chemical Interactions of Goethermal Fluids and Injectates with Reservoir Rocks, Wells, Surface Equiptment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy Moller Weare

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes the results of a research program we carried out over a five-year (3/1999-9/2004) period with funding from a Department of Energy geothermal FDP grant (DE-FG07-99ID13745) and from other agencies. The goal of research projects in this program were to develop modeling technologies that can increase the understanding of geothermal reservoir chemistry and chemistry-related energy production processes. The ability of computer models to handle many chemical variables and complex interactions makes them an essential tool for building a fundamental understanding of a wide variety of complex geothermal resource and production chemistry. With careful choice of methodology and parameterization, research objectives were to show that chemical models can correctly simulate behavior for the ranges of fluid compositions, formation minerals, temperature and pressure associated with present and near future geothermal systems as well as for the very high PT chemistry of deep resources that is intractable with traditional experimental methods. Our research results successfully met these objectives. We demonstrated that advances in physical chemistry theory can be used to accurately describe the thermodynamics of solid-liquid-gas systems via their free energies for wide ranges of composition (X), temperature and pressure. Eight articles on this work were published in peer-reviewed journals and in conference proceedings. Four are in preparation. Our work has been presented at many workshops and conferences. We also considerably improved our interactive web site (geotherm.ucsd.edu), which was in preliminary form prior to the grant. This site, which includes several model codes treating different XPT conditions, is an effective means to transfer our technologies and is used by the geothermal community and other researchers worldwide. Our models have wide application to many energy related and other important problems (e.g., scaling prediction in petroleum production systems, stripping towers for mineral production processes, nuclear waste storage, CO2 sequestration strategies, global warming). Although funding decreases cut short completion of several research activities, we made significant progress on these abbreviated projects.

  18. Extended (5-year) Outcomes of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using MammoSite Balloon Brachytherapy: Patterns of Failure, Patient Selection, and Dosimetric Correlates for Late Toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargo, John A.; Verma, Vivek; Kim, Hayeon; Kalash, Ronny; Heron, Dwight E.; Johnson, Ronald; Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with balloon and catheter-based brachytherapy has gained increasing popularity in recent years and is the subject of ongoing phase III trials. Initial data suggest promising local control and cosmetic results in appropriately selected patients. Long-term data continue to evolve but are limited outside of the context of the American Society of Breast Surgeons Registry Trial. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of 157 patients completing APBI after breast-conserving surgery and axillary staging via high-dose-rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy from June 2002 to December 2007 was made. APBI was delivered with a single-lumen MammoSite balloon-based applicator to a median dose of 34 Gy in 10 fractions over a 5-day period. Tumor coverage and critical organ dosimetry were retrospectively collected on the basis of computed tomography completed for conformance and symmetry. Results: At a median follow-up time of 5.5 years (range, 0-10.0 years), the 5-year and 7-year actuarial incidences of ipsilateral breast control were 98%/98%, of nodal control 99%/98%, and of distant control 99%/99%, respectively. The crude rate of ipsilateral breast recurrence was 2.5% (n=4); of nodal failure, 1.9% (n=3); and of distant failure, 0.6% (n=1). The 5-year and 7-year actuarial overall survival rates were 89%/86%, with breast cancer–specific survival of 100%/99%, respectively. Good to excellent cosmetic outcomes were achieved in 93.4% of patients. Telangiectasia developed in 27% of patients, with 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year actuarial incidence of 7%/24%/33%; skin dose >100% significantly predicted for the development of telangiectasia (50% vs 14%, P<.0001). Conclusions: Long-term single-institution outcomes suggest excellent tumor control, breast cosmesis, and minimal late toxicity. Skin toxicity is a function of skin dose, which may be ameliorated with dosimetric optimization afforded by newer multicatheter brachytherapy applicators and a more rigorous skin dose constraint of ?100%.

  19. Energy Independence for North America - Transition to the Hydrogen Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberhardt, J.

    2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. transportation sector is almost totally dependent on liquid hydrocarbon fuels, primarily gasoline and diesel fuel from conventional oil. In 2002, the transportation sector accounted for 69 percent of the U.S. oil use; highway vehicles accounted for 54 percent of the U.S. oil use. Of the total energy consumed in the U.S., more than 40 percent came from oil. More significantly, more than half of this oil is imported and is projected by the Energy Information Agency (EIA) to increase to 68 percent by 2025 [1]. The supply and price of oil have been dictated by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). In 2002, OPEC accounted for 39 percent of world oil production and this is projected by the EIA to increase to 50 percent in 2025. Of the world's oil reserves, about 80 percent is owned by OPEC members. Major oil price shocks have disrupted world energy markets four times in the past 30 years (1973-74, 1979-80, 1990-1991, and 1999- 2000) and with each came either a recession or slowdown in the GDP (Gross Domestic Product) of the United States. In addition, these market upheavals have cost the U.S. approximately $7 trillion (in 1998 dollars) in total economic costs [2]. Finally, it is estimated that military expenditures for defending oil supplies in the Middle East range from $6 billion to $60 billion per year [3] and do not take into account the costs of recent military operations in Iraq (i.e., Operation Iraqi Freedom, 2003). At the outset of his administration in 2001, President George W. Bush established the National Energy Policy Development (NEPD) Group to develop a national energy policy to promote dependable, affordable, and environmentally sound energy for the future in order to avert potential energy crises. In the National Energy Policy report [4], the NEPD Group urges action by the President to meet five specific national goals that America must meet--''modernize conservation, modernize our energy infrastructure, increase energy supplies, accelerate the protection and improvement of the environment, and increase our nation's energy security.'' It is generally recognized that energy security can be achieved partially by reducing importation of oil from sources that are less politically stable.

  20. Exploring the Economic Value of EPAct 2005's PV Tax Credits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Ing, Edwin

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The market for grid-connected photovoltaics (PV) in the US has grown dramatically in recent years, driven in large part by PV grant or ''buy-down'' programs in California, New Jersey, and many other states. The recent announcement of a new 11-year, $3.2 billion PV program in California suggests that state policy will continue to drive even faster growth over the next decade. Federal policy has also played a role, primarily by providing commercial PV systems access to tax benefits, including accelerated depreciation (5-year MACRS schedule) and a business energy investment tax credit (ITC). With the signing of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct) on August 8, the federal government is poised to play a much more significant future role in supporting both commercial and residential PV systems. Specifically, EPAct increased the federal ITC for commercial PV systems from 10% to 30% of system costs, and also created a new 30% ITC (capped at $2000) for residential solar systems. Both changes went into effect on January 1, 2006, and--absent an extension (for which the solar industry has already begun lobbying)--will last for a period of two years: the new residential ITC will expire, and the 30% commercial ITC will revert back to 10%, on January 1, 2008. How much economic value do these new and expanded federal tax credits really provide to PV system purchasers? And what implications might they hold for state/utility PV grant programs? Using a generic (i.e., non-state-specific) cash flow model, this report explores these questions. We begin with a discussion of the taxability of PV grants and their interaction with federal credits, as this issue significantly affects the analysis that follows. We then calculate the incremental value of EPAct's new and expanded credits for PV systems of different sizes, and owned by different types of entities. We conclude with a discussion of potential implications for purchasers of PV systems, as well as for administrators of state/utility PV programs.

  1. Exploring the Economic Value of EPAct 2005's PV Tax Credits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A; Wiser, Ryan; Ing, Edwin

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This CESA - LBNL Case Study examines how much economic value do new and expanded federal tax credits really provide to PV system purchasers, and what implications might they hold for state/utility PV grant programs. The report begins with a discussion of the taxability of PV grants and their interaction with federal credits, as this issue significantly affects the analysis that follows. We then calculate the incremental value of EPAct's new and expanded credits for PV systems of different sizes, and owned by different types of entities. The report concludes with a discussion of potential implications for purchasers of PV systems, as well as for administrators of state/utility PV programs. The market for grid-connected photovoltaics (PV) in the US has grown dramatically in recent years, driven in large part by PV grant or 'buy-down' programs in California, New Jersey, and many other states. The recent announcement of a new 11-year, $3.2 billion PV program in California suggests that state policy will continue to drive even faster growth over the next decade. Federal policy has also played a role, primarily by providing commercial PV systems access to tax benefits, including accelerated depreciation (5-year MACRS schedule) and a business energy investment tax credit (ITC). Since the signing of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct) on August 8, the federal government has begun to play a much more significant role in supporting both commercial and residential PV systems. Specifically, EPAct increased the federal ITC for commercial PV systems from 10% to 30% of system costs, and also created a new 30% ITC (capped at $2000) for residential solar systems. Both changes went into effect on January 1, 2006, for an initial period of two years, and in late 2006 were extended for an additional year. Unless extended further, the new residential ITC will expire, and the 30% commercial ITC will revert back to 10%, on January 1, 2009. How much economic value do these new and expanded federal tax credits really provide to PV system purchasers? And what implications might they hold for state/utility PV grant programs? Using a generic (i.e., non-state-specific) cash flow model, this report explores these questions.1 We begin with a discussion of the taxability of PV grants and their interaction with federal credits, as this issue significantly affects the analysis that follows. We then calculate the incremental value of EPAct's new and expanded credits for PV systems of different sizes, and owned by different types of entities. We conclude with a discussion of potential implications for purchasers of PV systems, as well as for administrators of state/utility PV programs.

  2. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Southern Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert D. Hatcher

    2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the second-year accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employs the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempts to characterize the T-P parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempts to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is working with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) is geochemically characterizing the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). Second-year results include: All current milestones have been met and other components of the project have been functioning in parallel toward satisfaction of year-3 milestones. We also have been effecting the ultimate goal of the project in the dissemination of information through presentations at professional meetings, convening a major workshop in August 2003, and the publication of results. Our work in geophysical log correlation in the Middle Ordovician units is bearing fruit in recognition that the criteria developed locally in Tennessee and southern Kentucky have much greater extensibility than anticipated earlier. We have identified a major 60 mi-long structure in the western part of the Valley and Ridge thrust belt that is generating considerable exploration interest. If this structure is productive, it will be one of the largest structures in the Appalachians. We are completing a more quantitative structural reconstruction of the Valley and Ridge than has been made before. This should yield major dividends in future exploration in the southern Appalachian basin. Our work in mapping, retrodeformation, and modeling of the Sevier basin is a major component of the understanding of the Ordovician petroleum system in this region. Prior to our undertaking this project, this system was the least understood in the Appalachian basin. We have made numerous presentations, convened a workshop, and are beginning to disseminate our results in print. This project, in contrast to many if not most programs undertaken in DOE laboratories, has a major educational component wherein three Ph.D. students have been partially supported by this grant, one M.S. student partially supported, and another M.S. student fully supported by the project. These students will be well prepared for professional careers in the oil and gas industry.

  3. Poly(cyclohexadiene)-Based Polymer Electrolyte Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mays, Jimmy W.

    2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research project was to create and develop fuel cell membranes having high proton conductivity at high temperatures and high chemical and mechanical durability. Poly(1,3-cyclohexadiene) (PCHD) is of interest as an alternative polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) material due to its ring-like structure which is expected to impart superior mechanical and thermal properties, and due to the fact that PCHD can readily be incorporated into a range of homopolymer and copolymer structures. PCHD can be aromatized, sulfonated, or fluorinated, allowing for tuning of key performance structure and properties. These factors include good proton transport, hydrophilicity, permeability (including fuel gas impermeability), good mechanical properties, morphology, thermal stability, crystallinity, and cost. The basic building block, 1,3-cyclohexadiene, is a hydrocarbon monomer that could be inexpensively produced on a commercial scale (pricing typical of other hydrocarbon monomers). Optimal material properties will result in novel low cost PEM membranes engineered for high conductivity at elevated temperatures and low relative humidities, as well as good performance and durability. The primary objectives of this project were: (1) To design, synthesize and characterize new non-Nafion PEM materials that conduct protons at low (25-50%) RH and at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 120 C; and (2) To achieve these objectives, a range of homopolymer and copolymer materials incorporating poly(cyclohexadiene) (PCHD) will be synthesized, derivatized, and characterized. These two objectives have been achieved. Sulfonated and crosslinked PCHD homopolymer membranes exhibit proton conductivities similar to Nafion in the mid-RH range, are superior to Nafion at higher RH, but are poorer than Nafion at RH < 50%. Thus to further improve proton conductivity, particularly at low RH, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was incorporated into the membrane by blending and by copolymerization. Conductivity measurements at 120 C over RH ranging from 20 to 100% using the BekkTech protocol showed much improved proton conductivities. Conductivities for the best of these new membranes exceed the DOE Year 3 milestone of 100 mS/cm at 50% RH at 120 C. Further optimization of these very promising low cost membranes could be pursued in the future.

  4. A feasibility study of reactor-based deep-burn concepts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.; Hill, R. N.; Yang, W. S.

    2005-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic assessment of the General Atomics (GA) proposed Deep-Burn concept based on the Modular Helium-Cooled Reactor design (DB-MHR) has been performed. Preliminary benchmarking of deterministic physics codes was done by comparing code results to those from MONTEBURNS (MCNP-ORIGEN) calculations. Detailed fuel cycle analyses were performed in order to provide an independent evaluation of the physics and transmutation performance of the one-pass and two-pass concepts. Key performance parameters such as transuranic consumption, reactor performance, and spent fuel characteristics were analyzed. This effort has been undertaken in close collaborations with the General Atomics design team and Brookhaven National Laboratory evaluation team. The study was performed primarily for a 600 MWt reference DB-MHR design having a power density of 4.7 MW/m{sup 3}. Based on parametric and sensitivity study, it was determined that the maximum burnup (TRU consumption) can be obtained using optimum values of 200 {micro}m and 20% for the fuel kernel diameter and fuel packing fraction, respectively. These values were retained for most of the one-pass and two-pass design calculations; variation to the packing fraction was necessary for the second stage of the two-pass concept. Using a four-batch fuel management scheme for the one-pass DB-MHR core, it was possible to obtain a TRU consumption of 58% and a cycle length of 286 EFPD. By increasing the core power to 800 MWt and the power density to 6.2 MW/m{sup 3}, it was possible to increase the TRU consumption to 60%, although the cycle length decreased by {approx}64 days. The higher TRU consumption (burnup) is due to the reduction of the in-core decay of fissile Pu-241 to Am-241 relative to fission, arising from the higher power density (specific power), which made the fuel more reactivity over time. It was also found that the TRU consumption can be improved by utilizing axial fuel shuffling or by operating with lower material temperatures (colder core). Results also showed that the transmutation performance of the one-pass deep-burn concept is sensitive to the initial TRU vector, primarily because longer cooling time reduces the fissile content (Pu-241 specifically.) With a cooling time of 5 years, the TRU consumption increases to 67%, while conversely, with 20-year cooling the TRU consumption is about 58%. For the two-pass DB-MHR (TRU recycling option), a fuel packing fraction of about 30% is required in the second pass (the recycled TRU). It was found that using a heterogeneous core (homogeneous fuel element) concept, the TRU consumption is dependent on the cooling interval before the 2nd pass, again due to Pu-241 decay during the time lag between the first pass fuel discharge and the second pass fuel charge. With a cooling interval of 7 years (5 and 2 years before and after reprocessing) a TRU consumption of 55% is obtained. With an assumed ''no cooling'' interval, the TRU consumption is 63%. By using a cylindrical core to reduce neutron leakage, TRU consumption of the case with 7-year cooling interval increases to 58%. For a two-pass concept using a heterogeneous fuel element (and homogeneous core) with first and second pass volume ratio of 2:1, the TRU consumption is 62.4%. Finally, the repository loading benefits arising from the deep-burn and Inert Matrix Fuel (IMF) concepts were estimated and compared, for the same initial TRU vector. The DB-MHR concept resulted in slightly higher TRU consumption and repository loading benefit compared to the IMF concept (58.1% versus 55.1% for TRU consumption and 2.0 versus 1.6 for estimated repository loading benefit).

  5. Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Residential Downlights and Undercabinet Lights in the Lane County Tour of Homes, Eugene, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In August 2008 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a light emitting diode (LED) residential lighting demonstration project for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Building Technologies, as part of DOE’s Solid State Lighting (SSL) Technology Demonstration Gateway Program. Two lighting technologies, an LED replacement for downlight lamps (bulbs) and an LED undercabinet lighting fixture, were tested in the demonstration which was conducted in two homes built for the 2008 Tour of Homes in Eugene, Oregon. The homes were built by the Lane County Home Builders Association (HBA), and Future B Homes. The Energy Trust of Oregon (ETO) also participated in the demonstration project. The LED downlight product, the LR6, made by Cree LED Lighting Solutions acts as a screw-in replacement for incandescent and halogen bulbs in recessed can downlights. The second product tested is Phillips/Color Kinetics’ eW® Profile Powercore undercabinet fixture designed to mount under kitchen cabinets to illuminate the countertop and backsplash surfaces. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light performance and electrical power usage were taken at each site before and after initially installed halogen and incandescent lamps were replaced with the LED products. Energy savings and simple paybacks were also calculated and builders who toured the homes were surveyed for their responses to the LED products. The LED downlight product drew 12 Watts of power, cutting energy use by 82% compared to the 65W incandescent lamp and by 84% compared to the 75W halogen lamp. The LED undercabinet fixture drew 10 watts, cutting energy use by 83% to 90% compared to the halogen product, which was tested at two power settings: a low power 60W setting and a high power 105W setting. The LED downlight consistently provided more light than the halogen and incandescent lamps in horizontal measurements at counter height and floor level. It also outperformed in vertical illuminance measurements taken on the walls, indicating better lateral dispersion of the light. The undercabinet fixture’s light output was midway between the low and high power halogen undercabinet fixture light outputs (35.8 foot candle versus 13.4 fc and 53.4 fc) but it produced a more uniform light (max/min ratio of 7.0 versus 10.8). The color correlated temperature (CCT, the blue or yellowness) of the LED light correlated well with the halogen and incandescent lights (2675 K vs 2700 K). The color rendering of the LED downlight also correlated well at 92 CRI compared to 100 CRI for the halogen and incandescent lamps. The LED undercabinet fixture had measures of 2880 K CCT and 71 CRI compared to the 2700 K and 100 CRI scores for the halogen undercabinet fixture. Builders who toured the homes were surveyed; they gave the LED downlight high marks for brightness, said the undercabinet improved shadows and glare and said both products improved overall visibility, home appearance, and home value. Paybacks on the LED downlight ranged from 7.6 years (assuming electricity cost of 11 c/kWh) to 13.5 years (at 5C/kWh). Paybacks on the LED undercabinet fixture in a new home ranged from 4.4 years (11c/kWh electricity) to 7.6 years (5c/kWh) based on product costs of $95 per LED downlight and $140 per LED undercabinet fixture at 3 hrs per day of usage for the downlight and 2 hrs per day for the undercabinet lighting.

  6. SPECIAL ANALYSIS OF OPERATIONAL STORMWATER RUNOFF COVERS OVER SLIT TRENCHES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collard, L; Luther Hamm, L

    2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid Waste Management (SWM) commissioned this Special Analysis (SA) to determine the effects of placing operational stormwater runoff covers (referred to as covers in the remainder of this document) over slit trench (ST) disposal units ST1 through ST7 (the center set of slit trenches). Previously the United States Department of Energy (DOE) entered into an agreement with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) to place covers over Slit Trenches 1 and 2 to be able to continue disposing Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) solid waste (see USDOE 2008). Because the covers changed the operating conditions, DOE Order 435.1 (DOE 1999) required that an SA be performed to assess the impact. This Special Analysis has been prepared to determine the effects of placing covers over slit trenches at about years 5, 10 and 15 of the 30-year operational period. Because some slit trenches have already been operational for about 15 years, results from analyzing covers at 5 years and 10 years provide trend analysis information only. This SA also examined alternatives of covering Slit Trenches 1 and 2 with one cover and Slit Trenches 3 and 4 with a second cover versus covering them all with a single cover. Based on modeling results, minimal differences exist between covering Slit Trench groups 1-2 and 3-4 with two covers or one large cover. This SA demonstrates that placement of covers over slit trenches will slow the subsequent release and transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone in the early time periods (from time of placement until about 100 years). Release and transport of some radionuclides in the vadose zone beyond 100 years were somewhat higher than for the case without covers. The sums-of-fractions (SOFs) were examined for the current waste inventory in ST1 and ST2 and for estimated inventories at closure for ST3 through ST7. In all cases SOFs were less than one (except for one SOF for ST5 that remained at one), indicating that there should be no unacceptable impacts on operations from placing covers for the cover alternatives that were analyzed. Minimal operational limits provided in Table 4 should be used as the new set of limits for Slit Trenches 1 through 7. ST1 and ST2 are expected to be covered about 15 years after the first disposal in ST1. Because the time of actual placement of covers over the other slit trenches is unknown, this SA did not consider limit increases, only limit decreases. Thus, each minimal operational limit is the minimum of the Performance Assessment (PA) final limit and the limit calculated in this SA if covers were placed at about 5, 10 or 15 years. If other cover times are desired, further analysis will be required.

  7. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 465: Hydronuclear Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, with ROTC 1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 465, Hydronuclear, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 465 comprises the following four corrective action sites (CASs) located in Areas 6 and 27 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) 00-23-01, Hydronuclear Experiment; (2) 00-23-02, Hydronuclear Experiment; (3) 00-23-03, Hydronuclear Experiment; (4) 06-99-01, Hydronuclear. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 6, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for each CAS in CAU 465. For CAU 465, two potential release components have been identified. The subsurface release component includes potential releases of radiological and nonradiological contaminants from the subsurface hydronuclear experiments and disposal boreholes. The surface release component consists of other potential releases of radiological and nonradiological contaminants to surface soils that may have occurred during the pre- and post-test activities. This plan provides the methodology for collection of the necessary information for closing each CAS component. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation, contaminant characteristics, existing regional and site groundwater models, and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 465 using the SAFER process. For potential subsurface releases, flow and transport models will be developed to integrate existing data into a conservative description of contaminant migration in the unsaturated zone from the hydronuclear experiments and disposal boreholes. For the potential surface releases, additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS component. It is anticipated that results of the flow and transport models, the field investigation, and implementation of the corrective action of closure in place will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 465: (1) Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, and radiological and visual surveys). (2) Move or remove and dispose of debris at various CASs, as required. (3) Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., stained soil) to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern as necessary to supplement existing information. (4) Evaluate and analyze existing data to develop conservative flow and transport models to simulate the potential for contaminant migration from the hydronuclear experiments and disposal boreholes to the water table within 1,000 years. (5) Confirm the preferred closure option (closure in place with use restrictions) is sufficient to protect human health and the environment.

  8. Recovery Act - Demonstration of Sodium Ion Battery for Grid Level Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiley, Ted; Whitacre, Jay; Eshoo, Michael; Noland, James; Campbell, Williams; Spears, Christopher

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquion Energy received a $5.179 million cooperative research agreement under the Department of Energyâ??s Smart Grid Demonstration Program â?? Demonstration of Promising Energy Storage Technologies (Program Area 2.5) of FOA DE-FOE-0000036. The main objective of this project was to demonstrate Aquionâ??s low cost, grid-scale, ambient temperature sodium ion energy storage device. The centerpiece of the technology is a novel hybrid energy storage chemistry that has been proven in a laboratory environment. The objective was to translate these groundbreaking results from the small-batch, small-cell test environment to the pilot scale to enable significant numbers of multiple ampere-hour cells to be manufactured and assembled into test batteries. Aquion developed a proof of concept demonstration unit that showed similar performance and major cost improvement over existing technologies. Beyond minimizing cell and system cost, Aquion built a technology that is safe, environmentally benign and durable over many thousands of cycles as used in a variety of grid support roles. As outlined in the Program documents, the original goals of the project were to demonstrate a unit that: 1. Has a projected capital cost of less than $250/kWh at the pack level 2. A deep discharge cycle life of > 10,000 cycles 3. A volumetric energy density of >20 kWh/m3 4. Projected calendar life of over 10 years 5. A device that contains no hazardous materials and retains best in class safety characteristics. Through the course of this project Aquion developed its aqueous electrolyte electrochemical energy storage device to the point where large demonstration units (> 10 kWh) were able to function in grid-supporting functions detailed by their collaborators. Aquionâ??s final deliverable was an ~15 kWh system that has the ability to perform medium to long duration (> 2 hours) charge and discharge functions approaching 95% DC-DC efficiency. The system has functioned, and continues to function as predicted with no indication that it will not tolerate well beyond 10 calendar years and 10,000 cycles. It has been in continuous operation for more than 1 year with 1,000 cycles (of varying depth of discharge, including 100% depth of discharge) and no identifiable degradation to the system. The final thick electrode cell structure has shown an energy density of 25 kWh/m3 at a five hour (or greater) discharge time. The primary chemistry has remained non-toxic, containing no acids or other corrosive chemicals, and the battery units have passed numerous safety tests, including flame resistance testing. These tests have verified the claim that the device is safe to use and contains no hazardous materials. Current projections show costs at the pack level to offer best in class value and are competitive with lead-acid batteries, factoring in LCOE.

  9. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

    2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides information about environmental programs during 2003 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Seasonal activities that span calendar years are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the DOE for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. This summary demonstrates the effective application of SLAC environmental management to meet the site's integrated safety management system (ISMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring proper procedures are followed so that worker safety and health are protected; the environment is protected; and compliance is ensured. Throughout 2003, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems (described in Chapter 3). These systems were utilized by SLAC to implement such ''greening of the government'' initiatives like Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. There were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations during 2003. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2003 in waste minimization, recycling, decreasing air emission rates, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and planning for a system to better manage chemical use. Program-specific details discussed are: (1) Air Quality--SLAC operates its air quality management program in compliance with established permit conditions; 2003 was the sixth consecutive year the air quality management program operated without any NOVs issued by regulators. Nevertheless, SLAC has an active program to improve its environmental performance in air quality. (2) Hazardous Waste--The Environmental Health Division of the San Mateo County Health Services Agency is the California certified unified permitting agency (CUPA) responsible for overseeing hazardous materials and waste management at SLAC. The CUPA made facility enforcement inspections of SLAC in August and September of 2003. These inspections covered SLAC's hazardous materials and waste management, business plan, California Accidental Release Prevention Program (CalARP), and tiered permitting/permit-by-rule programs. No notices of violation were issued as a result of either inspection. (3) Stormwater and Industrial Wastewater--SLAC operates its industrial and sanitary wastewater management program in compliance with established permit conditions; 2003 was the seventh consecutive year the program operated without any NOVs issued by regulators. SLAC actively pursues projects to reduce flow to the wastewater system, and through a variety of measures, has managed to keep its facility-wide wastewater discharge constant during a period in which many new connections were made to the system. SLAC continues to make the transition to a new facility-wide sanitary sewer flow-monitoring scheme, and made substantial progress towards completing the project during 2003. SLAC discharges stormwater with the potential to come into contact with industrial activities. SLAC has an extensive monitoring program in place at the eight discharge locations where the greatest potential for contact exists. During the 2002-2003 wet season, SLAC met all the requirements of its monitoring plan, with the exception of consistent sample collection within the first hour of discharge. For the eleventh consecutive year, the surface water program operated in 2003 without receiving any NOVs from program regulators. After expenditures of more than $1 million, SLAC was nearly complete with its Unauthorized Stormwater Connection Project at year-end; only 32 connections (less than 10 percent of the original total) remained to be replumed. SLAC actively pursued several other BMP-related performance improvements during the year. (4) Hazardous Materials Program--Although SLAC has been successful in meeting regulatory requirements for managing hazardous materials, it has decided to pursue a more activ

  10. Final Technical Report - High-Performance, Oxide-Dispersion-Strengthened Tubes for Production of Ethylene adn Other Industrial Chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKimpson, Marvin G.

    2006-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was undertaken by Michigan Technological University and Special Metals Corporation to develop creep-resistant, coking-resistant oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) tubes for use in industrial-scale ethylene pyrolysis and steam methane reforming operations. Ethylene pyrolysis tubes are exposed to some of the most severe service conditions for metallic materials found anywhere in the chemical process industries, including elevated temperatures, oxidizing atmospheres and high carbon potentials. During service, hard deposits of carbon (coke) build up on the inner wall of the tube, reducing heat transfer and restricting the flow of the hydrocarbon feedstocks. About every 20 to 60 days, the reactor must be taken off-line and decoked by burning out the accumulated carbon. This decoking costs on the order of $9 million per year per ethylene plant, accelerates tube degradation, and requires that tubes be replaced about every 5 years. The technology developed under this program seeks to reduce the energy and economic cost of coking by creating novel bimetallic tubes offering a combination of improved coking resistance, creep resistance and fabricability not available in current single-alloy tubes. The inner core of this tube consists of Incoloy(R) MA956, a commercial ferritic Fe-Cr-Al alloy offering a 50% reduction in coke buildup combined with improved carburization resistance. The outer sheath consists of a new material - oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Alloy 803(R) developed under the program. This new alloy retains the good fireside environmental resistance of Alloy 803, a commercial wrought alloy currently used for ethylene production, and provides an austenitic casing to alleviate the inherently-limited fabricability of the ferritic Incoloy(R) MA956 core. To provide mechanical compatibility between the two alloys and maximize creep resistance of the bimetallic tube, both the inner Incoloy(R) MA956 and the outer ODS Alloy 803 are oxide dispersion strengthened materials produced using mechanical alloying technology. To minimize cost, the bimetallic tube is produced by direct powder co-extrusion. This technology has potential for domestic energy savings of up to 4.1 trillion BTU/year (4.3 x 1015J/year) and a reduction of 370,000 tons (340,000 tonnes) of CO2 emissions in short-residence-time ethylene furnaces. This represents an energy savings and CO2 emissions reduction of about 3.3%. If the technology is also applied to other types of ethylene pyrolysis furnaces, total energy savings and CO2 emissions reductions could increase by up to five times. The work involved: Developing powder and consolidation processing protocols to produce an oxide-dispersion strengthened variant of Alloy 803 exhibiting creep strength comparable to Incoloy? Alloy MA956, Developing a direct powder co-extrusion protocol for fabricating co-extruded bimetallic Incoloy? Alloy MA956 / ODS Alloy 803 tubes, Characterizing the properties of the ODS Alloy 803 material, the welding characteristics of the bimetallic tubes, and the coking characteristics of the Incoloy? MA956 alloy, and Documenting the potential energy savings and user requirements for these bimetallic pyrolysis furnace tubes. The project demonstrated that oxide dispersion strengthened Alloy 803 can be produced successfully using conventional mechanical alloying technology. The oxide dispersion strengthened bimetallic radiant coil technology explored under this program has significant potential for energy savings and productivity improvements for domestic ethylene producers. In today's competitive market, however, domestic furnace manufacturers and ethylene producers appear reluctant to pay any cost premium for higher-performance coil materials offering either higher temperature capabilities or longer service life. Interest in oxide dispersion strengthened radiant coils is likely to increase if furnace and ethylene producers begin to focus more on increasing tube wall temperatures to improve productivity.

  11. Development of All-Solid-State Sensors for Measurement of Nitric Oxide and Ammonia Concentrations by Optical Absorption in Particle-Laden Combustion Exhaust Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerald A. Caton; Kalyan Annamalai; Robert P. Lucht

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An all-solid-state continuous-wave (cw) laser system for ultraviolet absorption measurements of the nitric oxide (NO) molecule has been developed and demonstrated. For the NO sensor, 250 nW of tunable cw ultraviolet radiation is produced by sum-frequency-mixing of 532-nm radiation from a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser and tunable 395-nm radiation from an external cavity diode laser (ECDL). The sum-frequency-mixing process occurs in a beta-barium borate crystal. The nitric oxide absorption measurements are performed by tuning the ECDL and scanning the sum-frequency-mixed radiation over strong nitric oxide absorption lines near 226 nm. In Year 1 of the research, the nitric oxide sensor was used for measurements in the exhaust of a coal-fired laboratory combustion facility. The Texas A&M University boiler burner facility is a 30 kW (100,000 Btu/hr) downward-fired furnace with a steel shell encasing ceramic insulation. Measurements of nitric oxide concentration in the exhaust stream were performed after modification of the facility for laser based NOx diagnostics. The diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption measurements were successful even when the beam was severely attenuated by particulate in the exhaust stream and window fouling. Single-laser-sweep measurements were demonstrated with an effective time resolution of 100 msec, limited at this time by the scan rate of our mechanically tuned ECDL system. In Year 2, the Toptica ECDL in the original system was replaced with a Sacher Lasers ECDL. The mode-hop-free tuning range and tuning rate of the Toptica ECDL were 25 GHz and a few Hz, respectively. The mode-hop-free tuning range and tuning rate of the Sacher Lasers ECDL were 90 GHz and a few hundred Hz, respectively. The Sacher Lasers ECDL thus allows us to scan over the entire NO absorption line and to determine the absorption baseline with increased accuracy and precision. The increased tuning rate is an advantage in that data can be acquired much more rapidly and the absorption measurements are less susceptible to the effects of transient fluctuations in the properties of the coal combustor exhaust stream. Gas cell measurements were performed using the NO sensor with the new ECDL, and a few spectra were acquired from the coal exhaust stream. However, the laser diode in the new ECDL failed during the coal combustor tests. In Year 3, however, we obtained a new GaN laser diode for our ECDL system, installed it, and completed an extensive series of measurements in the Texas A&M coal-fired laboratory combustion facility. The combustor was operated with coal and coal/biomass as fuels, with and without reburn, and with and without ammonia injection. Several different fuel equivalence ratios were investigated for each operating condition.

  12. Development of All-Solid-State Sensors for Measurement of Nitric Oxide and Ammonia Concentrations by Optical Absorption in Particle-Laden Combustion Exhaust Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerald A. Caton; Kalyan Annamalai; Robert P. Lucht

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An all-solid-state continuous-wave (cw) laser system for ultraviolet absorption measurements of the nitric oxide (NO) molecule has been developed and demonstrated. For the NO sensor, 250 nW of tunable cw ultraviolet radiation is produced by sum-frequency-mixing of 532-nm radiation from a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser and tunable 395-nm radiation from an external cavity diode laser (ECDL). The sum-frequency-mixing process occurs in a beta-barium borate crystal. The nitric oxide absorption measurements are performed by tuning the ECDL and scanning the sum-frequency-mixed radiation over strong nitric oxide absorption lines near 226 nm. In Year 1 of the research, the nitric oxide sensor was used for measurements in the exhaust of a coal-fired laboratory combustion facility. The Texas A&M University boiler burner facility is a 30 kW (100,000 Btu/hr) downward-fired furnace with a steel shell encasing ceramic insulation. Measurements of nitric oxide concentration in the exhaust stream were performed after modification of the facility for laser based NOx diagnostics. The diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption measurements were successful even when the beam was severely attenuated by particulate in the exhaust stream and window fouling. Single-laser-sweep measurements were demonstrated with an effective time resolution of 100 msec, limited at this time by the scan rate of our mechanically tuned ECDL system. In Year 2, the Toptica ECDL in the original system was replaced with a Sacher Lasers ECDL. The mode-hop-free tuning range and tuning rate of the Toptica ECDL were 25 GHz and a few Hz, respectively. The mode-hop-free tuning range and tuning rate of the Sacher Lasers ECDL were 90 GHz and a few hundred Hz, respectively. The Sacher Lasers ECDL thus allows us to scan over the entire NO absorption line and to determine the absorption baseline with increased accuracy and precision. The increased tuning rate is an advantage in that data can be acquired much more rapidly and the absorption measurements are less susceptible to the effects of transient fluctuations in the properties of the coal combustor exhaust stream. Gas cell measurements were performed using the NO sensor with the new ECDL, and a few spectra were acquired from the coal exhaust stream. However, the laser diode in the new ECDL failed during the coal combustor tests. In Year 3, however, we obtained a new GaN laser diode for our ECDL system, installed it, and completed an extensive series of measurements in the Texas A&M coal-fired laboratory combustion facility. The combustor was operated with coal and coal/biomass as fuels, with and without reburn, and with and without ammonia injection. Several different fuel equivalence ratios were investigated for each operating condition. A series of spectral simulations was performed using the HITRAN code to investigate the potential sensitivity of absorption measurements of ammonia in different spectral regions. It was concluded that ammonia absorption features in the 3000-nm spectral region would be hard to measure due to water vapor interferences. We will concentrate on the spectral region near 1530 nm, where other researchers have had some success in measuring ammonia.

  13. Aging of Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foltz, M F

    2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is a relatively sensitive explosive used in many electroexplosive devices as well as in medicine. Of primary interest to LLNL is its use in items such as exploding bridgewire (EBW) detonators and exploding bridge foil initiators (EFI). In these devices the crystalline powder is pressed into a granular, low-density compact that can be initiated by an exploding wire or foil. The long-term stability of this pressed compact is of interest to weapon stockpile lifetime prediction studies. Key points about potential aging mechanisms can be summarized as follows: (1) There are a number of factors that can contribute to PETN instability. These include particle size, polymorphic phase transitions, crystal structure, impurities, moisture, occlusions, chemical incompatibility and biological (microorganism) action. of these factors the most important for long-term aging of high surface area powders used in detonators appears to be that of particle size growth. (2) There is a great deal of literature on the thermal degradation kinetics of PETN, unfortunately much of it with little bearing on ambient temperature aging during long-term storage. PETN is very stable with respect to thermal decomposition. Low-temperature thermal studies have not revealed evidence of chemical degradation products in archived PETN. Data extrapolated to 30 C predicts a half-life of 12 million years. (3) Moisture seems to lower the activation energy for and accelerate the decomposition of PETN. (4) External drivers affecting stability include temperature, moisture, radiation fields, and stress, while internal drivers include residual solvents, and impurities. Temperature affects kinetic processes of crystal growth such as adsorption, desorption, and diffusion rates of molecules on the surface of PETN crystals. A low-level radiation field may induce unexpected changes in the chemical makeup of PETN and its homologue impurities. Stress at high pressure points caused by crystalline surface irregularities may cause a decrease in surface area over time due to smoothing of contact points and sintering. PETN has been found to contain a number of impurities, including homologues, pentaerythryl ethers with a mixture of hydroxyl and nitrate functional groups, and organic salts, that can alter its physical and chemical properties. (5) The processes of sublimation/recrystallization and surface diffusion are important processes that can cause changes in PETN crystal morphology, particle size distribution and specific surface area. Sublimation feeds a process called Ostwald ripening, which involves the spontaneous growth of larger crystals from those of smaller size. This process proceeds with age regardless of storage conditions unless the crystals are treated to retard growth. The coarsening mechanisms include Ostwald ripening, 'sintering', and surface diffusion. The latter has not been experimentally observed, but a molecular modeling approach has attempted to investigate this phenomenon theoretically. (6) Threshold test fire, particle size distribution, specific surface area, thermal analysis, chemical analysis, powder compact specific surface area and density are approaches that have been used in the attempt to assess changes attributable to aging of PETN, with varying results. The biggest problem lies in the aging mechanism itself, which likely influences small changes in morphology, both internal and external, and particle size distribution changes on a scale too small to reliably monitor. Other aspects, such as subtle changes in density profiles within pressed powder compacts, may be beyond the capability of current technology to assess. Crystal growth significant enough to affect the PETN particle size distribution is expected to impact detonator performance. (7) Factors relevant to stabilizing particle size growth include crystal morphology, powder surface area and particle size distribution; crystal density and internal defects; and powder compact density and density gradients.

  14. Development of Low-Cost Austenitic Stainless Gas-Turbine and Diesel Engine Components with Enhanced High-Temperature Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Swindeman, R.W.; Browning, P.F. (Solar Turbines, Inc.); Frary, M.E. (Caterpillar, Inc.); Pollard, M.J.; Siebenaler, C.W.; McGreevy, T.E.

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In July of 1999, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Solar Turbines, Inc. and Caterpillar, Inc. (Caterpillar Technical Center) to evaluate commercial cast stainless steels for gas turbine engine and diesel engine exhaust component applications relative to the materials currently being used. If appropriate, the goal was to develop cast stainless steels with improved performance and reliability rather than switch to more costly cast Ni-based superalloys for upgraded performance. The gas-turbine components considered for the Mercury-50 engine were the combustor housing and end-cover, and the center-frame hot-plate, both made from commercial CF8C cast austenitic stainless steel (Fe-l9Cr-12Ni-Nb,C), which is generally limited to use at below 650 C. The advanced diesel engine components considered for truck applications (C10, C12, 3300 and 3400) were the exhaust manifold and turbocharger housing made from commercial high SiMo ductile cast iron with uses limited to 700-750 C or below. Shortly after the start of the CRADA, the turbine materials emphasis changed to wrought 347H stainless steel (hot-plate) and after some initial baseline tensile and creep testing, it was confirmed that this material was typical of those comprising the abundant database; and by 2000, the emphasis of the CRADA was primarily on diesel engine materials. For the diesel applications, commercial SiMo cast iron and standard cast CN12 austenitic stainless steel (Fe-25Cr-13Ni-Nb,C,N,S) baseline materials were obtained commercially. Tensile and creep testing from room temperature to 900 C showed the CN12 austenitic stainless steel to have far superior strength compared to SiMo cast iron above 550 C, together with outstanding oxidation resistance. However, aging at 850 C reduced room-temperature ductility of the standard CN12, and creep-rupture resistance at 850 C was less than expected, which triggered a focused laboratory-scale alloy development effort on modified cast austenitic stainless steels at ORNL. Isothermal fatigue testing at 700 C also showed that standard CN12 was far superior to SiMo cast iron, but somewhat less than the desired behavior. During the first year, 3 new modified CF8C heats and 8 new modified CN12 heats were made, based on compositional changes specifically designed to change the nature, dispersion and stability of the as-cast and high-temperature aging-induced microstructures that consisted of carbides and other precipitate phases. Screening of the alloys at room-temperature and at 850 C (tensile and creep-rupture) showed -a ten-fold increase in rupture life of the best modified CN12 relative to the baseline material, better room-temperature ductility after aging, caused by less precipitation in the as-cast material and much less aging-induced precipitation. The best new modified CF8C steel showed strength at tensile and creep-rupture strength comparable to standard CN12 steel at 850 C, due to a unique and very stable microstructure. The CRADA was scheduled to end in July 2001, but was extended twice until July 2002. Based on the very positive results on the newly developed modified CF8C and CN12 cast austenitic stainless steels, a new CRADA with Caterpillar has been set up to commercially scale-up, test and evaluate, and make trial components from the new steels.

  15. Energy Efficient Microwave Hybrid Processing of Lime for Cement, Steel, and Glass Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fall, Morgana L; Yakovlev, Vadim; Sahi, Catherine; Baranova, Inessa; Bowers, Johnney G; Esquenazi\t, Gibran L

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the microwave materials interactions were studied through dielectric property measurements, process modeling, and lab scale microwave hybrid calcination tests. Characterization and analysis were performed to evaluate material reactions and energy usage. Processing parameters for laboratory scale and larger scale calcining experiments were developed for MAT limestone calcination. Early stage equipment design concepts were developed, with a focus on microwave post heating treatment. The retrofitting of existing rotary calcine equipment in the lime industry was assessed and found to be feasible. Ceralink sought to address some of the major barriers to the uptake of MAT identified as the need for (1) team approach with end users, technology partners, and equipment manufacturers, (2) modeling that incorporates kiln materials and variations to the design of industrial microwave equipment. This project has furthered the commercialization effort of MAT by working closely with an industrial lime manufacturer to educate them regarding MAT, identifying equipment manufacturer to supply microwave equipment, and developing a sophisticated MAT modeling with WPI, the university partner. MAT was shown to enhance calcining through lower energy consumption and faster reaction rates compared to conventional processing. Laboratory testing concluded that a 23% reduction in energy was possible for calcining small batches (5kg). Scale-up testing indicated that the energy savings increased as a function of load size and 36% energy savings was demonstrated (22 kg). A sophisticated model was developed which combines simultaneous microwave and conventional heating. Continued development of this modeling software could be used for larger scale calcining simulations, which would be a beneficial low-cost tool for exploring equipment design prior to actual building. Based on these findings, estimates for production scale MAT calcining benefits were calculated, assuming uptake of MAT in the US lime industry. This estimate showed that 7.3 TBTU/year could be saved, with reduction of 270 MMlbs of CO2 emissions, and $29 MM/year in economic savings. Taking into account estimates for MAT implementation in the US cement industry, an additional 39 TBTU/year, 3 Blbs of CO2 and $155 MM/year could be saved. One of the main remaining barriers to commercialization of MAT for the lime and cement industries is the sheer size of production. Through this project, it was realized that a production size MAT rotary calciner was not feasible, and a different approach was adapted. The concept of a microwave post heat section located in the upper portion of the cooler was devised and appears to be a more realistic approach for MAT implementation. Commercialization of this technology will require (1) continued pilot scale calcining demonstrations, (2) involvement of lime kiln companies, and (3) involvement of an industrial microwave equipment provider. An initial design concept for a MAT post-heat treatment section was conceived as a retrofit into the cooler sections of existing lime rotary calciners with a 1.4 year payback. Retrofitting will help spur implementation of this technology, as the capital investment will be minimal for enhancing the efficiency of current rotary lime kilns. Retrofits would likely be attractive to lime manufacturers, as the purchase of a new lime kiln is on the order of a $30 million dollar investment, where as a MAT retrofit is estimated on the order of $1 million. The path for commercialization lies in partnering with existing lime kiln companies, who will be able to implement the microwave post heat sections in existing and new build kilns. A microwave equipment provider has been identified, who would make up part of the continued development and commercialization team.

  16. I-NERI Quarterly Technical Report (April 1 to June 30, 2005)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang Oh; Prof. Hee Cheon NO; Prof. John Lee; Prof. William Martin; Prof. James Holloway; Prof. Jong Kim; Prof. Goon Cherl Park

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Korean/United States/laboratory/university collaboration is to develop new advanced computational methods for safety analysis codes for very-high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTGRs) and numerical and experimental validation of these computer codes. This study consists of five tasks for FY-03: (1) development of computational methods for the VHTGR, (2) theoretical modification of aforementioned computer codes for molecular diffusion (RELAP5/ATHENA) and modeling CO and CO2 equilibrium (MELCOR), (3) development of a state-of-the-art methodology for VHTGR neutronic analysis and calculation of accurate power distributions and decay heat deposition rates, (4) reactor cavity cooling system experiment, and (5) graphite oxidation experiment. Second quarter of Year 3: (A) Prof. NO and Kim continued Task 1. As a further plant application of GAMMA code, we conducted two analyses: IAEA GT-MHR benchmark calculation for LPCC and air ingress analysis for PMR 600MWt. The GAMMA code shows comparable peak fuel temperature trend to those of other country codes. The analysis results for air ingress show much different trend from that of previous PBR analysis: later onset of natural circulation and less significant rise in graphite temperature. (B) Prof. Park continued Task 2. We have designed new separate effect test device having same heat transfer area and different diameter and total number of U-bands of air cooling pipe. New design has smaller pressure drop in the air cooling pipe than the previous one as designed with larger diameter and less number of U-bands. With the device, additional experiments have been performed to obtain temperature distributions of the water tank, the surface and the center of cooling pipe on axis. The results will be used to optimize the design of SNU-RCCS. (C) Prof. NO continued Task 3. The experimental work of air ingress is going on without any concern: With nuclear graphite IG-110, various kinetic parameters and reaction rates for the C/CO2 reaction were measured. Then, the rates of C/CO2 reaction were compared to the ones of C/O2 reaction. The rate equation for C/CO2 has been developed. (D) INL added models to RELAP5/ATHENA to cacilate the chemical reactions in a VHTR during an air ingress accident. Limited testing of the models indicate that they are calculating a correct special distribution in gas compositions. (E) INL benchmarked NACOK natural circulation data. (F) Professor Lee et al at the University of Michigan (UM) Task 5. The funding was received from the DOE Richland Office at the end of May and the subcontract paperwork was delivered to the UM on the sixth of June. The objective of this task is to develop a state of the art neutronics model for determining power distributions and decay heat deposition rates in a VHTGR core. Our effort during the reporting period covered reactor physics analysis of coated particles and coupled nuclear-thermal-hydraulic (TH) calculations, together with initial calculations for decay heat deposition rates in the core.

  17. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R&D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management tools for managing the R&D program elements; (2) Developing a specific work package for the R&D activities to be performed during each government fiscal year; (3) Reporting the status and progress of the work based on committed deliverables and milestones; (4) Developing collaboration in areas of materials R&D of benefit to the NGNP with countries that are a part of the Generation IV International Forum; and (5) Ensuring that the R&D work performed in support of the materials program is in conformance with established Quality Assurance and procurement requirements. The objective of the NGNP Materials R&D Program is to provide the essential materials R&D needed to support the design and licensing of the reactor and balance of plant, excluding the hydrogen plant. The materials R&D program is being initiated prior to the design effort to ensure that materials R&D activities are initiated early enough to support the design process and support the Project Integrator. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge; thus, new materials and approaches may be required.

  18. Fragility Analysis Methodology for Degraded Structures and Passive Components in Nuclear Power Plants - Illustrated using a Condensate Storage Tank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nie, J.; Braverman, J.; Hofmayer, C.; Choun, Y.; Kim, M.; Choi, I.

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is conducting a five-year research project to develop a realistic seismic risk evaluation system which includes the consideration of aging of structures and components in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The KAERI research project includes three specific areas that are essential to seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA): (1) probabilistic seismic hazard analysis, (2) seismic fragility analysis including the effects of aging, and (3) a plant seismic risk analysis. Since 2007, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has entered into a collaboration agreement with KAERI to support its development of seismic capability evaluation technology for degraded structures and components. The collaborative research effort is intended to continue over a five year period. The goal of this collaboration endeavor is to assist KAERI to develop seismic fragility analysis methods that consider the potential effects of age-related degradation of structures, systems, and components (SSCs). The research results of this multi-year collaboration will be utilized as input to seismic PRAs. In the Year 1 scope of work, BNL collected and reviewed degradation occurrences in US NPPs and identified important aging characteristics needed for the seismic capability evaluations. This information is presented in the Annual Report for the Year 1 Task, identified as BNL Report-81741-2008 and also designated as KAERI/RR-2931/2008. The report presents results of the statistical and trending analysis of this data and compares the results to prior aging studies. In addition, the report provides a description of U.S. current regulatory requirements, regulatory guidance documents, generic communications, industry standards and guidance, and past research related to aging degradation of SSCs. In the Year 2 scope of work, BNL carried out a research effort to identify and assess degradation models for the long-term behavior of dominant materials that are determined to be risk significant to NPPs. Multiple models have been identified for concrete, carbon and low-alloy steel, and stainless steel. These models are documented in the Annual Report for the Year 2 Task, identified as BNL Report-82249-2009 and also designated as KAERI/TR-3757/2009. This report describes the research effort performed by BNL for the Year 3 scope of work. The objective is for BNL to develop the seismic fragility capacity for a condensate storage tank with various degradation scenarios. The conservative deterministic failure margin method has been utilized for the undegraded case and has been modified to accommodate the degraded cases. A total of five seismic fragility analysis cases have been described: (1) undegraded case, (2) degraded stainless tank shell, (3) degraded anchor bolts, (4) anchorage concrete cracking, and (5)a perfect combination of the three degradation scenarios. Insights from these fragility analyses are also presented.

  19. Fuel Cycle Research & Development Technical Monthly - June 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Michael C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Topics are: (1) MPACT Campaign - (a) Management and Integration - Coordination meetings between NE and NA-22, NA-24, and NA-82 were conducted the week of June 11th. Preparations are being made for the next MPACT working group meeting, scheduled for Aug 28-30 at Idaho Falls. In addition to covering accomplishments and discussing future plans, a site tour of INL facilities (MFC, EBR, ATR, INTEC) is being organized. (2) Accounting and Control Technologies - (a) Microcalorimetry - Now operating 256-pixel array at LANL. We are in the process of tuning detector parameters to improve and optimize performance. Preliminary measurements show approximate number of live pixels is similar to that observed previously at NIST. Continuing to study contribution to systematic error from uncertainties in tabulated gamma-ray energies. (b) Electrochemical Sensor - Testing of sensors fashioned from different precursor materials continued. SEM analysis of all used sensors has been or will be performed. (c) Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer - Ongoing perturbation calculations are providing information on the fundamental systematic error limits of LSDS. In order to achieve separating the contribution of Pu and 235U to the signal, there will need to be tight controls on systematic errors. Continuing to look into a He4 detector. Research into local construction of a He4 detector continued. We have started to apply the algorithm to test the LSDS using experimental data from previous RPI measurements. PNNL also developed a plan to address the lack of statistics in the MCNP modeling of the NGSI 64 assemblies. The ISU graduate student built and tested a fission chamber to gain experience with them. (d) Fast Neutron Imaging to Quantify Nuclear Materials - The imaging detector design was modified for each pixel to have an 8 x 8 pixel array. Quotations and purchasing process for components, including the new PSD scintillator are in progress. (e) Fast Neutron Multiplicity Analysis - The team submitted two papers to the upcoming INMM meeting that are related to the fast neutron multiplicity R&D effort. Progress was made on the project's main goal of designing a concept for a prototype fast-neutron multiplicity counter. We started laying out the outline for the final report. We have been working with our ORNL collaborators to develop a new digitizer system to support our experimental campaign planned for next year. (3) MPACT Analysis Tools - (a) Multi-isotope Process Monitor - Fuel characterization framework development continued during June. A report describing the methodologies is being completed. Kenneth Dayman, from University of Texas, spent a week at PNNL wrapping up his master's research and working on a journal submission covering that work. The target journal is the IEEE transactions on Nuclear Science; submission is planned for the end of July. A proposal to instrument H-Canyon is being prepared in conjunction with SRNL and the NNSA's NGSI program. The impact of gamma-ray spectrum counting statistics on the precision of relative radioisotope component intensities as reconstructed via Principal Component Regression (PCR) continued in June with Monte Carlo simulations of a two-component (i.e., two radioisotope) system. This work generalizes earlier studies in FY12 in which Poisson counting variations of only a single spectrum component were simulated. (b) Modeling and Simulation for Analysis of Safeguards Performance (Electrochemical) - Preliminary insights into safeguards challenges and the initial design for an electrochemical plant have been written up into an INMM paper and will be presented at the INMM Summer Meeting. Work is currently adding a new visualization capability for integrating materials accountancy with physical protection. (c) Material Control including Process Monitoring (Pattern Recognition, Sensors) - Fabrication of quartz chips continued at an external foundry. Awaiting delivery of the heat exchange manifold and chip holder. (d) MPACT System Integration and Technical Support - The initial report on cost-basis metrics for nucle

  20. Wheeler County Riparian Buffers; 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homer, Will (Wheeler County Soil and Water Conservation District, John Day, OR)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Number of Contacts Made--I have contacted 35 landowners in Wheeler County. Of the 35 contacts 12 have resulted in meeting on their property to discuss available options. Included an article in the Annual Report and Wheeler SWCD newsletter mailed to 550 landowners. Contacts are primarily through networking with others here in the office as well as working closely with the NRCS office. Number of Contracts Negotiated--This Project has produced five riparian buffers within the past contract year. Each has greater meaning to the landowner than simply a buffer. In most cases the buffer is providing the landowner with improved grazing management and/or more reliable water source for livestock. Landowners also feel the enhanced wildlife habitat is a bonus to the program. Other Accomplishments--I took part in the John Day Subbasin Planning process and was able to offer assistance into the inventory items related to Wheeler County. I was often the only local representative able to attend the meetings. I assisted the Wheeler SWCD in writing a successful OWEB grant to remove 110 acres of junipers for watershed restoration, range rehabilitation, and economic development. One partner in the project is a manufacturer that uses juniper as their primary construction material. The goal is to create a pilot project that may grow into a self sustaining industry within the county. I also assisted in writing a small grant to improve water usage in the Muddy Creek watershed. I assisted with the Pine Creek Conservation Area ''Twilight Tour'' as well as the Wheeler SWCD ''Annual Meeting and Dinner''. Both events were successful in getting information out about our riparian buffer program. Facilitate office training and utilization of advanced GIS technology and mapping. Problems Encountered During Contract Year--The NRCS Cultural Resources Review process has ground to a halt. It is takes 6 months to get initial results from the Portland offices. Nearly all requests require site surveys that delay the process even further. The Farm Services Agency is not user friendly when it comes to the CREP program. The program has not been designed to fit everyone along a steelhead stream. Crop/Field designations often negate or complicate CREP eligibility along qualifying streams. I spend a great deal of time mediating between FSA and the landowner. I have lost one interested landowner specifically to the fears related to the Oregon Department of State Lands ''Navigability'' study. Outlook for Contract Year 3--I am currently working on a project area that will encompass nearly six miles of steelhead habitat. It is located in the critical Bridge Creek watershed. Another is nearly three miles in the Mountain Creek Watershed. Both projects will take great steps in improving fish habitat. Both are on Steelhead streams. Further out I am working with two landowners for projects in the Butte Creek watershed that will be highly visible and will likely gain the attention of many more landowners. Like all previous projects, there is a great deal of work in future projects in massaging the landowner into feeling comfortable with the riparian buffer program. The potential to do great things with this program is huge in Wheeler County. Continuing outreach and education efforts will help the process.

  1. Atmospheric Dispersion at Spatial Resolutions Below Mesoscale for university of Tennessee SimCenter at Chattanooga: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. David Whitfield; Dr. Daniel Hyams

    2009-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In Year 1 of this project, items 1.1 and 1.2 were addressed, as well as item 2.2. The baseline parallel computational simulation tool has been refined significantly over the timeline of this project for the purpose of atmospheric dispersion and transport problems; some of these refinements are documented in Chapter 3. The addition of a concentration transport capability (item 1.2) was completed, along with validation and usage in a highly complex urban environment. Multigrid capability (item 2.2) was a primary focus of Year 1 as well, regardless of the fact that it was scheduled for Year 2. It was determined by the authors that due to the very large nature of the meshes required for atmospheric simulations at mesoscale, multigrid was a key enabling technology for the rest of the project to be successful. Therefore, it was addressed early according to the schedule laid out in the original proposal. The technology behind the multigrid capability is discussed in detail in Chapter 5. Also in Year 1, the issue of ground topography specification is addressed. For simulations of pollutant transport in a given region, a key prerequisite is the specification of the detailed ground topography. The local topography must be placed into a form suitable for generating an unstructured grid both on the topography itself and the atmospheric volume above it; this effort is documented in Chapter 6. In Year 2 of this project, items 1.3 and 2.1 were addressed. Weather data in the form of wind speeds, relative humidity, and baseline pollution levels may be input into the code in order to improve the real-world fidelity of the solutions. Of course, the computational atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) boundary condition developed in Year 1 may still be used when necessary. Cloud cover may be simulated via the levels of actinic flux allowed in photochemical reactions in the atmospheric chemistry model. The primary focus of Year 2 was the formulation of a multispecies capability with included chemical reactions (item 2.1). This proved to be a very arduous task, taking the vast majority of the time and personnel allocation for Year Two. The addition of this capability and related verification is documented in Chapter 7. A discussion of available tropospheric chemistry models is located in Chapter 8; and, a technology demonstrator for the full multispecies capability is detailed in Chapter 9. Item 2.3 has been partially addressed, in that the computation of sensitivity derivatives have been incorporated in the Tenasi code [7]. However, it has not been utilized in this project in order to compute probability distribution functions for pollutant deposition. In order to completely address the integration of weather and sensor data into the code (item 1.3) and integrate with existing sensor networks (item 3.1), a customizable interface was established. Weather data is most commonly available via a real database, and as such, support for accessing these databases is present in the solver source code. For integration functionality, a method of dynamic code customization was developed in Year 3, which is documented in Chapter 11.

  2. PG&E WaveConnect Program Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brendan P. Dooher; Edward Cheslak; Robert Booth; Doug Davy; Annette Faraglia; Ian Caliendo; Gina Morimoto; Douglas Herman

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PG&E WaveConnect project was intended to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of wave power in the open ocean adjacent to PG&E's service territory. WaveConnect was conceived as a multi-stage development process leading to long-term megawatt-scale wave power production. The first-stage tasks consisted of site selection, permitting, pilot plant design, and assessment of technology and commercial readiness. The second stage would have included development of infrastructure, undersea cabling, and deployment of wave energy conversion devices (WECs). In the third stage, the most promising WEC devices would have been deployed in larger quantities and connected to the grid. This report documents the findings of Stage One. Site Selection: After studying the wave energy potential, grid interconnection and other project infrastructure along the California coast, PG&E selected two sites: one near Eureka, called the Humboldt WaveConnect (HWC) project, and another near Vandenberg Air Force Base, called the Central Coast WaveConnect project (CCWC). Permitting: FERC issued PG&E preliminary permits for HWC in 2008 and for CCWC in 2010. PG&E chose to use FERC's Pilot Project Licensing Process, which was intended to streamline licensing to allow relatively quick and easy installation, operation, and environmental testing for pilot projects. Permitting, however, proved to be complicated, time-consuming and expensive, mainly because of the uncertain impacts of WEC devices. PG&E learned that even under the PPLP the project would still require a full analysis under CEQA, including an EIR, as well as Monitoring and Adaptive Management Programs and other requirements that had significant cost and scheduling implications. A majority of efforts were expended on permitting activities. Pilot Plant Design: PG&E prepared a conceptual design for a 5-MW pilot test facility at the Humboldt site, which consisted of an off-shore deployment area where WECs of different designs and from different device manufacturers could be tested. PG&E was to provide permitting, subsea cables, and on-shore facilities necessary to connect WaveConnect to an existing PG&E substation, while the WEC manufacturers would provide, operate and maintain their devices during the test period. Technology and Commercial Readiness: PG&E issued a Request for Information to the wave power industry to assess the technical and commercial capabilities of WEC manufacturers. Sixteen manufacturers responded, representing the four best-known and most mature designs. PG&E found that WECs are early-stage devices with evolving designs and little real-world operating experience. These characteristics made environmental impacts difficult to assess, which complicated permitting efforts. It also made a megawatt-scale demonstration project difficult to support because early stage WECs are costly and have limited track records for performance and reliability. Results: PG&E withdrew its FERC DPLA for HWC in November 2010 and surrendered its preliminary permit for CCWC in May 2011, effectively discontinuing the project for the following combination of reasons: Permitting issues were much more challenging than originally anticipated. Stage One project funding of $6 million proved insufficient to complete the necessary development and permitting work. During Stage One development, PG&E determined that permitting costs would be $2 million to $5 million greater than originally budgeted. The cost of developing a five-year, 5-MW pilot project at Humboldt Bay is much greater than the $15 million to $20 million originally estimated. Even assuming that vendors provide WEC devices at no cost to the utility, which was the proposed strategy with WaveConnect, PG&E concluded that a pilot project comparable to HWC would cost approximately $47 million. If WEC devices were purchased for such a project, its total cost would be on the order of $90 million. It is unclear when or if wave power will become competitive with renewable energy alternatives. Significant additional investment in design, testing and de

  3. Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation of Avian Predation on Salmonid Smolts in the Lower and Mid-Columbia River, 2008 Draft Season Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roby, Daniel D. [USGS - Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University; Collis, Ken [Real Time Research, Inc.; Lyons, Donald E. [USGS - Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Oregon State University

    2009-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes investigations into predation by piscivorous colonial waterbirds on juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) from throughout the Columbia River basin during 2008. East Sand Island in the Columbia River estuary again supported the largest known breeding colony of Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia) in the world (approximately 10,700 breeding pairs) and the largest breeding colony of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) in western North America (approximately 10,950 breeding pairs). The Caspian tern colony increased from 2007, but not significantly so, while the double-crested cormorant colony experienced a significant decline (20%) from 2007. Average cormorant nesting success in 2008, however, was down only slightly from 2007, suggesting that food supply during the 2008 nesting season was not the principal cause of the decline in cormorant colony size. Total consumption of juvenile salmonids by East Sand Island Caspian terns in 2008 was approximately 6.7 million smolts (95% c.i. = 5.8-7.5 million). Caspian terns nesting on East Sand Island continued to rely primarily on marine forage fishes as a food supply. Based on smolt PIT tag recoveries on the East Sand Island Caspian tern colony, predation rates were highest on steelhead in 2008; minimum predation rates on steelhead smolts detected passing Bonneville Dam averaged 8.3% for wild smolts and 10.7% for hatchery-raised smolts. In 2007, total smolt consumption by East Sand Island double-crested cormorants was about 9.2 million juvenile salmonids (95% c.i. = 4.4-14.0 million), similar to or greater than that of East Sand Island Caspian terns during that year (5.5 million juvenile salmonids; 95% c.i. = 4.8-6.2 million). The numbers of smolt PIT tags recovered on the cormorant colony in 2008 were roughly proportional to the relative availability of PIT-tagged salmonids released in the Basin, suggesting that cormorant predation on salmonid smolts in the estuary was less selective than tern predation. Cormorant predation rates in excess of 30%, however, were observed for some groups of hatchery-reared fall Chinook salmon released downstream of Bonneville Dam. Implementation of the federal plan 'Caspian Tern Management to Reduce Predation of Juvenile Salmonids in the Columbia River Estuary' was initiated in 2008 with construction by the Corps of Engineers of two alternative colony sites for Caspian terns in interior Oregon: a 1-acre island on Crump Lake in the Warner Valley and a 1-acre island on Fern Ridge Reservoir near Eugene. We deployed Caspian tern social attraction (decoys and sound systems) on these two islands and monitored for Caspian tern nesting. Caspian terns quickly colonized the Crump Lake tern island; about 430 pairs nested there, including 5 terns that had been banded at the East Sand Island colony in the Columbia River estuary, over 500 km to the northwest. No Caspian terns nested at the Fern Ridge tern island in 2008, but up to 9 Caspian terns were recorded roosting on the island after the nesting season. There were two breeding colonies of Caspian terns on the mid-Columbia River in 2008: (1) about 388 pairs nested at the historical colony on Crescent Island in the McNary Pool and (2) about 100 pairs nested at a relatively new colony site on Rock Island in the John Day Pool. Nesting success at the Crescent Island tern colony was only 0.28 young fledged per breeding pair, the lowest nesting success recorded at that colony since monitoring began in 2000, while only three fledglings were raised at the Rock Island tern colony. The diet of Crescent Island Caspian terns consisted of 68% salmonid smolts; total smolt consumption was estimated at 330,000. Since 2004, total smolt consumption by Crescent Island terns has declined by 34%, due mostly to a decline in colony size, while steelhead consumption has increased 10% during this same period. In 2008, approximately 64,000 steelhead smolts were consumed by Caspian terns nesting at Crescent Island. Based on smolt PIT tag recoveries on the Crescent Island Caspian tern colony, the average

  4. Monitoring Based Commissioning: Benchmarking Analysis of 24 UC/CSU/IOU Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Evan; Mathew, Paul

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Buildings rarely perform as intended, resulting in energy use that is higher than anticipated. Building commissioning has emerged as a strategy for remedying this problem in non-residential buildings. Complementing traditional hardware-based energy savings strategies, commissioning is a 'soft' process of verifying performance and design intent and correcting deficiencies. Through an evaluation of a series of field projects, this report explores the efficacy of an emerging refinement of this practice, known as monitoring-based commissioning (MBCx). MBCx can also be thought of as monitoring-enhanced building operation that incorporates three components: (1) Permanent energy information systems (EIS) and diagnostic tools at the whole-building and sub-system level; (2) Retro-commissioning based on the information from these tools and savings accounting emphasizing measurement as opposed to estimation or assumptions; and (3) On-going commissioning to ensure efficient building operations and measurement-based savings accounting. MBCx is thus a measurement-based paradigm which affords improved risk-management by identifying problems and opportunities that are missed with periodic commissioning. The analysis presented in this report is based on in-depth benchmarking of a portfolio of MBCx energy savings for 24 buildings located throughout the University of California and California State University systems. In the course of the analysis, we developed a quality-control/quality-assurance process for gathering and evaluating raw data from project sites and then selected a number of metrics to use for project benchmarking and evaluation, including appropriate normalizations for weather and climate, accounting for variations in central plant performance, and consideration of differences in building types. We performed a cost-benefit analysis of the resulting dataset, and provided comparisons to projects from a larger commissioning 'Meta-analysis' database. A total of 1120 deficiency-intervention combinations were identified in the course of commissioning the projects described in this report. The most common location of deficiencies was in HVAC equipment (65% of sites), followed by air-handling and distributions systems (59%), cooling plant (29%), heating plants (24%), and terminal units (24%). The most common interventions were adjusting setpoints, modifying sequences of operations, calibration, and various mechanical fixes (each done in about two-thirds of the sites). The normalized rate of occurrence of deficiencies and corresponding interventions ranged from about 0.1/100ksf to 10/100ksf, depending on the issue. From these interventions flowed significant and highly cost-effective energy savings For the MBCx cohort, source energy savings of 22 kBTU/sf-year (10%) were achieved, with a range of 2% to 25%. Median electricity savings were 1.9 kWh/sf-year (9%), with a range of 1% to 17%. Peak electrical demand savings were 0.2 W/sf-year (4%), with a range of 3% to 11%. The aggregate commissioning cost for the 24 projects was $2.9 million. We observed a range of normalized costs from $0.37 to 1.62/sf, with a median value of $1.00/sf for buildings that implemented MBCx projects. Per the program design, monitoring costs as a percentage of total costs are significantly higher in MBCx projects (median value 40%) than typical commissioning projects included in the Meta-analysis (median value of 2% in the commissioning database). Half of the projects were in buildings containing complex and energy-intensive laboratory space, with higher associated costs. Median energy cost savings were $0.25/sf-year, for a median simple payback time of 2.5 years. Significant and cost-effective energy savings were thus obtained. The greatest absolute energy savings and shortest payback times were achieved in laboratory-type facilities. While impacts varied from project to project, on a portfolio basis we find MBCx to be a highly cost-effective means of obtaining significant program-level energy savings across a variety of building types. Energy savings are ex

  5. Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants (Cooperative Agreement DE-FC03-99SF21902, Am. M004) Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanley E. Ritterbusch, et. al.

    2003-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 Research under this project addresses the barriers to long term use of nuclear-generated electricity in the United States. It was agreed that a very basic and significant change to the current method of design and regulation was needed. That is, it was believed that the cost reduction goal could not be met by fixing the current system (i.e., an evolutionary approach) and a new, more advanced approach for this project would be needed. It is believed that a completely new design and regulatory process would have to be developed--a ''clean sheet of paper'' approach. This new approach would start with risk-based methods, would establish probabilistic design criteria, and would implement defense-in-depth only when necessary (1) to meet public policy issues (e.g., use of a containment building no matter how low the probability of a large release is) and (2) to address uncertainties in probabilistic methods and equipment performance. This new approach is significantly different from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) current risk-informed program for operating plants. For our new approach, risk-based methods are the primary means for assuring plant safety, whereas in the NRC's current approach, defense-in-depth remains the primary means of assuring safety. The primary accomplishments in the first year--Phase 1 were (1) the establishment of a new, highly risk-informed design and regulatory framework, (2) the establishment of the preliminary version of the new, highly risk-informed design process, (3) core damage frequency predictions showing that, based on new, lower pipe rupture probabilities, the design of the emergency core cooling system equipment can be simplified without reducing plant safety, and (4) the initial development of methods for including uncertainties in a new integrated structures-systems design model. Under the new regulatory framework, options for the use of ''design basis accidents'' were evaluated. It is expected that design basis accidents would be an inherent part of the Probabilistic Safety Assessment for the plant and their evaluation would be probabilistic. Other first year accomplishments include (1) the conversion of an NRC database for cross-referencing NRC criteria and industry codes and standards to Microsoft 2000 software, (2) an assessment of the NRC's hearing process which concluded that the normal cross-examination during public hearings is not actually required by the U.S. Administrative Procedures Act, (3) the identification and listing of reliability data sources, and (4) interfacing with other industry groups (e.g., NEI and IAEA) and NRC at workshops for risk-informing regulations. The major accomplishments during the second year consisted of (1) issuance of the final report for Subtask 1.1, ''Identify Current Applicable Regulatory Requirements [and Industry Standards],'' (2) issuance of the final report for Subtask 1.2,'' Identify Structures, Systems, and Components and Their Associate d Costs for a Typical Plant,'' (3) extension of the new, highly risk-informed design and regulatory framework to non-light-water-reactor technology, (4) completion of more detailed thermal-hydraulic and probabilistic analyses of advanced conceptual reactor system/component designs, (6) initial evaluation and recommendations for improvement of the NRC design review process, and (7) initial development of the software format, procedures and statistical routines needed to store, analyze and retrieve the available reliability data. Final reports for Subtasks 1.1 (regulatory and design criteria) and 1.2 (costs for structures, systems, and components) were prepared and issued. A final report for Subtask 1.3 (Regulatory Framework) was drafted with the aim to issue it in Phase 3 (Year 3). One technical report was produced for Subtask 1.4 (methods development) and two technical reports were produced for Subtask 1.6 (sample problem analysis). An interim report on the NRC design review process (Subtask 1.7) was prepared and issued. Finally, a report on Subtask 2.2 (database weaknesses) addressed the i

  6. Project Title: Nuclear Astrophysics Data from Radioactive Beam Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan A. Chen

    2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The scientific aims of this project have been the evaluation and dissemination of key nuclear reactions in nuclear astrophysics, with a focus on ones to be studied at new radioactive beam facilities worldwide. These aims were maintained during the entire funding period from 2003 - 2006. In the following, a summary of the reactions evaluated during this period is provided. Year 1 (2003-04): {sup 21}Na(p,{gamma}){sup 22}Mg and {sup 18}Ne({alpha},p){sup 21}Na - The importance of the {sup 21}Na(p,{gamma}){sup 22}Mg and the {sup 18}Ne({alpha},p){sup 21}Na reactions in models of exploding stars has been well documented: the first is connected to the production of the radioisotope {sup 22}Na in nova nucleosynthesis, while the second is a key bridge between the Hot-CNO cycles and the rp-process in X-ray bursts. By the end of Summer 2004, our group had updated these reaction rates to include all published data up to September 2004, and cast the reaction rates into standard analytical and tabular formats with the assistance of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's computational infrastructure for reaction rates. Since September 2004, ongoing experiments on these two reactions have been completed, with our group's participation in both: {sup 21}Na(p,{gamma}){sup 22}Mg at the TRIUMF-ISAC laboratory (DRAGON collaboration), and 18Ne({alpha},p){sup 21}Na at Argonne National Laboratory (collaboration with Ernst Rehm, Argonne). The data from the former was subsequently published and included in our evaluation. Publication from the latter still awaits independent confirmation of the experimental results. Year 2 (2004-05): The 25Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si and {sup 13}N(p,{gamma})14O reactions - For Year 2, we worked on evaluations of the {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si and {sup 13}N(p,{gamma}){sup 14}O reactions, in accordance with our proposed deliverables and following similar standard procedures to those used in Year 1. The {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si reaction is a key uncertainty in the understanding the origin of galactic {sup 26}Al, a target radioisotope for gamma ray astronomy; the {sup 13}N(p,{gamma}){sup 14}O reaction in turn is the trigger reaction for the transition into the Hot-CNO cycles in novae and X-ray bursts. A graduate student of mine, who has been supported part-time by this grant, completed the evaluation of the {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si reaction as part of his plans to measure this reaction at TRIUMF for his Ph.D. thesis project. I also hired a part-time undergraduate student for the 2004-05 academic year to assist with the evaluations, including that of the {sup 13}N(p,{gamma}){sup 14}O reaction. Year 3 (2005-06): The {sup 40}Ca({alpha},{gamma}){sup 44}Ti and {sup 26}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 27}Si reactions - This year's progress was closely coupled to new results coming from our collaboration on the DRAGON spectrometer team at TRIUMF. The {sup 40}Ca({alpha},{gamma}){sup 44}Ti and {sup 26}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 27}Si reactions were both measured, and significant modifications to their respective reaction rates were required. Both are required input toward predicting the respective amounts of Titanium-44 and Aluminum-26 produced in our galaxy, in supernovae, massive stars, and nova explosions. The {sup 26}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 27}Si reaction rate was successfully completed. The {sup 40}Ca({alpha},{gamma}){sup 44}Ti reaction in particular served as the Ph.D. thesis for Christian Ouellet, and therefore the evaluation of this rate fell naturally within his thesis project. Christian successfully defended his thesis in 2007 and is now working for me on the McMaster DOE-funded Nuclear Data Project. In light of the recent data from his thesis, Christian is now putting the final touches on this evaluation, and will disseminate it through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory reaction rate database.