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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology DOE R&D Activities National Hydrogen Storage Compressed/Liquid Hydrogen Tanks Testing and Analysis Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards

2

Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Storage A discussion of depleted UF6 cylinder storage activities and associated risks. Management Activities for Cylinders in Storage The long-term management of the existing DUF6 storage cylinders and the continual effort to remediate and maintain the safe condition of the DUF6 storage cylinders will remain a Departmental responsibility for many years into the future. The day to day management of the DUF6 cylinders includes actions designed to cost effectively maintain and improve their storage conditions, such as: General storage cylinder and storage yard maintenance; Performing regular inspections of cylinders; Restacking and respacing the cylinders to improve drainage and to

3

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Energy Storage Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Testing to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Energy Storage Testing on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Energy...

4

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Energy Storage Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Testing The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is tasked by the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Office to conduct various types of energy storage...

5

Activated Aluminum Hydride Hydrogen Storage Compositions ...  

Aluminum hydride is the best known alane and has been known for over 60 years. It is potentially a very attractive medium for onboard automotive hydrogen storage ...

6

Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and ...  

In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of ...

7

Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbon  

SciTech Connect

Despite technical advances to reduce air pollution emissions, motor vehicles still account for 30 to 70% emissions of all urban air pollutants. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require 100 cities in the United States to reduce the amount of their smog within 5 to 15 years. Hence, auto emissions, the major cause of smog, must be reduced 30 to 60% by 1998. Natural gas con be combusted with less pollutant emissions. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) uses adsorbents and operates with a low storage pressure which results in lower capital costs and maintenance. This paper describes the production of an activated carbon adsorbent produced from an Illinois coal for ANG.

Sun, Jian; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

New Carbon Storage Atlas Shows Hundreds of Years of CO2 Storage Potential |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Storage Atlas Shows Hundreds of Years of CO2 Storage Carbon Storage Atlas Shows Hundreds of Years of CO2 Storage Potential New Carbon Storage Atlas Shows Hundreds of Years of CO2 Storage Potential December 21, 2012 - 9:58am Addthis Atlas IV was created by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and includes input from the more than 400 organizations in 43 states and four Canadian provinces that make up the Department’s seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (as shown above). See this map here. Atlas IV was created by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and includes input from the more than 400 organizations in 43 states and four Canadian provinces that make up the Department's seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (as shown above). See this map here.

9

Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Activities in the United States Electricity Grid Electricity Advisory Committee Energy Storage Technologies Subcommittee Members Ralph Masiello, Subcommittee Chair Senior...

10

Natural gas storage on activated carbon  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas is a good fuel for internal combustion engines, but its low energy density is a significant drawback. The energy density can be increased by adsorption on a high surface area activated carbon. But with usage, some of the constituents in the natural gas composition accumulate on the carbon and reduce its adsorptivity. The adsorption desorption of natural gas on 9LXC activated carbon was investigated to 100 cycles at 21/sup 0/C and pressures of up to 12 MPa. The decrease in the capacity, G, as a function of the number of cycles, N, was found to follow the empirical correlation: G/G /SUB o/ = 1 - 0.085Log(N). Analysis of the activated carbon after 100 cycles showed accumulation of C/sub 4/ and higher hydrocarbons but not of C/sub 2/ and C/sub 3/. For automotive applications, activated carbon appears practical in a narrow pressure range, centering around 7 MPa (1000 psig). The preferred storage is at a pressure of 17 MPa or higher, without the use of activated carbons.

Golovoy, A.; Blais, E.J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

A nine year study of file system and storage benchmarking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benchmarking is critical when evaluating performance, but is especially difficult for file and storage systems. Complex interactions between I/O devices, caches, kernel daemons, and other OS components result in behavior that is rather difficult to analyze. Moreover, systems have different features and optimizations, so no single benchmark is always suitable. The large variety of workloads that these systems experience in the real world also adds to this difficulty. In this article we survey 415 file system and storage benchmarks from 106 recent papers. We found that most popular benchmarks are flawed and many research papers do not provide a clear indication of true performance. We provide guidelines that we hope will improve future performance evaluations. To show how some widely used benchmarks can conceal or overemphasize overheads, we conducted a set of experiments. As a specific example, slowing down read operations on ext2 by a factor of 32 resulted in only a 25 % wall-clock slowdown in a popular compile benchmark. Finally, we discuss future work to improve file system and storage benchmarking.

Avishay Traeger; Erez Zadok; Nikolai Joukov; Charles P. Wright

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

Sandrock, Gary (Ringwood, NJ); Reilly, James (Bellport, NY); Graetz, Jason (Mastic, NY); Wegrzyn, James E. (Brookhaven, NY)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

13

Working natural gas storage capacity grows 3% year-over-year | U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

tags: natural gas storage. Email Updates. RSS Feeds. Facebook. Twitter. YouTube. Add us to your site. Have a question, comment, or suggestion for a future article?

14

303-K Storage Facility report on FY98 closure activities  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes and evaluates the decontamination activities, sampling activities, and sample analysis performed in support of the closure of the 303-K Storage Facility. The evaluation is based on the validated data included in the data validation package (98-EAP-346) for the 303-K Storage Facility. The results of this evaluation will be used for assessing contamination for the purpose of closing the 303-K Storage Facility as described in the 303-K Storage Facility Closure Plan, DOE/RL-90-04. The closure strategy for the 303-K Storage Facility is to decontaminate the interior of the north half of the 303-K Building to remove known or suspected dangerous waste contamination, to sample the interior concrete and exterior soils for the constituents of concern, and then to perform data analysis, with an evaluation to determine if the closure activities and data meet the closure criteria. The closure criteria for the 303-K Storage Facility is that the concentrations of constituents of concern are not present above the cleanup levels. Based on the evaluation of the decontamination activities, sampling activities, and sample data, determination has been made that the soils at the 303-K Storage Facility meet the cleanup performance standards (WMH 1997) and can be clean closed. The evaluation determined that the 303-K Building cannot be clean closed without additional closure activities. An additional evaluation will be needed to determine the specific activities required to clean close the 303-K Storage Facility. The radiological contamination at the 303-K Storage Facility is not addressed by the closure strategy.

Adler, J.G.

1998-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

15

Hydrogen storage on activated carbon. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project studied factors that influence the ability of carbon to store hydrogen and developed techniques to enhance that ability in naturally occurring and factory-produced commercial carbon materials. During testing of enhanced materials, levels of hydrogen storage were achieved that compare well with conventional forms of energy storage, including lead-acid batteries, gasoline, and diesel fuel. Using the best materials, an electric car with a modern fuel cell to convert the hydrogen directly to electricity would have a range of over 1,000 miles. This assumes that the total allowable weight of the fuel cell and carbon/hydrogen storage system is no greater than the present weight of batteries in an existing electric vehicle. By comparison, gasoline cars generally are limited to about a 450-mile range, and battery-electric cars to 40 to 60 miles. The project also developed a new class of carbon materials, based on polymers and other organic compounds, in which the best hydrogen-storing factors discovered earlier were {open_quotes}molecularly engineered{close_quotes} into the new materials. It is believed that these new molecularly engineered materials are likely to exceed the performance of the naturally occurring and manufactured carbons seen earlier with respect to hydrogen storage.

Schwarz, J.A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in Illinois Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in Illinois November 19, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A project important to demonstrating the commercial viability of carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technology has completed the first year of injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) from an industrial plant at a large-scale test site in Illinois. Led by the Illinois State Geological Survey, the Illinois Basin-Decatur Project is the first demonstration-scale project in the United States to use CO2 from an industrial source and inject it into a saline reservoir. The CO2 is being captured from an ethanol production facility operated by the Archer Daniels Midland Company in Decatur, Ill., and is being injected

17

Working natural gas storage capacity grows 3% year-over-year ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA estimates that the demonstrated peak working gas capacity for underground storage in the lower 48 states rose 3%, or 136 billion cubic feet (Bcf), to 4,239 Bcf in ...

18

Electrical Energy Storage Activities in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spurred by increased public and private sector investment as well as policy initiatives, electrical energy storage project activities are on the upswing worldwide. The growing number of operating and planned initiatives demands that they be rigorously documented and evaluated to promote information sharing and collective learning. This report provides descriptive case studies on ten U.S.-based energy storage projects offering insight into their background, status, successes, shortcomings, and lessons lea...

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Examination of Spent CANDU (TM) Fuel Following 27 Years of Pool Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After 27 years in pool storage, the Zircaloy cladding of CANDU fuel showed no deterioration. Further, in deliberately defected fuel elements, uranium oxide surface oxidation appeared to have no impact on fuel-cladding integrity. These results increase utilities' confidence that the fuel can be stored in pools for periods of at least 50 years.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Working natural gas storage capacity grows 3% year-over-year ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The four new facilities accounted for nearly 38 Bcf of the year-on-year ... as a percentage of design ... Report provides access to an interactive query ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Implementation and evaluation of active storage in modern parallel file systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Active Storage is a technology aimed at reducing the bandwidth requirements of current supercomputing systems, and leveraging the processing power of the storage nodes used by some modern file systems. To achieve both objectives, Active Storage moves ... Keywords: Active Storage, Lustre, NetCDF, PVFS2, Striped file

Juan Piernas-Canovas; Jarek Nieplocha

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Risks » Storage Environmental Risks » Storage Depleted UF6 Environmental Risks line line Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6 Storage Discussion of the potential environmental impacts from storage of depleted UF6 at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts Analyzed in the PEIS The PEIS included an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from continuing to store depleted UF6 cylinders at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts from Continued Storage of UF6 Cylinders Continued storage of the UF6 cylinders would require extending the use of a

23

Dynamic Analysis and Control of an Energy Storage Flywheel Rotor with Active Magnetic Bearings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flywheel energy storage is a promising technology for providing intermediate energy storage. An energy storage flywheel is supported by active magnetic bearings (AMBs) to achieve high speed running and increase energy efficiency of the energy storage ... Keywords: Flywheel, Energy Storage, Magnetic Bearing, Rotor Dynamics

Zhang Kai; Dai Xingjian; Zhang Xiaozhang

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Hazelwood Interim Storage Site environmental surveillance report for calendar year 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of environmental surveillance activities conducted at the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) during calendar year 1993. It includes an overview of site operations, the basis for monitoring for radioactive and non-radioactive parameters, summaries of environmental program at HISS, a summary of the results, and the calculated hypothetical radiation dose to the offsite population. Environmental surveillance activities were conducted in accordance with the site environmental monitoring plan, which describes the rationale and design criteria for the surveillance program, the frequency of sampling and analysis, specific sampling and analysis procedures, and quality assurance requirements. The US Department of Energy (DOE) began environmental monitoring of HISS in 1984, when the site was assigned to DOE by Congress through the energy and Water Development Appropriations Act and subsequent to DOE`s Formerly Utilized Sites Remediation Action Program (FUSRAP). Contamination at HISS originated from uranium processing work conducted at Mallinckrodt Chemical Works at the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS) from 1942 through 1957.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Colonie Interim Storage Site environmental surveillance report for calendar year 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of environmental surveillance activities conducted at the Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS) during calendar year 1993. It includes an overview of site operations, the basis for radiological and nonradiological monitoring, dose to the offsite population, and summaries of environmental programs at CISS. Environmental surveillance activities were conducted in accordance with the site environmental monitoring plan, which describes the rationale and design criteria for the surveillance program, the frequency of sampling and analysis, specific sampling and analysis procedures, and quality assurance requirements. Appendix A contains a discussion of the nature of radiation, the way it is measured, and common sources of it. The primary environmental guidelines and limits applicable to CISS are given in US Department of Energy (DOE) orders and mandated by six federal acts: the Clean Air Act; the Clean Water Act; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); the Toxic Substances Control Act; the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). DOE began environmental monitoring of CISS in 1984 when DOE was authorized by Congress through the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act to conduct a decontamination research and development program at the site. The site was subsequently assigned to DOE`s Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP).

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage Potential in U.S. and Portions of Canada Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage Potential in U.S. and Portions of Canada December 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - There could be as much as 5,700 years of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage potential available in geologic formations in the United States and portions of Canada, according to the latest edition of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Sequestration Atlas (Atlas III). The updated preliminary estimate, based on current emission rates, documents 1,800 billion to more than 20,000 billion metric tons of CO2 storage potential in saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and unmineable coal areas. This suggests the availability of approximately

27

Immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility, Project W-465 conceptual design report  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the design and Total Estimated Cost to modify the four unused grout vaults for the remote handling and interim storage of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). The grout vault facilities in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site were constructed in the 1980s to support Tank Waste disposal activities. The facilities were to serve project B-714 which was intended to store grouted low-activity waste. The existing 4 unused grout vaults, with modifications for remote handling capability, will provide sufficient capacity for approximately three years of immobilized low activity waste (ILAW) production from the Tank Waste Remediation System-Privatization Vendors (TWRS-PV). These retrofit modifications to the grout vaults will result in an ILAW interim storage facility (Project W465) that will comply with applicable DOE directives, and state and federal regulations.

Pickett, W.W.

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

28

Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Energy storage technologies offer cost-effective flexibility and ancillary services needed by the U.S power grid. As policy reforms and decreasing technology costs facilitate market penetration, energy storage technologies offer increasingly competitive alternative means for utilities to engage these ancillary services. This report prepared by the Electricity Advisory Committee summarizes energy storage technology activities and projects in the U.S. electric power grid as of May 2011. Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 More Documents & Publications Fact Sheet: Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage Project (October 2012)

29

Activities and Accomplishments in Model Year 2007  

SciTech Connect

Document summarizes the compliance activity of EPAct-covered state and alternative fuel provider fleets.

Not Available

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Conceptual design statement of work for the immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility project  

SciTech Connect

The Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Interim Storage subproject will provide storage capacity for immobilized low-activity waste product sold to the U.S. Department of Energy by the privatization contractor. This statement of work describes the work scope (encompassing definition of new installations and retrofit modifications to four existing grout vaults), to be performed by the Architect-Engineer, in preparation of a conceptual design for the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Interim Storage Facility.

Carlson, T.A., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

31

Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Energy storage technologies offer cost-effective flexibility and ancillary services needed by the U.S power grid. As policy reforms and decreasing technology costs facilitate market penetration, energy storage technologies offer increasingly competitive alternative means for utilities to engage these ancillary services. This report prepared by the Electricity Advisory Committee summarizes energy storage technology activities and projects in the U.S. electric power grid as of May 2011. Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 More Documents & Publications Fact Sheet: Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage Project (October 2012)

32

Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid Electricity Advisory Committee Energy Storage Technologies Subcommittee Members Ralph Masiello, Subcommittee Chair Senior Vice President, Transmission KEMA Honorable Lauren Azar Commissioner Wisconsin Public Utilities Commission Frederick Butler President & Chief Executive Officer Butler Advisory Services Richard Cowart Principal Regulatory Assistance Project and Chair, Electricity Advisory Committee Roger Duncan General Manager (Ret.) Austin Energy Robert Gramlich Senior Vice President, Public Policy American Wind Energy Association Brad Roberts Chairman Electricity Storage Association Honorable Tom Sloan Representative Kansas House of Representatives Wanda Reder Vice President

33

Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition: Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation and Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Activities  

SciTech Connect

A fifth annual Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition meeting organized by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was held February 16-18, 2004, at the State Education Center (SEC), 4 Aerodromnya Drive, St. Petersburg, Russia. The meeting discussed Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition topics for which LLNL has the US Technical Lead Organization responsibilities. The technical areas discussed included Radioactive Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal, Plutonium Oxide and Plutonium Metal Packaging, Storage and Transportation and Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation. The meeting was conducted with a conference format using technical presentations of papers with simultaneous translation into English and Russian. There were 46 Russian attendees from 14 different Russian organizations and six non-Russian attendees, four from the US and two from France. Forty technical presentations were made. The meeting agenda is given in Appendix B and the attendance list is in Appendix C.

Jardine, L J; Borisov, G B

2004-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

34

Low pressure storage of natural gas on activated carbon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The introduction of natural gas to the transportation energy sector offers the possibility of displacing imported oil with an indigenous fuel. The barrier to the acceptance of natural gas vehicles (NGV) is the limited driving range due to the technical difficulties of on-board storage of a gaseous fuel. In spite of this barrier, compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles are today being successfully introduced into the market place. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate an adsorbent natural gas (ANG) storage system as a viable alternative to CNG storage. It can be argued that low pressure ANG has reached near parity with CNG, since the storage capacity of CNG (2400 psi) is rated at 190 V/V, while low pressure ANG (500 psi) has reached storage capacities of 180 V/V in the laboratory. A program, which extends laboratory results to a full-scale vehicle test, is necessary before ANG technology will receive widespread acceptance. The objective of this program is to field test a 150 V/V ANG vehicle in FY 1994. As a start towards this goal, carbon adsorbents have been screened by Brookhaven for their potential use in a natural gas storage system. This paper reports on one such carbon, trade name Maxsorb, manufactured by Kansai Coke under an Amoco license.

Wegrzyn, J.; Wiesmann, H.; Lee, T.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

Low pressure storage of natural gas on activated carbon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The introduction of natural gas to the transportation energy sector offers the possibility of displacing imported oil with an indigenous fuel. The barrier to the acceptance of natural gas vehicles (NGV) is the limited driving range due to the technical difficulties of on-board storage of a gaseous fuel. In spite of this barrier, compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles are today being successfully introduced into the market place. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate an adsorbent natural gas (ANG) storage system as a viable alternative to CNG storage. It can be argued that low pressure ANG has reached near parity with CNG, since the storage capacity of CNG (2400 psi) is rated at 190 V/V, while low pressure ANG (500 psi) has reached storage capacities of 180 V/V in the laboratory. A program, which extends laboratory results to a full-scale vehicle test, is necessary before ANG technology will receive widespread acceptance. The objective of this program is to field test a 150 V/V ANG vehicle in FY 1994. As a start towards this goal, carbon adsorbents have been screened by Brookhaven for their potential use in a natural gas storage system. This paper reports on one such carbon, trade name Maxsorb, manufactured by Kansai Coke under an Amoco license.

Wegrzyn, J.; Wiesmann, H.; Lee, T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Figure 6.6 Natural Gas Underground Storage, End of Year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1954-2011 Base Gas and Working Gas in Underground Storage, 1954-2011 188 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011

37

Table 6.6 Natural Gas Underground Storage, End of Year 1954-2011 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Energy Outlook ... Commission, Form FPC-8, "Underground Gas Storage Report." - 1979-1984-U.S. Energy Information

38

Hazelwood Interim Storage Site environmental report for calendar year 1992, 9200 Latty Avenue, Hazelwood, Missouri  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the environmental surveillance program at the Hazelwood Interim storage Site (HISS) and surrounding area, provides the results for 1992, and discusses applicable environmental standards and requirements with which the results were compared. HISS is located in eastern Missouri in the City of Hazelwood (St. Louis County) and occupies approximately 2.2 ha (5.5 acres). Environmental monitoring of HISS began in 1984 when the site was assigned to the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the decontamination research and development project authorized by Congress under the 1984 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act. DOE placed responsibility for HISS under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), which was established to identify and decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation`s atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. In 1992 there were no environmental occurrences or unplanned contaminant releases as defined in DOE requirements and in the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act (SARA) Title III of CERCLA.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Impacts Associated with Transfer of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Spent Fuel Storage Pools to Dry Storage After Five Years of Cooling, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2010, EPRI performed a study of the accelerated transfer of spent fuel from pools to dry storage in response to the threat of terrorist activities at nuclear power plants (report 1021049). Following the March 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and the subsequent accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, some organizations issued a renewed call for accelerated transfer of used fuel from spent fuel ...

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

Immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility, Project W-465 conceptual design report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report outlines the design and total estimated cost to modify the four unused grout vaults for the remote handling and interim storage of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW).

Pickett, W.W.

1998-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

R&D Activities of Redox Flow Battery for Energy Storage at DICP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, R&D Activities of Redox Flow Battery for Energy Storage at DICP ... Optimization of Na0.44MnO2 Cathode Material for Use in Aqueous...

42

Electrical Energy Storage Activities 2011: Case Studies of U.S. Project Installations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spurred by increased public and private sector investment as well as policy initiatives, electrical energy storage project activities are on the upswing worldwide. The growing number of operating and planned initiatives demands that they be rigorously documented and evaluated to promote information sharing and collective learning. This report represents the latest iteration of EPRI's ongoing effort, begun in 2010, to catalogue both commercial and demonstration energy storage projects. Building on the EPR...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

43

Referenced-site environmental document for a Monitored Retrievable Storage facility: backup waste management option for handling 1800 MTU per year  

SciTech Connect

This environmental document includes a discussion of the purpose of a monitored retrievable storage facility, a description of two facility design concepts (sealed storage cask and field drywell), a description of three reference sites (arid, warm-wet, and cold-wet), and a discussion and comparison of the impacts associated with each of the six site/concept combinations. This analysis is based on a 15,000-MTU storage capacity and a throughput rate of up to 1800 MTU per year.

Silviera, D.J.; Aaberg, R.L.; Cushing, C.E.; Marshall, A.; Scott, M.J.; Sewart, G.H.; Strenge, D.L.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Niagara Falls Storage Site environmental report for calendar year 1989, Lewiston, New York  

SciTech Connect

The environmental monitoring program, which began in 1981, was continued during 1989 at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), a United States Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facility located in Niagara County, New York, that is currently used for interim storage of radioactive residues, contaminated soils, and rubble. The monitoring program is being conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. The monitoring program at NFSS measures radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in groundwater. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in this report, this hypothetical individual receives an annual external exposure equivalent to approximately 2 percent of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. This exposure is less than a person receives during a one-way flight from New York to Los Angeles (because of the greater amounts of cosmic radiation at higher altitudes). The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of NFSS that results from radioactive materials present at the site is indistinguishable from the dose that the same population receives from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1989 monitoring show that NFSS is in compliance with applicable DOE radiation protection standards. 18 refs., 26 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Design requirements document for project W-465, immobilized low activity waste interim storage  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this design requirements document is to identify the functions and associated requirements that must be performed to accept, transport, handle, and store immobilized low-activity waste produced by the privatized Tank Waste Remediation System treatment contractors. The functional and performance requirements in this document provide the basis for the conceptual design of the Tank Waste Remediation System Immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility project and provides traceability from the program level requirements to the project design activity.

Burbank, D.A.

1997-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

46

NREL Develops Accelerated Sample Activation Process for Hydrogen Storage Materials (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in developing a new sample activation process that reduces the time to prepare samples for measurement of hydrogen storage from several days to five minutes and provides more uniform samples. Work was performed by NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center.

Not Available

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Selection and preparation of activated carbon for fuel gas storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increasing the surface acidity of active carbons can lead to an increase in capacity for hydrogen adsorption. Increasing the surface basicity can facilitate methane adsorption. The treatment of carbons is most effective when the carbon source material is selected to have a low ash content i.e., below about 3%, and where the ash consists predominantly of alkali metals alkali earth, with only minimal amounts of transition metals and silicon. The carbon is washed in water or acid and then oxidized, e.g. in a stream of oxygen and an inert gas at an elevated temperature.

Schwarz, James A. (Fayetteville, NY); Noh, Joong S. (Syracuse, NY); Agarwal, Rajiv K. (Las Vegas, NV)

1990-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

48

Update on EH-23 activities in Calendar Year 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report briefly describes the activities undertaken by the US DOE`s Office of Environmental Guidance (EH-23) of the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environment (EH-20) in Calendar Year (CY) 1993 in seven major areas: (1) regulatory review and analysis; (2) environmental policy and guidance; (3) environmental training courses and workshops; (4) workgroups and committees; (5) environmental regulatory management support; (6) special projects and other activities; and (7) special presentations. A list of selected environmental guidance memoranda and documents distributed by EH-23 in CY 1993 is also included.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Colonie Interim Storage Site annual site environmental report for calendar year 1989, Colonie, New York  

SciTech Connect

IN 1984, Congress assigned the cleanup of the National Lead (NL) Industries site in Colonie, New York, to the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a decontamination research and development project under the 1984 Energy and Water Appropriations Act. DOE then included the site in the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), an existing DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain for the early years of the nation's atomic energy program. DOE instituted an environmental monitoring program at the site in 1984. Results are presented annually in reports such as this. Under FUSRAP, the first environmental monitoring report for this site presented data for calendar year 1984. This report presents the findings of the environmental monitoring program conducted during calendar year 1989. 16 refs., 17 figs., 14 tabs.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Twelve Year Study of Underground Corrosion of Activated Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subsurface radioactive disposal facility located at the U.S. Department of Energys Idaho site contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel nuclear-reactor-core components. A long-term corrosion study is being conducted to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements in an arid vadose zone environment. The study uses non-radioactive metal coupons representing the prominent neutron-activated material buried at the disposal location, namely, two types of stainless steels, welded stainless steel, welded nickel-chromium steel alloy, zirconium alloy, beryllium, and aluminum. Additionally, carbon steel (the material used in cask disposal liners and other disposal containers) and duplex stainless steel (high-integrity containers) are also included in the study. This paper briefly describes the test program and presents the corrosion rate results through twelve years of underground exposure.

M. Kay Adler Flitton; Timothy S. Yoder

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigates the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. This topical report describes the demonstration of the model-based predictive optimal control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory in a test facility in real-time using time-of-use differentiated electricity prices without demand charges. The laboratory testing findings presented in this topical report cover the second of three project phases. The novel supervisory controller successfully executed a three-step procedure consisting of (1) short-term weather prediction, (2) optimization of control strategy over the next planning horizon using a calibrated building model, and (3) post-processing of the optimal strategy to yield a control command for the current time step that can be executed in the test facility. The primary and secondary building mechanical systems were effectively orchestrated by the model-based predictive optimal controller in real-time while observing comfort and operational constraints. The findings reveal that when the optimal controller is given imperfect weather fore-casts and when the building model used for planning control strategies does not match the actual building perfectly, measured utility costs savings relative to conventional building operation can be substantial. This requires that the facility under control lends itself to passive storage utilization and the building model includes a realistic plant model. The savings associated with passive building thermal storage inventory proved to be small be-cause the test facility is not an ideal candidate for the investigated control technology. Moreover, the facility's central plant revealed the idiosyncratic behavior that the chiller operation in the ice-making mode was more energy efficient than in the chilled-water mode. Field experimentation (Phase III) is now required in a suitable commercial building with sufficient thermal mass, an active TES system, and a climate conducive to passive storage utilization over a longer testing period to support the laboratory findings presented in this topical report.

Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

52

Environmental Measurements Laboratory fiscal year 1998: Accomplishments and technical activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) is government-owned, government-operated, and programmatically under the DOE Office of Environmental Management. The Laboratory is administered by the Chicago Operations Office. EML provides program management, technical assistance and data quality assurance for measurements of radiation and radioactivity relating to environmental restoration, global nuclear nonproliferation, and other priority issues for the Department of Energy, as well as for other government, national, and international organizations. This report presents the technical activities and accomplishments of EML for Fiscal Year 1998.

Erickson, M.D.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

,"U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Withdraw (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5450us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5450us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:30 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Withdraw (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5450US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Withdraw (MMcf)" 34349,21349 34380,20684

54

,"U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5460us2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5460us2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:31 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5460US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)" 34515,-19376 34880,5419 35246,-12622 35611,6367

55

,"U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5460us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5460us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:31 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5460US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)" 34349,10392 34380,8240 34408,-5388

56

,"U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5440us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5440us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:30 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5440US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)" 34349,10956 34380,12444

57

,"U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5440us2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5440us2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:29 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5440US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)" 34515,142243 34880,194185 35246,258468

58

Electrodes and electrochemical storage cells utilizing tin-modified active materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrode has a substrate and a finely divided active material on the substrate. The active material is ANi.sub.x-y-z Co.sub.y Sn.sub.z, wherein A is a mischmetal or La.sub.1-w M.sub.w, M is Ce, Nd, or Zr, w is from about 0.05 to about 1.0, x is from about 4.5 to about 5.5, y is from 0 to about 3.0, and z is from about 0.05 to about 0.5. An electrochemical storage cell utilizes such an electrode as the anode. The storage cell further has a cathode, a separator between the cathode and the anode, and an electrolyte.

Anani, Anaba (Lauderhill, FL); Johnson, John (Calverton, NY); Lim, Hong S. (Agoura Hills, CA); Reilly, James (Bellport, NY); Schwarz, Ricardo (Los Alamos, NM); Srinivasan, Supramaniam (College Station, TX)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Technology Assessment and Application Guide for an Active Voltage Conditioner with Storage Option (AVC-Store)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes and documents the construction, performance, and application of an active voltage conditioner (AVC) with energy storage. The system8211called the AVC-Store8211is manufactured by Vectek in Napier, New Zealand. Composed of a novel power electronics module, the system is organized to mitigate voltage sags, phase shift, and outages. This report describes the various subsystems within the AVC-Store, its operation, results of characterization tests, and issues related to its application a...

2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

60

The effects of cooking, storage, and ionizing irradiation on carotenoids, antioxidant activity, and phenolics in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Past research conducted by our lab demonstrated that potatoes contain significant levels of phytochemicals important to human health. However, since potatoes are not consumed raw, it is important to determine the effects of processing on these levels. Therefore, the changes in carotenoid content, antioxidant activity, and phenolic content were investigated using combinations of cultivars, cooking methods, storage treatments, and low-dose ionizing irradiation. Carotenoid content was measured via absorbance at 445 nm, 450 nm, and HPLC identification. Antioxidant activity was measured initially and at stabilization via the DPPH method and phenolic content was measured via the Folin method and HPLC identification. Microwaved, baked, fried, and raw potato samples contained more carotenoids than boiled samples. The samples microwaved, baked, and fried contained higher antioxidant activity and phenolics than the boiled or raw samples. However, the compound quercetin dihydrate appeared to decrease with cooking. Carotenoids, antioxidant activity, and phenolics appeared to decrease with storage; however, high storage temperatures and long storage times were believed to cause a dehydration and concentration of compounds, which caused levels to be equal to or greater than before storage. However, this decreasing trend was not linear and there were multiple significant interactions. The compound chlorogenic acid appeared to be quite sensitive to high temperature storage. Irradiation dose appeared to have only a minor, if any, effect on carotenoid levels. The interaction between storage time and irradiation dose was very influential on antioxidant activity. In early stages of storage, higher doses of irradiation had greater antioxidant activity, while, with continued storage, low doses had higher antioxidant activity. Exposure to irradiation appeared to cause an increase in phenolic content, determined by the Folin method. There may be a stimulation, induction, or release of some compounds due to processing; however, its magnitude is not believed to be as great as genetic control. The effects of processing can not be denied and should continue to be investigated. Future studies investigating the health properties of fruits and vegetables, particularly potatoes should include processing effects.

Blessington, Tyann

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

New England seismotectonic study activities during fiscal year 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fiscal Year 1980 New England Seismotectonic Program consisted of thirty separate but coordinated studies covering New England and adjacent Canada, which are described in this report. Those studies can be grouped into eight separate categories. (1) Regional and local earthquake activity were studied and seismic hazard estimates made, an earthquake catalogue was developed for the period 1534--1977, and a seismometer array was installed in the Moodus, Connecticut seismic area. (2) The causes of seismicity along the northern Fall Zone from New Jersey to Connecticut were investigated. (3) The level of activity of faults in the Champlain-Hudson area were investigated. (4) Geologic mapping of fault systems was conducted in the Adirondack Mountains. (5) Geophysical studies were carried out in southern New England. (6) Geologic mapping was accomplished at selected locations to study Mesozoic and younger tectonics. (7) Brittle fractures in bedrock were mapped within areas of seismicity to determine if there is a relationship between these features and earthquakes. (8) Vertical crustal movements along the coast of Maine were studied. 94 refs., 88 figs., 34 tabs.

Barosh, P.J.; Smith, P.V. (Boston Coll., Weston, MA (USA). Weston Observatory)

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Development and testing of thermal-energy-storage modules for use in active solar heating and cooling systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Additional development work on thermal-energy-storage modules for use with active solar heating and cooling systems is summarized. Performance testing, problems, and recommendations are discussed. Installation, operation, and maintenance instructions are included. (MHR)

Parker, J.C.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory  

SciTech Connect

Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigated the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. To pursue the analysis, modeling, and simulation research of Phase 1, two separate simulation environments were developed. Based on the new dynamic building simulation program EnergyPlus, a utility rate module, two thermal energy storage models were added. Also, a sequential optimization approach to the cost minimization problem using direct search, gradient-based, and dynamic programming methods was incorporated. The objective function was the total utility bill including the cost of reheat and a time-of-use electricity rate either with or without demand charges. An alternative simulation environment based on TRNSYS and Matlab was developed to allow for comparison and cross-validation with EnergyPlus. The initial evaluation of the theoretical potential of the combined optimal control assumed perfect weather prediction and match between the building model and the actual building counterpart. The analysis showed that the combined utilization leads to cost savings that is significantly greater than either storage but less than the sum of the individual savings. The findings reveal that the cooling-related on-peak electrical demand of commercial buildings can be considerably reduced. A subsequent analysis of the impact of forecasting uncertainty in the required short-term weather forecasts determined that it takes only very simple short-term prediction models to realize almost all of the theoretical potential of this control strategy. Further work evaluated the impact of modeling accuracy on the model-based closed-loop predictive optimal controller to minimize utility cost. The following guidelines have been derived: For an internal heat gain dominated commercial building, reasonable geometry simplifications are acceptable without a loss of cost savings potential. In fact, zoning simplification may improve optimizer performance and save computation time. The mass of the internal structure did not show a strong effect on the optimization. Building construction characteristics were found to impact building passive thermal storage capacity. It is thus advisable to make sure the construction material is well modeled. Zone temperature setpoint profiles and TES performance are strongly affected by mismatches in internal heat gains, especially when they are underestimated. Since they are a key factor in determining the building cooling load, efforts should be made to keep the internal gain mismatch as small as possible. Efficiencies of the building energy systems affect both zone temperature setpoints and active TES operation because of the coupling of the base chiller for building precooling and the icemaking TES chiller. Relative efficiencies of the base and TES chillers will determine the balance of operation of the two chillers. The impact of mismatch in this category may be significant. Next, a parametric analysis was conducted to assess the effects of building mass, utility rate, building location and season, thermal comfort, central plant capacities, and an economizer on the cost saving performance of optimal control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory. The key findings are: (1) Heavy-mass buildings, strong-incentive time-of-use electrical utility rates, and large on-peak cooling loads will likely lead to attractive savings resulting from optimal combined thermal storage control. (2) By using economizer to take advantage of the cool fresh air during the night, t

Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

64

Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigated the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. To pursue the analysis, modeling, and simulation research of Phase 1, two separate simulation environments were developed. Based on the new dynamic building simulation program EnergyPlus, a utility rate module, two thermal energy storage models were added. Also, a sequential optimization approach to the cost minimization problem using direct search, gradient-based, and dynamic programming methods was incorporated. The objective function was the total utility bill including the cost of reheat and a time-of-use electricity rate either with or without demand charges. An alternative simulation environment based on TRNSYS and Matlab was developed to allow for comparison and cross-validation with EnergyPlus. The initial evaluation of the theoretical potential of the combined optimal control assumed perfect weather prediction and match between the building model and the actual building counterpart. The analysis showed that the combined utilization leads to cost savings that is significantly greater than either storage but less than the sum of the individual savings. The findings reveal that the cooling-related on-peak electrical demand of commercial buildings can be considerably reduced. A subsequent analysis of the impact of forecasting uncertainty in the required short-term weather forecasts determined that it takes only very simple short-term prediction models to realize almost all of the theoretical potential of this control strategy. Further work evaluated the impact of modeling accuracy on the model-based closed-loop predictive optimal controller to minimize utility cost. The following guidelines have been derived: For an internal heat gain dominated commercial building, reasonable geometry simplifications are acceptable without a loss of cost savings potential. In fact, zoning simplification may improve optimizer performance and save computation time. The mass of the internal structure did not show a strong effect on the optimization. Building construction characteristics were found to impact building passive thermal storage capacity. It is thus advisable to make sure the construction material is well modeled. Zone temperature setpoint profiles and TES performance are strongly affected by mismatches in internal heat gains, especially when they are underestimated. Since they are a key factor in determining the building cooling load, efforts should be made to keep the internal gain mismatch as small as possible. Efficiencies of the building energy systems affect both zone temperature setpoints and active TES operation because of the coupling of the base chiller for building precooling and the icemaking TES chiller. Relative efficiencies of the base and TES chillers will determine the balance of operation of the two chillers. The impact of mismatch in this category may be significant. Next, a parametric analysis was conducted to assess the effects of building mass, utility rate, building location and season, thermal comfort, central plant capacities, and an economizer on the cost saving performance of optimal control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory. The key findings are: (1) Heavy-mass buildings, strong-incentive time-of-use electrical utility rates, and large on-peak cooling loads will likely lead to attractive savings resulting from optimal combined thermal storage control. (2) By using economizer to take advantage of the cool fresh air during the night, the bu

Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

65

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adki ns, "Raccoon Mountain Pumped-Storage Plant- Ten Years2J O. D. Johnson, "Worldwide Pumped-Storage Projects", PowerUnderground Pumped Hydro Storage", Proc. 1976 Eng.

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Metal?organic frameworks for the storage and delivery of biologically active hydrogen sulfide  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen sulfide is an extremely toxic gas that is also of great interest for biological applications when delivered in the correct amount and at the desired rate. Here we show that the highly porous metal-organic frameworks with the CPO-27 structure can bind the hydrogen sulfide relatively strongly, allowing the storage of the gas for at least several months. Delivered gas is biologically active in preliminary vasodilation studies of porcine arteries, and the structure of the hydrogen sulfide molecules inside the framework has been elucidated using a combination of powder X-ray diffraction and pair distribution function analysis.

Allan, Phoebe K.; Wheatley, Paul S.; Aldous, David; Mohideen, M. Infas; Tang, Chiu; Hriljac, Joseph A.; Megson, Ian L.; Chapman, Karena W.; De Weireld, Guy; Vaesen, Sebastian; Morris, Russell E. (St Andrews)

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

67

Energy Storage Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Testing The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is tasked by the U.S. Department of Energys Vehicle Technology Program to conduct various types of energy storage...

68

Design requirements document for Project W-465, immobilized low-activity waste interim storage  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this Design Requirements Document (DRD) is to identify the functions and associated requirements that must be performed to accept, transport, handle, and store immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) produced by the privatized Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) treatment contractors. The functional and performance requirements in this document provide the basis for the conceptual design of the TWRS ILAW Interim Storage facility project and provides traceability from the program level requirements to the project design activity. Technical and programmatic risk associated with the TWRS planning basis are discussed in the Tank Waste Remediation System Decisions and Risk Assessment (Johnson 1994). The design requirements provided in this document will be augmented by additional detailed design data documented by the project.

Burbank, D.A.

1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

69

Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

70

Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

71

Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

72

Colonie Interim Storage Site environmental report for calendar year 1992, 1130 Central Avenue, Colonie, New York. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the environmental surveillance program at the Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS) and provides the results for 1992. The site is located in eastern New York State, approximately 6.4 km (4.0 mi) northwest of downtown Albany. From 1958 to 1984, National Lead (NL) Industries used the facility to manufacture various components from depleted and enriched uranium natural thorium. Environmental monitoring of CISS began in 1984 when Congress added, the site to the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP is a program established to identify and decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation`s atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The environmental surveillance program at CISS includes sampling networks for external gamma radiation exposure and for thorium-232 and total uranium concentrations in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Several chemical parameters are also measured in groundwater, including total metals, volatile organics, and water quality parameters. This surveillance program assists in fulfilling the DOE policy of measuring and monitoring effluents from DOE activities and calculating hypothetical doses. Results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) standards, DOE derived concentration guides (DCGs), dose limits, and other DOE requirements.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Maywood Interim Storage Site environmental report for calendar year 1992, 100 West Hunter Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the environmental surveillance program at the Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS) and provides the results for 1992. Environmental monitoring of MISS began in 1984, when the site was assigned to DOE by Congress through the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act and was placed under DOE`s Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP was established to identify and decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation`s atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. MISS is part of a National Priorities List (NPL) site. The environmental surveillance program at MISS includes sampling networks for radon and thoron in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and radium-226, radium-228, thorium-232, and total uranium in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Additionally, chemical analysis includes metals and organic compounds in surface water and groundwater and metals in sediments. This program assists in fulfilling the DOE objective of measuring and monitoring effluents from DOE activities and calculating hypothetical doses to members of the general public. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state standards, DOE derived concentration guides (DCGs), dose limits, and other DOE requirements. Environmental standards are established to protect public health and the environment. The radiological data for all media sampled support the conclusion that doses to the public are not distinguishable from natural background radiation.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Proceedings of the 6th Annual Meeting for Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition: Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation and WasteTreatment, Storage and Disposal Activities  

SciTech Connect

The sixth annual Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition meeting organized by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was held November 15-17, 2004, at the State Education Center (SEC), 4 Aerodromnya Drive, St. Petersburg, Russia. The meeting discussed Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition topics for which LLNL has the US Technical Lead Organization responsibilities. The technical areas discussed included Radioactive Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal, and Plutonium Oxide and Plutonium Metal Packaging, Storage and Transportation and Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation. The meeting was conducted with a conference format using technical presentations of papers with simultaneous translation into English and Russian. There were 55 Russian attendees from 16 different Russian organizations and four non-Russian attendees from the US. Forty technical presentations were made. The meeting agenda is given in Appendix B and the attendance list is in Appendix C. The 16 different Russian design, industrial sites, and scientific organizations in attendance included staff from Rosatom/Minatom, Federal Nuclear and Radiation Safety Authority of Russia (GOSATOMNADZOR, NIERA/GAN), All Russian Designing & Scientific Research Institute of Complex Power Technology (VNIPIET), Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI), A. A. Bochvar All Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), All Russian & Design Institute of Production Engineering (VNIPIPT), Ministry of Atomic Energy of Russian Federation Specialized State Designing Institute (GSPI), State Scientific Center Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR), Siberian Chemical Combine Tomsk (SCC), Mayak PO, Mining Chemical Combine (MCC K-26), Institute of Biophysics (IBPh), Sverdlosk Scientific Research Institute of Chemical Machine Building (SNIIChM), Kurchatov Institute (KI), Institute of Physical Chemistry Russian Academy of Science (IPCh RAS) and Radon PO-Moscow. The four non-Russian attendees included one representative from DOE NNSA, and LLNL, and two from Duratek, The meeting was organized into three major sessions: (1) Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal; (2) Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation; (3) Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation. Twenty presentations were made on the topic of Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal (Session II), ten presentations on Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation (Session III), and four presentations on Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation (Session IV). In addition, DOE/NNSA, Minatom/Rosatom and TVEL summarized the bases for the conference at the beginning of the meeting (Session I). Nine months had passed since the last LLNL contracts review meeting. During that time period, LLNL and TVEL have been able to sign six contracts for a total of $1,700,000 in the areas of: (1) Waste treatment, storage and disposal; and (2) Plutonium packaging, storage and transportation. The scope of several other work projects are now in various stages of development in these areas. It is anticipated that more contracts will be signed before the next meeting of this type. These events have allowed us to start work in our technical activities under new direction from TVEL, which is now the single Russian organization to coordinate and conclude contracts with LLNL. The meeting presentations and discussions have defined where we are and where we are going in the near term in regard to our joint interests in excess weapons plutonium disposition. Each topical section of this Proceedings is introduced by a summary of the presentations in that section.

Jardine, L J

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

75

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

76

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

77

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Final Report: Main Group Element Chemistry in Service of Hydrogen Storage and Activation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Replacing combustion of carbon-based fuels with alternative energy sources that have minimal environmental impact is one of the grand scientific and technological challenges of the early 21st century. Not only is it critical to capture energy from new, renewable sources, it is also necessary to store the captured energy efficiently and effectively for use at the point of service when and where it is needed, which may not be collocated with the collection site. There are many potential storage media but we focus on the storage of energy in chemical bonds. It is more efficient to store energy on a per weight basis in chemical bonds. This is because it is hard to pack electrons into small volumes with low weight without the use of chemical bonds. The focus of the project was the development of new chemistries to enable DOE to meet its technical objectives for hydrogen storage using chemical hydrogen storage systems. We provided computational chemistry support in terms of thermodynamics, kinetics, and properties prediction in support of the experimental efforts of the DOE Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage. The goal of the Center is to store energy in chemical bonds involving hydrogen atoms. Once the hydrogen is stored in a set of X-H/Y-H bonds, the hydrogen has to be easily released and the depleted fuel regenerated very efficiently. This differs substantially from our current use of fossil fuel energy sources where the reactant is converted to energy plus CO2 (coal) or CO2 and H2O (gasoline, natural gas), which are released into the atmosphere. In future energy storage scenarios, the spent fuel will be captured and the energy storage medium regenerated. This places substantial additional constraints on the chemistry. The goal of the computational chemistry work was to reduce the time to design new materials and develop materials that meet the 2010 and 2015 DOE objectives in terms of weight percent, volume, release time, and regeneration ability. This goal was met in terms of reducing the number of costly experiments and helping to focus the experimental effort on the potentially optimal targets. We have used computational chemistry approaches to predict the thermodynamic properties of a wide range of compounds containing boron, nitrogen, hydrogen, and other elements as appropriate including carbon. These calculations were done in most cases with high level molecular orbital theory methods that have small error bars on the order of 1 to 2 kcal/mol. The results were used to benchmark more approximate methods such as density functional theory for larger systems and for database development. We predicted reliable thermodynamics for thousands of compounds for release and regeneration schemes to aid/guide materials design and process design and simulation. These are the first reliable computed values for these compounds and for many represent the only available values. Overall, the computational results have provided us with new insights into the chemistry of main group and organic-base chemical hydrogen systems from the release of hydrogen to the regeneration of spent fuel. A number of experimental accomplishments were also made in this project. The experimental work on hydrogen storage materials centered on activated polarized ?- or ?-bonded frameworks that hold the potential for ready dihydrogen activation, uptake, and eventually release. To this end, a large number of non-traditional valence systems including carbenes, cyanocarbons, and C-B and and B-N systems were synthesized and examined. During the course of these studies an important lead arose from the novel valency of a class of stable organic singlet bi-radical systems. A synthetic strategy to an endless hydrogen storage polymer has been developed based on our cyanocarbon chemistry. A key issue with the synthetic efforts was being able to link the kinetics of release with the size of the substituents as it was difficult to develop a low molecular weight molecule with the right kinetics. A novel hydrogen activation process has been developed

David A. Dixon; Anthony J. Arduengo, III

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

79

Final Report: Main Group Element Chemistry in Service of Hydrogen Storage and Activation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Replacing combustion of carbon-based fuels with alternative energy sources that have minimal environmental impact is one of the grand scientific and technological challenges of the early 21st century. Not only is it critical to capture energy from new, renewable sources, it is also necessary to store the captured energy efficiently and effectively for use at the point of service when and where it is needed, which may not be collocated with the collection site. There are many potential storage media but we focus on the storage of energy in chemical bonds. It is more efficient to store energy on a per weight basis in chemical bonds. This is because it is hard to pack electrons into small volumes with low weight without the use of chemical bonds. The focus of the project was the development of new chemistries to enable DOE to meet its technical objectives for hydrogen storage using chemical hydrogen storage systems. We provided computational chemistry support in terms of thermodynamics, kinetics, and properties prediction in support of the experimental efforts of the DOE Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage. The goal of the Center is to store energy in chemical bonds involving hydrogen atoms. Once the hydrogen is stored in a set of X-H/Y-H bonds, the hydrogen has to be easily released and the depleted fuel regenerated very efficiently. This differs substantially from our current use of fossil fuel energy sources where the reactant is converted to energy plus CO2 (coal) or CO2 and H2O (gasoline, natural gas), which are released into the atmosphere. In future energy storage scenarios, the spent fuel will be captured and the energy storage medium regenerated. This places substantial additional constraints on the chemistry. The goal of the computational chemistry work was to reduce the time to design new materials and develop materials that meet the 2010 and 2015 DOE objectives in terms of weight percent, volume, release time, and regeneration ability. This goal was met in terms of reducing the number of costly experiments and helping to focus the experimental effort on the potentially optimal targets. We have used computational chemistry approaches to predict the thermodynamic properties of a wide range of compounds containing boron, nitrogen, hydrogen, and other elements as appropriate including carbon. These calculations were done in most cases with high level molecular orbital theory methods that have small error bars on the order of 1 to 2 kcal/mol. The results were used to benchmark more approximate methods such as density functional theory for larger systems and for database development. We predicted reliable thermodynamics for thousands of compounds for release and regeneration schemes to aid/guide materials design and process design and simulation. These are the first reliable computed values for these compounds and for many represent the only available values. Overall, the computational results have provided us with new insights into the chemistry of main group and organic-base chemical hydrogen systems from the release of hydrogen to the regeneration of spent fuel. A number of experimental accomplishments were also made in this project. The experimental work on hydrogen storage materials centered on activated polarized ?- or ?-bonded frameworks that hold the potential for ready dihydrogen activation, uptake, and eventually release. To this end, a large number of non-traditional valence systems including carbenes, cyanocarbons, and C-B and and B-N systems were synthesized and examined. During the course of these studies an important lead arose from the novel valency of a class of stable organic singlet bi-radical systems. A synthetic strategy to an endless hydrogen storage polymer has been developed based on our cyanocarbon chemistry. A key issue with the synthetic efforts was being able to link the kinetics of release with the size of the substituents as it was difficult to develop a low molecular weight molecule with the right kinetics. A novel hydrogen activation process has been developed

David A. Dixon; Anthony J. Arduengo, III

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

80

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

Joel Morrison

2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Low pressure storage of methane on interlayered clays for potential vehicular applications. [Comparison with activated carbon  

SciTech Connect

Inexpensive, high surface area sorbents were prepared by treating naturally occurring hectorite and bentonite clays with aluminum chlorohydroxide, zirconium chlorohydroxide, or silica-sol solutions. Data were obtained comparing these interlayered clays with activated carbons and zeolites as sorbents for the low pressure storage of methane onboard natural gas powered vehicles. Methane sorption at pressures up to 7 MPa (1000 psig) resembled a Langmuir-type curve with a saturation sorption equal to about six micromoles of methane per square meter of surface area. Even at low pressures, methane sorption capacity was largely determined by surface area. At 2.2 MPa (300 psig), the best interlayered clay sorbed less than one-third the methane sorbed by an equal volume of Witco grade 9JXC activated carbon. Both the activated carbons and interlayered clays exhibited excellent release-on-demand capability. Driving ranges were calculated for a 2500-lb automobile equipped with three, 35-liter fuel tanks filled with sorbent and pressurized to 3.6 MPa (500 psig) with methane. Enough methane was stored with the best interlayered clay to travel 41 km (25 mi). With 9JXC carbon, one could travel 82 km (51 mi). The same vehicle equipped with high pressure (2400 psig) fuel tanks having the same volume but containing no sorbent would have a 190 km (118 mi) range.

Innes, R.A.; Lutinski, F.E.; Occelli, M.L.; Kennedy, J.V.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Yearly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2009, a new activity was launched under the International Energy Agency Wind Implementing Agreement (IEA Wind) for the small wind sector. The main focus of this activity, called Task 27, is to develop recommended practices for consumer labeling of existing commercial small wind turbines. Participants will also exchange information about the status of the small wind industry in the member countries. This report outlines the status of the small wind sector in 2009 in the countries participating in Task 27. (For more information about IEA Wind and the consumer label developed under Task 27, see www.ieawind.org.)

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 1 YEAR 2011 Males 18 Females 23 YEAR 2011 SES 2 EJ/EK 2 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 35 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 1 American Indian Female 2 African American Male 3 African American Female 9 Asian Male 0 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 2 Hispanic Female 6 White Male 12 White Female 6 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Information Management & Chief Information Officer, NA-IM As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 18 43.9% 23 56.1% Gender Males Females 4.9% 4.9% 85.4% 4.9% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2.4% 4.9% 7.3% 22.0% 0.0% 0.0% 4.9% 14.6% 29.3% 14.6% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male

84

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

4 4 YEAR 2011 Males 21 Females 23 YEAR 2011 SES 3 EJ/EK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 3 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 31 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 5 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American Indian Female 0 African American Male 1 African American Female 2 Asian Male 1 Asian Female 1 Hispanic Male 6 Hispanic Female 10 White Male 13 White Female 10 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Office of General Counsel, NA-GC As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 21 47.7% 23 52.3% Gender Males Females 6.8% 2.3% 2.3% 6.8% 70.5% 11.4% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK EN 03 NN (Engineering) NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 0.0% 0.0% 2.3% 4.5% 2.3% 2.3% 13.6% 22.7% 29.5% 22.7% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male

85

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

6 6 YEAR 2011 Males 7 Females 9 YEAR 2011 SES 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 9 GS 15 2 GS 13 2 GS 12 1 GS 11 1 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American Indian Female 0 African American Male 1 African American Female 3 Asian Male 1 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 1 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 4 White Female 6 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator of External Affairs, NA-EA As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 7 43.8% 9 56.3% Gender Males Females 6.3% 56.3% 12.5% 12.5% 6.3% 6.3% Pay Plan SES NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) GS 15 GS 13 GS 12 GS 11 0.0% 0.0% 6.3% 18.8% 6.3% 0.0% 6.3% 0.0% 25.0% 37.5% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male Hispanic Female White Male White Female FY11 Workforce Diversity

86

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

40 40 YEAR 2011 Males 68 Females 72 YEAR 2011 SES 5 EJ/EK 1 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 115 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 1 American Indian Female 2 African American Male 3 African American Female 7 Asian Male 4 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 25 Hispanic Female 26 White Male 35 White Female 37 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Acquistion & Project Management, NA-APM As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 68 48.6% 72 51.4% Gender Males Females 3.6% 0.7% 11.4% 82.1% 2.1% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK NN (Engineering) NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 0.7% 1.4% 2.1% 5.0% 2.9% 0.0% 17.9% 18.6% 25.0% 26.4% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male

87

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

88

Mississippi Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

89

Pennsylvania Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

90

Washington Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

91

CALCULATING ENERGY STORAGE DUE TO TOPOLOGICAL CHANGES IN EMERGING ACTIVE REGION NOAA AR 11112  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The minimum current corona model provides a way to estimate stored coronal energy using the number of field lines connecting regions of positive and negative photospheric flux. This information is quantified by the net flux connecting pairs of opposing regions in a connectivity matrix. Changes in the coronal magnetic field, due to processes such as magnetic reconnection, manifest themselves as changes in the connectivity matrix. However, the connectivity matrix will also change when flux sources emerge or submerge through the photosphere, as often happens in active regions. We have developed an algorithm to estimate the changes in flux due to emergence and submergence of magnetic flux sources. These estimated changes must be accounted for in order to quantify storage and release of magnetic energy in the corona. To perform this calculation over extended periods of time, we must additionally have a consistently labeled connectivity matrix over the entire observational time span. We have therefore developed an automated tracking algorithm to generate a consistent connectivity matrix as the photospheric source regions evolve over time. We have applied this method to NOAA Active Region 11112, which underwent a GOES M2.9 class flare around 19:00 on 2010 October 16th, and calculated a lower bound on the free magnetic energy buildup of {approx}8.25 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg over 3 days.

Tarr, Lucas; Longcope, Dana [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

92

Years  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology in and Technology in the National Interest 60 Years of Excellence Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory FY 2012 Annual Report About the Cover: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) engineers Chris Spadaccini (left) and Eric Duoss are shown experimenting with direct ink-writing to create micro- to macroscale structures with extreme precision. The Laboratory is advancing this process and other additive manufacturing technologies to develop new materials with extraordinary properties for use in a wide range of national-security and other applications. About the Laboratory: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was founded in 1952 to enhance the security of the United States by advancing nuclear weapons science and technology. With a talented and dedicated workforce and

93

Plan for certification and related activities for the Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve oil storage caverns  

SciTech Connect

In order to comply with state laws, protect the environment, and protect the national investment in oil stored, it is necessary to periodically verify the integrity of the Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve (DOE/SPR) oil storage caverns. The task of developing plans for cavern certification was a responsibility in Sandia's role of geotechnical support for the SPR program. As an implementation of this task, this report includes a plan and procedures for tests and related activities to evaluate the integrity of the DOE/SPR oil storage caverns. 2 references.

Goin, K.L.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

OTEC Utility Users Council. Final grant termination report, second year activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The second year of the activities of the OTEC Utility Users Council is reported, including meetings and a statement on the DOE OTEC Pilot Plant. (LEW)

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Iowa Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

96

Measured leak rates of the temporary seals in DWPF canistered waste forms after three years of on site storage  

SciTech Connect

In the summer of 1990 a study was carried out to determine the-internal pressure, relative humidity, and chemical composition of the gas within the free volume of four canistered waste forms produced at TNX in May of 1988. Three of these canistered waste forms were sealed only by temporary seals and subsequently stored in the TNX boneyard' with no protection. The fourth canister was sealed by upset resistance welding. All three canisters with temporary seals were decontaminated by aqueous frit blasting. It was important to remeasure the leak rates of these seals to ensure that leaktightness had not deteriorated during canister handling and storage prior to the time the experiment were performed. This paper details the results of two separate measurements of the leak rates of these seals.

Harbour, J.R.; Miller, T.J.

1992-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

97

Measured leak rates of the temporary seals in DWPF canistered waste forms after three years of on site storage  

SciTech Connect

In the summer of 1990 a study was carried out to determine the-internal pressure, relative humidity, and chemical composition of the gas within the free volume of four canistered waste forms produced at TNX in May of 1988. Three of these canistered waste forms were sealed only by temporary seals and subsequently stored in the TNX `boneyard` with no protection. The fourth canister was sealed by upset resistance welding. All three canisters with temporary seals were decontaminated by aqueous frit blasting. It was important to remeasure the leak rates of these seals to ensure that leaktightness had not deteriorated during canister handling and storage prior to the time the experiment were performed. This paper details the results of two separate measurements of the leak rates of these seals.

Harbour, J.R.; Miller, T.J.

1992-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

98

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

99

Niagara Falls Storage Site environmental report for calendar year 1992, 1397 Pletcher Road, Lewiston, New York. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the environmental surveillance program at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) and provides the results for 1992. From 1944 to the present, the primary use of NFSS has been storage of radioactive residues produced as a by-product of uranium production. All onsite areas of residual radioactivity above guidelines have been remediated. Materials generated during remediation are stored onsite in the 4-ha (10-acre) waste containment structure (WCS). The WCS is a clay-lined, clay-capped, and grass-covered storage pile. The environmental surveillance program at NFSS includes sampling networks for radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and total uranium and radium-226 concentrations in surface water, sediments, and groundwater. Several chemical parameters, including seven metals, are also routinely measured in groundwater. This surveillance program assists in fulfilling the DOE policy of measuring and monitoring effluents from DOE activities and calculating hypothetical doses. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) standards, DOE derived concentration guides (DCGs), dose limits, and other DOE requirements. Results of environmental monitoring during 1992 indicate that levels of the parameters measured were in compliance with all but one requirement: Concentrations of iron and manganese in groundwater were above NYSDEC groundwater quality standards. However, these elements occur naturally in the soils and groundwater associated with this region. In 1992 there were no environmental occurrences or reportable quantity releases.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

,"U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5560us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5560us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:35 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5560US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)" 34349,747322 34380,509144

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

,"U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Withdraw (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5550us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5550us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:34 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Withdraw (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5550US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Withdraw (MMcf)" 34349,770932

102

,"U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Withdraw (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5550us2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5550us2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:34 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Withdraw (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5550US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Withdraw (MMcf)" 34515,2385284 34880,2774498

103

,"U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5560us2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5560us2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:34 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5560US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)" 34515,-268751 34880,402800 35246,18357

104

Solar activity reconstructed over the last 7000 years: The influence of geomagnetic field changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar activity reconstructed over the last 7000 years: The influence of geomagnetic field changes I activity depends, however, on independently evaluated data of the geomagnetic dipole strength variations to the earlier geomagnetic reconstructions. We have revised the earlier sunspot activity reconstruction since

Usoskin, Ilya G.

105

Massachusetts Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

106

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

107

Louisiana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

108

Washington Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Washington Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

109

Utah Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

110

Tennessee Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

111

Minnesota Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Minnesota Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

112

Iowa Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

113

California Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

114

Texas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

115

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

116

Ohio Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

117

Mississippi Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

118

NETL: Carbon Storage - Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage Reference Shelf Below are links to Carbon Storage Program documents and reference materials. Each of the 10 categories has a variety of documents posted for easy access to current information - just click on the category link to view all related materials. RSS Icon Subscribe to the Carbon Storage RSS Feed. Carbon Storage Collage 2012 Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas IV Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap Public Outreach and Education for Carbon Storage Projects Carbon Storage Technology Program Plan Carbon Storage Newsletter Archive Impact of the Marcellus Shale Gas Play on Current and Future CCS Activities Site Screening, Selection, and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geologic Formations Carbon Storage Systems and Well Management Activities Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations

119

Adhesion Force Control and Active Gravitational Compensation for Autonomous Inspection in LPG Storage Spheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a climbing robot based in wheel locomotion and magnetic adherence, a common mechanical topology applicable to a wide range of industrial tasks. The robot is applied to perform internal/external inspection in liquefied petroleum gas ... Keywords: climbing robot, adherence, storage spheres, dynamic control

Andre Schneider de Oliveira; Lucia Valeria Ramos de Arruda; Flavio Neves Jr.; Rodrigo Valerio Espinoza; Joao Pedro Battistella Nadas

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

NGLW RCRA Storage Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory contains radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the INTEC Tank Farm Facility (TFF). INTEC is currently treating the waste by evaporation to reduce the liquid volume for continued storage, and by calcination to reduce and convert the liquid to a dry waste form for long-term storage in calcine bins. Both treatment methods and activities in support of those treatment operations result in Newly Generated Liquid Waste (NGLW) being sent to TFF. The storage tanks in the TFF are underground, contained in concrete vaults with instrumentation, piping, transfer jets, and managed sumps in case of any liquid accumulation in the vault. The configuration of these tanks is such that Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations apply. The TFF tanks were assessed several years ago with respect to the RCRA regulations and they were found to be deficient. This study considers the configuration of the current tanks and the RCRA deficiencies identified for each. The study identifies four potential methods and proposes a means of correcting the deficiencies. The cost estimates included in the study account for construction cost; construction methods to minimize work exposure to chemical hazards, radioactive contamination, and ionizing radiation hazards; project logistics; and project schedule. The study also estimates the tank volumes benefit associated with each corrective action to support TFF liquid waste management planning.

R. J. Waters; R. Ochoa; K. D. Fritz; D. W. Craig

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Georgia Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Georgia Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

122

Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

123

Delaware Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

124

Wisconsin Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Wisconsin Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

125

Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Energy Storage: Materials, Systems and Applications: Hydrogen Storage Program Organizers: Zhenguo "Gary" Yang, Pacific Northwest...

126

Idaho Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

127

Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

128

Delaware Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

129

Georgia Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Georgia Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

130

Indiana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

131

Wyoming Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

132

Louisiana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

133

Virginia Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

134

New Mexico Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

135

Illinois Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

136

New York Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New York Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

137

Maryland Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

138

Oklahoma Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

139

Alabama Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

140

Kansas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

142

Missouri Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

143

Oregon Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

144

Colorado Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

145

Montana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

146

Minnesota Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

147

Arkansas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

148

Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

149

Nebraska Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

150

Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

151

Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

152

Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

153

Kentucky Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

154

Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

155

Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

156

Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

157

Michigan Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

158

U.S. Department of Energy thermal energy storage research activities review: 1989 Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

Thermal Energy Storage (TES) offers the opportunity for the recovery and re-use of heat currently rejected to the ambient environment. Further, through the ability of TES to match an energy supply with a thermal energy demand, TES increases efficiencies of energy systems and improves capacity factors of power plants. The US Department of Energy has been the leader in TES research, development, and demonstration since recognition in 1976 of the need for fostering energy conservation as a component of the national energy budget. The federal program on TES R and D is the responsibility of the Office of Energy Storage and Distribution within the US Department of Energy (DOE). The overall program is organized into three program areas: diurnal--relating primarily to lower temperature heat for use in residential and commercial buildings on a daily cycle; industrial--relating primarily to higher temperature heat for use in industrial and utility processes on an hourly to daily cycle; seasonal--relating primarily to lower temperature heat or chill for use in residential complexes (central supply as for apartments or housing developments), commercial (light manufacturing, processing, or retail), and industrial (space conditioning) on a seasonal to annual cycle. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Hoffman, H.W. [ed.] [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tomlinson, J.J. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Reimbursements to Licensees of Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites, Fiscal Year 2009 and 2010 Status Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Reimbursements to Licensees of Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites, Fiscal Year 2009 and 2010 Status Report (March 2010)

160

EIA - Natural Gas Storage Data & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Storage Storage Weekly Working Gas in Underground Storage U.S. Natural gas inventories held in underground storage facilities by East, West, and Producing regions (weekly). Underground Storage - All Operators Total storage by base gas and working gas, and storage activity by State (monthly, annual). Underground Storage by Type U.S. storage and storage activity by all operators, salt cavern fields and nonsalt cavern (monthly, annual). Underground Storage Capacity Storage capacity, working gas capacity, and number of active fields for salt caverns, aquifers, and depleted fields by State (monthly, annual). Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage By State (annual). Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Estimates of natural gas in underground storage for the U.S. and three regions of the U.S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Storage Sub-committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Sub-committee Storage Sub-committee 2012 Work Plan Confidential 1 2012 Storage Subcommittee Work Plan * Report to Congress. (legislative requirement) - Review existing and projected research and funding - Review existing DOE, Arpa-e projects and the OE 5 year plan - Identify gaps and recommend additional topics - Outline distributed (review as group) * Develop and analysis of the need for large scale storage deployment (outline distributed again) * Develop analysis on regulatory issues especially valuation and cost recovery Confidential 2 Large Scale Storage * Problem Statement * Situation Today * Benefits Analysis * Policy Issues * Technology Gaps * Recommendations * Renewables Variability - Reserves and capacity requirements - Financial impacts - IRC Response to FERC NOI and update

162

Alaska Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

163

Colonie Interim Storage Site: Annual site environmental report, Colonie, New York, Calendar year 1986: Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)  

SciTech Connect

During 1986, the environmental monitoring program continued at the Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in Colonie, New York. The CISS is part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has mandated DOE to remedy. As part of the decontamination research and development project authorized by Congress under the 1984 Energy and Water Appropriations Act, remedial action is being conducted at the site and at vicinity properties by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI), Project Management Contractor for FUSRAP. The environmental monitoring program is also carried out by BNI. The monitoring program at the CISS measures external gamma radiation levels as well as uranium and radium-226 concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess the potential effect of the site on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in the report, the maximally exposed individual would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 5% of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/y. Results of 1986 monitoring show that the CISS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 14 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Massachusetts Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

165

Illinois Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov...

166

Did Open Solar Magnetic Field Increase during the Last 100 Years: A Reanalysis of Geomagnetic Activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-term geomagnetic activity presented by the aa index has been used to show that the heliospheric magnetic field has more than doubled during the last 100 years. However, serious concern has been raised on the long-term consistency of the aa index and on the centennial rise of the solar magnetic field. Here we reanalyze geomagnetic activity during the last 100 years by calculating the recently suggested IHV (Inter-Hour Variability) index as a measure of local geomagnetic activity for seven stations. We find that local geomagnetic activity at all stations follows the same qualitative long-term pattern: an increase from early 1900s to 1960, a dramatic dropout in 1960s and a (mostly weaker) increase thereafter. Moreover, at all stations, the activity at the end of the 20th century has a higher average level than at the beginning of the century. This agrees with the result based on the aa index that global geomagnetic activity, and thereby, the open solar magnetic field has indeed increased during the last 100 years. However, quantitatively, the estimated centennial increase varies greatly from one station to another. We find that the relative increase is higher at the high-latitude stations and lower at the low and mid-latitude stations. These differences may indicate that the fraction of solar wind disturbances leading to only moderate geomagnetic activity has increased during the studied time interval. We also show that the IHV index needs to be corrected for the long-term change of the daily curve, and calculate the corrected IHV values. Most dramatically, we find the centennial increase in global geomagnetic activity was considerably smaller, only about one half of that depicted by the aa index.

K. Mursula; D. Martini; A. Karinen

2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

167

Wayne Interim Storage Site environmental report for calendar year 1992, 868 Black Oak Ridge Road, Wayne, New Jersey. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the environmental surveillance program at the Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS) and provides the results for 1992. The fenced, site, 32 km (20 mi) northwest of Newark, New Jersey, was used between 1948 and 1971 for commercial processing of monazite sand to separate natural radioisotopes - predominantly thorium. Environmental surveillance of WISS began in 1984 in accordance with Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 when Congress added the site to DOE`s Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The environmental surveillance program at WISS includes sampling networks for radon and thoron in air; external gamma radiation exposure; radium-226, radium-228, thorium-230, thorium-232, total uranium, and several chemicals in surface water and sediment; and total uranium, radium-226, radium-228, thorium-230, thorium-232, and organic and inorganic chemicals in groundwater. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state standards, DOE derived concentration guides (DCGs), dose limits, and other DOE requirements. This monitoring program assists in fulfilling the DOE policy of measuring and monitoring effluents from DOE activities and calculating hypothetical doses. Results for environmental surveillance in 1992 show that the concentrations of all radioactive and most chemical contaminants were below applicable standards.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Soil carbon and nitrogen cycling and storage throughout the soil profile in a sweetgum plantation after 11 years of CO2-enrichment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increased partitioning of carbon (C) to fine roots under elevated [CO2], especially deep in the soil profile, could alter soil C and nitrogen (N) cycling in forests. After more than 11 years of free-Air CO2 enrichment in a Liquidambar styraciflua L. (sweetgum) plantation in Oak Ridge, TN, USA, greater inputs of fine roots resulted in the incorporation of new C (i.e., C with a depleted 13C) into root-derived particulate organic matter (POM) pools to 90-cm depth. Even though production in the sweetgum stand was limited by soil N availability, soil C and N content increased over time, and were greater throughout the soil profile under elevated [CO2] at the conclusion of the experiment. However, greater C inputs under elevated [CO2] did not result in increased net N immobilization or C mineralization rates in long-term laboratory incubations, and did not appear to prime the decomposition of older SOM. The 13CO2 of the C mineralized from the incubated soil closely tracked the 13C of the labile POM pool in the elevated [CO2] treatment, especially in shallower soil, and did not indicate the decomposition of older (i.e., pre-experiment) SOM. While potential C mineralization rates were positively and linearly related to total soil organic matter (SOM) C content in the top 30 cm of soil, this relationship did not hold in deeper soil. Taken together with an increased mean residence time of C in deeper soil pools, these findings indicate that C inputs from relatively deep roots under elevated [CO2] may have increased potential for long-term storage. Expanded representation of biogeochemical cycling throughout the soil profile may improve model projections of future forest responses to rising atmospheric [CO2].

Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Keller, Dr. Jason K. [Chapman University; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Norby, Richard J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

PRESERVATION OF H2 PRODUCTION ACTIVITY IN NANOPOROUS LATEX COATINGS OF RHODOPSEUDOMONAS PALUSTRIS CGA009 DURING DRY STORAGE AT AMBIENT TEMPERATURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assess the applicability of latex cell coatings as an "off-the-shelf' biocatalyst, the effect of osmoprotectants, temperature, humidity and O{sub 2} on preservation of H{sub 2} production in Rhodopseudomonas palustris coatings was evaluated. Immediately following latex coating coalescence (24 h) and for up to 2 weeks of dry storage, rehydrated coatings containing different osmoprotectants displayed similar rates of H{sub 2} production. Beyond 2 weeks of storage, sorbitol- treated coatings lost all H{sub 2} production activity, whereas considerable H{sub 2} production was still detected in sucrose- and trehalose-stabilized coatings. The relative humidity level at which the coatings were stored had a significant impact on the recovery and subsequent rates of H{sub 2} production. After 4 weeks storage under air at 60% humidity, coatings produced only trace amounts of H{sub 2} (0-0.1% headspace accumulation), whereas those stored at production activity after 8 weeks of storage. When stored in argon at production activity for 3 months, implicating oxidative damage as a key factor limiting coating storage. Overall, the results demonstrate that biocatalytic latex coatings are an attractive cell immobilization platform for preservation of bioactivity in the dry state.

Milliken, C.; Piskorska, M.; Soule, T.; Gosse, J.; Flickinger, M.; Smith, G.; Yeager, C.

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

170

PRESERVATION OF H2 PRODUCTION ACTIVITY IN NANOPOROUS LATEX COATINGS OF RHODOPSEUDOMONAS PALUSTRIS CGA009 DURING DRY STORAGE AT AMBIENT TEMPERATURES  

SciTech Connect

To assess the applicability of latex cell coatings as an "off-the-shelf' biocatalyst, the effect of osmoprotectants, temperature, humidity and O{sub 2} on preservation of H{sub 2} production in Rhodopseudomonas palustris coatings was evaluated. Immediately following latex coating coalescence (24 h) and for up to 2 weeks of dry storage, rehydrated coatings containing different osmoprotectants displayed similar rates of H{sub 2} production. Beyond 2 weeks of storage, sorbitol- treated coatings lost all H{sub 2} production activity, whereas considerable H{sub 2} production was still detected in sucrose- and trehalose-stabilized coatings. The relative humidity level at which the coatings were stored had a significant impact on the recovery and subsequent rates of H{sub 2} production. After 4 weeks storage under air at 60% humidity, coatings produced only trace amounts of H{sub 2} (0-0.1% headspace accumulation), whereas those stored at <5% humidity retained 27-53% of their H{sub 2} production activity after 8 weeks of storage. When stored in argon at <5% humidity and room temperature, R. palustris coatings retained full H{sub 2} production activity for 3 months, implicating oxidative damage as a key factor limiting coating storage. Overall, the results demonstrate that biocatalytic latex coatings are an attractive cell immobilization platform for preservation of bioactivity in the dry state.

Milliken, C.; Piskorska, M.; Soule, T.; Gosse, J.; Flickinger, M.; Smith, G.; Yeager, C.

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

171

Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

172

Wisconsin Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Wisconsin Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

173

Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

174

U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 747,322 509,144 140,062 -209,505 -392,623 -345,738 -377,296 -341,227 -317,699 -167,421 100,786 385,442 1995 589,738 511,065 216,506 -41,643 -327,918 -365,501 -308,336 -219,875 -295,844 -197,690 267,893 574,406 1996 682,457 437,052 311,728 -94,920 -322,158 -366,131 -363,342 -341,003 -356,733 -199,710 258,941 372,176 1997 654,194 350,146 160,439 -56,196 -306,863 -358,494 -296,924 -321,870 -324,144 -194,514 190,679 521,131 1998 455,535 287,201 239,965 -182,046 -387,234 -328,594 -309,129 -275,336 -232,541 -229,171 35,876 421,014 1999 604,196 316,690 289,287 -80,850 -319,498 -301,075 -225,579 -213,848 -304,510 -153,137 36,020 526,898

175

Massachusetts Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

176

U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Withdraw (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 21,349 20,684 8,350 5,111 4,874 12,293 5,060 7,715 6,287 7,414 9,306 14,425 1995 23,161 21,667 22,099 9,525 10,312 9,437 13,507 22,780 5,755 13,830 20,139 27,393 1996 40,778 33,145 31,908 10,206 13,300 11,520 14,106 15,649 13,315 13,943 20,341 27,635 1997 51,003 23,196 15,887 19,083 13,325 15,774 29,607 22,474 14,408 14,231 23,645 31,042 1998 30,927 21,261 29,146 11,980 22,555 23,440 18,231 21,735 32,733 12,095 17,825 33,401 1999 38,870 20,846 25,860 19,086 12,348 15,704 24,585 15,541 13,183 21,005 17,408 34,649 2000 49,811 21,849 20,070 19,237 23,731 17,578 20,857 31,615 18,309 19,954 22,581 54,523

177

U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 10,956 12,444 13,738 13,524 14,931 10,472 12,153 9,236 12,757 10,248 10,991 10,792 1995 13,745 13,232 15,992 17,283 17,654 14,528 10,998 9,778 23,267 21,484 16,206 20,016 1996 23,488 23,256 21,012 29,831 18,909 20,523 20,268 20,540 22,624 16,908 15,716 25,394 1997 20,945 14,876 21,608 21,581 27,492 22,410 15,072 22,801 26,605 29,839 25,383 18,699 1998 18,091 17,783 23,444 30,168 25,873 21,482 26,158 24,084 24,200 44,723 22,501 18,461 1999 19,390 16,158 17,906 28,378 29,410 22,024 16,494 23,088 23,680 23,005 21,254 18,866 2000 15,558 22,648 23,516 24,379 27,001 30,582 29,501 23,710 30,559 28,773 21,222 18,466

178

U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Withdraw (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 770,932 546,434 231,831 62,724 19,888 24,814 20,984 22,048 15,030 46,518 195,100 428,981 1995 620,577 541,886 304,769 117,604 23,796 30,261 40,063 63,120 23,618 54,325 347,342 607,136 1996 708,453 510,436 371,103 102,077 32,108 23,432 34,445 38,753 18,929 59,151 333,462 433,132 1997 701,615 390,142 269,403 127,340 27,844 26,362 48,682 33,817 29,210 70,031 278,208 547,914 1998 506,773 343,922 352,600 67,598 19,868 29,034 36,192 36,555 41,018 34,170 150,376 485,222 1999 642,891 363,774 357,952 100,683 32,159 25,911 56,004 74,334 29,331 71,095 187,431 570,886 2000 791,385 511,430 271,314 126,850 57,934 46,957 61,997 76,969 61,441 67,586 373,257 730,970

179

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Current Technology to someone Current Technology to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology Gaseous and Liquid Hydrogen Storage Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Storage Challenges Status of Hydrogen Storage Technologies DOE R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Current Technology

180

Changes in the subsurface stratification of the Sun with the 11-year activity cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the changes of the Sun's subsurface stratification inferred from helioseismology data. Using SOHO/MDI (SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager) data for the last 9 years and, more precisely, the temporal variation of f-mode frequencies, we have computed the variation of the radius of subsurface layers of the Sun by applying helioseismic inversions. We have found a variability of the ``helioseismic'' radius in antiphase with the solar activity, with the strongest variations of the stratification being just below the surface around 0.995$R_{\\odot}$. Besides, the radius of the deeper layers of the Sun, between 0.975$R_{\\odot}$ and 0.99$R_{\\odot}$ changes in phase with the 11-year cycle.

Sandrine Lefebvre; Alexander Kosovichev

2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Montana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

182

Utah Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

183

Virginia Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

184

Kansas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

185

Alabama Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

186

Michigan Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

187

Maryland Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

188

Arkansas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

189

Iowa Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Iowa Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

190

Colorado Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

191

Illinois Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

192

Nebraska Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

193

Texas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

194

Ohio Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

195

Missouri Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

196

Oklahoma Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

197

Indiana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

198

Wyoming Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

199

Oregon Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

200

Kentucky Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

COSBench: cloud object storage benchmark  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With object storage systems being increasingly recognized as a preferred way to expose one's storage infrastructure to the web, the past few years have witnessed an explosion in the acceptance of these systems. Unfortunately, the proliferation of available ... Keywords: benchmark tool, object storage

Qing Zheng; Haopeng Chen; Yaguang Wang; Jian Zhang; Jiangang Duan

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

TWRS Retrieval and Storage Mission and Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) Disposal Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project plan has a twofold purpose. First, it provides a waste stream project plan specific to the River Protection Project (RPP) (formerly the Tank Waste Remediation System [TWRS] Project) Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Disposal Subproject for the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) that meets the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-90-01 (Ecology et al. 1994) and is consistent with the project plan content guidelines found in Section 11.5 of the Tri-Party Agreement action plan (Ecology et al. 1998). Second, it provides an upper tier document that can be used as the basis for future subproject line-item construction management plans. The planning elements for the construction management plans are derived from applicable U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) planning guidance documents (DOE Orders 4700.1 [DOE 1992] and 430.1 [DOE 1995a]). The format and content of this project plan are designed to accommodate the requirements mentioned by the Tri-Party Agreement and the DOE orders. A cross-check matrix is provided in Appendix A to explain where in the plan project planning elements required by Section 11.5 of the Tri-Party Agreement are addressed.

BURBANK, D.A.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Idaho Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 110...

204

New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

205

Nevada Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

206

Alabama Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

207

Wisconsin Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Wisconsin Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

208

Nebraska Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

209

Alabama Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

210

Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

211

Colorado Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

212

Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

213

Louisiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

214

New Hampshire Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) New Hampshire Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

215

Missouri Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

216

Minnesota Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

217

Maine Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Maine Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

218

California Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

219

Indiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

220

Minnesota Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Maryland Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

222

Illinois Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

223

Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

224

Oregon Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

225

Iowa Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

226

Maine Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Maine Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

227

Idaho Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

228

Maine Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Maine Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0...

229

Delaware Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

230

Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

231

Idaho Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

232

Massachusetts Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

233

Iowa Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

234

Missouri Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0...

235

Delaware Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

236

South Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) South Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

237

Oregon Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 251...

238

Arkansas Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

239

Louisiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

240

California Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

South Dakota Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

242

Nevada Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 294...

243

Alaska Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's...

244

Maryland Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

245

Nebraska Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

246

North Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) North Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

247

Virginia Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

248

Georgia Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Georgia Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

249

Wisconsin Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Wisconsin Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

250

Illinois Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

251

Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

252

Arkansas Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

253

New Hampshire Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) New Hampshire Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

254

Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1990's:

255

New Mexico Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

256

Warehouse and Storage Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Warehouse and Storage Warehouse and Storage Characteristics by Activity... Warehouse and Storage Warehouse and storage buildings are those used to store goods, manufactured products, merchandise, raw materials, or personal belongings. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Warehouse and Storage Buildings... While the idea of a warehouse may bring to mind a large building, in reality most warehouses were relatively small. Forty-four percent were between 1,001 and 5,000 square feet, and seventy percent were less than 10,000 square feet. Many warehouses were newer buildings. Twenty-five percent were built in the 1990s and almost fifty percent were constructed since 1980. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

257

Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applied Neutron Scattering in Engineering and Materials Science Research: Hydrogen Storage Sponsored by: Metallurgical Society of the Canadian Institute of...

258

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Carbon Storage Geologic Storage Focus Area Geologiccarbon dioxide (CO2) storage involves the injection of supercritical CO2 into deep geologic formations (injection zones) overlain by competent sealing formations and geologic traps that will prevent the CO2 from escaping. Current research and field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The following summarizes the potential for storage and the challenges related to CO2 storage capability for fluids that may be present in more conventional clastic and carbonate reservoirs (saline water, and oil and gas), as well as unconventional reservoirs (unmineable coal seams, organic-rich shales, and basalts):

259

Flywheel energy storage workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the November 1993 Flywheel Workshop, there has been a major surge of interest in Flywheel Energy Storage. Numerous flywheel programs have been funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), by the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Hybrid Vehicle Program, and by private investment. Several new prototype systems have been built and are being tested. The operational performance characteristics of flywheel energy storage are being recognized as attractive for a number of potential applications. Programs are underway to develop flywheels for cars, buses, boats, trains, satellites, and for electric utility applications such as power quality, uninterruptible power supplies, and load leveling. With the tremendous amount of flywheel activity during the last two years, this workshop should again provide an excellent opportunity for presentation of new information. This workshop is jointly sponsored by ARPA and DOE to provide a review of the status of current flywheel programs and to provide a forum for presentation of new flywheel technology. Technology areas of interest include flywheel applications, flywheel systems, design, materials, fabrication, assembly, safety & containment, ball bearings, magnetic bearings, motor/generators, power electronics, mounting systems, test procedures, and systems integration. Information from the workshop will help guide ARPA & DOE planning for future flywheel programs. This document is comprised of detailed viewgraphs.

O`Kain, D.; Carmack, J. [comps.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Tennessee Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Arkansas Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

262

Alabama Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

263

South Dakota Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

264

Colorado Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

265

Wisconsin Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Wisconsin Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

266

Minnesota Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

267

Nebraska Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

268

Delaware Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

269

Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

270

Louisiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

271

Indiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

272

Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

273

Nevada Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

274

Virginia Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

275

Oregon Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

276

Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

277

California Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

278

North Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) North Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

279

Missouri Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

280

New Jersey Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) New Jersey Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

New Mexico Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

282

Georgia Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Georgia Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

283

New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

284

Alaska Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

285

Illinois Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

286

Pennsylvania Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

287

Maryland Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

288

New Mexico Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

289

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Where is CO2 storage happening today? Where is CO2 storage happening today? Sleipner Project (Norway) Sleipner Project (Norway) Carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is currently happening across the United States and around the world. Large, commercial-scale projects, like the Sleipner CO2 Storage Site in Norway, the Weyburn-Midale CO2 Project in Canada, and the In Salah project in Algeria, have been injecting CO2 for many years. Each of these projects stores more than 1 million tons of CO2 per year. Large-scale efforts are currently underway in Africa, China, Australia, and Europe, too. These commercial-scale projects are demonstrating that large volumes of CO2 can be safely and permanently stored. Additionally, a multitude of pilot efforts are underway in different parts of the world to determine suitable locations and technologies for future

290

Production, Storage, and FC Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Roxanne Danz Technology Development Manager DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program Systems Analysis Workshop July 28-29, 2004 Washington, D.C. 2 HFCI Analysis * National Laboratory projects (including subcontracts to National Labs) - covered by presentations later today. * Cooperative Agreements - GTI - Sunita Satyapal - Battelle - Kathi Epping - TIAX - Roxanne Danz 3 GTI Project Development of Cost-Effective and Reliable Underground Off-Board Hydrogen Storage Technology * Gas Technology Institute (GTI) - Over 40 years RD&D in hydrogen technologies GTI Hydrogen Capabilities and Activities - Hydrogen Production (reformation, gasification, thermochemical, thermal decomposition, biological, and electrolysis)

291

Idaho Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

292

Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

293

Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

294

Delaware Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

295

Georgia Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Georgia Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

296

Wisconsin Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Wisconsin Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

297

Low temperature thermal energy storage: a state-of-the-art survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preliminary version of an analysis of activities in research, development, and demonstration of low temperature thermal energy storage (TES) technologies having applications in renewable energy systems is presented. Three major categories of thermal storage devices are considered: sensible heat; phase change materials (PCM); and reversible thermochemical reactions. Both short-term and annual thermal energy storage technologies based on prinicples of sensible heat are discussed. Storage media considered are water, earth, and rocks. Annual storage technologies include solar ponds, aquifers, and large tanks or beds of water, earth, or rocks. PCM storage devices considered employ salt hydrates and organic compounds. The sole application of reversible chemical reactions outlined is for the chemical heat pump. All program processes from basic research through commercialization efforts are investigated. Nongovernment-funded industrial programs and foreign efforts are outlined as well. Data describing low temperature TES activities are presented also as project descriptions. Projects for all these programs are grouped into seven categories: short-term sensible heat storage; annual sensible heat storage; PCM storage; heat transfer and exchange; industrial waste heat recovery and storage; reversible chemical reaction storage; and models, economic analyses, and support studies. Summary information about yearly funding and brief descriptions of project goals and accomplishments are included.

Baylin, F.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

South Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) South Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

299

North Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) North Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

300

New Hampshire Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) New Hampshire Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Electric storage cell or battery  

SciTech Connect

A lead storage cell comprises a storage jar, an electrolyte contained in the storage jar, negative and positive electrodes within the electrolyte and respectively having a negative electrode metal or active material and a positive electrode active material which are placed in contact with each other preferably a large-meshed woven or non-woven fabric having resistance to the electrolyte and inserted between the negative and positive electrodes.

Kosuga, J.

1981-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

302

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Laboratories September 27, 2007 San Francisco, CA PEER REVIEW 2007 DOE(SNL)CEC Energy Storage Program FYO7 Projects Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by...

303

NERSC HPSS Storage Trends and Summaries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summaries Summaries Storage Trends and Summaries Total Bytes Utilized The growth in NERSC's storage systems amounts to roughly 1.7x per year. Total Bytes Utilized Number of Files Stored The growth in the number of files stored is less than the growth in the number of bytes stored as the average file size has increased over time. The average file size as of August 2003 is about 30 MB. The median file size is closer to 1 MB. Number of Files Monthly I/O The growth rate of I/O is roughly the same as the growth rate of the number of bytes stored. As a rough rule of thumb, the amount of I/O per month is about 10% to 14% of the amount of data residing in the storage systems. Additional graphs show the last 30 days of activity for the amount of I/O and the number of files transferred.

304

Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov...

305

Illinois Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct...

306

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

different options for CO2 storage? different options for CO2 storage? Oil and gas reservoirs, many containing carbon dioxide (CO2), as well as natural deposits of almost pure CO2, can be found in many places in the United States and around the world. These are examples of long-term storage of CO2 by nature, where "long term" means millions of years. Their existence demonstrates that naturally occurring geologic formations and structures of various kinds are capable of securely storing CO2 deep in the subsurface for very long periods of time. Because of the economic importance of oil and gas, scientists and engineers have studied these natural deposits for many decades in order to understand the physical and chemical processes which led to their formation. There are also many decades of engineering experience in subsurface operations similar to those needed for CO2 storage. The most directly applicable experience comes from the oil industry, which, for 40 years, has injected CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs for the recovery of additional product through enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Additional experience comes from natural gas storage operations, which have utilized depleted gas reservoirs, as well as reservoirs containing only water. Scientists and engineers are now combining the knowledge obtained from study of natural deposits with experience from analogous operations as a basis for studying the potential for large-scale storage of CO2 in the deep subsurface.

307

NETL: Carbon Storage - NETL Carbon Capture and Storage Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS Database CCS Database Carbon Storage NETL's Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage Database - Version 4 Welcome to NETL's Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) Database. The database includes active, proposed, canceled, and terminated CCUS projects worldwide. Information in the database regarding technologies being developed for capture, evaluation of sites for carbon dioxide (CO2) storage, estimation of project costs, and anticipated dates of completion is sourced from publically available information. The CCUS Database provides the public with information regarding efforts by various industries, public groups, and governments towards development and eventual deployment of CCUS technology. As of November 2012, the database contained 268 CCUS projects worldwide. The 268 projects include 68 capture, 61 storage, and 139 for capture and storage in more than 30 countries across 6 continents. While most of the projects are still in the planning and development stage, or have recently been proposed, 37 are actively capturing and injecting CO2

308

U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

309

New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

310

Diesel Rig Mechanical Peaking System Based on Flywheel Storage Technolgy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flywheel energy storage technology is an emerging energy storage technology, there is a great development in recent years promising energy storage technology, with a large energy storage, high power, no pollution, use of broad, simple maintenance, enabling ... Keywords: Flywheel energy storage technology, mechanical peaking, diesel rig, peak motor

Shuguang Liu, Jia Wang

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Hydrogen Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well a

312

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Development Concept Nitrogen-Air Battery F.M. Delnick, D. Ingersoll, K.Waldrip Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM presented to U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems...

313

Flash Storage Today  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Can flash memory become the foundation for a new tier in the storage hierarchy? The past few years have been an exciting time for flash memory. The cost has fallen dramatically as fabrication has become more efficient and the market has grown; the density ...

Adam Leventhal

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 24, 2011 August 24, 2011 Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction Construction activities have begun at an Illinois ethanol plant that will demonstrate carbon capture and storage. July 6, 2011 Confirming CCS Security and Environmental Safety Aim of Newly Selected Field Projects The U.S. Department of Energy's portfolio of field projects aimed at confirming that long-term geologic carbon dioxide storage is safe and environmentally secure has been expanded by three projects selected to collectively receive $34.5 million over four years. June 28, 2011 Redesigned CCS Website Offers Wealth of Information on Worldwide Technology, Projects A wealth of information about worldwide carbon capture and storage technologies and projects is available on the newly launched, updated and

315

Programming storage-centric sensor networks with Squirrel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present Squirrel, a stream-oriented programming framework for storage-centric sensor networks. The storage-centric paradigm---where storage operations prevail over communication activity---applies to scenarios such as batch data collection, delay-tolerant ...

Luca Mottola

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

DUF6 Storage Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Safety Depleted UF6 Storage line line How DUF6 is Stored Where DUF6 is Stored DUF6 Storage Safety Cylinder Leakage Depleted UF6 Storage Safety Continued cylinder storage is...

317

SERI Solar-Energy-Storage Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SERI Solar Energy Storage Program is summarized. The program provides research, systems analysis, and assessments of thermal energy storage and transport in support of the Thermal Energy Storage Program of the DOE Division of Energy Storage Technology; emphasis is on thermal energy storage for solar thermal power and process heat applications and on thermal energy transport. Currently, research is in progress on direct-contact thermal energy storage and thermochemical energy storage and transport. In addition, SERI is directing the definition of new concepts for thermal energy storage and supporting research on thermal energy transport by sensible and latent heat media. SERI is performing systems analyses of thermal energy storage for solar thermal application and coordinating thermal energy storage activities for solar applications.

Wyman, C.E.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

NETL: News Release - Ohio State Develops Game-Changing CO Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Injection Operations in Illinois 2 Capture Membranes in DOE-Funded Injection Operations in Illinois 2 Capture Membranes in DOE-Funded Project Publications News Release Release Date: November 28, 2012 Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally Acceptable Shale Gas Development Selected by DOE Washington, D.C. - Fifteen research projects aimed at addressing the technical challenges of producing natural gas from shales and tight sands, while simultaneously reducing environmental footprints and risks, have been selected to receive a total of $28 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The projects, valued at just over $36.6 million over two years, add to the research portfolio for FE's Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research Program, which develops technologies and strategies to improve the safety and minimize the environmental impacts of oil and natural gas exploration and production.

319

Annual report to Congress: Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Calendar Year 1999  

SciTech Connect

This is the tenth Annual Report to the Congress describing Department of Energy activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board). The Board, an independent executive-branch agency established in 1988, provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of Energy regarding public health and safety issues at the Department's defense nuclear facilities. The Board also reviews and evaluates the content and implementation of health and safety standards, as well as other requirements, relating to the design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Department's defense nuclear facilities. During 1999, Departmental activities resulted in the closure of nine Board recommendations. In addition, the Department has completed all implementation plan milestones associated with three Board recommendations. One new Board recommendation was received and accepted by the Department in 1999, and a new implementation plan is being developed to address this recommendation. The Department has also made significant progress with a number of broad-based initiatives to improve safety. These include expanded implementation of integrated safety management at field sites, opening of a repository for long-term storage of transuranic wastes, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

None

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Technical Progress Report for the Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of October 1, 2005 through December 31, 2005. Activities during this time period were: (1) Nomination and election of Executive Council members for 2006-07 term, (2) Release the 2006 GSTC request-for-proposals (RFP), (3) Recruit and invoice membership for FY2006, (4) Improve communication efforts, and (5) Continue planning the GSTC spring meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

Robert W. Watson

2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

322

Liaison activities with the Institute of Physical Chemistry/Russian Academy of Science Fiscal Year 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investigations into the chemistry of alkaline Hanford Site tank waste (TTP RL4-3-20-04) were conducted in Fiscal Year 1995 at Westinghouse Hanford Company under the support of the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (EM-53). The investigation had two main subtasks: liaison with the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Science and further laboratory testing of the chemistry of thermal reconstitution of Hanford Site tank waste. Progress, which was achieved in the liaison subtask during Fiscal Year 1995, is summarized as follows: (1) A technical dialogue has been established with Institute scientists. (2) Editing was done on a technical literature review on the chemistry of transuranic elements and technetium in alkaline media written by researchers at the Institute. The report was issued in May 1995 as a Westinghouse Hanford Company document. (3) Four tasks from the Institute were selected for support by the U.S. Department of Energy. Work on three tasks commenced on 1 March 1995; the fourth task commenced on 1 April 1995. (4) Technical information describing the composition of Hanford Site tank waste was supplied to the Institute. (5) A program review of the four tasks was conducted at the Institute during a visit 25 August to 1 September, 1995. A lecture on the origin, composition, and proposed treatment of Hanford Site tank wastes was presented during this visit. Eight additional tasks were proposed by Institute scientists for support in Fiscal Year 1996. (6) A paper was presented at the Fifth International Conference on Radioactive Waste Management and Environmental Remediation (ICEM`95) in Berlin, Germany on 3 to 9 September, 1995 on the solubility of actinides in alkaline media.

Delegard, C.H.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Demonstrated maximum working gas volume is the sum of the highest storage inventory levels of working gas observed in each facility over the previous 5-year ...

324

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Related Links: Storage Basics: ... natural gas consumption declined roughly 2 percent from the previous year a reflection of 2009's mild temperatures and weak ...

325

U.S. Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

326

Managing Environmental and Human Safety Risks Associated with Geologic Storage of CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.0 Natural Gas Storage.0 Yaggy Natural Gas Storage Field: A Case Study................................................. 41 7 storage can be learned from other functionally similar activities such as underground natural gas storage

327

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Objectives - Develop and verify: On-board hydrogen storage systems achieving: 1.5 kWhkg (4.5 wt%), 1.2 kWhL, and 6kWh by 2005 2 kWhkg (6 wt%), 1.5 kWhL, and 4kWh by...

329

Advanced research in solar-energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Energy Storage Program at the Solar Energy Research Institute is reviewed. The program provides research, systems analyses, and economic assessments of thermal and thermochemical energy storage and transport. Current activities include experimental research into very high temperature (above 800/sup 0/C) thermal energy storage and assessment of novel thermochemical energy storage and transport systems. The applications for such high-temperature storage are thermochemical processes, solar thermal-electric power generation, cogeneration of heat and electricity, industrial process heat, and thermally regenerative electrochemical systems. The research results for five high-temperature thermal energy storage technologies and two thermochemical systems are described.

Luft, W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEEfor SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", inSuperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant, Advances in

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storage Coil", Proc. 19 80 ASC,Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEE Trans.SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", in Advances

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Storage | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Usage Storage Storage Energy storage isnt just for AA batteries. Thanks to investments from the Energy Department's Advanced Research...

334

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on...

336

Underground-Energy-Storage Program, 1982 annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two principal underground energy storage technologies are discussed--Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) and Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES). The Underground Energy Storage Program objectives, approach, structure, and milestones are described, and technical activities and progress in the STES and CAES areas are summarized. STES activities include aquifer thermal energy storage technology studies and STES technology assessment and development. CAES activities include reservoir stability studies and second-generation concepts studies. (LEW)

Kannberg, L.D.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology DOE R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts On-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications continues to be

338

National Low-Level Waste Management Program final summary report of key activities and accomplishments for fiscal year 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibilities under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 to assist states and compacts in their siting and licensing efforts for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP) is the element of the DOE that performs the key support activities under the Act. The NLLWMP`s activities are driven by the needs of the states and compacts as they prepare to manage their low-level waste under the Act. Other work is added during the fiscal year as necessary to accommodate new requests brought on by status changes in states` and compacts` siting and licensing efforts. This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the NLLWMP during FY 1997.

Rittenberg, R.B.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

Robert W. Watson

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Underground Energy Storage Program. 1983 annual summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Underground Energy Storage Program approach, structure, history, and milestones are described. Technical activities and progress in the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage and Compressed Air Energy Storage components of the program are then summarized, documenting the work performed and progress made toward resolving and eliminating technical and economic barriers associated with those technologies. (LEW)

Kannberg, L.D.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Technical Progress Report for the Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2005 through September 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) receiving proposals in response to the RFP, and (2) organizing and hosting the proposal selection meeting on August 30-31, 2005.

Joel L. Morrison

2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

342

OCRWM annual report to Congress, fiscal year 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the progress in the activities of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. Chapters include: Yucca Mountain site characterization project; Waste acceptance, storage and transportation project; Program management; Working with external parties; and Financial management. Also included in five appendices are: financial statements; key federal laws and regulations; fiscal year 1997 Congressional testimony and meetings with regulators and oversight bodies; OCREM publications for fiscal year 1997; and selected publications from other organizations during fiscal year 1997.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Daniel R. Borneo, PE Daniel R. Borneo, PE Sandia National Laboratories September 27, 2007 San Francisco, CA PEER REVIEW 2007 DOE(SNL)/CEC Energy Storage Program FYO7 Projects Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 2 Presentation Outline * DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration - Background of DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration - FY07 Project Review * Zinc Bromine Battery (ZBB) Demonstration * Palmdale Super capacitor Demonstration * Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Regional Transit (RT) Super capacitor demonstration * Beacon Flywheel Energy Storage System (FESS) 3 Background of DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration * Memorandum of Understanding Between CEC and DOE (SNL). - In Place since 2004

344

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development Concept Development Concept Nitrogen-Air Battery F.M. Delnick, D. Ingersoll, K.Waldrip Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM presented to U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Research Program Washington, DC November 2-4, 2010 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through Sandia National Laboratories Full Air Breathing Battery Concept * Concept is to use O 2 and N 2 as the electrodes in a battery * Novel because N 2 is considered inert * Our group routinely reacts N 2 electrochemically

345

ALARA Analysis for Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 Fuel Storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The addition of Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assembly storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB) will increase the total cumulative CSB personnel exposure from receipt and handling activities. The loaded Shippingport Spent Fuel Canisters (SSFCs) used for the Shippingport fuel have a higher external dose rate. Assuming an MCO handling rate of 170 per year (K East and K West concurrent operation), 24-hr CSB operation, and nominal SSFC loading, all work crew personnel will have a cumulative annual exposure of less than the 1,000 mrem limit.

Lewis, M E

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Silo Storage Preconceptual Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has a need to develop and field a low-cost option for the long-term storage of a variety of radiological material. The storage options primary requirement is to provide both environmental and physical protection of the materials. Design criteria for this effort require a low initial cost and minimum maintenance over a 50-year design life. In 1999, Argonne National Laboratory-West was tasked with developing a dry silo storage option for the BN-350 Spent Fuel in Aktau Kazakhstan. Argons design consisted of a carbon steel cylinder approximately 16 ft long, 18 in. outside diameter and 0.375 in. wall thickness. The carbon steel silo was protected from corrosion by a duplex coating system consisting of zinc and epoxy. Although the study indicated that the duplex coating design would provide a design life well in excess of the required 50 years, the review board was concerned because of the novelty of the design and the lack of historical use. In 2012, NNSA tasked Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with reinvestigating the silo storage concept and development of alternative corrosion protection strategies. The 2012 study, Silo Storage Concepts, Cathodic Protection Options Study (INL/EST-12-26627), concludes that the option which best fits the design criterion is a passive cathotic protection scheme, consisting of a carbon steel tube coated with zinc or a zinc-aluminum alloy encapsulated in either concrete or a cement grout. The hot dipped zinc coating option was considered most efficient, but the flame-sprayed option could be used if a thicker zinc coating was determined to be necessary.

Stephanie L. Austad; Patrick W. Bragassa; Kevin M Croft; David S Ferguson; Scott C Gladson; Annette L Shafer; John H Weathersby

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

348

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Acquifers...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquifers Capacity (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

349

New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

350

NETL: Carbon Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) Programmatic Points of Contact Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Coordinator Carbon Storage...

351

Energy Storage Success Stories - Energy Innovation Portal  

Energy Storage Success Stories These success stories highlight some of the effective licensing and partnership activity between laboratories and industry in the area ...

352

Application-storage discovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Discovering application dependency on data and storage is a key prerequisite for many storage optimization tasks such as data assignment to storage tiers, storage consolidation, virtualization, and handling unused data. However, in the real world these ... Keywords: enterprise storage, experimental evaluation, storage discovery

Nikolai Joukov; Birgit Pfitzmann; HariGovind V. Ramasamy; Murthy V. Devarakonda

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Reversible Seeding in Storage Rings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose to generate steady-state microbunching in a storage ring with a reversible seeding scheme. High gain harmonic generation (HGHG) and echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) are two promising methods for microbunching linac electron beams. Because both schemes increase the energy spread of the seeded beam, they cannot drive a coherent radiator turn-by-turn in a storage ring. However, reversing the seeding process following the radiator minimizes the impact on the electron beam and may allow coherent radiation at or near the storage ring repetition rate. In this paper we describe the general idea and outline a proof-of-principle experiment. Electron storage rings can drive high average power light sources, and free-electron lasers (FELs) are now producing coherent light sources of unprecedented peak brightness While there is active research towards high repetition rate FELs (for example, using energy recovery linacs), at present there are still no convenient accelerator-based sources of high repetition rate, coherent radiation. As an alternative avenue, we recently proposed to establish steady-state microbunching (SSMB) in a storage ring. By maintaining steady-state coherent microbunching at one point in the storage ring, the beam generates coherent radiation at or close to the repetition rate of the storage ring. In this paper, we propose a method of generating a microbunched beam in a storage ring by using reversible versions of linac seeding schemes.

Ratner, Daniel; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

354

NETL: Natural Gas and Petroleum Storage Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage Strategic Petroleum Reserve Click on project number for a more detailed description of the project Project Number Project Name Primary Performer DE-FE0014830 Strategic Petroleum Reserve Core Laboratories Natural Gas Storage There are currently no active storage projects Storage - Completed Projects Click on project number for a more detailed description of the project Project Number Project Name Primary Performer DE-DT0000358 Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northrop Grumman Missions System DE-FC26-03NT41813 Geomechanical Analysis and Design Criteria Terralog Technologies DE-FC26-03NT41779 Natural Gas Storage Technology Consortium Pennsylvania State University (PSU) DE-FC26-03NT41743 Improved Deliverability in Gas Storage Fields by Identifying the Timing and Sources of Damage Using Smart Storage Technology Schlumberger Technology Corporation

355

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

356

Radiogenic gas accumulation in TRU waste storage drums  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A field experiment was conducted over a four-year time span to determine the effect of high-activity transuranic (TRU) waste on the atmosphere within TRU waste storage drums typical of those generated in Savannah River Plant operation. Routine gas composition analyses showed that a significant amount of hydrogen can accumulate in drums that contain high alpha activity, and that flammable gas mixtures could form in such drums in spite of the radiolytic consumption of oxygen. According to this study, gas pressure accumulation does not pose a threat to the integrity of the TRU waste containers that are now being stored at the Savannah River Plant. Therefore, the 20-year storage criterion is still viable. However, the continued avoidance of a perfectly gas-tight drum seal (e.g., epoxy, metal welding) is recommended. The test drums will continue to be monitored.

Ryan, J.P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Utility Battery Storage Systems Program Report for FY92  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the fiscal year 1992 activities of the, Utility Battery Storage Systems Program (UBS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Management (OEM). The UBS program is conducted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). UBS is responsible for the engineering development of integrated battery systems for use in utility-energy-storage (UES) and other stationary applications. Development is accomplished primarily through cost-shared contracts with industrial organizations. An important part of the development process is the identification, analysis, and characterization of attractive UES applications. UBS is organized into five projects: Utility Battery Systems Analyses; Battery Systems Engineering; Zinc/Bromine; Sodium/Sulfur; Supplemental Evaluations and Field Tests. The results of the Utility Systems Analyses are used to identify several utility-based applications for which battery storage can effectively solve existing problems. The results will also specify the engineering requirements for widespread applications and motivate and define needed field evaluations of full-size battery systems.

Butler, P.C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

gas cylinder storage guidelines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressed Gas Cylinder Storage Guidelines Compressed Gas Cylinder Storage Guidelines All cylinders must be stored vertical, top up across the upper half the cylinder but below the shoulder. Small cylinder stands or other methods may be appropriate to ensure that the cylinders are secured from movement. Boxes, cartons, and other items used to support small cylinders must not allow water to accumulate and possible cause corrosion. Avoid corrosive chemicals including salt and fumes - keep away from direct sunlight and keep objects away that could fall on them. Use Gas pressure regulators that have been inspected in the last 5 years. Cylinders that contain fuel gases whether full or empty must be stored away from oxidizer cylinders at a minimum of 20 feet. In the event they are stored together, they must be separated by a wall 5 feet high with

359

Lih thermal energy storage device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures.

Olszewski, Mitchell (Knoxville, TN); Morris, David G. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Overview of the US Department of Energy Utility Battery Storage Systems Program  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program at Sandia National Laboratories and its contractors. This program is specifically aimed at developing battery energy storage systems for electric utility applications commencing in the mid to late 1990s. One factory-integrated utility battery system and three battery technologies: sodium/sulfur, zinc/bromine, and lead-acid are being developed under this program. In the last few years the emphasis of this program has focused on battery system development. This emphasis has included greater interactions with utilities to define application requirements. Recent activities have identified specific applications of battery energy storage in certain utility systems and quantified the value of these applications to these utility companies. In part due to these activities, battery energy storage is no longer regarded by utilities as a load-leveling resource only, but as a multifunction, energy management resource.

Eaton, R. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Akhil, A.; Butler, P.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hurwitch, J. [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

FCT Hydrogen Storage: The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project' to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project' on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: The...

362

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

363

Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990...

364

Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 84,808...

365

Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990...

366

Compressed Air Storage for Electric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Report focuses on the use of underground storage of natural gas as a means of leveling the load between supply and demand. The book presents a view of the way compressed air storage can reduce costs when constructing new facilities for generating peak load electricity. The primary emphasis given concerns underground storage of air in underground porous media, the vehicle utilized on a large scale for over 25 years by the natural gas industry.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Occult Trucking and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At least we used to. We are Occult Trucking and Storage andNOTHING. FLASHBACK -- OCCULT TRUCKING AND STORAGE DEPOT --I saw him. FLASHBACK - OCCULT TRUCKING AND STORAGE DEPOT -

Eyres, Jeffrey Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Sorption Storage Technology Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Technology Summary DOE H2 Storage Workshop, Feb 14-15, 2011, Washington, DC 1 Compressed & Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshop February 14 - 15, 2011, Washington, DC...

369

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Google...

371

Subsea Pumped Hydro Storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A new technology for energy storage called Subsea Pumped Hydro Storage (SPHS) has been evaluated from a techno-economical point of view. Intermittent renewable energy sources (more)

Erik, Almen John

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

NERSC HPSS Storage Statistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Trends and Summaries Storage by Scientific Discipline Troubleshooting Optimizing IO performance on the Lustre file system IO Formats Sharing Data Transferring Data Unix...

373

Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Storage. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Monthly Survey of Storage Field Operators -- asking injections, withdrawals, base gas, working gas.

374

U.S. Refinery Normal Butane/Butylene Shell Storage Capacity as ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Normal Butane/Butylene Shell Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

375

Storage and Aging Effects on Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin Ion Exchange Performance  

SciTech Connect

Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) is evaluating the alternate Cs ion exchanger, spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), for use in the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP).( ) Previous test activities with spherical RF indicate that it has adequate capacity, selectivity, and kinetics to perform in the plant according to the flowsheet needs. It appears to have better elution and hydraulic properties than the existing alternatives: ground-gel RF and SuperLig 644 (SL 644).( ) To date, the spherical RF performance testing has been conducted on freshly manufactured resin (within ~2 months of manufacture). The ion exchange resins will be manufactured and shipped to the WTP up to 1 year before being used in the plant. Changes in the resin properties during storage could reduce the capacity of the resin to remove Cs from low-activity waste solutions. Active sites on organic SL-644 resin have been shown to degrade during storage (Arm et al. 2004). Additional testing was needed to study the effects of storage conditions and aging on spherical RF ion exchange performance. Variables that could have a significant impact on ion exchange resins during storage include storage temperature, medium, and time. BattellePacific Northwest Division (PNWD) was contracted to test the effects of various storage conditions on spherical RF resin. Data obtained from the testing will be used by the WTP operations to provide direction for suitable storage conditions and manage the spherical RF resin stock. Storage test conditions included wet and dry resin configurations under nitrogen at three temperatures. Work was initially conducted under contract number 24590-101-TSA-W000-00004 satisfying the needs defined in Appendix C of the Research and Technology Plan( ) TSS A-219 to evaluate the impact of storage conditions on RF resin performance. In February 2007, the contract mechanism was switched to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Operating Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Arm, Stuart T.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Steele, Marilyn J.; Thomas, Kathie K.

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

376

ADVANCED UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS REFRIGERATED-MINED CAVERN STORAGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill-withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. Five regions of the U.S.A. were studied for underground storage development and PB-KBB reviewed the literature to determine if the geology of these regions was suitable for siting hard rock storage caverns. Area gas market conditions in these regions were also studied to determine the need for such storage. Based on an analysis of many factors, a possible site was determined to be in Howard and Montgomery Counties, Maryland. The area has compatible geology and a gas industry infrastructure for the nearby market populous of Baltimore and Washington D.C.. As Gas temperature is lowered, the compressibility of the gas reaches an optimum value. The compressibility of the gas, and the resultant gas density, is a function of temperature and pressure. This relationship can be used to commercial advantage by reducing the size of a storage cavern for a given working volume of natural gas. This study looks at this relationship and and the potential for commercialization of the process in a storage application. A conceptual process design, and cavern design were developed for various operating conditions. Potential site locations were considered and a typical plant layout was developed. In addition a geomechanical review of the proposed cavern design was performed, evaluating the stability of the mine rooms and shafts, and the effects of the refrigerated gas temperatures on the stability of the cavern. Capital and operating cost estimates were also developed for the various temperature cases considered. The cost estimates developed were used to perform a comparative market analysis of this type of gas storage system to other systems that are commercially used in the region of the study.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Storage | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Storage Storage Energy storage isn’t just for AA batteries. Thanks to investments from the Energy Department's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), energy storage may soon play a bigger part in our electricity grid, making it possible to generate more renewable electricity. Learn more. Energy storage isn't just for AA batteries. Thanks to investments from the Energy Department's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), energy storage may soon play a bigger part in our electricity grid, making it possible to generate more renewable electricity. Learn more.

378

Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity With Data for September 2013 | Release Date: November 27, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 29, 2013 Previous Issues Year: September 2013 March 2013 September 2012 March 2012 September 2011 March 2011 September 2010 Go Containing storage capacity data for crude oil, petroleum products, and selected biofuels. The report includes tables detailing working and net available shell storage capacity by type of facility, product, and Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PAD District). Net available shell storage capacity is broken down further to show the percent for exclusive use by facility operators and the percent leased to others. Crude oil storage capacity data are also provided for Cushing, Oklahoma, an

379

Technical Standards, Fiscal Year 2007 Agency Report - February...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

research, energy efficency, oil storage, hydroelectric power, accelerator operations, nuclear facility decommissioning, and fusion experiments. Technical Standards, Fiscal Year...

380

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Note: 1) 'Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity' is the sum of the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the prior 5-year period as...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

EVALUATION OF ULTIMATE DISPOSAL METHOD FOR LIQUID AND SOLID RADIOACTIVE WASTES. PART I. INTERIM LIQUID STORAGE  

SciTech Connect

As the first part of a study to evaluate the economics of the various steps leading to and including the permanent disposal of high-activity liquid and solid radioactive waste, costs of interim liquid storage of acid and alkaline Purex and Thorex wastes were estimated for storage times of 0.5 to 30 years. A 6- ton/day plant was assumed, processing 1500 tons/year of uranium converter fuel at a burnup of 10,000 Mwd/ton and 270 tons/year of thorium converter fuel at a burnup of 20,000 Mwd/ton. Tanks of Savannah River design were assumed, with stainless steel construction for acid wastes and mild steel construction for neutralized wastes. The operating cycle of each tank was assumed to consist of equal filling and emptying periods plus a full (or dead) period. With interim storage time defined as filling time plus full time, tank costs were minimum when full time was 40 to 70% of the interim storage time, using present worth considerations. For waste storage times of 0.5 to 30 years, costs ranged from 2.2 x 10/sup -3/ to 9.5 x 10/sup -3/ mill/kwh/sub e/ for acid wastes and from 1.7 x 10/sup -3/ to 5.1 x 10/sup -3/ mill/kwh/sub e/ for neutralized wastes. (auth)

Bradshaw, R.L.; Perona, J.J.; Roberts, J.T.; Blomeke, J.O.

1961-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

382

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Definitions Definitions Definitions Since 2006, EIA has reported two measures of aggregate capacity, one based on demonstrated peak working gas storage, the other on working gas design capacity. Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity: This measure sums the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the 5-year range from May 2005 to April 2010, as reported by the operator on the Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Underground Gas Storage Report." This data-driven estimate reflects actual operator experience. However, the timing for peaks for different fields need not coincide. Also, actual available maximum capacity for any storage facility may exceed its reported maximum storage level over the last 5 years, and is virtually certain to do so in the case of newly commissioned or expanded facilities. Therefore, this measure provides a conservative indicator of capacity that may understate the amount that can actually be stored.

383

Bi-cell electrical storage battery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A battery is described, comprising: a pressure vessel; an internal impermeable membrane within the pressure vessel dividing the pressure vessel into two compartments hermetically sealed against mass flow between the compartments; storage means for storing electrical energy, the storage means including at least one active plate set in each of the compartments of the pressure vessel.

Lim, Hong S.; Bogner, R.S.

1993-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

384

Underground Energy Storage Program. 1984 annual summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Underground Energy Storage (UES) Program activities during the period from April 1984 through March 1985 are briefly described. Primary activities in seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involved field testing of high-temperature (>100/sup 0/C (212/sup 0/F)) aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) at St. Paul, laboratory studies of geochemical issues associated with high-temperatures ATES, monitoring of chill ATES facilities in Tuscaloosa, and STES linked with solar energy collection. The scope of international activities in STES is briefly discussed.

Kannberg, L.D.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

An Underwater Robotic Network for Monitoring Nuclear Waste Storage Pools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Underwater Robotic Network for Monitoring Nuclear Waste Storage Pools Sarfraz Nawaz1 , Muzammil must be stored for around 60 years in underwater storage pools before permanent disposal. These underwater storage environments must be carefully monitored and controlled to avoid an environmental

Jeavons, Peter

386

Transportation Storage Interface | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Interface Transportation Storage Interface Regulation of Future Extended Storage and Transportation. Transportation Storage Interface More Documents & Publications Status...

387

A Successful Cool Storage Rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Houston Lighting & Power (HL&P) initiated design and development of its commercial cool storage program as part of an integrated resource planning process with a targeted 225 MW of demand reduction through DSM. Houston's extensive commercial air conditioning load, which is highly coincident with HL&P's system peak, provided a large market for cool storage technologies. Initial market research made it very clear that a special cool storage rate was required to successfully market the technology. Development of the rate required an integrated, multidepartment effort and extensive use of DSManager, an integrated resource planning model. An experimental version of the rate was initially implemented as part of the initial phase of the cool storage program. A permanent rate, incorporating lessons learned from the experimental rate, was then developed for the long term implementation of the program. The permanent rate went through a lengthy regulatory approval process which included intervention by a local natural gas distribution company. The end result is a very successful cool storage program with 52 projects and 31 megawatts of demand reduction in the first three and one-half years of program implementation.

Ahrens, A. C.; Sobey, T. M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Final safety analysis report for the irradiated fuels storage facility  

SciTech Connect

A fuel storage facility has been constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant to provide safe storage for spent fuel from two commercial HTGR's, Fort St. Vrain and Peach Bottom, and from the Rover nuclear rocket program. The new facility was built as an addition to the existing fuel storage basin building to make maximum use of existing facilities and equipment. The completed facility provides dry storage for one core of Peach Bottom fuel (804 elements), 1$sup 1$/$sub 2$ cores of Fort St. Vrain fuel (2200 elements), and the irradiated fuel from the 20 reactors in the Rover program. The facility is designed to permit future expansion at a minimum cost should additional storage space for graphite-type fuels be required. A thorough study of the potential hazards associated with the Irradiated Fuels Storage Facility has been completed, indicating that the facility is capable of withstanding all credible combinations of internal accidents and pertinent natural forces, including design basis natural phenomena of a 10,000 year flood, a 175-mph tornado, or an earthquake having a bedrock acceleration of 0.33 g and an amplification factor of 1.3, without a loss of integrity or a significant release of radioactive materials. The design basis accident (DBA) postulated for the facility is a complete loss of cooling air, even though the occurrence of this situation is extremely remote, considering the availability of backup and spare fans and emergency power. The occurrence of the DBA presents neither a radiation nor an activity release hazard. A loss of coolant has no effect upon the fuel or the facility other than resulting in a gradual and constant temperature increase of the stored fuel. The temperature increase is gradual enough that ample time (28 hours minimum) is available for corrective action before an arbitrarily imposed maximum fuel centerline temperature of 1100$sup 0$F is reached. (LK)

Bingham, G.E.; Evans, T.K.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Effect of residual stress on the life prediction of dry storage canisters for used nuclear fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Used nuclear fuel dry storage canisters will likely be tasked with holding used nuclear fuel for a period longer than originally intended. Originally designed for 20 years, the storage time will likely approach 100 years. ...

Black, Bradley P. (Bradley Patrick)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Second thermal storage applications workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On February 7 and 8, 1980, approximately 20 persons representing the management of both the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program (TPS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Division of Central Solar Technology (CST) and the Thermal Energy Storage Program (TES) of the DOE Division of Energy Storage Systems (STOR) met in San Antonio, Texas, for the Second Thermal Storage Applications Workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to review the joint Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Thermal Applications (TESSTA) Program between CST and STOR and to discuss important issues in implementing it. The meeting began with summaries of the seven major elements of the joint program (six receiver-related, storage development elements, and one advanced technology element). Then, a brief description along with supporting data was given of several issues related to the recent joint multiyear program plan (MYPP). Following this session, the participants were divided into three smaller groups representing the program elements that mainly supported large power, small power, and advanced technology activities. During the afternoon of the first day, each group prioritized the program elements through program budgets and discussed the issues defined as well as others of concern. On the morning of the second day, representatives of each group presented the group's results to the other participants. Major conclusions arising from the workshop are presented regarding program and budget. (LEW)

Wyman, C.E.; Larson, R.W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Storage research in industry and universities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review activities at universities and industrial research centers in the storage area, but also briefly mention topics such as processor design, operating systems, databases, and performance analysis. Our starting point is the Berkeley RAID proposal ...

Alexander Thomasian

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Upcoming Natural Gas Storage Facilities.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kentucky Energy Hub Project Orbit Gas Storage Inc KY Leader One Gas Storage Project Peregrine Midstream Partners WY Tricor Ten Section Storage Project

393

Vehicle Technologies Office: Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Energy Storage on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Energy Storage on Twitter Bookmark...

394

Carbon Storage Review 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23,...

395

NREL: Energy Storage - News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage News Below are news stories related to NREL's energy storage research. August 28, 2013 NREL Battery Calorimeters Win R&D 100 Award The award-wining Isothermal...

396

NETL: Carbon Storage Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Carbon Storage Newsletter PDF-571KB has been posted. 08.27.2013 Publications August 2013 Carbon Storage Newsletter PDF-1.1MB has been posted. 08.15.2013 News Ancient...

397

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pumped hydro, compressed air, and battery energy storage areto other energy storage sys tem s suc h as pumped hydro andenergy would be $50/MJ whereas the cost of the pumped hydro

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Energy Storage & Delivery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Storage & Delivery. Summary: Schematic of Membrane Molecular Structure The goal of the project is to develop ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

399

Conventional Storage Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Conventional storage water heaters remain the most popular type of water heating system for homes and buildings.

400

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to research technologies and methodologies that will reduce the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of underground natural gas storage. This effort will include a survey of public information to determine the amount of natural gas lost from underground storage fields, determine the causes of this lost gas, and develop strategies and remedial designs to reduce or stop the gas loss from selected fields. Phase I includes a detailed survey of US natural gas storage reservoirs to determine the actual amount of natural gas annually lost from underground storage fields. These reservoirs will be ranked, the resultant will include the amount of gas and revenue annually lost. The results will be analyzed in conjunction with the type (geologic) of storage reservoirs to determine the significance and impact of the gas loss. A report of the work accomplished will be prepared. The report will include: (1) a summary list by geologic type of US gas storage reservoirs and their annual underground gas storage losses in ft{sup 3}; (2) a rank by geologic classifications as to the amount of gas lost and the resultant lost revenue; and (3) show the level of significance and impact of the losses by geologic type. Concurrently, the amount of storage activity has increased in conjunction with the net increase of natural gas imports as shown on Figure No. 3. Storage is playing an ever increasing importance in supplying the domestic energy requirements.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY S CLEAN ENERGY APPLICATION CENTERS: FISCAL YEAR 2010  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsors a set of Clean Energy Application Centers that promote the development and deployment of clean energy technologies. There are eight regional centers that provide assistance for specific areas of the country plus a separate center operated by the International District Energy Association that provides technical assistance on district energy issues and applications to the regional centers. The original focus of the centers was on combined heat and power (CHP) alone but, beginning in fiscal year 2010, their scope expanded to include district energy systems and waste heat recovery. At that time, the official name of the centers changed from CHP Regional Application Centers (RACs) to Clean Energy Application Centers, and their number was expanded to include the previously-mentioned center focusing on district energy. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has performed two previous studies of RAC activities. The first one examined what the RACs had done each year from the initiation of the program through fiscal year (FY) 2008 and the second one examined RAC activities for the 2009 fiscal year. The most recent study, described in this report, examines what was accomplished in fiscal year 2010, the first year since the RACs expanded their focus and changed their name to Clean Energy Application Centers.

Schweitzer, Martin [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Methodology  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary Prices Exploration & Reserves Production Imports/Exports Pipelines Storage Consumption All Natural Gas Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Consumption Exploration & Reserves Imports/Exports & Pipelines Prices Production Projections Storage All Reports ‹ See All Natural Gas Reports Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity With Data for November 2012 | Release Date: July 24, 2013 | Next Release Date: Spring 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 Go Methodology Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity Estimates: Estimates are based on aggregation of the noncoincident peak levels of working gas inventories at individual storage fields as reported monthly over a 60-month period ending in November 2012 on Form EIA-191, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage

403

Carbon Capture and Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is the long-term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. This includes a range of approaches including soil carbon sequestration (e.g., through no-till farming), terrestrial biomass sequestration (e.g., through planting forests), direct ocean injection of CO{sub 2} either onto the deep seafloor or into the intermediate depths, injection into deep geological formations, or even direct conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonate minerals. Some of these approaches are considered geoengineering (see the appropriate chapter herein). All are considered in the 2005 special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2005). Of the range of options available, geological carbon sequestration (GCS) appears to be the most actionable and economic option for major greenhouse gas reduction in the next 10-30 years. The basis for this interest includes several factors: (1) The potential capacities are large based on initial estimates. Formal estimates for global storage potential vary substantially, but are likely to be between 800 and 3300 Gt of C (3000 and 10,000 Gt of CO{sub 2}), with significant capacity located reasonably near large point sources of the CO{sub 2}. (2) GCS can begin operations with demonstrated technology. Carbon dioxide has been separated from large point sources for nearly 100 years, and has been injected underground for over 30 years (below). (3) Testing of GCS at intermediate scale is feasible. In the US, Canada, and many industrial countries, large CO{sub 2} sources like power plants and refineries lie near prospective storage sites. These plants could be retrofit today and injection begun (while bearing in mind scientific uncertainties and unknowns). Indeed, some have, and three projects described here provide a great deal of information on the operational needs and field implementation of CCS. Part of this interest comes from several key documents written in the last three years that provide information on the status, economics, technology, and impact of CCS. These are cited throughout this text and identified as key references at the end of this manuscript. When coupled with improvements in energy efficiency, renewable energy supplies, and nuclear power, CCS help dramatically reduce current and future emissions (US CCTP 2005, MIT 2007). If CCS is not available as a carbon management option, it will be much more difficult and much more expensive to stabilize atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions. Recent estimates put the cost of carbon abatement without CCS to be 30-80% higher that if CCS were to be available (Edmonds et al. 2004).

Friedmann, S

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

404

Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts: Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage, Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 40 years, cavern storage of LPG's, petrochemicals, such as ethylene and propylene, and other petroleum products has increased dramatically. In 1991, the Gas Processors Association (GPA) lists the total U.S. underground storage capacity for LPG's and related products of approximately 519 million barrels (82.5 million cubic meters) in 1,122 separate caverns. Of this total, 70 are hard rock caverns and the remaining 1,052 are caverns in salt deposits. However, along the eastern seaboard of the U.S. and the Pacific northwest, salt deposits are not available and therefore, storage in hard rocks is required. Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. Competing methods include LNG facilities and remote underground storage combined with pipeline transportation to the area. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. DOE has identified five regions, that have not had favorable geological conditions for underground storage development: New England, Mid-Atlantic (NY/NJ), South Atlantic (DL/MD/VA), South Atlantic (NC/SC/GA), and the Pacific Northwest (WA/OR). PB-KBB reviewed published literature and in-house databases of the geology of these regions to determine suitability of hard rock formations for siting storage caverns, and gas market area storage needs of these regions.

none

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

EA-0820: Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

waste storage facilities (Buildings 7668 and 7669) in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements. Site preparation and construction activities would...

406

Chemical Storage-Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage - Storage - Overview Ali T-Raissi, FSEC Hydrogen Storage Workshop Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois August 14-15, 2002 Hydrogen Fuel - Attributes * H 2 +½ O 2 → H 2 O (1.23 V) * High gravimetric energy density: 27.1 Ah/g, based on LHV of 119.93 kJ/g * 1 wt % = 189.6 Wh/kg (0.7 V; i.e. η FC = 57%) * Li ion cells: 130-150 Wh/kg Chemical Hydrides - Definition * They are considered secondary storage methods in which the storage medium is expended - primary storage methods include reversible systems (e.g. MHs & C-nanostructures), GH 2 & LH 2 storage Chemical Hydrides - Definition (cont.) * The usual chemical hydride system is reaction of a reactant containing H in the "-1" oxidation state (hydride) with a reactant containing H in the "+1" oxidation

407

NETL: Carbon Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage Technologies Carbon Storage (formerly referred to as the "Carbon Sequestration Program") Program Overview For quick navigation of NETL's Carbon Storage Program website, please click on the image. NETL's Carbon Storage Program Fossil fuels are considered the most dependable, cost-effective energy source in the world. The availability of these fuels to provide clean, affordable energy is essential for domestic and global prosperity and security well into the 21st century. However, a balance is needed between energy security and concerns over the impacts of concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere - particularly carbon dioxide (CO2). NETL's Carbon Storage Program is developing a technology portfolio of safe, cost-effective, commercial-scale CO2 capture, storage, and mitigation

408

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage On-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications continues to be one of the most technically challenging barriers to the widespread commercialization of hydrogen-fueled vehicles. The EERE hydrogen storage activity focuses primarily on the applied research and development (R&D) of low-pressure, materials-based technologies to allow for a driving range of more than 300 miles (500 km) while meeting packaging, cost, safety, and performance requirements to be competitive with current vehicles. While automakers have recently demonstrated progress with some prototype vehicles traveling more than 300 miles on a single fill, this driving range must be achievable across different vehicle models and without compromising space, performance, or cost. In addition, hydrogen storage will be needed for both other niche vehicular applications and off-board uses such as for stationary power generation and for hydrogen delivery and refueling infrastructure.

409

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research Search More Search Options Site Map NREL's Energy Storage Project is leading the charge on battery thermal management, modeling, and systems solutions to enhance the performance of fuel cell, hybrid electric, and electric vehicles (FCVs, HEVs, and EVs) for a cleaner, more secure transportation future. NREL's experts work closely with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), industry, and automotive manufacturers to improve energy storage devices, such as battery modules and ultracapacitors, by enhancing their thermal performance and life-cycle cost. Activities also involve modeling and simulation to evaluate technical targets and energy storage parameters, and investigating combinations of energy storage systems to increase vehicle efficiency. Much of this research is conducted at our state-of-the-art energy storage

410

Differences in physical activity and sedentary time in relation to weight in 8-9 year old children.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Burns TL, Torner JC, Willing MC, Warren JJ: Fat- ness, Physical Activity, and Television Viewing in Children during the Adiposity Rebound Period: The Iowa Bone Devel- opment Study. Prev Med 2002, 35:563-571. 12. Rowlands AV, Pilgrim EL, Eston RG...

Purslow, Lisa R; Hill, Claire; Saxton, Jenny; Corder, Kirsten; Wardle, Jane

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

411

General Guidance for Education and Public Outreach Activities Under Sequestration for the Remainder of Fiscal Year 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and technical conferences, science and youth organization and education events, permanent and traveling exhibits existing NASA contracts involving visitor center staff and resources and/or Center/HQ employee time activities where shipping is reimbursed by receiving organizations are approved for the remainder

412

Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, 1985 Fiscal Year, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report presents a brief synopsis and discussion of wildlife activities undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration. The objectives of the program were wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning; and implementation of actions to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by development and operation of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia River Basin. (ACR)

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Distributed Energy Storage Product Reference Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distribution-scale energy storage deployments have increased significantly in the last few years. These deployments have resulted in several lessons learned, and have pointed out the need for standardization and development of common industry agreed approaches to grid-scale energy storage deployments. This report documents the progress in many of these deployments and summarizes the lessons learned. In addition, the report presents a brief update on a PNNL/Sandia-lead multi stakeholder pre-standard ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

414

Vapor sampling of the headspace of radioactive waste storage tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper recants the history of vapor sampling in the headspaces of radioactive waste storage tanks at Hanford. The first two tanks to receive extensive vapor pressure sampling were Tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-C-103. At various times, a gas chromatography, on-line mass spectrometer, solid state hydrogen monitor, FTIR, and radio acoustic ammonia monitor have been installed. The head space gas sampling activities will continue for the next few years. The current goal is to sample the headspace for all the tanks. Some tank headspaces will be sampled several times to see the data vary with time. Other tanks will have continuous monitors installed to provide additional data.

Reynolds, D.A., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

415

Utah Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Utah Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 48.7 19.2...

416

California Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Percent) California Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 5.1...

417

Michigan Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep...

418

Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One LiH molecule contains one hydrogen atom because the valence of a Li ion is +1. One MgH2 molecule contains two hydrogen atoms because the valence of a Mg ion is +2. In metal perhydrides, a molecule could contain more hydrogen atoms than expected based on the metal valance, i.e. LiH1+n and MgH2+n (n is equal to or greater than 1). When n is sufficiently high, there will be plenty of hydrogen storage capacity to meet future requirements. The existence of hydrogen clusters, Hn+ (n = 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15) and transition metal ion-hydrogen clusters, M+(H2)n (n = 1-6), such as Sc(H2)n+, Co(H2)n+, etc., have assisted the development of this concept. Clusters are not stable species. However, their existence stimulates our approach on using electric charges to enhance the hydrogen adsorption in a hydrogen storage system in this study. The experimental and modeling work to verify it are reported here. Experimental work included the generation of cold hydrogen plasma through a microwave approach, synthesis of sorbent materials, design and construction of lab devices, and the determination of hydrogen adsorption capacities on various sorbent materials under various electric field potentials and various temperatures. The results consistently show that electric potential enhances the adsorption of hydrogen on sorbents. NiO, MgO, activated carbon, MOF, and MOF and platinum coated activated carbon are some of the materials studied. Enhancements up to a few hundred percents have been found. In general, the enhancement increases with the electrical potential, the pressure applied, and the temperature lowered. Theoretical modeling of the hydrogen adsorption on the sorbents under the electric potential has been investigated with the density functional theory (DFT) approach. It was found that the interaction energy between hydrogen and sorbent is increased remarkably when an electric field is applied. This increase of binding energy offers a potential solution for DOE when looking for a compromise between chemisorption and physisorption for hydrogen storage. Bonding of chemisorption is too

Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

419

Heat storage duration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Both the amount and duration of heat storage in massive elements of a passive building are investigated. Data taken for one full winter in the Balcomb solar home are analyzed with the aid of sub-system simulation models. Heat storage duration is tallied into one-day intervals. Heat storage location is discussed and related to overall energy flows. The results are interpreted and conclusions drawn.

Balcomb, J.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Annual report to Congress: Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the ninth Annual Report to the Congress describing Department of Energy (Department) activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board). The Board, an independent executive-branch agency established in 1988, provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of energy regarding public health and safety issues at the Department`s defense nuclear facilities. The Board also reviews and evaluates the content and implementation of health and safety standards, as well as other requirements, relating to the design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Department`s defense nuclear facilities. The locations of the major Department facilities are provided. During 1998, Departmental activities resulted in the proposed closure of one Board recommendation. In addition, the Department has completed all implementation plan milestones associated with four other Board recommendations. Two new Board recommendations were received and accepted by the Department in 1998, and two new implementation plans are being developed to address these recommendations. The Department has also made significant progress with a number of broad-based initiatives to improve safety. These include expanded implementation of integrated safety management at field sites, a renewed effort to increase the technical capabilities of the federal workforce, and a revised plan for stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

NONE

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

NETL: Carbon Storage - Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Infrastructure Carbon Storage Infrastructure The Infrastructure Element of DOE's Carbon Storage Program is focused on research and development (R&D) initiatives to advance geologic CO2 storage toward commercialization. DOE determined early in the program's development that addressing CO2 mitigation on a regional level is the most effective way to address differences in geology, climate, population density, infrastructure, and socioeconomic development. This element includes the following efforts designed to support the development of regional infrastructure for carbon capture and storage (CCS). Click on Image to Navigate Infrastructure Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) - This

422

Other Innovative Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Efficiency Electrical Energy Storage Using Reversible Solid Oxide Cells: Scott Barnett1; Gareth Hughes1; Kyle Yakal-Kremski1; Zhan Gao1; 1 Northwestern...

423

NREL: Energy Storage - Webmaster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to reply. Your name: Your email address: Your message: Send Message Printable Version Energy Storage Home About the Project Technology Basics Research & Development Awards &...

424

NREL: Energy Storage - Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Energy Storage team and partners work within a variety of programs that have created test manuals to establish standard...

425

Advanced Energy Storage Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Energy Storage Publications Reports: Advanced Technology Development Program For Lithium-Ion Batteries: Gen 2 Performance Evaluation Final Report Advanced Technology...

426

Storage Sub-committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gaps - Existing R&D and pilot programs - CAES - Controllable pumping - Off shore (energy island, etc) - Gravity systems - Thermal storage Confidential 3 Report to DOE ...

427

Carbon Storage Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel power plants as viable, clean sources of electric power. The program is focused on developing technologies that can achieve 99 percent of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) storage...

428

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-Es HEATS program, short for High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage, seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

H 2 Storage Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 10. Titanium-decorated carbon nanotubes: a potential high-capacity hydrogen storage madium. ... 3. Exohydrogenated single-wall carbon nanotubes. ...

430

Natural Gas Storage Valuation .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, one methodology for natural gas storage valuation is developed and two methodologies are improved. Then all of the three methodologies are applied (more)

Li, Yun

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Does CCS really make a difference for the environment? Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is one of several options, including the use of renewables, nuclear energy, alternative...

432

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Energy International Energy Storage Program Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage Program Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on September 27, 2007 in San Francisco, CA. Eighteen presentations were divided into categories; those related to international energy storage programs are below. Other presentation categories were: Economics - Benefit Studies and Environment Benefit Studies Utility & Commercial Applications of Advanced Energy Storage Systems Power Electronics Innovations in Energy Storage Systems ESS 2007 Peer Review - DOE-CEC Energy Storage Program FY07 Projects - Daniel Borneo, SNL.pdf ESS 2007 Peer Review - Joint NYSERDA-DOE Energy Storage Initiative Projects

433

Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A porous polymer, poly-9,9'-spirobifluorene and its derivatives for storage of H.sub.2 are prepared through a chemical synthesis method. The porous polymers have high specific surface area and narrow pore size distribution. Hydrogen uptake measurements conducted for these polymers determined a higher hydrogen storage capacity at the ambient temperature over that of the benchmark materials. The method of preparing such polymers, includes oxidatively activating solids by CO.sub.2/steam oxidation and supercritical water treatment.

Yu, Luping; Liu, Di-Jia; Yuan, Shengwen; Yang, Junbing

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

434

U.S. Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,581...

435

Annual report to Congress. Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Annual Report to the Congress describes the Department of Energy's activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. During 2000, the Department completed its implementation and proposed closure of one Board recommendation and completed all implementation plan milestones associated with two additional Board recommendations. Also in 2000, the Department formally accepted two new Board recommendations and developed implementation plans in response to those recommendations. The Department also made significant progress with a number of broad-based safety initiatives. These include initial implementation of integrated safety management at field sites and within headquarters program offices, issuance of a nuclear safety rule, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

None

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Assessment of Non-traditional Isotopic Ratios by Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Nuclear Activities: Annual Report Year 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to identify isotopic ratios suitable for analysis via mass spectrometry that distinguish between commercial nuclear reactor fuel cycles, fuel cycles for weapons grade plutonium, and products from nuclear weapons explosions. Methods will also be determined to distinguish the above from medical and industrial radionuclide sources. Mass spectrometry systems will be identified that are suitable for field measurement of such isotopes in an expedient manner. Significant progress has been made with this project within the past year: (1) Isotope production from commercial nuclear fuel cycles and nuclear weapons fuel cycles have been modeled with the ORIGEN and MCNPX codes. (2) MCNPX has been utilized to calculate isotopic inventories produced in a short burst fast bare sphere reactor (to approximate the signature of a nuclear weapon). (3) Isotopic ratios have been identified that are good for distinguishing between commercial and military fuel cycles as well as between nuclear weapons and commercial nuclear fuel cycles. (4) Mass spectrometry systems have been assessed for analysis of the fission products of interest. (5) A short-list of forensic ratios have been identified that are well suited for use in portable mass spectrometry systems.

Biegalski, S; Buchholz, B

2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

437

Blast rips Texas LPG storage site  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that Seminole Pipeline Co. at presstime last week had planned to reopen its 775 mile liquefied petroleum gas pipeline in South Texas by Apr. 12 after a huge explosion devastated the area around a Seminole LPG storage salt dome near Brenham, Tex., forcing the pipeline shutdown. A large fire was still burning at the storage site at presstime last week. The blast - shortly after 7 a.m. Apr. 7 - occurred at a pipeline connecting the main Seminole line with the storage facility and caused shock waves felt 130 miles away. A 5 year old boy who lived in a trailer near Seminole's LPG storage dome was killed, and 20 persons were injured.

1992-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

438

Energy Storage Fuel Cell Vehicle Analysis: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years, hydrogen fuel cell (FC) vehicle technology has received considerable attention as a strategy to decrease oil consumption and reduce harmful emissions. However, the cost, transient response, and cold performance of FC systems may present significant challenges to widespread adoption of the technology for transportation in the next 15 years. The objectives of this effort were to perform energy storage modeling with fuel cell vehicle simulations to quantify the benefits of hybridization and to identify a process for setting the requirements of ES for hydrogen-powered FC vehicles for U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Program.

Markel, T.; Pesaran, A.; Zolot, M.; Sprik, S.; Tataria, H.; Duong, T.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Energy Storage Fuel Cell Vehicle Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years, hydrogen fuel cell (FC) vehicle technology has received considerable attention as a strategy to decrease oil consumption and reduce harmful emissions. However, the cost, transient response, and cold performance of FC systems may present significant challenges to widespread adoption of the technology for transportation in the next 15 years. The objectives of this effort were to perform energy storage modeling with fuel cell vehicle simulations to quantify the benefits of hybridization and to identify a process for setting the requirements of ES for hydrogen-powered FC vehicles for U.S. Department of Energy?s Energy Storage Program.

Pesaran, A.; Markel, T.; Zolot, M.; Sprik, S.; Tataria, H.; Duong, T.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Cool Storage Technology Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is a fact that avoiding load growth is cheaper than constructing new power plants. Cool storage technologies offer one method for strategically stemming the impact of future peak demand growth. This guide provides a comprehensive resource for understanding and evaluating cool storage technologies.

2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Energy storage capacitors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The properties of capacitors are reviewed in general, including dielectrics, induced polarization, and permanent polarization. Then capacitance characteristics are discussed and modelled. These include temperature range, voltage, equivalent series resistance, capacitive reactance, impedance, dissipation factor, humidity and frequency effects, storage temperature and time, and lifetime. Applications of energy storage capacitors are then discussed. (LEW)

Sarjeant, W.J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detecting Things We Cannot See: Learning the Concepts of Control and Detecting Things We Cannot See: Learning the Concepts of Control and Variable in an Experiment Submitted by Anita Brook-Dupree, 1996 TRAC teacher at Fermilab, Teacher, Alternative Middle Years School, Philadelphia, PA. Particle physicists at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois are faced with the problem of detecting the presence of sub-atomic particles they cannot see. During my summer as a TRAC teacher at Fermilab, I tried to think of ways to teach middle school students about things we cannot see. I want to thank my nine-year-old daughter Gia for the idea for the following activity. I was lamenting that I could not come up with ideas of how to relate the work of Fermilab scientists to anything that my students would understand. Then I was reminded by my daughter, that when I brought her to school on the

443

Comparison of cask and drywell storage concepts for a monitored retrievable storage/interim storage system  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy, through its Richland Operations Office is evaluating the feasibility, timing, and cost of providing a federal capability for storing the spent fuel, high-level wastes, and transuranic wastes that DOE may be obligated by law to manage until permanent waste disposal facilities are available. Three concepts utilizing a monitored retrievable storage/interim storage (MRS/IS) facility have been developed and analyzed. The first concept, co-location with a reprocessing plant, has been developed by staff of Allied General Nuclear Services. the second concept, a stand-alone facility, has been developed by staff of the General Atomic Company. The third concept, co-location with a deep geologic repository, has been developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory with the assistance of the Westinghouse Hanford Company and Kaiser Engineers. The objectives of this study are: to develop preconceptual designs for MRS/IS facilities: to examine various issues such as transportation of wastes, licensing of the facilities, and environmental concerns associated with operation of such facilities; and to estimate the life-cycle costs of the facilities when operated in response to a set of scenarios that define the quantities and types of waste requiring storage in specific time periods, generally spanning the years 1989 to 2037. Three scenarios are examined to develop estimates of life-cycle costs for the MRS/IS facilities. In the first scenario, the reprocessing plant is placed in service in 1989 and HLW canisters are stored until a repository is opened in the year 1998. Additional reprocessing plants and repositories are placed in service at intervals as needed to meet the demand. In the second scenario, the reprocessing plants are delayed in starting operations by 10 years, but the repositories open on schedule. In the third scenario, the repositories are delayed 10 years, but the reprocessing plants open on schedule.

Rasmussen, D.E.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

,"Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sourcekey","N5030US2","N5010US2","N5020US2","N5070US2","N5050US2","N5060US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)","U.S. Total Natural Gas in Underground...

445

Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Feb-13 Mar-13 Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 View History All Operators Natural Gas in Storage 6,482,603 6,102,063 6,235,751 6,653,184 7,027,708 7,302,556 1973-2013 Base Gas 4,379,494...

446

Hydrogen-based electrochemical energy storage - Energy ...  

An energy storage device (100) providing high storage densities via hydrogen storage. The device (100) includes a counter electrode (110), a storage ...

447

Design and evaluation of seasonal storage hydrogen peak electricity supply system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The seasonal storage hydrogen peak electricity supply system (SSHPESS) is a gigawatt-year hydrogen storage system which stores excess electricity produced as hydrogen during off-peak periods and consumes the stored hydrogen ...

Oloyede, Isaiah Olanrewaju

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Novel carbons from Illinois coal for natural gas storage. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Goal is to develop a technology for producing microengineered adsorbent carbons from Illinois coal and to evaluate their potential application for storing natural gas for use in emerging low pressure, natural gas vehicles (NGVs). Focus is to design and engineer adsorbents that meet or exceed performance and cost targets established for low-pressure natural gas storage materials. Potentially, about two million tons adsorbent could be consumed in NGVs by year 2000. If successful, the results could lead to use of Illinois coal in a market that could exceed 6 million tons per year. Activated carbon samples were prepared from IBC-106 coal by controlling both the preoxidation temperature and time, and the devolatilization temperature in order to eliminate coal caking. A 4.6 cc pressurized vessel was constructed to measure the Vm/Vs methane adsorption capacity (volume of stored methane at STP per volume storage container). Several IBC-106 derived activated carbons showed methane adsorption capacities comparable to that of a 1000 m{sup 2}/g commercial activated carbon. Results indicated that surface area and micropore volume of activated carbons are important for natural gas storage. Work is in progress to synthesize samples from IBC-106 coal with optimum pore diameter for methane adsorption.

Rostam-Abadi, M.; Sun, Jian; Lizzio, A.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

Corrosion in ICPP fuel storage basins  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant currently stores irradiated nuclear fuel in fuel storage basins. Historically, fuel has been stored for over 30 years. During the 1970`s, an algae problem occurred which required higher levels of chemical treatment of the basin water to maintain visibility for fuel storage operations. This treatment led to higher levels of chlorides than seen previously which cause increased corrosion of aluminum and carbon steel, but has had little effect on the stainless steel in the basin. Corrosion measurements of select aluminum fuel storage cans, aluminum fuel storage buckets, and operational support equipment have been completed. Aluminum has exhibited good general corrosion rates, but has shown accelerated preferential attack in the form of pitting. Hot dipped zinc coated carbon steel, which has been in the basin for approximately 40 years, has shown a general corrosion rate of 4 mpy, and there is evidence of large shallow pits on the surface. A welded Type 304 stainless steel corrosion coupon has shown no attack after 13 years exposure. Galvanic couples between carbon steel welded to Type 304 stainless steel occur in fuel storage yokes exposed to the basin water. These welded couples have shown galvanic attack as well as hot weld cracking and intergranular cracking. The intergranular stress corrosion cracking is attributed to crevices formed during fabrication which allowed chlorides to concentrate.

Dirk, W.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Recombinant electric storage battery  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a recombinant storage battery. It comprises: a plurality of positive plates containing about 2 to 4 percent of antimony based upon the total weight of the alloy and positive active material, and essentially antimony free negative plates in a closed case; a fibrous sheet plate separator between adjacent ones of the plates, and a body of an electrolyte to which the sheet separators are inert absorbed by each of the separators and maintained in contact with each of the adjacent ones of the plates. Each of the separator sheets comprising first fibers which impart to the sheet a given absorbency greater than 90 percent relative to the electrolyte and second fibers which impart to the sheet a different absorbency less than 80 percent relative to the electrolyte. The first and second fibers being present in such proportions that each of the sheet separators has an absorbency with respect to the electrolyte of from 75 to 95 percent and the second fibers being present in such proportions that the battery has a recombination rate adequate to compensate for gassing.

Flicker, R.P.; Fenstermacher, S.

1989-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

451

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Storage Systems Analysis Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Storage Systems Analysis Working Group The Storage Systems Analysis Working Group, launched in March 2005, provides a forum to facilitate research and communication of hydrogen storage-related analysis activities among researchers actively engaged in hydrogen storage systems analyses. The working group includes members from DOE, the national laboratories, industry, and academia. Description Technical Targets Meetings Contacts Description Hydrogen storage is a key enabling technology for the advancement of hydrogen and fuel cell power technologies in transportation, stationary, and portable power applications. One of the most challenging technical barriers known is how to efficiently store hydrogen on-board a vehicle to meet customer expectations of a driving range greater than 300 miles-as well as performance, safety, and cost-without impacting passenger or cargo space. The Department of Energy's hydrogen storage activity is coordinated through the "National Hydrogen Storage Project," with multiple university, industry, and federal laboratory partners focused on research and development of on-board vehicular hydrogen storage technologies. This research also has components applicable to off-board storage of hydrogen for refueling infrastructure and the off-board regeneration of chemical hydrogen carriers applicable to hydrogen delivery.

452

Southern company energy storage study : a study for the DOE energy storage systems program.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates the business case for additional bulk electric energy storage in the Southern Company service territory for the year 2020. The model was used to examine how system operations are likely to change as additional storage is added. The storage resources were allowed to provide energy time shift, regulation reserve, and spinning reserve services. Several storage facilities, including pumped hydroelectric systems, flywheels, and bulk-scale batteries, were considered. These scenarios were tested against a range of sensitivities: three different natural gas price assumptions, a 15% decrease in coal-fired generation capacity, and a high renewable penetration (10% of total generation from wind energy). Only in the elevated natural gas price sensitivities did some of the additional bulk-scale storage projects appear justifiable on the basis of projected production cost savings. Enabling existing peak shaving hydroelectric plants to provide regulation and spinning reserve, however, is likely to provide savings that justify the project cost even at anticipated natural gas price levels. Transmission and distribution applications of storage were not examined in this study. Allowing new storage facilities to serve both bulk grid and transmission/distribution-level needs may provide for increased benefit streams, and thus make a stronger business case for additional storage.

Ellison, James; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Black, Clifton [Southern Company Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL; Jenkins, Kip [Southern Company Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Energy storage systems program report for FY1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Energy Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. The goal of this program is to assist industry in developing cost-effective energy storage systems as a resource option by 2000. Sandia is responsible for the engineering analyses, contracted development, and testing of energy storage systems for stationary applications. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1996.

Butler, P.C.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Energy Storage Systems Program Report for FY99  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Energy Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Office of Power Technologies. The goal of this program is to develop cost-effective electric energy storage systems for many high-value stationary applications in collaboration with academia and industry. Sandia National Laboratories is responsible for the engineering analyses, contracted development, and testing of energy storage components and systems. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1999.

BOYES,JOHN D.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

NREL: Energy Storage - Working with Us  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working with Us Working with Us Partnering with industry, government, and universities is key to developing affordable energy storage technology and moving it into the marketplace and the U.S. economy. In collaboration with our diverse partners, we use thermal management and modeling and analysis from a vehicle systems perspective to improve energy storage devices. Much of our research is conducted at the state-of-the-art energy storage laboratory, in Golden, Colorado. There are a variety of ways to become involved with NREL's Energy Storage activities: NREL's Partnering Agreements Work collaboratively with NREL through a variety of Technology Partnership Agreements. We can help you select the most appropriate agreement for your research project. Gain access to NREL's expertise and specialized research facilities through

456

Radon free storage container and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radon free containment environment for either short or long term storage of radon gas detectors can be provided as active, passive, or combined active and passive embodiments. A passive embodiment includes a resealable vessel containing a basket capable of holding and storing detectors and an activated charcoal adsorbing liner between the basket and the containment vessel wall. An active embodiment includes the resealable vessel of the passive embodiment, and also includes an external activated charcoal filter that circulates the gas inside the vessel through the activated charcoal filter. An embodiment combining the active and passive embodiments is also provided.

Langner, Jr., G. Harold (Mack, CO); Rangel, Mark J. (Austin, CO)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Doylestown, PA); Pecharsky, Vitalij K. (Ames, IA); Ting, Jason (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert (Ames, IA); Bowman, Robert C. (La Mesa, CA); Witham, Charles K. (Pasadena, CA); Fultz, Brent T. (Pasadena, CA); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Arcadia, CA)

2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

458

SERI Solar Energy Storage Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SERI Solar Energy Storage Program provides research on advanced technologies, system analyses, and assessments of thermal energy storage for solar applications in support of the Thermal and Chemical Energy Storage Program of the DOE Division of Energy Storage Systems. Currently, research is in progress on direct contact latent heat storage and thermochemical energy storage and transport. Systems analyses are being performed of thermal energy storage for solar thermal applications, and surveys and assessments are being prepared of thermal energy storage in solar applications.

Copeland, R. J.; Wright, J. D.; Wyman, C. E.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

NREL: Energy Storage - Industry Participants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Participants NREL's energy storage project is funded by the DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office. We work closely with automobile manufacturers, energy storage developers,...

460

Cooling thermal storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article gives some overall guidelines for successful operation of cooling thermal storage installations. Electric utilities use rates and other incentives to encourage thermal storage, which not only reduces their system peaks but also transfers a portion of their load from expensive daytime inefficient peaking plants to less expensive nighttime base load high efficiency coal and nuclear plants. There are hundreds of thermal storage installations around the country. Some of these are very successful; others have failed to achieve all of their predicted benefits because application considerations were not properly addressed.

Gatley, D.P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Collector: storage wall systems  

SciTech Connect

Passive Trombe wall systems require massive masonry walls to minimize large temperature swings and movable night insulation to prevent excessive night heat losses. As a solar energy collection system, Trombe wall systems have low efficiencies because of the nature of the wall and, if auxiliary heat is needed, because of absorption of this heat. Separation of collector and storage functions markedly improves the efficiency. A simple fiberglass absorber can provide high efficiency while phase change storage provides a compact storage unit. The need for movable insulation is obviated.

Boardman, H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Central unresolved issues in thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document explores the frontier of the rapidly expanding field of thermal energy storage, investigates unresolved issues, outlines research aimed at finding solutions, and suggests avenues meriting future research. Issues related to applications include value-based ranking of storage concepts, temperature constraints, consistency of assumptions, nomenclature and taxonomy, and screening criteria for materials. Issues related to technologies include assessing seasonal storage concepts, diurnal coolness storage, selection of hot-side storage concepts for cooling-only systems, phase-change storage in building materials, freeze protection for solar water heating systems, and justification of phase-change storage for active solar space heating.

Swet, C.J.; Baylin, F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

DEMONSTRATION OF LONG-TERM STORAGE CAPABILITY FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN L BASIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy decisions for the ultimate disposition of its inventory of used nuclear fuel presently in, and to be received and stored in, the L Basin at the Savannah River Site, and schedule for project execution have not been established. A logical decision timeframe for the DOE is following the review of the overall options for fuel management and disposition by the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future (BRC). The focus of the BRC review is commercial fuel; however, the BRC has included the DOE fuel inventory in their review. Even though the final report by the BRC to the U.S. Department of Energy is expected in January 2012, no timetable has been established for decisions by the U.S. Department of Energy on alternatives selection. Furthermore, with the imminent lay-up and potential closure of H-canyon, no ready path for fuel disposition would be available, and new technologies and/or facilities would need to be established. The fuel inventory in wet storage in the 3.375 million gallon L Basin is primarily aluminum-clad, aluminum-based fuel of the Materials Test Reactor equivalent design. An inventory of non-aluminum-clad fuel of various designs is also stored in L Basin. Safe storage of fuel in wet storage mandates several high-level 'safety functions' that would be provided by the Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) of the storage system. A large inventory of aluminum-clad, aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel, and other nonaluminum fuel owned by the U.S. Department of Energy is in wet storage in L Basin at the Savannah River Site. An evaluation of the present condition of the fuel, and the Structures, Systems, or Components (SSCs) necessary for its wet storage, and the present programs and storage practices for fuel management have been performed. Activities necessary to validate the technical bases for, and verify the condition of the fuel and the SSCs under long-term wet storage have also been identified. The overall conclusion is that the fuel can be stored in L Basin, meeting general safety functions for fuel storage, for an additional 50 years and possibly beyond contingent upon continuation of existing fuel management activities and several augmented program activities. It is concluded that the technical bases and well-founded technologies have been established to store spent nuclear fuel in the L Basin. Methodologies to evaluate the fuel condition and characteristics, and systems to prepare fuel, isolate damaged fuel, and maintain water quality storage conditions have been established. Basin structural analyses have been performed against present NPH criteria. The aluminum fuel storage experience to date, supported by the understanding of the effects of environmental variables on materials performance, demonstrates that storage systems that minimize degradation and provide full retrievability of the fuel up to and greater than 50 additional years will require maintaining the present management programs, and with the recommended augmented/additional activities in this report.

Sindelar, R.; Deible, R.

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

464

Utility Battery Storage Systems Program report for FY93  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management. In this capacity, Sandia is responsible for the engineering analyses, contract development, and testing of rechargeable batteries and systems for utility-energy-storage applications. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1993.

Butler, P.C.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Natural Gas Year-in-Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

12 'Demonstrated peak working gas capacity' is the sum of the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the prior 5-year period ...

466

ACTIVITIES REPORT FISCAL YEAR 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Phase Transition in Cooperative Agent-based Digital Ant ... a method of structurally constructing models of an ... This figure shows a temporal model of a ...

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

467

NATURAL GAS HYDRATES STORAGE PROJECT PHASE II. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ECONOMIC STUDY  

SciTech Connect

DOE Contract DE-AC26-97FT33203 studied feasibility of utilizing the natural-gas storage property of gas hydrates, so abundantly demonstrated in nature, as an economical industrial process to allow expanded use of the clean-burning fuel in power plants. The laboratory work achieved breakthroughs: (1) Gas hydrates were found to form orders of magnitude faster in an unstirred system with surfactant-water micellar solutions. (2) Hydrate particles were found to self-pack by adsorption on cold metal surfaces from the micellar solutions. (3) Interstitial micellar-water of the packed particles were found to continue forming hydrates. (4) Aluminum surfaces were found to most actively collect the hydrate particles. These laboratory developments were the bases of a conceptual design for a large-scale process where simplification enhances economy. In the design, hydrates form, store, and decompose in the same tank in which gas is pressurized to 550 psi above unstirred micellar solution, chilled by a brine circulating through a bank of aluminum tubing in the tank employing gas-fired refrigeration. Hydrates form on aluminum plates suspended in the chilled micellar solution. A low-grade heat source, such as 110 F water of a power plant, circulates through the tubing bank to release stored gas. The design allows a formation/storage/decomposition cycle in a 24-hour period of 2,254,000 scf of natural gas; the capability of multiple cycles is an advantage of the process. The development costs and the user costs of storing natural gas in a scaled hydrate process were estimated to be competitive with conventional storage means if multiple cycles of hydrate storage were used. If more than 54 cycles/year were used, hydrate development costs per Mscf would be better than development costs of depleted reservoir storage; above 125 cycles/year, hydrate user costs would be lower than user costs of depleted reservoir storage.

R.E. Rogers

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

468

Hydrogen Storage- Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- - Overview George Thomas, Hydrogen Consultant to SNL * and Jay Keller, Hydrogen Program Manager Sandia National Laboratories H 2 Delivery and Infrastructure Workshop May 7-8, 2003 * Most of this presentation has been extracted from George Thomas' invited BES Hydrogen Workshop presentation (May 13-14, 2003) Sandia National Laboratories 4/14/03 2 Sandia National Laboratories From George Thomas, BES workshop 5/13/03 H 2 storage is a critical enabling technology for H 2 use as an energy carrier The low volumetric density of gaseous fuels requires a storage method which compacts the fuel. Hence, hydrogen storage systems are inherently more complex than liquid fuels. Storage technologies are needed in all aspects of hydrogen utilization. production distribution utilization

469

storage technology barriers. The...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summit Power to build a 400-megawatt (MW) coal-fired power plant with carbon capture and storage (CCS) in Britain. The companies will submit the Caledonia Clean Energy Project to...

470

Flywheel Energy Storage Module  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

kWh100 kW Flywheel Energy Storage Module * 100KWh - 18 cost KWh vs. current State of the Art * Bonded Magnetic Bearings on Rim ID * No Shaft Hub (which limits surface speed)...

471

DUF6 Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of depleted UF6 is stored in steel cylinders at three sites in the U.S. Depleted UF6 Inventory and Storage Locations U.S. DOE's inventory of depleted UF6 consists of approximately...

472

Storage Ring Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Source Parameters Storage Ring Parameters Print General Parameters Parameter Value Beam particle electron Beam energy 1.9 GeV (1.0-1.9 GeV possible) Injection energy 1.9 GeV...

473

Structural Integrity Program for INTEC Calcined Solids Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual'. Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities.

Jeffrey Bryant

2008-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

474

Structural Integrity Program for INTEC Calcined Solids Storage Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities.

Bryant, Jeffrey Whealdon; Nenni, Joseph A; Timothy S. Yoder

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ice Bear30 Hybrid Air Conditionerthermal energy storage system150uses smart integrated controls, ice storage, and a dedicated compressor for cooling. The system is designed to provide cooling to interior spaces by circulating refrigerant within an additional evaporator coil added to a standard unitary air conditioner. The Ice Bear 30 is a relatively small size (5 ton), intended for use in residential and light commercial applications. This report describes EPRI tests of the Ice Bear 30, which is manu...

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

476

Analog storage integrated circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks.

Walker, J. T. (Palo Alto, CA); Larsen, R. S. (Menlo Park, CA); Shapiro, S. L. (Palo Alto, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Brief provides an update on the current state of cool thermal energy storage systems (TES) for end-use applications. Because of its ability to shape energy use, TES is strategic technology that allows end-users to reduce their energy costs while simultaneously providing benefits for electric utilities through persistent peak demand reduction and peak shifting. In addition to discussing the concepts of thermal energy storage, the Brief discusses the current state of TES technologies and dr...

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

478

Analog storage integrated circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks. 6 figs.

Walker, J.T.; Larsen, R.S.; Shapiro, S.L.

1989-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

479

Design and simulation of latent heat storage units  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of two years of research and development on passive latent heat storage systems. Analytical models have been developed and extended, and a computer code for simulating the performance of a latent heat storage has been developed. The code is intended to be merged into a larger solar energy system simulation code and used for making realistic system studies. Simulation studies using a code which has a flexible and accurate routine for handling the storage subsystem should lead to the development of better systems than those in which storage is added on after the rest of the system has already been selected and optimized.

Shamsundar, N.; Stein, E.; Rooz, E.; Bascaran, E.; Lee, T.C. (Houston Univ., TX (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Design and simulation of latent heat storage units. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of two years of research and development on passive latent heat storage systems. Analytical models have been developed and extended, and a computer code for simulating the performance of a latent heat storage has been developed. The code is intended to be merged into a larger solar energy system simulation code and used for making realistic system studies. Simulation studies using a code which has a flexible and accurate routine for handling the storage subsystem should lead to the development of better systems than those in which storage is added on after the rest of the system has already been selected and optimized.

Shamsundar, N.; Stein, E.; Rooz, E.; Bascaran, E.; Lee, T.C. [Houston Univ., TX (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year storage activity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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481

Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport News. Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport News. (showing ...

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

482

Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport Portal. Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport Portal. Programs ...

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

483

Options for thermal energy storage in solar-cooling systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The current effort concentrates on design requirements of thermal storage subsystems for active solar cooling systems. The use of thermal storage with respect to absorption, Rankine, and desiccant cooling technologies is examined.

Curran, H.M.; DeVries, J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Measurements for Hydrogen Storage Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements for Hydrogen Storage Materials. Summary: ... Hydrogen is promoted as petroleum replacement in the Hydrogen Economy. ...

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

485

Dry Cask Storage Characterization Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear utilities have developed independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs) as a means of expanding their spent-fuel storage capacity on an interim basis until a geologic repository is available to accept the fuel for permanent storage. This report provides a technical basis for demonstrating the feasibility of extended spent-fuel storage in ISFSIs.

2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

486

Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability and Capacity Concerns in the Modern Grid - EAC Report (December 2008) Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability and Capacity Concerns in the Modern Grid - EAC Report (December 2008) The objectives of this report are to provide the Secretary of Energy with the Electricity Advisory Committee's proposed five-year plan for integrating basic and applied research on energy storage technology applications. This report recommends policies that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) should consider as it develops and implements an energy storage technologies program, as authorized by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability

487

ADAPTING A CERTIFIED SHIPPING PACKAGE FOR STORAGE APPLICATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For years shipping packages have been used to store radioactive materials at many DOE sites. Recently, the K-Area Material Storage facility at the Savannah River Site became interested in and approved the Model 9977 Shipping Package for use as a storage package. In order to allow the 9977 to be stored in the facility, there were a number of evaluations and modifications that were required. There were additional suggested modifications to improve the performance of the package as a storage container that were discussed but not incorporated in the design that is currently in use. This paper will discuss the design being utilized for shipping and storage, suggested modifications that have improved the storage configuration but were not used, as well as modifications that have merit for future adaptations for both the 9977 and for other shipping packages to be used as storage packages.

Loftin, B.; Abramczyk, G.

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

488

Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology: A Summary Report of Activities Completed at the National Center for Hydrogen Technology - Year 6  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology? (NCHT?) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research on hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT?s inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding for hydrogen-related projects ($24 million for projects in the NCHT, which includes federal and corporate partner development funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT Program?s nine activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan that refers to realistic testing of technologies at adequate scale, process intensification, and contaminant control. A number of projects have been completed that range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in Year 6 of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

Holmes, Michael

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

489

Thermochemical seasonal energy storage for solar thermal power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the many years that thermochemical energy storage has been under investigation, the concept has been plagued with two persistent problems: high capital cost and poor efficiency. Literally hundreds of chemical reactions have also been carried out. For short-term storage, thermochemical systems suffer in comparison with highly efficient sensible storage media such as molten salts. Long-term storage, on the other hand, is not cost-competitive with systems employing fossil backup power. Thermochemical storage will play a significant role in solar thermal electric conversion only under highly select circumstances. The portion of electric demand served by solar plants must be sufficiently high that the balance of the grid cannot fully supplant seasonal storage. High fossil fuel costs must preclude the use of gas turbines for backup power. Significant breakthroughs in the development of one or more chemical reaction systems must occur. Ingeniously integrated systems must be employed to enhance the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of thermochemical storage. A promising integration scheme discussed herein consists of using sensible storage for diurnal cycling in parallel with thermochemical seasonal storage. Under the most favorable circumstances, thermochemical storage can be expected to play a small but perhaps vital role in supplying baseload energy from solar thermal electric conversion plants.

Barnhart, J.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

The necessity for permanence : making a nuclear waste storage facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy is proposing to build a nuclear waste storage facility in southern Nevada. This facility will be designed to last 10,000 years. It must prevent the waste from contaminating the ...

Stupay, Robert Irving

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Utah Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 46,944 46,944...

492

Utah Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 12,862 9,993...

493

American Indian Complex to Cool Off Using Ice Storage System...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

main complex will use an ice storage system estimated to save 644,000 kilowatt hours of electricity a year. "Certainly it was a choice to save money in the long run," says Nathan...

494

Ohio Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 100,467...

495

Keeping the Lights on: Smart Storage for a Smart Grid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grade AEP Community Energy Storage (CES) Operating temperature: - 30 C to +50 C Humidity: 10 % - 100 % Building Code: Zone 4 No maintenance first 5 years 28 kWh < 500 kg No...

496

Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 16,578 28,110 27,940 28,203...

497

Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 17,902 17,902 83,592...

498

Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 -380...

499

Colorado Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 39,062 39,062...

500

Illinois Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 571,959 571,959...