Sample records for year format large

  1. Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries...

  2. Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL 2012 DOE...

  3. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Diatom assemblages promote ice formation in large

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Diatom assemblages promote ice formation in large lakes NA D'souza1,3 , Y evidence for the directed formation of ice by planktonic communities dominated by filamentous diatoms sampled from the ice-covered Laurentian Great Lakes. We hypothesize that ice formation promotes attachment

  4. SIMULATING LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE FORMATION FOR BSI POWER SPECTRA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Mueller

    1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A double inflationary model provides perturbation spectra with enhanced power at large scales (Broken Scale Invariant perturbations -- BSI), leading to a promising scenario for the formation of cosmic structures. We describe a series of high-resolution PM simulations with a model for the thermodynamic evolution of baryons in which we are capable of identifying 'galaxy' halos with a reasonable mass spectrum and following the genesis of large and super-large scale structures. The power spectra and correlation functions of 'galaxies' are compared with reconstructed power spectra of the CfA catalogue and the correlation functions of the Las Campanas Deep Redshift Survey.

  5. Large-scale star formation in the Magellanic Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochen M. Braun

    2001-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this contribution I will present the current status of our project of stellar population analyses and spatial information of both Magellanic Clouds (MCs). The Magellanic Clouds - especially the LMC with its large size and small depth (<300pc) - are suitable laboratories and testing ground for theoretical models of star formation. With distance moduli of 18.5 and 18.9mag for the LMC and SMC, respectively, and small galactic extinction, their stellar content can be studied in detail from the most massive stars of the youngest populations (<25Myr) connected to H-alpha emission down to the low mass end of about 1/10 of a solar mass. Based on broad-band photometry (U,B,V) I present results for the supergiant shell (SGS) SMC1, some regions at the LMC east side incl. LMC2 showing different overlapping young populations and the region around N171 with its large and varying colour excess, and LMC4. This best studied SGS shows a coeval population aged about 12Myr with little age spread and no correlation to distance from LMC4's centre. I will show that the available data are not compatible with many of the proposed scenarios like SSPSF or a central trigger (like a cluster or GRB), while a large-scale trigger like the bow-shock of the rotating LMC can do the job.

  6. Fermi Large Area Telescope Operations: Progress Over 4 Years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron, Robert A.; /SLAC

    2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was launched into orbit in June 2008, and is conducting a multi-year gamma-ray all-sky survey, using the main instrument on Fermi, the Large Area Telescope (LAT). Fermi began its science mission in August 2008, and has now been operating for almost 4 years. The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory hosts the LAT Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC), which supports the operation of the LAT in conjunction with the Mission Operations Center (MOC) and the Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC), both at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The LAT has a continuous output data rate of about 1.5 Mbits per second, and data from the LAT are stored on Fermi and transmitted to the ground through TDRS and the MOC to the ISOC about 10 times per day. Several hundred computers at SLAC are used to process LAT data to perform event reconstruction, and gamma-ray photon data are subsequently delivered to the FSSC for public release with a few hours of being detected by the LAT. We summarize the current status of the LAT, and the evolution of the data processing and monitoring performed by the ISOC during the first 4 years of the Fermi mission, together with future plans for further changes to detected event data processing and instrument operations and monitoring.

  7. "Sabiha Gök?cen's 80-year-old secret" : Kemalist nation formation and the Ottoman Armenians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulgen, Fatma

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    year old secret? 2.1. Introduction………………………………………………….Tree Uprooted by a 60-year old Secret. ? The New York Times,Gökçen‘s 80-Year-Old Secret?: Kemalist Nation Formation and

  8. Modeling of Nonuniform Degradation in Large-Format Li-ion Batteries (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Kim, G. H.; Pesaran, A.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Study of impacts of large-format cell design features on battery useful life to improve battery engineering models, including both realistic geometry and physics.

  9. Addressing the Impact of Temperature Extremes on Large Format Li-Ion Batteries for Vehicle Applications (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G. H.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses the effects of temperature on large format lithium-ion batteries in electric drive vehicles.

  10. A novel lithography technique for formation of large areas of uniform nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    such as plasmonics, sensors, storage devices, solar cells, nano-filtration and artificial kidneys require applications such as surface plasmonics[1] , data storage[2] , optoelectronic devices[3] , and nanoA novel lithography technique for formation of large areas of uniform nanostructures Wei Wu

  11. Formation of large-scale structures by turbulence in rotating planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constantinou, Navid C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a newly developed theory for the formation and maintenance of eddy-driven jets in planetary turbulence. The novelty is that jet formation and maintenance is studied as a dynamics of the statistics of the flow rather than a dynamics of individual realizations. This is pursued using Stochastic Structural Stability Theory (S3T) which studies the closed dynamics of the first two cumulants of the full statistical state dynamics of the flow after neglecting or parameterizing third and higher-order cumulants. With this statistical closure large-scale structure formation is studied in barotropic turbulence on a $\\beta$-plane. It is demonstrated that at analytically predicted critical parameter values the homogeneous turbulent state undergoes a bifurcation becoming inhomogeneous with the emergence of large-scale zonal and/or non-zonal flows. The mechanisms by which the turbulent Reynolds stresses organize to reinforce infinitesimal mean flow inhomogeneities, thus leading to this statistical state ...

  12. EXTENDED STAR FORMATION IN THE INTERMEDIATE-AGE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD STAR CLUSTER NGC 2209

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, Stefan C.; Mackey, A. Dougal; Da Costa, Gary S. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of the 1 Gyr old star cluster NGC 2209 in the Large Magellanic Cloud made with the GMOS imager on the Gemini South Telescope. These observations show that the cluster exhibits a main-sequence turnoff that spans a broader range in luminosity than can be explained by a single-aged stellar population. This places NGC 2209 amongst a growing list of intermediate-age (1-3 Gyr) clusters that show evidence for extended or multiple epochs of star formation of between 50 and 460 Myr in extent. The extended main-sequence turnoff observed in NGC 2209 is a confirmation of the prediction in Keller et al. made on the basis of the cluster's large core radius. We propose that secondary star formation is a defining feature of the evolution of massive star clusters. Dissolution of lower mass clusters through evaporation results in only clusters that have experienced secondary star formation surviving for a Hubble time, thus providing a natural connection between the extended main-sequence turnoff phenomenon and the ubiquitous light-element abundance ranges seen in the ancient Galactic globular clusters.

  13. Large-Scale Structure Formation in the Quasi-linear Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Bernardeau

    1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The understanding of the large-scale structure formation requires the resolution of coupled nonlinear equations describing the cosmic density and velocity fields. This is a complicated problem that, for the last decade, has been essentially addressed with N-body simulations. There is however a regime, the so-called quasi-linear regime, for which the relative density fluctuations are on average below unity. It is then possible to apply Perturbation Theory techniques where the perturbation expansions are made with respect to the initial fluctuations. I review here the major results that have been obtained in this regime.

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by XALT Energy LLC at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about development of large format...

  15. Optimized Operating Range for Large-Format LiFePO4/Graphite Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Jiuchun; Shi, Wei; Zheng, Jianming; Zuo, Pengjian; Xiao, Jie; Chen, Xilin; Xu, Wu; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    e investigated the long-term cycling performance of large format 20Ah LiFePO4/graphite batteries when they are cycled in various state-of-charge (SOC) ranges. It is found that batteries cycled in the medium SOC range (ca. 20~80% SOC) exhibit superior cycling stability than batteries cycled at both ends (0-20% or 80-100%) of the SOC even though the capcity utilized in the medium SOC range is three times as large as those cycled at both ends of the SOC. Several non-destructive techniques, including a voltage interruption approach, model-based parameter identification, electrode impedance spectra analysis, ?Q/?V analysis, and entropy change test, were used to investigate the performance of LiFePO4/graphite batteries within different SOC ranges. The results reveal that batteries at the ends of SOC exhibit much higher polarization impedance than those at the medium SOC range. These results can be attributed to the significant structural change of cathode and anode materials as revealed by the large entropy change within these ranges. The direct correlation between the polarization impedance and the cycle life of the batteries provides an effective methodology for battery management systems to control and prolong the cycle life of LiFePO4/graphite and other batteries.

  16. A Formation Behavior for Large-Scale Micro-Robot Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudenhoeffer, Donald Dean; Jones, Michael Paul

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Micro-robots will soon be available for deployment by the thousands. Consequently, controlling and coordinating a force this large to accomplish a prescribed task is of great interest. This paper describes a flexible architecture for modeling thousands of autonomous agents simultaneously. The agents’ behavior is based on a subsumption architecture in which individual behaviors are prioritized with respect to all others. The primary behavior explored in this work is a group formation behavior based on social potential fields (Reif and Wang 1999). This paper extends the social potential field model by introducing a neutral zone within which other behaviors may exhibit themselves. Previous work with social potential fields has been restricted to models of “perfect” autonomous agents. The paper evaluates the effect of social potential fields in the presence of agent death (failure) and imperfect sensory input.

  17. Formation of Large Polysulfide Complexes during the Lithium-Sulfur Battery Discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Bin [Vanderbilt University, Nashville; Alhassan, Saeed M. [The Petroleum Institute; Pantelides, Sokrates T [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfur cathodes have much larger capacities than transition-metal-oxide cathodes used in commercial lithium-ion batteries but suffer from unsatisfactory capacity retention and long-term cyclability. Capacity degradation originates from soluble lithium polysulfides gradually diffusing into the electrolyte. Understanding of the formation and dynamics of soluble polysulfides during the discharging process at the atomic level remains elusive, which limits further development of lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. Here we report first-principles molecular dynamics simulations and density functional calculations, through which the discharging products of Li-S batteries are studied. We find that, in addition to simple Li2Sn (1 n 8) clusters generated from single cyclooctasulfur (S8) rings, large Li-S clusters form by collectively coupling several different rings to minimize the total energy. At high lithium concentration, a Li-S network forms at the sulfur surfaces. The results can explain the formation of the soluble Li-S complex, such as Li2S8, Li2S6, and Li2S4, and the insoluble Li2S2 and Li2S structures. In addition, we show that the presence of oxygen impurities in graphene, particularly oxygen atoms bonded to vacancies and edges, may stabilize the lithium polysulfides that may otherwise diffuse into the electrolyte.

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  11. Three-Dimensional Thermal-Electrochemical Coupled Model for Spirally Wound Large-Format Lithium-Ion Batteries (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K. J.; Smith K.; Kim, G. H.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses the behavior of spirally wound large-format Li-ion batteries with respect to their design. The objectives of the study include developing thermal and electrochemical models resolving 3-dimensional spirally wound structures of cylindrical cells, understanding the mechanisms and interactions between local electrochemical reactions and macroscopic heat and electron transfers, and developing a tool and methodology to support macroscopic designs of cylindrical Li-ion battery cells.

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  4. Characterization of Pliocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles, for Large-Scale Geologic Storage of CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruno, Michael

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Geomechanics Technologies has completed a detailed characterization study of the Wilmington Graben offshore Southern California area for large-scale CO2 storage. This effort has included: an evaluation of existing wells in both State and Federal waters, field acquisition of about 175 km (109 mi) of new seismic data, new well drilling, development of integrated 3D geologic, geomechanics, and fluid flow models for the area. The geologic analysis indicates that more than 796 MMt of storage capacity is available within the Pliocene and Miocene formations in the Graben for midrange geologic estimates (P50). Geomechanical analyses indicate that injection can be conducted without significant risk for surface deformation, induced stresses or fault activation. Numerical analysis of fluid migration indicates that injection into the Pliocene Formation at depths of 1525 m (5000 ft) would lead to undesirable vertical migration of the CO2 plume. Recent well drilling however, indicates that deeper sand is present at depths exceeding 2135 m (7000 ft), which could be viable for large volume storage. For vertical containment, injection would need to be limited to about 250,000 metric tons per year per well, would need to be placed at depths greater than 7000ft, and would need to be placed in new wells located at least 1 mile from any existing offset wells. As a practical matter, this would likely limit storage operations in the Wilmington Graben to about 1 million tons per year or less. A quantitative risk analysis for the Wilmington Graben indicate that such large scale CO2 storage in the area would represent higher risk than other similar size projects in the US and overseas.

  5. ForPeerReview Channel formation by flow stripping: large-scale scour features along the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Gary

    East Channel and their relation to sediment waves Journal: Sedimentology Manuscript ID: SED-2005-OM-049 1 of 63 Sedimentology #12;ForPeerReview Monterey East ms -- 2005 June 13, 2005 1 Channel formation it Page 2 of 63Sedimentology 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR 2012

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR42

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR424

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR4247

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR42478

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861 YEAR

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861 YEAR40

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861 YEAR4096

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111 YEAR

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111 YEAR17

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008748611196 YEAR

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 2014 Males

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 2014 Males16

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 2014

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 20144

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 20144707

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 201447072540

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 563

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 56378

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 5637831

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 56378318

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 28

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 280

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 2801

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 280192

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733

  5. Year

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand Motor444 U.S.Working and.

  6. Large

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,sand CERNLand and AssetLandscapingLarge

  7. Large Area Microcorrals and Cavity Formation on Cantilevers using a Focused Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Britt, David W.

    2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We utilize focused ion beam (FIB) to explore various sputtering parameters to form large area microcorrals and cavities on cantilevers. Microcorrals were rapidly created by modifying ion beam blur and overlaps. Modification in FIB sputtering parameters affects the periodicity and shape of corral microstructure. Cantilever deflections show ion beam amorphization effects as a function of sputtered area and cantilever base cavities with or without side walls. The FIB sputtering parameters address a method for rapid creation of a cantilever tensiometer with integrated fluid storage and delivery.

  8. Large eddy simulation of soot formation in a turbulent non-premixed jet flame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Asrag, Hossam [Center For Turbulence Research, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Menon, Suresh [School of Aerospace Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently developed subgrid model for soot dynamics [H. El-Asrag, T. Lu, C.K. Law, S. Menon, Combust. Flame 150 (2007) 108-126] is used to study the soot formation in a non-premixed turbulent flame. The model allows coupling between reaction, diffusion and soot (including soot diffusion and thermophoretic forces) processes in the subgrid domain without requiring ad hoc filtering or model parameter adjustments. The combined model includes the entire process, from the initial phase, when the soot nucleus diameter is much smaller than the mean free path, to the final phase, after coagulation and aggregation, where it can be considered in the continuum regime. A relatively detailed but reduced kinetics for ethylene-air is used to simulate an experimentally studied non-premixed ethylene/air jet diffusion flame. Acetylene is used as a soot precursor species. The soot volume fraction order of magnitude, the location of its maxima, and the soot particle size distribution are all captured reasonably. Along the centerline, an initial region dominated by nucleation and surface growth is established followed by an oxidation region. The diffusion effect is found to be most important in the nucleation regime, while the thermophoretic forces become more influential downstream of the potential core in the oxidation zone. The particle size distribution shows a log-normal distribution in the nucleation region, and a more Gaussian like distribution further downstream. Limitations of the current approach and possible solution strategies are also discussed. (author)

  9. LARGE AREA SURVEY FOR z = 7 GALAXIES IN SDF AND GOODS-N: IMPLICATIONS FOR GALAXY FORMATION AND COSMIC REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ouchi, Masami [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Mobasher, Bahram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Ono, Yoshiaki; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Okamura, Sadanori [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ferguson, Henry C.; Fall, S. Michael [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Kashikawa, Nobunari; Morokuma, Tomoki [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Dickinson, Mark [NOAO, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Giavalisco, Mauro [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Ohta, Kouji, E-mail: ouchi@obs.carnegiescience.ed [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of our large area survey for z'-band dropout galaxies at z = 7 in a 1568 arcmin{sup 2} sky area covering the SDF and GOODS-N fields. Combining our ultra-deep Subaru/Suprime-Cam z'- and y-band (lambda{sub eff} = 1 mum) images with legacy data of Subaru and Hubble Space Telescope, we have identified 22 bright z-dropout galaxies down to y = 26, one of which has a spectroscopic redshift of z = 6.96 determined from Lyalpha emission. The z = 7 luminosity function yields the best-fit Schechter parameters of phi* = 0.69{sup +2.62}{sub -0.55} x 10{sup -3} Mpc{sup -3}, M*{sub UV} = -20.10 +- 0.76 mag, and alpha = -1.72 +- 0.65, and indicates a decrease from z = 6 at a >95% confidence level. This decrease is beyond the cosmic variance in our two fields, which is estimated to be a factor of approx<2. We have found that the cosmic star formation rate density drops from the peak at z = 2-3 to z = 7 roughly by a factor of approx10 but not larger than approx100. A comparison with the reionization models suggests either that the universe could not be totally ionized by only galaxies at z = 7, or more likely that properties of galaxies at z = 7 are different from those at low redshifts having, e.g., a larger escape fraction (approx>0.2), a lower metallicity, and/or a flatter initial mass function. Our SDF z-dropout galaxies appear to form 60 Mpc long filamentary structures, and the z = 6.96 galaxy with Lyalpha emission is located at the center of an overdense region consisting of four UV bright dropout candidates, which might suggest an existence of a well-developed ionized bubble at z = 7.

  10. An Empirical Analysis of Factors That Influence the First Year to Second Year Retention of Students at One Large, Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkerson, Steven Lamar

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    -semester residence, entry-college, semester credit hours attempted, academic course difficulty, participation in Supplemental Instruction, and enrollment in a first-year seminar course. Both descriptive and univariate statistics were used to describe the sample...

  11. PROJECT DESCRIPTION In recent years there has been a rapid proliferation of large interconnected and spatially dis-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schenato, Luca

    , communication and computation capabilities are added to these networks, resulting in smart-grids with a large

  12. An Empirical Analysis of Factors That Influence the First Year to Second Year Retention of Students at One Large, Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkerson, Steven Lamar

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    -year seminar course. Both iv descriptive and univariate statistics were used to describe the sample population, as well as the similarities and differences found to exist among the seven Astin types. Three separate logistic regression analyses organized... ............................................................ 85 Preliminary Data Analysis.................................................... 86 Descriptive and Univariate Statistics for Astin Types........... 92 Logistic Regression Analyses.............................................. 112...

  13. NIHAO project I: Reproducing the inefficiency of galaxy formation across cosmic time with a large sample of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Liang; Stinson, Gregory S; Macciò, Andrea V; Penzo, Camilla; Kang, Xi; Keller, Ben W; Wadsley, James

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce project NIHAO (Numerical Investigation of a Hundred Astrophysical Objects), a set of 100 cosmological zoom-in hydrodynamical simulations performed using the GASOLINE code, with an improved implementation of the SPH algorithm. The haloes in our study range from dwarf to Milky Way masses, and represent an unbiased sampling of merger histories, concentrations and spin parameters. The particle masses and force softenings are chosen to resolve the mass profile to below 1% of the virial radius at all masses, ensuring that galaxy half-light radii are well resolved. Using the same treatment of star formation and stellar feedback for every object, the simulated galaxies reproduce the observed inefficiency of galaxy formation across cosmic time as expressed through the stellar mass vs halo mass relation, and the star formation rate vs stellar mass relation. We thus conclude that stellar feedback is the chief piece of physics required to limit the efficiency of star formation in galaxies less massive than t...

  14. Figure 3. Area of timberland by stand-size class (based on small, medium, and large trees) and year.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of growing- stock trees (1,000 ft3/year) 13,626 30.7 -51.6 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 Maple/beech/birch Oak/hickory Aspen/birch Spruce/fir Elm/ash/cottonwood White/red/jack pine Oak/pine Forest Land

  15. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Lee, E-mail: leeli@mail.hust.edu.cn; Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electric and Electronic Engineering, HuaZhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  16. Separation and Capture of CO2 from Large Stationary Sources and Sequestration in Geological Formations: A Summary of the 2003 Critical Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, C.M.; Strazisar, B.R.; Granite, E.J.; Hoffman, J.S.; Pennline, H.W.

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere, and the resulting global warming effect, is a major air quality concern. CO2 is the most abundant greenhouse gas emitted by fossil-fuel combustion for power generation, transportation, and heating. Reducing worldwide emissions of CO2 will require many mitigation measures, including reductions in energy consumption, more efficient use of available energy, renewable energy sources, and carbon sequestration. The feasibility of capturing CO2 from large point sources and subsequent geological sequestration is the subject of this year’s Critical Review.

  17. High-mass star formation triggered by collision between CO filaments in N159 West in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukui, Yasuo; Tokuda, Kazuki; Morioka, Yuuki; Onishi, Toshikazu; Torii, Kazufumi; Ohama, Akio; Nayak, Omnarayani; Meixner, Margaret; Sewilo, Marta; Indebetouw, Remy; Kawamura, Akiko; Saigo, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Tachihara, Kengo; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Madden, Suzanna; Galametz, Maud; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Mizuno, Norikazu; Chen, Rosie

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have carried out 13CO (J=2-1) observations of the active star-forming region N159 West in the LMC with ALMA. We have found that the CO distribution at a sub-pc scale is highly elongated with a small width. These elongated clouds called "filaments" show straight or curved distributions with a typical width of 0.5-1.0 pc and a length of 5-10 pc. All the known infrared YSOs are located toward the filaments. We have found broad CO wings of two molecular outflows toward young high-mass stars in N159W-N and N159W-S, whose dynamical timescale is ~10^4 yrs. This is the first discovery of protostellar outflow in external galaxies. For N159W-S which is located toward an intersection of two filaments we set up a hypothesis that the two filaments collided with each other ~10^5 yrs ago and triggered formation of the high-mass star having ~37Mo. The colliding clouds show significant enhancement in linewidth in the intersection, suggesting excitation of turbulence in the shocked interface layer between them as is consist...

  18. The Lyman-? forest in three dimensions: measurements of large scale flux correlations from BOSS 1st-year data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slosar, Anže [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Blgd 510, Upton NY 11375 (United States); Font-Ribera, Andreu [Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Fac. Ciències, torre C5 parell 2, Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Pieri, Matthew M. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Rich, James; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Charlassier, Romain [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Aubourg, Éric; Busca, Nicolas; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe [APC, Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA, Observatoire de Paris, 10, rue A. Domon and L. Duquet, Paris (France); Brinkmann, Jon [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Carithers, Bill; Cortês, Marina; Ho, Shirley; McDonald, Patrick [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Croft, Rupert [Bruce and Astrid McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Dawson, Kyle S. [University of Utah, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, 115 S 1400 E, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Eisenstein, Daniel [Harvard College Observatory, 60 Garden St., Cambridge MA 02138 (United States); Lee, Khee-Gan; Lupton, Robert [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Medolin, Bumbarija, E-mail: anze@bnl.gov [104-20 Queens Blvd 17A, Forest Hills, NY 11375 (United States); and others

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a sample of approximately 14,000 z > 2.1 quasars observed in the first year of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), we measure the three-dimensional correlation function of absorption in the Lyman-? forest. The angle-averaged correlation function of transmitted flux (F = e{sup ??}) is securely detected out to comoving separations of 60 h{sup ?1}Mpc, the first detection of flux correlations across widely separated sightlines. A quadrupole distortion of the redshift-space correlation function by peculiar velocities, the signature of the gravitational instability origin of structure in the Lyman-? forest, is also detected at high significance. We obtain a good fit to the data assuming linear theory redshift-space distortion and linear bias of the transmitted flux, relative to the matter fluctuations of a standard ?CDM cosmological model (inflationary cold dark matter with a cosmological constant). At 95% confidence, we find a linear bias parameter 0.16 < b < 0.24 and redshift-distortion parameter 0.44 < ? < 1.20, at central redshift z = 2.25, with a well constrained combination b(1+?) = 0.336±0.012. The errors on ? are asymmetric, with ? = 0 excluded at over 5? confidence level. The value of ? is somewhat low compared to theoretical predictions, and our tests on synthetic data suggest that it is depressed (relative to expectations for the Lyman-? forest alone) by the presence of high column density systems and metal line absorption. These results set the stage for cosmological parameter determinations from three-dimensional structure in the Lyman-? forest, including anticipated constraints on dark energy from baryon acoustic oscillations.

  19. Reduced 30% scanning time 3D multiplexer integrated circuit applied to large array format 20KHZ frequency inkjet print heads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, J -C

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhancement of the number and array density of nozzles within an inkjet head chip is one of the keys to raise the printing speed and printing resolutions. However, traditional 2D architecture of driving circuits can not meet the requirement for high scanning speed and low data accessing points when nozzle numbers greater than 1000. This paper proposes a novel architecture of high-selection-speed three-dimensional data registration for inkjet applications. With the configuration of three-dimensional data registration, the number of data accessing points as well as the scanning lines can be greatly reduced for large array inkjet printheads with nozzles numbering more than 1000. This IC (Integrated Circuit) architecture involves three-dimensional multiplexing with the provision of a gating transistor for each ink firing resistor, where ink firing resistors are triggered only by the selection of their associated gating transistors. Three signals: selection (S), address (A), and power supply (P), are employed toge...

  20. Large Area Survey for z=7 Galaxies in SDF and GOODS-N: Implications for Galaxy Formation and Cosmic Reionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouchi, Masami; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Ferguson, Henry C; Fall, Michael S; Ono, Yoshiaki; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Morokuma, Tomoki; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Okamura, Sadanori; Dickinson, Mark; Giavalisco, Mauro; Ohta, Kouji

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of our large-area survey for z'-band dropout galaxies at z=7 in a 1568 arcmin^2 sky area covering the SDF and GOODS-N fields. Combining our ultra-deep Subaru/Suprime-Cam z'- and y-band (lambda_eff=1um) images with legacy data of Subaru and HST, we have identified 22 bright z-dropout galaxies down to y=26, one of which has a spectroscopic redshift of z=6.96 determined from Lya emission. The z=7 luminosity function (LF) yields the best-fit Schechter parameters of phi*=1.1 +2.8/-0.8 x10^(-3) Mpc^(-3), Muv*=-19.9 +/-0.7 mag, and alpha=-1.7 +/-1.3, and indicates a decrease from z=6 at the =~ 95% confidence level. This decrease is beyond the cosmic variance in our two fields, which is estimated to be a factor of ~ 3 but not larger than ~100. A comparison with the reionization models suggests either that the Universe could not be totally ionized by only galaxies at z=7, or more likely that properties of galaxies at z=7 are different from those at low redshifts having, e.g., a larger escape fractio...

  1. Star formation in the cluster CLG0218.3-0510 at z=1.62 and its large-scale environment: the infrared perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Joana S; Tanaka, Masayuki; Valtchanov, Ivan; Saintonge, Amelie; Dickinson, Mark; Foucaud, Sebastien; Kodama, Tadayuki; Rawle, Tim D; Tadaki, Ken-ichi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The galaxy cluster CLG0218.3-0510 at z=1.62 is one of the most distant galaxy clusters known, with a rich muti-wavelength data set that confirms a mature galaxy population already in place. Using very deep, wide area (20x20 Mpc) imaging by Spitzer/MIPS at 24um, in conjunction with Herschel 5-band imaging from 100-500um, we investigate the dust-obscured, star-formation properties in the cluster and its associated large scale environment. Our galaxy sample of 693 galaxies at z=1.62 detected at 24um (10 spectroscopic and 683 photo-z) includes both cluster galaxies (i.e. within r <1 Mpc projected clustercentric radius) and field galaxies, defined as the region beyond a radius of 3 Mpc. The star-formation rates (SFRs) derived from the measured infrared luminosity range from 18 to 2500 Ms/yr, with a median of 55 Ms/yr, over the entire radial range (10 Mpc). The cluster brightest FIR galaxy, taken as the centre of the galaxy system, is vigorously forming stars at a rate of 256$\\pm$70 Ms/yr, and the total cluster ...

  2. EDUCATOR'S GUIDE The large format film Hurricane on the Bayou is appropriate for all intermediate gradesHurricane on the Bayou is appropriate for all intermediate gradesHurricane on the Bayou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    EDUCATOR'S GUIDE #12;The large format film Hurricane on the Bayou is appropriate for all intermediate gradesHurricane on the Bayou is appropriate for all intermediate gradesHurricane on the Bayou (4 for young children. Hurricane on the Bayou Produced and distributed by MacGillivray Freeman Films Executive

  3. INTRODUCTION The Louisiana Department ofTransportation (LADOTD) has collected geotechnical data for many years in a variety of different formats.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    by disparate systems and stored as hard copies, scanned images, various digital formats, or other non-digital, software tools are now available that streamline the entire data management process from data collection that allows for the integration of historically acquired (likely in non-digital format), recently acquired

  4. Investigation of CO2 Plume Behavior for a Large-Scale Pilot Test of Geologic Carbon Storage in a Saline Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doughty, Christine

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    formations (SPE 84344). Soc. Petrol. Eng. J. 10(3), 349–properties (SPE 1942). Soc. Petrol. Eng. J. 8, 149–156 (of CO 2 (SPE 83695). Soc. Petrol. Eng. J. 8(1), 49–60 (2003)

  5. Computer modeling and simulation of Black Warrior Basin formation: Annual report for the 1987--1988 SOMED (School of Mines and Energy Development) project year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visscher, P.B.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer simulations have been performed, aimed at achieving a better understanding of the geological and physical processes involved in the formation of sedimentary basins in general and the Black Warrior basin of Alabama and Mississippi in particular. Microscopic-level computer modeling of sandstone porosity reduction has been done, elucidating the detailed small-scale dynamics which lead to the geological phenomenon of pressure solution. A new technique has been developed for 1D burial and thermal modeling of sedimentary basins based on stratigraphic data from test wells. It is significantly faster than previous methods, and can be used in interactive menu-oriented program requiring relatively little learning time or prior computer experience. This allows a geologist to rapidly determine the results of various different hypotheses about basin formation, providing insight which may help determine which is correct. A program has also been written to simulate tectonic-plate collisions and rifting processes using viscoelastic hydrodynamics.

  6. The Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering, Volume 81, October 2003 913 n recent years, the static mixer has been adopted for a large number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, Ajay K.

    , the static mixer has been adopted for a large number of blending and dispersion operations. Static mixers process industry. Static mixers offer attractive features such as closed-loop operation, and no moving geometry. A typical inlet geometry to the static mixer is the centerline injector as depicted schematically

  7. Low-temperature (180?°C) formation of large-grained Ge (111) thin film on insulator using accelerated metal-induced crystallization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toko, K., E-mail: toko@bk.tsukuba.ac.jp; Numata, R.; Oya, N.; Suemasu, T. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Fukata, N. [National Institute for Materials Science, Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Usami, N. [Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Nagoya University, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan)

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Al-induced crystallization (AIC) yields a large-grained (111)-oriented Ge thin film on an insulator at temperatures as low as 180?°C. We accelerated the AIC of an amorphous Ge layer (50-nm thickness) by initially doping Ge in Al and by facilitating Ge diffusion into Al. The electron backscatter diffraction measurement demonstrated the simultaneous achievement of large grains over 10??m and a high (111) orientation fraction of 90% in the polycrystalline Ge layer formed at 180?°C. This result opens up the possibility for developing Ge-based electronic and optical devices fabricated on inexpensive flexible substrates.

  8. Conference Proceedings (Refereed Invited Reviews). 1. "Role of Large-Scale Magnetic Fields and Material Flows in the Formation of Solar Filaments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackay, Duncan

    Conference Proceedings (Refereed Invited Reviews). 1. "Role of Large-Scale Magnetic Fields Scale Structures and their Role in Solar Activity, ASP Conference Proceedings Series, 346, 177. 2. "The-297. Conference Proceedings (Others). 1. "Basic Magnetic Field Configurations for Filament Channels and Filaments

  9. Thorotrast and in vivo thorium dioxide: numerical simulation of 30 years of alpha radiation absorption by the tissues near a large compact source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianconi, Andrea

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The epidemiology of the slightly radioactive contrast agent named Thorotrast presents a very long latency period between the injection and the development of the related pathologies. It is an example of the more general problem posed by a radioactive internal contaminant whose effects are not noteworthy in the short term but become dramatic in the long period. A point that is still to be explored is fluctuations (in space and time) in the localized absorption of radiation by the tissues. Methods: A Monte Carlo simulation code has been developed to study over a 30 year period the daily absorption of alpha radiation by micrometer sized portions of tissue placed at a distance of 0-100 micrometers from a model source, that approximates a compact thorium dioxide source in liver or spleen whose size is larger or equal to 20 micrometers. The biological depletion of the daughter nuclei of the thorium series is taken into account. The initial condition assumes chemically purified natural thorium. Results: ...

  10. Adaptive Optics in Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Brandner

    2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past ten years, the concept of adaptive optics has evolved from early experimental stages to a standard observing tool now available at almost all major optical and near-infrared telescope facilities. Adaptive optics will also be essential in exploiting the full potential of the large optical/infrared interferometers currently under construction. Both observations with high-angular resolution and at high contrast, and with a high point source sensitivity are facilitated by adaptive optics. Among the areas which benefit most from the use of adaptive optics are studies of the circumstellar environment (envelopes, disks, outflows), substellar companions and multiple systems, and dense young stellar populations. This contribution highlights some of the recent advances in star formation studies facilitated by adaptive optics, and gives a brief tutorial on optimized observing and data reduction strategies.

  11. Dragon Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Can you believe it? It's New Year again. It seems like only yesterday we were celebrating the advent of the year of the Rabbit and now, here it is, the year of the Dragon. January 22nd is New Year's ...

  12. A Climatology of Tropical Anvil and Its Relationship to the Large-Scale Circulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wei

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    of anvil formation, and to provide a more realistic assessment of the radiative impact of tropical anvil on the large-scale circulation. Based on 10 years (1998-2007) of observations, anvil observed by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM...

  13. Star Formation and Galaxy Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. K. C. Yee

    2000-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The dependence of star formation rate on galaxian environment is a key issue in the understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. However, the study of this subject is complex and observationally challenging. This paper reviews some of the current results, drawing mostly from recent large redshift surveys such the LCRS, the MORPH collaboration, and the CNOC1 and CNOC2 redshift surveys.

  14. The (Unstable) Threshold of Black Hole Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. W. Choptuik

    1998-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years it has become apparent that intriguing phenomenology exists at the threshold of black hole formation in a large class of general relativistic collapse models. This phenomenology, which includes scaling, self-similarity and universality, is largely analogous to statistical mechanical critical behaviour, a fact which was first noted empirically, and subsequently clarified by perturbative calculations which borrow on ideas and techniques from dynamical systems theory and renormalization group theory. This contribution, which closely parallels my talk at the conference, consists of an overview of the considerable ``zoo''' of critical solutions which have been discovered thus far, along with a brief discussion of how we currently understand the nature of these solutions from the point of view of perturbation theory.

  15. What do Multiple Planet Systems Teach us about Planet Formation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric B. Ford

    2005-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    For centuries, our knowledge of planetary systems and ideas about planet formation were based on a single example, our solar system. During the last thirteen years, the discovery of ~170 planetary systems has ushered in a new era for astronomy. I review the surprising properties of extrasolar planetary systems and discuss how they are reshaping theories of planet formation. I focus on how multiple planet systems constrain the mechanisms proposed to explain the large eccentricities typical of extrasolar planets. I suggest that strong planet-planet scattering is common and most planetary systems underwent a phase of large eccentricities. I propose that a planetary system's final eccentricities may be strongly influenced by how much mass remains in a planetesimal disk after the last strong planet-planet scattering event.

  16. Predictions from star formation in the multiverse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bousso, Raphael; Leichenauer, Stefan [Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7300 (United States) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8162 (United States)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute trivariate probability distributions in the landscape, scanning simultaneously over the cosmological constant, the primordial density contrast, and spatial curvature. We consider two different measures for regulating the divergences of eternal inflation, and three different models for observers. In one model, observers are assumed to arise in proportion to the entropy produced by stars; in the others, they arise at a fixed time (5 or 10x10{sup 9} years) after star formation. The star formation rate, which underlies all our observer models, depends sensitively on the three scanning parameters. We employ a recently developed model of star formation in the multiverse, a considerable refinement over previous treatments of the astrophysical and cosmological properties of different pocket universes. For each combination of observer model and measure, we display all single and bivariate probability distributions, both with the remaining parameter(s) held fixed and marginalized. Our results depend only weakly on the observer model but more strongly on the measure. Using the causal diamond measure, the observed parameter values (or bounds) lie within the central 2{sigma} of nearly all probability distributions we compute, and always within 3{sigma}. This success is encouraging and rather nontrivial, considering the large size and dimension of the parameter space. The causal patch measure gives similar results as long as curvature is negligible. If curvature dominates, the causal patch leads to a novel runaway: it prefers a negative value of the cosmological constant, with the smallest magnitude available in the landscape.

  17. Predictions from Star Formation in the Multiverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphael Bousso; Stefan Leichenauer

    2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute trivariate probability distributions in the landscape, scanning simultaneously over the cosmological constant, the primordial density contrast, and spatial curvature. We consider two different measures for regulating the divergences of eternal inflation, and three different models for observers. In one model, observers are assumed to arise in proportion to the entropy produced by stars; in the others, they arise at a fixed time (5 or 10 billion years) after star formation. The star formation rate, which underlies all our observer models, depends sensitively on the three scanning parameters. We employ a recently developed model of star formation in the multiverse, a considerable refinement over previous treatments of the astrophysical and cosmological properties of different pocket universes. For each combination of observer model and measure, we display all single and bivariate probability distributions, both with the remaining parameter(s) held fixed, and marginalized. Our results depend only weakly on the observer model but more strongly on the measure. Using the causal diamond measure, the observed parameter values (or bounds) lie within the central $2\\sigma$ of nearly all probability distributions we compute, and always within $3\\sigma$. This success is encouraging and rather nontrivial, considering the large size and dimension of the parameter space. The causal patch measure gives similar results as long as curvature is negligible. If curvature dominates, the causal patch leads to a novel runaway: it prefers a negative value of the cosmological constant, with the smallest magnitude available in the landscape.

  18. Black hole formation in the early universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latif, M A; Schmidt, W; Niemeyer, J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supermassive black holes with up to a $\\rm 10^{9}~M_{\\odot}$ dwell in the centers of present-day galaxies, and their presence has been confirmed at z $\\geq$ 6. Their formation at such early epochs is still an enigma. Different pathways have been suggested to assemble supermassive black holes in the first billion years after the Big Bang. Direct collapse has emerged as a highly plausible scenario to form black holes as it provides seed masses of $\\rm 10^{5}-10^{6}~M_{\\odot}$. Gravitational collapse in atomic cooling haloes with virial temperatures T$_{vir} \\geq 10^{4}$~K may lead to the formation of massive seed black holes in the presence of an intense background UV flux. Turbulence plays a central role in regulating accretion and transporting angular momentum. We present here the highest resolution cosmological large-eddy simulations to date which track the evolution of high-density regions on scales of $0.25$~AU beyond the formation of the first peak, and study the impact of subgrid-scale turbulence. The pe...

  19. Alternate Thesis & Dissertation Formats Manuscript Format Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, John

    Alternate Thesis & Dissertation Formats Manuscript Format Guidelines In addition to the standard format for dissertation/thesis, the Graduate School allows for the use of an alternative format. The manuscript format refers to the use of articles and/or book chapters to replace the standard dissertation

  20. Chapeau! First-Year French

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinneen, David A.; Kernen, Madeleine

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapeau! is a first-year college text. Although it may appear, at first glance, o move very fast and introduce a large amount of material early, the vocabulary and grammatical structures that we expect students to control ...

  1. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; /UC, Irvine; Zentner, Andrew R.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., EFI; Bullock, James S.; /UC, Irvine; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo

    2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding the importance of triggered star formation in a cosmological context.

  2. Long-term Survival Outcomes Following Internal Mammary Node Irradiation in Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Results of a Large Retrospective Study With 12-Year Follow-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Jee Suk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Bae; Lee, Ik Jae; Keum, Ki Chang; Lee, Chang Geol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Doo Ho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Chang-Ok, E-mail: cosuh317@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Seung Jae, E-mail: sjhuh@smc.samsung.co.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To examine the effect of internal mammary node irradiation (IMNI) on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in breast cancer patients treated with modified radical mastectomy and postoperative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2002, 396 patients with stage II-III breast cancer were treated with postmastectomy radiation therapy with (n=197) or without (n=199) IMNI. Patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy were excluded. IMNI was administered at the clinical discretion of the treating physician. Median RT dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 45.0-59.4 Gy) in 28 fractions, with inclusion of the supraclavicular fossa in 96% of patients. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 99.7% of the patients and endocrine therapy to 53%. Results: The median follow-up was 149 months (range, 124-202). IMNI patients had more advanced nodal stage and non-high grade tumors than those without IMNI (P<.001). Otherwise, disease and treatment characteristics were well balanced. The 10-year DFS with and without IMNI was 65% and 57%, respectively (P=.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that IMNI was an independent, positive predictor of DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; P=.02). Benefits of IMNI in DFS were seen most apparently in N2 patients (HR, 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.26-0.74) and inner/central tumors (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.34-0.90). The 10-year OS with and without IMNI was 72% and 66%, respectively (P=.62). The 10-year DFS and OS were 61%, and 69%, respectively. Conclusions: Internal mammary node irradiation significantly improved DFS in postmastectomy breast cancer patients. Pending long-term results from randomized trials, treatment of internal mammary nodes should be considered in postmastectomy radiation therapy.

  3. Research project on CO2 geological storage and groundwaterresources: Large-scale hydrological evaluation and modeling of impact ongroundwater systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin; Rutqvist, Jonny; Jordan,Preston; Zhang,K.; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    If carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies areimplemented on a large scale, the amounts of CO2 injected and sequesteredunderground could be extremely large. The stored CO2 then replaces largevolumes of native brine, which can cause considerable pressureperturbation and brine migration in the deep saline formations. Ifhydraulically communicating, either directly via updipping formations orthrough interlayer pathways such as faults or imperfect seals, theseperturbations may impact shallow groundwater or even surface waterresources used for domestic or commercial water supply. Possibleenvironmental concerns include changes in pressure and water table,changes in discharge and recharge zones, as well as changes in waterquality. In compartmentalized formations, issues related to large-scalepressure buildup and brine displacement may also cause storage capacityproblems, because significant pressure buildup can be produced. Toaddress these issues, a three-year research project was initiated inOctober 2006, the first part of which is summarized in this annualreport.

  4. Formation of Carbon Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles L. Steinhardt; Dimitar D. Sasselov

    2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the formation of dwarf carbon stars via accretion from a carbon AGB companion in light of the new 107 object sample of Downes et al. (2004). This sample is now large enough to allow good mass determination via comparison of a composite spectrum to theoretical atmospheric models. Carbon dwarfs of spectral type M are indeed main sequence M dwarfs with enhanced metallicity and carbon abundance. We also calculate the predicted abundance of both M and of F/G carbon dwarfs, and show that the latter should be falsifiable in the near future.

  5. 3rd year final contractor report for: U.S. Department of Energy Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program Project Title: Detailed Measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing at Large and Small Atwood Numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm J. Andrews

    2006-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This project had two major tasks: Task 1. The construction of a new air/helium facility to collect detailed measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing at high Atwood number, and the distribution of these data to LLNL, LANL, and Alliance members for code validation and design purposes. Task 2. The collection of initial condition data from the new Air/Helium facility, for use with validation of RT simulation codes at LLNL and LANL. This report describes work done in the last twelve (12) months of the project, and also contains a summary of the complete work done over the three (3) life of the project. As of April 1, 2006, the air/helium facility (Task 1) is now complete and extensive testing and validation of diagnostics has been performed. Initial condition studies (Task 2) is also comp lete. Detailed experiments with air/helium with Atwood numbers up to 0.1 have been completed, and Atwood numbers of 0.25. Within the last three (3) months we have been able to successfully run the facility at Atwood numbers of 0.5. The progress matches the project plan, as does the budget. We have finished the initial condition studies using the water channel, and this work has been accepted for publication on the Journal of Fluid Mechanics (the top fluid mechanics journal). Mr. Nick Mueschke and Mr. Wayne Kraft are continuing with their studies to obtain PhDs in the same field, and will also continue their collaboration visits to LANL and LLNL. Over its three (3) year life the project has supported two(2) Ph.D.’s and three (3) MSc’s, and produced nine (9) international journal publications, twenty four (24) conference publications, and numerous other reports. The highlight of the project has been our close collaboration with LLNL (Dr. Oleg Schilling) and LANL (Drs. Dimonte, Ristorcelli, Gore, and Harlow).

  6. FORMATION OF PLANETARY CORES AT TYPE I MIGRATION TRAPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandor, Zsolt; Dullemond, Cornelis P. [Max Planck Research Group, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lyra, Wladimir, E-mail: sandor@mpia.de [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

    2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the long-standing unsolved problems of planet formation is how solid bodies of a few decimeters in size can 'stick' to form large planetesimals. This is known as the 'meter-size barrier'. In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that some form of 'particle trapping' must have played a role in overcoming the meter-size barrier. Particles can be trapped in long-lived local pressure maxima, such as those in anticyclonic vortices, zonal flows, or those believed to occur near ice lines or at dead zone boundaries. Such pressure traps are the ideal sites for the formation of planetesimals and small planetary embryos. Moreover, they likely produce large quantities of such bodies in a small region, making it likely that subsequent N-body evolution may lead to even larger planetary embryos. The goal of this Letter is to show that this indeed happens, and to study how efficient it is. In particular, we wish to find out if rocky/icy bodies as large as 10 M{sub +} can form within 1 Myr, since such bodies are the precursors of gas giant planets in the core accretion scenario.

  7. (Non) formation of methanol by direct hydrogenation of formate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Non) formation of methanol by direct hydrogenation of formate on copper catalysts. (Non) formation of methanol by direct hydrogenation of formate on copper catalysts. Abstract: We...

  8. Photophoresis boosts giant planet formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teiser, Jens

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the core accretion model of giant planet formation, a solid protoplanetary core begins to accrete gas directly from the nebula when its mass reaches about 5 earth masses. The protoplanet has at most a few million years to reach runaway gas accretion, as young stars lose their gas disks after 10 million years at the latest. Yet gas accretion also brings small dust grains entrained in the gas into the planetary atmosphere. Dust accretion creates an optically thick protoplanetary atmosphere that cannot efficiently radiate away the kinetic energy deposited by incoming planetesimals. A dust-rich atmosphere severely slows down atmospheric cooling, contraction, and inflow of new gas, in contradiction to the observed timescales of planet formation. Here we show that photophoresis is a strong mechanism for pushing dust out of the planetary atmosphere due to the momentum exchange between gas and dust grains. The thermal radiation from the heated inner atmosphere and core is sufficient to levitate dust grains and to ...

  9. Manufacturability Study and Scale-Up for Large Format Lithium...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    integrators - Original equipment manufacturers * Development of processes, process optimization, manufacturing schemes, materials improvements, diagnostics, and production yield...

  10. Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    microscopy Rhodia - Inorganic fillers ENTEK Manufacturing Inc -Equipment and materials processing Project objectives Selection of electrochemically stable,...

  11. Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation es008pekala2011...

  12. Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting es008pekala2012...

  13. Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    We plan on expanding our options with respect to suppliers of the silicon-carbon composite materials. 06162014 This presentation does not contain any proprietary,...

  14. Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    May 10, 2011 Project ID ES008 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Overview Timeline Start - Feb 2010 ...

  15. Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and reducing variability. Reliability, life and cost Characterize the moisture absorption properties of the silica-filled separator and develop handling and drying...

  16. Sequentially Triggered Star Formation in OB Associations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Preibisch; Hans Zinnecker

    2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss observational evidence for sequential and triggered star formation in OB associations. We first review the star formation process in the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association, the nearest OB association to the Sun, where several recent extensive studies have allowed us to reconstruct the star formation history in a rather detailed way. We then compare the observational results with those obtained for other OB associations and with recent models of rapid cloud and star formation in the turbulent interstellar medium. We conclude that the formation of whole OB subgroups (each consisting of several thousand stars) requires large-scale triggering mechanisms such as shocks from expanding wind and supernova driven superbubbles surrounding older subgroups. Other triggering mechanisms, like radiatively driven implosion of globules, also operate, but seem to be secondary processes, forming only small stellar groups rather than whole OB subgroups with thousands of stars.

  17. ABSTRACT & DISSERTATION FORMAT GUIDELINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Yi

    2 ABSTRACT & DISSERTATION FORMAT GUIDELINES The Knowledge Navigation Center (second floor these guidelines. The most up-to-date version of the Abstract and Dissertation Format Guidelines is available;2 Abstract Format Guidelines ABSTRACT Title of the Dissertation by by Student's Name Chair: Chair's name Text

  18. Format requirements of thermal neutron scattering data in a nuclear data format to succeed the ENDF format

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In November 2012, the Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation Subgroup 38 (WPEC-SG38) began with the task of developing a nuclear data format and supporting infrastructure to replace the now nearly 50 year old ENDF format. The first step in this process is to develop requirements for the new format and infrastructure. In this talk, I will review the status of ENDF's Thermal Scattering Law (TSL) formats as well as support for this data in the GND format (from which the new format is expected to evolve). Finally, I hope to begin a dialog with members of the thermal neutron scattering community so that their data needs can be accurately and easily accommodated by the new format and tools, as captured by the requirements document. During this discussion, we must keep in mind that the new tools and format must; Support what is in existing data files; Support new things we want to put in data files; and Be flexible enough for us to adapt it to future unanticipated challenges.

  19. Einstein's Miraculous Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasant Natarajan; V Balakrishnan; N Mukunda

    2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    With each passing year, the young Albert Einstein's achievements in physics in the year 1905 seem to be ever more miraculous. We describe why the centenary of this remarkable year is worthy of celebration.

  20. 1991 - The year in review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross, P.S.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A look at the last year shows that utility regulators devoted a large part of their 1991 resources to the task of refining programs put in place over the last decade to push electric, gas and telephone regulation toward a more market-oriented approach. Heightened competition in electric generation, natural gas supply and transmission, and telecommunications markets kept regulators busy running competitive bidding programs, sorting competitive from noncompetitive services, and ensuring access to utility delivery networks.

  1. Year of last Year of last

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herring 2003 2002 Transboundary Resource Assessment Committee Monkfish Northern Monkfish 2003 2003FMP Stock Year of last assessment Year of last data used in last stock assessment Source document for stock assessment Atlantic Sea Scallop Atlantic Sea Scallop 2000 2000 Stock Assessment Workshop (SAW

  2. UIC Honors College This year represents the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Arie, Jezekiel

    . They are due February 15th. For all the important in- formation, check out the Ball website: http:// uichcab. The sessions cover the process of searching for internal and external awards, highlight upcoming deadlines scholarships (some are in preparation for applying next year). Please visit the OSSP website for more

  3. Cryogenic heat pipe for cooling high temperature superconductors with application to Electromagnetic Formation Flight Satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Daniel W., 1980-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An emerging method of propellant-less formation flight propulsion is the use of electromagnets coupled with reaction wheels. This technique is called Electromagnetic Formation Flight (EMFF). In order to create a large ...

  4. Format: A4_20070715 Press Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    delivery, global warming. Over the 20 year history of INCOSE Systems Engineering has developed and matured and valued for projects of all sizes and at all levels of problem solving from providing integrated to enabling holistic solutions to global challenges. INCOSE has grown significantly since its formation

  5. Effect of friction on disoriented chiral condensate formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the effect of friction on the DCC domain formation. We solve the Newton equation of motion for the O(4) fields, with quenched initial condition. The initial fields are randomly distributed in a Gaussian form. In one dimensional expansion, on the average, large DCC domains can not be formed. However, in some particular orbits, large instabilities may occur. This possibility also greatly diminishes with the introduction of friction. But, if the friction is large, the system may be overdamped and then, there is a possibility of large DCC domain formation in some events.

  6. ImpactsofLarge Dams:agLobaL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    #12;ImpactsofLarge Dams:agLobaL assessment Editors Cecilia Tortajada, Dogan Altinbilek, Asit K of the most controversial issues of the water sector in recent years has been the impacts of large dams and environmental costs of large dams far exceed their benefits, and that the era of construction of large dams

  7. Secretary Moniz's First Year

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    We're looking back at some of the biggest moments from Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz's first year in office.

  8. Top-down formation of fullerenes in the interstellar medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berne, O; Joblin, C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    [Abridged] Fullerenes have been recently detected in various circumstellar and interstellar environments, raising the question of their formation pathway. It has been proposed that they can form by the photo-chemical processing of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Following our previous work on the evolution of PAHs in the NGC 7023 reflection nebula, we evaluate, using photochemical modeling, the possibility that the PAH C$_{66}$H$_{20}$ (i.e. circumovalene) can lead to the formation of C$_{60}$ upon irradiation by ultraviolet photons. The chemical pathway involves full dehydrogenation, folding into a floppy closed cage and shrinking of the cage by loss of C$_2$ units until it reaches the symmetric C$_{60}$ molecule. At 10" from the illuminating star and with realistic molecular parameters, the model predicts that 100\\% of C$_{66}$H$_{20}$ is converted into C$_{60}$ in $\\sim$ 10$^5$ years, a timescale comparable to the age of the nebula. Shrinking appears to be the kinetically limiting step of th...

  9. Solar-Type Activity: Epochs of Cycle Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsova, M M; Livshits, M A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The diagram of indices of coronal and chromospheric activity allowed us to reveal stars where solar-type activity appears and regular cycles are forming. Using new consideration of a relation between coronal activity and the rotation rate, together with new data on the ages of open clusters, we estimate the age of the young Sun corresponding to the epoch of formation of its cycle. The properties of the activity of this young Sun, with an age slightly older than one billion years, are briefly discussed. An analysis of available data on the long-term regular variability of late-type stars leads to the conclusion that duration of a cycle associated with solar-type activity increases with the deceleration of the stellar rotation; i.e., with age. New data on the magnetic fields of comparatively young G stars and changes in the role of the large-scale and the local magnetic fields in the formation of the activity of the young Sun are discussed. Studies in this area aim to provide observational tests aimed at identi...

  10. A System Degradation Study of 445 Systems Using Year-Over-Year Performance Index Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This graphic summarizes the results of a study conducted by the SunPower Corporation, to assess the median degradation of a large number of systems. This is important because solar investors need proof of low degradation. The study, a project under DOE's SunShot Initiative, makes use of year-over-year performance index change analysis, a powerful and practical technique for assessing the median degradation of a large fleet of systems, which in this case includes a sample of 445.

  11. Center for Ergonomics For nearly 50 years, Center for Ergonomics research has led to a better understanding of work-related

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    the department and college. These include large format printers, 3D scanners, and a 3D model printer for rapid

  12. A Unique Dust Formation Episode in the SC-Type Star UY Cen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justin D. R. Steinfadt; Geoffrey C. Clayton; Tom Lloyd Evans; Tom Williams

    2005-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first detection of new dust formation in an SC star. The prototype of the SC stars, UY Cen, underwent a decline of 2 magnitudes in the V-band. The SC stars show pulsational variations and have 60 micron excesses indicating past dust formation. It has been suggested that as a star evolves from oxygen rich to carbon rich, there is a short period of time when C/O$~1 that the star appears spectroscopically as an SC star and ceases to produce dust. The SC star, BH Cru, has shown large spectroscopic and pulsation period variations in only 30 years, indicating rapid evolution but it has shown no sign of new dust formation. UY Cen has not shown any pulsation or spectroscopic variations accompanying the onset of its dust formation. In addition, UY Cen did not show emission in the resonance lines of Na I, K I or Rb I when it was at its faintest, although these lines were a feature of the carbon stars R Lep and V Hya during similar faint phases.

  13. Triggered star formation in the Magellanic Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Elmegreen; J. Palous; Kenji Bekki

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract. We discuss how tidal interaction between the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), and the Galaxy triggers galaxy-wide star formation in the Clouds for the last ? 0.2 Gyr based on our chemodynamical simulations on the Clouds. Our simulations demonstrate that the tidal interaction induces the formation of asymmetric spiral arms with high gas densities and consequently triggers star formation within the arms in the LMC. Star formation rate in the present LMC is significantly enhanced just above the eastern edge of the LMC’s stellar bar owing to the tidal interaction. The location of the enhanced star formation is very similar to the observed location of 30 Doradus, which suggests that the formation of 30 Doradus is closely associated with the last Magellanic collision about 0.2 Gyr ago. The tidal interaction can dramatically compress gas initially within the outer part of the SMC so that new stars can be formed from the gas to become intergalactic young stars in the inter-Cloud region (e.g., the Magellanic Bridge). The metallicity distribution function of the newly formed stars in the Magellanic Bridge has a peak of [Fe/H] ? ?0.8, which is significantly lower than the stellar metallicity of the SMC.

  14. Annual Report Fiscal Year 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Year in Review.............................................................. 8 Academic Accomplishments

  15. Calendar Year 1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    > Year1999NEFINA1.pdf" class"">Inspection Report: INS-O-00-02

  16. HPSS Yearly Network Traffic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    growth in network traffic to storage over the years. Network Traffic Growth Network Distribution 2010 Network Distribution 2010 Network Distribution 2009 Network Distribution...

  17. Zonal Flow as Pattern Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Jeffrey B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this section, we examine the transition from statistically homogeneous turbulence to inhomogeneous turbulence with zonal flows. Statistical equations of motion can be derived from the quasilinear approximation to the Hasegawa-Mima equation. We review recent work that finds a bifurcation of these equations and shows that the emergence of zonal flows mathematically follows a standard type of pattern formation. We also show that the dispersion relation of modulational instability can be extracted from the statistical equations of motion in a certain limit. The statistical formulation can thus be thought to offer a more general perspective on growth of coherent structures, namely through instability of a full turbulent spectrum. Finally, we offer a physical perspective on the growth of large-scale structures.

  18. Unveiling the Formation of Massive Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice

    2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Massive galaxies, such as nearby ellipticals, have relatively low number densities, yet they host the majority of the stellar mass in the universe. Understanding their origin is a central problem of galaxy formation. Age dating of stellar populations found in modern ellipticals, and observations of star formation in high redshift galaxies, allow us to determine roughly when these systems formed. These age diagnostics however do not tell us what triggered star formation, or how galaxies form as opposed to simply when. Recent analyses of the structures of z > 2 ultraviolet selected galaxies reveal that major galaxy mergers are a likely method for forming some massive galaxies. There are however galaxy populations at high redshift (z > 2), namely infrared and sub-millimeter bright systems, whose evolutionary relationship to modern ellipticals is still uncertain. An improved characterization of these and other high redshift galaxy populations is achievable with large infrared imaging and spectroscopic surveys.

  19. 11/8/09 2:31 PMPrincipal component analysis of potential energy surfaces of large clusters: al..... (DOI: 10.1039/b913802a) Page 1 of 16http://www.rsc.org.proxy.uchicago.edu/delivery/_ArticleLinking/Artic...?JournalCode=CP&Year=2009&ManuscriptID=b913802a&

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, R. Stephen

    11/8/09 2:31 PMPrincipal component analysis of potential energy surfaces of large clusters: al Chemical Physics Principal component analysis of potential energy surfaces of large clusters: allowing The analysis of the potential energy surfaces (PES) of clusters has proven to be a useful tool in theoretical

  20. Final Year Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubsch, Tristan [Howard University

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last years of this eighteen-year grant project, the research efforts have focused mostly on the study of off-shell representations of supersymmetry, both on the worldline and on the world- sheet, i.e., both in supersymmetric quantum mechanics and in supersymmetric field theory in 1+1-dimensional spacetime.

  1. The Efficiency of Globular Cluster Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean E. McLaughlin

    1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    (Abridged): The total populations of globular cluster systems (GCSs) are discussed in terms of their connection to the efficiency of globular cluster formation---the mass fraction of star-forming gas that was able to form bound stellar clusters rather than isolated stars or unbound associations---in galaxy halos. Observed variations in GCS specific frequencies (S_N=N_gc/L_gal), both as a function of galactocentric radius in individual systems and globally between entire galaxies, are reviewed in this light. It is argued that trends in S_N do not reflect any real variation in the underlying efficiency of cluster formation; rather, they result from ignoring the hot gas in many large ellipticals. This claim is checked and confirmed in each of M87, M49, and NGC 1399, for which existing data are combined to show that the volume density profile of globular clusters, rho_cl, is directly proportional to the sum of (rho_gas+rho_stars) at large radii. The constant of proportionality is the same in each case: epsilon=0.0026 +/- 0.0005 in the mean. This is identified with the globular cluster formation efficiency. The implication that epsilon might have had a universal value is supported by data on the GCSs of 97 early-type galaxies, on the GCS of the Milky Way, and on the ongoing formation of open clusters. These results have specific implications for some issues in GCS and galaxy formation, and they should serve as a strong constraint on more general theories of star and cluster formation.

  2. Star Formation Histories in the Local Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas M. Brown

    2004-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep color magnitude diagrams extending to the main sequence provide the most direct measure of the detailed star formation history in a stellar population. With large investments of observing time, HST can obtain such data for populations out to 1 Mpc, but its field of view is extremely small in comparison to the size of Local Group galaxies. This limitation severely constrains our understanding of galaxy formation. For example, the largest galaxy in the Local Group, Andromeda, offers an ideal laboratory for studying the formation of large spiral galaxies, but the galaxy shows substructure on a variety of scales, presumably due to its violent merger history. Within its remaining lifetime, HST can only sample a few sight-lines through this complex galaxy. In contrast, a wide field imager could provide a map of Andromeda's halo, outer disk, and tidal streams, revealing the spatially-dependent star formation history in each structure. The same data would enable many secondary studies, such as the age variation in Andromeda's globular cluster system, gigantic samples of variable stars, and microlensing tracers of the galaxy's dark matter distribution.

  3. Statistical analysis of 4-year observations of aerosol sizes in a semi-rural continental environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Shan-Hu

    Statistical analysis of 4-year observations of aerosol sizes in a semi-rural continental. Introduction Formation of new aerosol particles via gas-to-particle conver- sion is an important process, which to understanding how new particle formation (NPF) processes lead to formation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN

  4. Dissipation, noise and DCC domain formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effect of friction on domain formation in disoriented chiral condensate. We solve the equation of motion of the linear sigma model, in the Hartree approximation, including a friction and a white noise term. For quenched initial condition, we find that even in presence of noise and dissipation domain like structure emerges after a few fermi of evolution. Domain size as large as 5 fm can be formed.

  5. Observing Massive Galaxy Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice

    2002-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A major goal of contemporary astrophysics is understanding the origin of the most massive galaxies in the universe, particularly nearby ellipticals and spirals. Theoretical models of galaxy formation have existed for many decades, although low and high redshift observations are only beginning to put constraints on different ideas. We briefly describe these observations and how they are revealing the methods by which galaxies form by contrasting and comparing fiducial rapid collapse and hierarchical formation model predictions. The available data show that cluster ellipticals must have rapidly formed at z > 2, and that up to 50% of all massive galaxies at z ~ 2.5 are involved in major mergers. While the former is consistent with the monolithic collapse picture, we argue that hierarchal formation is the only model that can reproduce all the available observations.

  6. Calendar Year 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    had not taken action necessary to protect the PII of a large number of its past and present employees, their dependents and many contractors. We concluded that the July 2013...

  7. JPEG File Interchange Format

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Eric

    2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    interchange format compressed image representation • PC or Mac or Unix workstation compatible • Standard color space: one or three components. For three components, YCbCr (CCIR 601-256 levels) • APP0 marker used to specify Units, X pixel density, Y pixel... by the Macintosh but not by PCs or workstations. JPEG File Interchange Format, Version 1.02 2 Standard color space The color space to be used is YCbCr as defined by CCIR 601 (256 levels). The RGB components calculated by linear conversion from YCbCr shall...

  8. Large-bore pipe decontamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of 1200 buildings within the US Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Complex will require the disposition of miles of pipe. The disposition of large-bore pipe, in particular, presents difficulties in the area of decontamination and characterization. The pipe is potentially contaminated internally as well as externally. This situation requires a system capable of decontaminating and characterizing both the inside and outside of the pipe. Current decontamination and characterization systems are not designed for application to this geometry, making the direct disposal of piping systems necessary in many cases. The pipe often creates voids in the disposal cell, which requires the pipe to be cut in half or filled with a grout material. These methods are labor intensive and costly to perform on large volumes of pipe. Direct disposal does not take advantage of recycling, which could provide monetary dividends. To facilitate the decontamination and characterization of large-bore piping and thereby reduce the volume of piping required for disposal, a detailed analysis will be conducted to document the pipe remediation problem set; determine potential technologies to solve this remediation problem set; design and laboratory test potential decontamination and characterization technologies; fabricate a prototype system; provide a cost-benefit analysis of the proposed system; and transfer the technology to industry. This report summarizes the activities performed during fiscal year 1997 and describes the planned activities for fiscal year 1998. Accomplishments for FY97 include the development of the applicable and relevant and appropriate regulations, the screening of decontamination and characterization technologies, and the selection and initial design of the decontamination system.

  9. Design and Development of an Artificial Neural Network for Estimation of Formation Permeability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    SPE 28237 Design and Development of an Artificial Neural Network for Estimation of Formation and measuring their oldest practices for estimating the formation permeability. Coring every well in a large, especially in fields with hundreds of wells, requires a large amount of capital. In a heterogeneous field

  10. Multiscale analysis of three consecutive years of anomalous flooding in Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    Multiscale analysis of three consecutive years of anomalous flooding in Pakistan By K. L. Rasmussen investigation into three years of anomalous floods in Pakistan provides insight into their formation, unifying for the formation of anomalous easterly midlevel flow across central India into Pakistan that advected deep

  11. Fiscal Year 2007 Greenhouse Gas Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Fiscal Year 2007 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Greg Smith Brandon Trelstad OSU Facilities Services June #12;#12;Acknowledgments Due to the broad scope of this inventory, a large number of people from many, geothermal, tidal or sea currents etc. (7) "OUS Method" refers to the inventory for FY07 that is similar

  12. Hair follicle Formation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    Hair follicle Formation of new follicles Bud Healed skin Hair bulge Open wound Epidermis a b Dermis 1950s and help to explain the controversy. What is the origin of the cells that make up these new hair follicles? Are they derived from existing hair follicles located at the wound edge

  13. Large scale disease prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmid, Patrick R. (Patrick Raphael)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to present the foundation of an automated large-scale disease prediction system. Unlike previous work that has typically focused on a small self-contained dataset, we explore the possibility ...

  14. MODELING THE FORMATION OF GIANT PLANET CORES. I. EVALUATING KEY PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levison, Harold F. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Thommes, Edward [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); Duncan, Martin J. [Department of Physics, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada)], E-mail: hal@boulder.swri.edu

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most challenging problems we face in our understanding of planet formation is how Jupiter and Saturn could have formed before the solar nebula dispersed. The most popular model of giant planet formation is the so-called core accretion model. In this model a large planetary embryo formed first, mainly by two-body accretion. This is then followed by a period of inflow of nebular gas directly onto the growing planet. The core accretion model has an Achilles heel, namely the very first step. We have undertaken the most comprehensive study of this process to date. In this study, we numerically integrate the orbits of a number of planetary embryos embedded in a swarm of planetesimals. In these experiments, we have included a large number of physical processes that might enhance accretion. In particular, we have included (1) aerodynamic gas drag, (2) collisional damping between planetesimals, (3) enhanced embryo cross sections due to their atmospheres, (4) planetesimal fragmentation, and (5) planetesimal-driven migration. We find that the gravitational interaction between the embryos and the planetesimals leads to the wholesale redistribution of material-regions are cleared of material and gaps open near the embryos. Indeed, in 90% of our simulations without fragmentation, the region near those embryos is cleared of planetesimals before much growth can occur. Thus, the widely used assumption that the surface density distribution of planetesimals is smooth can lead to misleading results. In the remaining 10% of our simulations, the embryos undergo a burst of outward migration that significantly increases growth. On timescales of {approx}10{sup 5} years, the outer embryo can migrate {approx}6 AU and grow to roughly 30 M {sub +}. This represents a largely unexplored mode of core formation. We also find that the inclusion of planetesimal fragmentation tends to inhibit growth except for a narrow range of fragment migration rates.

  15. Adaptive Training for Large Vocabulary Continuous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hain, Thomas

    Adaptive Training for Large Vocabulary Continuous Speech Recognition Kai Yu Hughes Hall College for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy #12;ii Summary In recent years, there has been a trend towards training is to train hidden Markov models (HMMs) on the whole data set as if all data comes from a single acoustic

  16. Star Formation in Mergers and Interacting Galaxies: Gathering the Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis Struck

    2006-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Selected results from recent studies of star formation in galaxies at different stages of interaction are reviewed. Recent results from the Spitzer Space Telescope are highlighted. Ideas on how large-scale driving of star formation in interacting galaxies might mesh with our understanding of star formation in isolated galaxies and small scale mechanisms within galaxies are considered. In particular, there is evidence that on small scales star formation is determined by the same thermal and turbulent processes in cool compressed clouds as in isolated galaxies. If so, this affirms the notion that the primary role of large-scale dynamics is to gather and compress the gas fuel. In gas-rich interactions this is generally done with increasing efficiency through the merger process.

  17. NETL Report format template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that large-scale CO 2 storage is safe and effective requires predicting the long-term integrity of storage sites as well as demonstrating the comprehensive consideration of...

  18. Methanol Masers and Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Sobolev; A. B. Ostrovskii; M. S. Kirsanova; O. V. Shelemei; M. A. Voronkov; A. V. Malyshev

    2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanol masers which are traditionally divided into two classes provide possibility to study important parts of the star forming regions: Class~II masers trace vicinities of the massive YSOs while class~I masers are likely to trace more distant parts of the outflows where newer stars can form. There are many methanol transitions which produce observed masers. This allows to use pumping analysis for estimation of the physical parameters in the maser formation regions and its environment, for the study of their evolution. Extensive surveys in different masing transitions allow to conclude on the values of the temperatures, densities, dust properties, etc. in the bulk of masing regions. Variability of the brightest masers is monitored during several years. In some cases it is probably caused by the changes of the dust temperature which follow variations in the brightness of the central YSO reflecting the character of the accretion process. A unified catalogue of the class II methanol masers consisting of more than 500 objects is compiled. Analysis of the data shows that: physical conditions within the usual maser source vary considerably; maser brightness is determined by parameters of some distinguished part of the object - maser formation region; class II methanol masers are formed not within the outflows but in the regions affected by their propagation. It is shown that the "near" solutions for the kinematic distances to the sources can be used for statistical analysis. The luminosity function of the 6.7 GHz methanol masers is constructed. It is shown that improvement of the sensitivity of surveys can increase number of detected maser sources considerably.

  19. The formation of massive Pop III stars in the presence of turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latif, M A; Schmidt, W; Niemeyer, J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Population III stars forming in the infant universe at z=30 heralded the end of the cosmic dark ages. They are presumed to be assembled in so-called minihaloes with virial temperatures of a few thousand K where collapse is triggered by molecular hydrogen cooling. A central question concerns their final masses, and whether fragmentation occurs during their formation. While studies employing Lagrangian codes suggest fragmentation via a self-gravitating disk, recent high resolution simulations indicated that disk formation is suppressed. Here we report the first high-resolution large-eddy simulations performed with the Eulerian grid-based code Enzo following the evolution beyond the formation of the first peak, to investigate the accretion of the central massive clump and potential fragmentation. For a total of 3 halos, we see that a disk forms around the first clump. The central clump reaches $\\sim10$ solar masses after 40 years, while subsequent accretion is expected at a rate of $10^{-2}$ solar masses per yea...

  20. Substructure: Clues to the Formation of Clusters of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael J. West; Christine Jones; William Forman

    1995-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We have examined the spatial distribution of substructure in clusters of galaxies using Einstein X-ray observations. Subclusters are found to have a markedly anisotropic distribution that reflects the surrounding matter distribution on supercluster scales. Our results suggest a picture in which cluster formation proceeds by mergers of subclusters along large-scale filaments. The implications of such an anisotropic formation process for the shapes, orientations and kinematics of clusters are discussed briefly.

  1. Large power transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karsai, K.; Kerenyi, D.; Kiss, L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The book deals with the following aspects of transformer engineering: general principles governing the function of transformers, iron cores, windings, stray losses caused by stray flux, the insulation of transformers, and the structural parts and accessories. This edition includes the developments in theory and practice on the basis of the authors' experience in design, manufacturing and testing of large transformers. New developments have been particularly extensive in the fields of new magnetic materials, cooling methods, dielectric strength for overvoltages of different types, and stray-load loss problems, which are presented in the book in detail. The many diagrams in the book can be used directly in the design, manufacture and testing of large transformers. In preparing their text, the authors have aimed to satisfy the demand for a work that summarizes the latest experience in development and design of large power transformers.

  2. Project Year Project Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey J.

    Project Year 2011-2012 Project Title Using M-Health and GIS Technology in the Field to Improve-specialized, but practically useless skill. Solution One goal of this summer's Applied Geographic Information Systems in Public lessons about observational epidemiology. Technologies Used Geographic Info System (GIS), Blackboard

  3. The Expanded Very Large Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perley, R; Jackson, J; Butler, B; Carlson, B; Fort, D; Dewdney, P; Clark, B; Hayward, R; Durand, S; Revnell, M; McKinnon, M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In almost 30 years of operation, the Very Large Array (VLA) has proved to be a remarkably flexible and productive radio telescope. However, the basic capabilities of the VLA have changed little since it was designed. A major expansion utilizing modern technology is currently underway to improve the capabilities of the VLA by at least an order of magnitude in both sensitivity and in frequency coverage. The primary elements of the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) project include new or upgraded receivers for continuous frequency coverage from 1 to 50 GHz, new local oscillator, intermediate frequency, and wide bandwidth data transmission systems to carry signals with 16 GHz total bandwidth from each antenna, and a new digital correlator with the capability to process this bandwidth with an unprecedented number of frequency channels for an imaging array. Also included are a new monitor and control system and new software that will provide telescope ease of use. Scheduled for completion in 2012, the EVLA will prov...

  4. Dynamics of Primordial Black Hole Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Niemeyer; K. Jedamzik

    1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a numerical investigation of the gravitational collapse of horizon-size density fluctuations to primordial black holes (PBHs) during the radiation-dominated phase of the Early Universe. The collapse dynamics of three different families of initial perturbation shapes, imposed at the time of horizon crossing, is computed. The perturbation threshold for black hole formation, needed for estimations of the cosmological PBH mass function, is found to be $\\delta_{\\rm c} \\approx 0.7$ rather than the generally employed $\\delta_{\\rm c} \\approx 1/3$, if $\\delta$ is defined as $\\Delta M/\\mh$, the relative excess mass within the initial horizon volume. In order to study the accretion onto the newly formed black holes, we use a numerical scheme that allows us to follow the evolution for long times after formation of the event horizon. In general, small black holes (compared to the horizon mass at the onset of the collapse) give rise to a fluid bounce that effectively shuts off accretion onto the black hole, while large ones do not. In both cases, the growth of the black hole mass owing to accretion is insignificant. Furthermore, the scaling of black hole mass with distance from the formation threshold, known to occur in near-critical gravitational collapse, is demonstrated to apply to primordial black hole formation.

  5. Composting Large Animal Carcasses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auvermann, Brent W.; Mukhtar, Saqib; Heflin, Kevin

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Disposing of large animal carcasses can be a problem for agricultural producers. Composting is a simple, low-cost method that yields a useful product that can be used as fertilizer. In this publication you'll learn the basics of composting, how...

  6. Composting Large Animal Carcasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auvermann, Brent W.; Mukhtar, Saqib; Heflin, Kevin

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Disposing of large animal carcasses can be a problem for agricultural producers. Composting is a simple, low-cost method that yields a useful product that can be used as fertilizer. In this publication you'll learn the basics of composting, how...

  7. Planning and Search Exam format

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alechina, Natasha

    is the frame problem. Revision 5 #12;Exam topics: planning Classical planning. How the problem definitionPlanning and Search Revision Revision 1 #12;Outline Exam format Exam topics How to revise Revision 2 #12;Exam format 4 questions out of 6 same format as 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 exams (on G52PAS

  8. 2008 Year in Review 1 2008 Year in Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    2008 Year in Review 1 2008 Year in Review The Science of Communication Disorders Departmental Research Committee. #12;2 2008 Year in Review Billinghurst, M., Moran, C., Gostomski, P., Basu, A

  9. The influence of large dams on surrounding climate and precipitation patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    The influence of large dams on surrounding climate and precipitation patterns Ahmed Mohamed Degu,1 February 2011. [1] Understanding the forcings exerted by large dams on local climate is key to establishing formation are identified around the reservoir shoreline for 92 large dams of North America. Our study

  10. Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Abstract: The formation...

  11. 70 Years of Innovations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYou are70 Years of Innovations

  12. 50 Years of Space

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment ofAugustDecember8th MeetingAllocation50 Years of

  13. Allocation Year Rollover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA,Portal Allocation Year

  14. HPSS Yearly Network Traffic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonic EngineHIV and evolution studiedHPSSHPSS Yearly

  15. Glendale Water and Power- Large Business Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Glendale Water and Power (GWP) offers a rebate to its medium and large business customers with electric bills of more than $3000 per month (electric usage of 250,000 kWh annually ~ $36,000 per year...

  16. Large, noisy, and incomplete : mathematics for modern biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baym, Michael Hartmann

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years there has been a great deal of new activity at the interface of biology and computation. This has largely been driven by the massive in flux of data from new experimental technologies, particularly ...

  17. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print Wednesday, 31 August 2011 00:00 From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile...

  18. Changes in the halo formation rates due to features in the primordial spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhiraj Kumar Hazra

    2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Features in the primordial scalar power spectrum provide a possible roadway to describe the outliers at the low multipoles in the WMAP data. Apart from the CMB angular power spectrum, these features can also alter the matter power spectrum and, thereby, the formation of the large scale structure. Carrying out a complete numerical analysis, we investigate the effects of primordial features on the formation rates of the halos. We consider a few different inflationary models that lead to features in the scalar power spectrum and an improved fit to the CMB data, and analyze the corresponding imprints on the formation of halos. Performing a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis with the WMAP seven year data and the SDSS halo power spectrum from LRG DR7 for the models of our interest, we arrive at the parameter space of the models allowed by the data. We illustrate that, inflationary potentials, such as the quadratic potential with sinusoidal modulations and the axion monodromy model, which generate certain repeated, oscillatory features in the inflationary perturbation spectrum, do not induce a substantial difference in the number density of halos at their best fit values, when compared with, say, a nearly scale invariant spectrum as is generated by the standard quadratic potential. However, we find that the number density and the formation rates of halos change by about 13-22% for halo masses ranging over 10^4-10^14 solar mass, for potential parameters that lie within 2-sigma around the best fit values arrived at from the aforesaid joint constraints. We briefly discuss the implications of our results.

  19. MARVELS: Revealing the Formation and Dynamical Evolution of Giant Planet Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Jian; Gaudi, B Scott

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MARVELS, the Multi-Object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey, is a 6-year program to characterize the distribution of gas giant planets with orbital periods ranging from several hours to two years. MARVELS will use multi-fiber interferometric spectrographs on the wide-field, 2.5-meter Sloan Foundation telescope at Apache Point Observatory to monitor ~11,000 stars in the magnitude range V=8-12, visiting each star ~30 times over an 18-month interval, with velocity precision of 14, 18, and 35 m/s at V=8, 10, and 12. MARVELS will survey far more stars with a wider range of spectral types and metallicities than previous radial velocity searches, yielding a statistically well defined sample of ~150 giant planets drawn from a host sample with well understood selection biases. With a unique combination of large numbers and well characterized sensitivity, MARVELS will provide a critical data set for testing theories of the formation and dynamical evolution of giant planet systems. The MARVELS detections w...

  20. Large Spectral Library Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chilton, Lawrence K.; Walsh, Stephen J.

    2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Hyperspectral imaging produces a spectrum or vector at each image pixel. These spectra can be used to identify materials present in the image. In some cases, spectral libraries representing atmospheric chemicals or ground materials are available. The challenge is to determine if any of the library chemicals or materials exist in the hyperspectral image. The number of spectra in these libraries can be very large, far exceeding the number of spectral channels collected in the ¯eld. Suppose an image pixel contains a mixture of p spectra from the library. Is it possible to uniquely identify these p spectra? We address this question in this paper and refer to it as the Large Spectral Library (LSL) problem. We show how to determine if unique identi¯cation is possible for any given library. We also show that if p is small compared to the number of spectral channels, it is very likely that unique identi¯cation is possible. We show that unique identi¯cation becomes less likely as p increases.

  1. Assessment of the potential for karst in the Rustler Formation at the WIPP site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenz, John Clay

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an independent assessment of the potential for karst dissolution in evaporitic strata of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site. Review of the available data suggests that the Rustler strata thicken and thin across the area in depositional patterns related to lateral variations in sedimentary accommodation space and normal facies changes. Most of the evidence that has been offered for the presence of karst in the subsurface has been used out of context, and the different pieces are not mutually supporting. Outside of Nash Draw, definitive evidence for the development of karst in the Rustler Formation near the WIPP site is limited to the horizon of the Magenta Member in drillhole WIPP-33. Most of the other evidence cited by the proponents of karst is more easily interpreted as primary sedimentary structures and the localized dissolution of evaporitic strata adjacent to the Magenta and Culebra water-bearing units. Some of the cited evidence is invalid, an inherited baggage from studies made prior to the widespread knowledge of modern evaporite depositional environments and prior to the existence of definitive exposures of the Rustler Formation in the WIPP shafts. Some of the evidence is spurious, has been taken out of context, or is misquoted. Lateral lithologic variations from halite to mudstone within the Rustler Formation under the WIPP site have been taken as evidence for the dissolution of halite such as that seen in Nash Draw, but are more rationally explained as sedimentary facies changes. Extrapolation of the known karst features in Nash Draw eastward to the WIPP site, where conditions are and have been significantly different for half a million years, is unwarranted. The volumes of insoluble material that would remain after dissolution of halite would be significantly less than the observed bed thicknesses, thus dissolution is an unlikely explanation for the lateral variations from halite to mudstone and siltstone. Several surficial depressions at WIPP, suggested to be sinkholes, do not have enough catchment area to form a sinkhole, and holes drilled to investigate the subsurface strata do not support a sinkhole interpretation. Surface drainage across the WIPP site is poorly developed because it has been disrupted by migrating sand dunes and because precipitation is not focused by defined catchment areas in this region of low precipitation and low-dip bedding, not because it has been captured by sinkholes. There are no known points of discharge from the Rustler Formation at WIPP that would indicate the presence of a subsurface karst drainage system. The existing drillholes across the WIPP site, though small in diameter, are sufficient to assess the probability of karst development along the horizontal fractures that are common in the Rustler Formation, and the area of investigation has been augmented significantly by the mapping of four large-diameter shafts excavated into the WIPP repository. The general absence of dissolution, karsting, and related conduits is corroborated by the pumping tests which have interrogated large volumes of the Rustler Formation between drillholes. Diffusion calculations suggest that separate isotopic signatures for the water found in the fractures and the water found in the pores of the matrix rock between fractures are unlikely, thus the isotopic evidence for ancient Rustler formation waters is valid. Geophysical techniques show a number of anomalies, but the anomalies do not overlap to portray consistent and mutually supporting patterns that can be definitively related to karst void space at any given location. The coincidence of the Culebra and Magenta potentiometric heads between Nash Draw and the WIPP site is the inevitable intersection of two non-parallel surfaces rather than an indication of karst-related hydraulic communication between the two units. The proponents of karst in the Rustler Formation at the WIPP site tend to mix data, to take data out of context, and to offer theory as fact. They do not analyze the data or synthesize

  2. Cooling, Gravity and Geometry: Flow-driven Massive Core Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabian Heitsch; Lee Hartmann; Adrianne D. Slyz; Julien E. G. Devriendt; Andreas Burkert

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study numerically the formation of molecular clouds in large-scale colliding flows including self-gravity. The models emphasize the competition between the effects of gravity on global and local scales in an isolated cloud. Global gravity builds up large-scale filaments, while local gravity -- triggered by a combination of strong thermal and dynamical instabilities -- causes cores to form. The dynamical instabilities give rise to a local focusing of the colliding flows, facilitating the rapid formation of massive protostellar cores of a few 100 M$_\\odot$. The forming clouds do not reach an equilibrium state, though the motions within the clouds appear comparable to ``virial''. The self-similar core mass distributions derived from models with and without self-gravity indicate that the core mass distribution is set very early on during the cloud formation process, predominantly by a combination of thermal and dynamical instabilities rather than by self-gravity.

  3. The Complete Atomic Structure of the Large Ribosomal Subunit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sereno, Martin

    of its RNAs all have irregular shapes and fit together in the ribosome like the pieces of a three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle to form a large, monolithic structure. Proteins are abundant everywhere on its surface). Earlier this year, an approx- imate model of the RNA structure in the large subunit was constructed to fit

  4. NUCLEAR ENGINEERING Four Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    ;Nuclear Engineering Four Year Plan Starting Fall 2009 FALL Year 1 Credits WINTER Year 1 Credits SPRINGNUCLEAR ENGINEERING Four Year Plan Fall 2009 Nuclear Engineering (67 hrs) CH Grade Perspectives (15 I NE 452 3 Neutronic Analysis II NE 457 2 Nuclear Reactor Lab Western Culture (3): NE 467 4 Nucl

  5. Stabilization of Large Scale Structure by Adhesive Gravitational Clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Buchert

    1999-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The interplay between gravitational and dispersive forces in a multi-streamed medium leads to an effect which is exposed in the present note as the genuine driving force of stabilization of large-scale structure. The conception of `adhesive gravitational clustering' is advanced to interlock the fairly well-understood epoch of formation of large-scale structure and the onset of virialization into objects that are dynamically in equilibrium with their large-scale structure environment. The classical `adhesion model' is opposed to a class of more general models traced from the physical origin of adhesion in kinetic theory.

  6. The Formation History of Globular Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean E. McLaughlin

    2000-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of old globular cluster systems in galaxy halos are used to infer quantitative constraints on aspects of generic star (cluster) formation. First, the spatial distribution of globulars in three large galaxies, together with trends in total cluster population vs. galaxy luminosity for 97 early-type systems plus the halo of the Milky Way, imply that bound stellar clusters formed with a universal efficiency throughout early protogalaxies: by mass, always 0.26% of star-forming gas was converted into globulars rather than halo field stars. That this fraction is so robust in the face of extreme variations in local and global galaxy environment suggests that any parcel of gas needs primarily to exceed a relative density threshold in order to form a bound cluster of stars. Second, it is shown that a strict, empirical scaling of total binding energy with luminosity and Galactocentric position is a defining equation for a fundamental plane of Galactic globular clusters. The characteristics of this plane, which subsumes all other observable correlations between the structural parameters of globulars, provide a small but complete set of facts that must be explained by theories of cluster formation and evolution in the Milky Way. It is suggested that the E_b(L,r_{\\rm gc}) relation specifically resulted from star formation efficiencies having been systematically higher inside more massive protoglobular gas clumps.

  7. Our 6-year-old plantation in Escanaba is growing 3.6 dry tons per acre each year.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hybrids, aspen, and European larch in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. USDA: A guide to insect, disease The paper and oriented-strand board industries in Michigan consume a large quantity of aspen fiber each year. Prices for aspen pulpwood have hit record highs in recent years as a result of increased demand

  8. Collisionless Weibel shocks: Full formation mechanism and timing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bret, A. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Stockem, A. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Institut für Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum- und Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Narayan, R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51 Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Silva, L. O. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Collisionless shocks in plasmas play an important role in space physics (Earth's bow shock) and astrophysics (supernova remnants, relativistic jets, gamma-ray bursts, high energy cosmic rays). While the formation of a fluid shock through the steepening of a large amplitude sound wave has been understood for long, there is currently no detailed picture of the mechanism responsible for the formation of a collisionless shock. We unravel the physical mechanism at work and show that an electromagnetic Weibel shock always forms when two relativistic collisionless, initially unmagnetized, plasma shells encounter. The predicted shock formation time is in good agreement with 2D and 3D particle-in-cell simulations of counterstreaming pair plasmas. By predicting the shock formation time, experimental setups aiming at producing such shocks can be optimised to favourable conditions.

  9. EXFOR systems manual: Nuclear reaction data exchange format

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLane, V. [ed.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes EXFOR, the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. In addition to storing the data and its bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. The exchange format, as outlined, is designed to allow a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine).

  10. FORMATION GESTION DU STRESS CONTEXTE, PUBLIC, FINALITE DE LA FORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    FORMATION GESTION DU STRESS CONTEXTE, PUBLIC, FINALITE DE LA FORMATION La vie moderne et le stress : mettre en place des stratégies de gestion , étudier quelques aspects essentiels de la et cas cliniques composés par les participants ou fournis par le formateur . - Jeux de rôle en sous

  11. Projects of the year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, T.

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Peabody Hotel, Orlando, Florida was the site of Power Engineering magazine's 2006 Projects of the Year Awards Banquet, which kicked-off the Power-Gen International conference and exhibition. The Best Coal-fired Project was awarded to Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association Inc., owner of Springenville Unit 3. This is a 400 MW pulverized coal plant in Springeville, AZ, sited with two existing coal-fired units. Designed to fire Powder River Basin coal, it has low NOx burners and selective catalytic reduction for NOx control, dry flue gas desulfurization for SO{sub 2} control and a pulse jet baghouse for particulate control. It has a seven-stage feedwater heater and condensers to ensure maximum performance. Progress Energy-Carolinas' Asheville Power Station FGD and SCR Project was awarded the 2006 coal-fired Project Honorable Mention. This plant in Skyland, NC was required to significantly reduce NOx emissions. When completed, the improvements will reduce NOx by 93% compared to 1996 levels and SO{sub 2} by 93% compared to 2001 levels. Awards for best gas-fired, nuclear, and renewable/sustainable energy projects are recorded. The Sasyadko Coal-Mine Methane Cogeneration Plant near Donezk, Ukraine, was given the 2006 Honorable Mention for Best Renewable/Sustainable Energy Project. In November 2004, Ukraine was among 14 nations to launch the Methane to Markets partnership. The award-winning plant is fuelled by methane released during coal extraction. It generates 42 MW of power. 4 photos.

  12. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify, and to confirm or determine rate constants for, the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize soot and fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics. Stable and radical species profiles in the aromatics oxidation study are measured using molecular beam sampling with on-line mass spectrometry. The rate of soot formation measured by conventional optical techniques is found to support the hypotheses that particle inception occurs through reactive coagulation of high molecular weight PAH in competition with destruction by OHattack, and that the subsequent growth of the soot mass occurs through addition reactions of PAH and C[sub 2]H[sub 2] with the soot particles. During the first year of this reporting period, fullerenes C[sub 60] and C[sub 70] in substantial quantities were found in the flames being studied. The fullerenes were recovered, purified and spectroscopically identified. The yields of C[sub 60] and C[sub 70] were then determined over ranges of conditions in low-pressure premixed flames of benzene and oxygen.

  13. Star Formation in the Era of the Three Great Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott J. Wolk; Norbert Schulz; John Stauffer; Nancy Evans; Leisa Townsley; Tom Megeath; Dave Huenemoerder; Claus Leitherer; Ray Jayawardana

    2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes contributions and suggestions as presented at the Chandra Workshop Star Formation in the Era of Three Great Observatories conducted in July 2005. One of the declared goals of the workshop was to raise recognition within the star formation research community about the sensible future utilization of the space observatories Spitzer, Hubble, and Chandra in their remaining years of operation to tackle imminent questions of our understanding of stellar formation and the early evolution of stars. A white paper was generated to support the continuous and simultaneous usage of observatory time for star formation research. The contents of this paper have been presented and discussed at several other meetings during the course of 2005 and January 2006.

  14. Dual-Doppler observations of the formative stage of an asymmetric squall line system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamieson, Daniel Richard

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to document and explain the formation of a large asymmetric squall line system. Despite having a precipitation pattern similar to the conceptual model of an asymmetric squall line, the development and evolution...

  15. Evaluating permeability anisotropy in the early Jurassic Tilje formation, offshore mid-Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliyev, Kanan

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of evaluating permeability anisotropy in the Tilje Formation, Heidrum field, offshore mid-Norway, has been investigated by the Statoil Research Centre by a detailed combination of the geological and petrophysical data. The large...

  16. Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosol from the Direct Photolytic Generation of Organic Radicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, Sean Herbert

    The immense complexity inherent in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA)—due primarily to the large number of oxidation steps and reaction pathways involved—has limited the detailed understanding of its underlying ...

  17. Star formation in the multiverse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bousso, Raphael; Leichenauer, Stefan [Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7300 (United States) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8162 (United States)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a simple semianalytic model of the star formation rate as a function of time. We estimate the star formation rate for a wide range of values of the cosmological constant, spatial curvature, and primordial density contrast. Our model can predict such parameters in the multiverse, if the underlying theory landscape and the cosmological measure are known.

  18. Large scale tracking algorithms.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  19. Formation depths of Fraunhofer lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurtovenko, E A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have summed up our investigations performed in 1970--1993. The main task of this paper is clearly to show processes of formation of spectral lines as well as their distinction by validity and by location. For 503 photospheric lines of various chemical elements in the wavelength range 300--1000 nm we list in Table the average formation depths of the line depression and the line emission for the line centre and on the half-width of the line, the average formation depths of the continuum emission as well as the effective widths of the layer of the line depression formation. Dependence of average depths of line depression formation on excitation potential, equivalent widths, and central line depth are demonstrated by iron lines.

  20. Nonequilibrium Alfvenic Plasma Jets Associated with Spheromak Formation Deepak Kumar and Paul M. Bellan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellan, Paul M.

    . Bellan California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA (Received 6 February 2009-current arcs [4], Z-pinch formation [5], spheromak formation [6,7], and sustainment [8]) to extraterrestrial whereby the radial magnetic pinch force associated with I produces a large on-axis plasma pressure. Axial

  1. Dense water formation on the northwestern shelf of the Okhotsk Sea: 2. Quantifying the transports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    the rate of formation of Dense Shelf Water (DSW) due to brine rejection on the Okhotsk Sea northwestern- mediate water (NPIW) [Talley, 1991, 1993; Yasuda, 1997]. The initial overturn is driven by brine rejection ice formation and brine rejection into underlying waters. Newly formed DSW is advected by the large

  2. Endowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1982-2012 Fiscal Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management Company, based on reinvestment of all earnings on a monthly basis. (3) Values have been recastEndowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1982-2012 Fiscal Year Year-end market value (in 000's) Return Market Value of Endowment Funds as of June 30, 2012 Endowment Market Value Market Value % of Total Arts

  3. Endowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1981-2011 Fiscal Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Harvard Management Company, based on reinvestment of all earnings on a monthly basis. (3) Values have beenEndowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1981-2011 Fiscal Year Year-end market value (in 000's) Return REPORTS Market Value of Endowment Funds as of June 30, 2011 Endowment Market Value Market Value % of Total

  4. Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 Migration Year Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 1 #12;Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 NIDS NCCR North-South #12;Book Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 Publishers Nepal Institute of Development Studies (NIDS) G.P.O. Box: 7647, Kathmandu, Nepal Email: nids@mail.com.np Web: www.nids.org.np National Centre of Competence in Research

  5. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey

    2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility for the Department of Energy's Office of Science, providing high-performance computing (HPC) resources to more than 3,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. NERSC provides large-scale computing resources and, crucially, the support and expertise needed for scientists to make effective use of them. In November 2009, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and DOE's Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) held a workshop to characterize the HPC resources needed at NERSC to support HEP research through the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users needs and deploying resources to meet those demands. The workshop revealed several key points, in addition to achieving its goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The chief findings: (1) Science teams need access to a significant increase in computational resources to meet their research goals; (2) Research teams need to be able to read, write, transfer, store online, archive, analyze, and share huge volumes of data; (3) Science teams need guidance and support to implement their codes on future architectures; and (4) Projects need predictable, rapid turnaround of their computational jobs to meet mission-critical time constraints. This report expands upon these key points and includes others. It also presents a number of case studies as representative of the research conducted within HEP. Workshop participants were asked to codify their requirements in this case study format, summarizing their science goals, methods of solution, current and three-to-five year computing requirements, and software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, multi-core environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report includes a section that describes efforts already underway or planned at NERSC that address requirements collected at the workshop. NERSC has many initiatives in progress that address key workshop findings and are aligned with NERSC's strategic plans.

  6. Year in Review Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    Year in Review 2005-06 Annual Report Center for Latin American Studies University Center for International Studies University of Pittsburgh #12;2005-06 Year in Review 2 Message from the Acting Director

  7. Year in Review Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    Year in Review 2004-05 Annual Report Center for Latin American Studies University Center for International Studies University of Pittsburgh #12;2004-05 Year in Review 2 Message from the Director This has

  8. Year in Review Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    Year in Review 2006-07 Annual Report Center for Latin American Studies University Center for International Studies University of Pittsburgh #12;2006-07 Year in Review 2 Message from the Director Academic

  9. Cloud and Star Formation in Disk Galaxy Models with Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahul Shetty; Eve C. Ostriker

    2008-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We include feedback in global hydrodynamic simulations in order to study the star formation properties, and gas structure and dynamics, in models of galactic disks. We extend previous models by implementing feedback in gravitationally bound clouds: momentum is injected at a rate proportional to the star formation rate. This mechanical energy disperses cloud gas back into the surrounding ISM, truncating star formation in a given cloud, and raising the overall level of ambient turbulence. Propagating star formation can however occur as expanding shells collide, enhancing the density and triggering new cloud and star formation. By controlling the momentum injection per massive star and the specific star formation rate in dense gas, we find that the negative effects of high turbulence outweigh the positive ones, and in net feedback reduces the fraction of dense gas and thus the overall star formation rate. The properties of the large clouds that form are not, however, very sensitive to feedback, with cutoff masses of a few million solar masses, similar to observations. We find a relationship between the star formation rate surface density and the gas surface density with a power law index ~2 for our models with the largest dynamic range, consistent with theoretical expectations for our model of disk flaring. We point out that the value of the "Kennicutt-Schmidt" index depends on the thickness of the disk. With our simple feedback prescription (a single combined star formation event per cloud), we find that global spiral patterns are not sustained; less correlated feedback and smaller scale turbulence appear to be necessary for spiral patterns to persist.

  10. Negative feedback effects on star formation history and cosmic reionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei Wang; Jirong Mao; Shouping Xiang; Ye-Fei Yuan

    2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    After considering the effects of negative feedback on the process of star formation, we explore the relationship between star formation process and the associated feedback, by investigating how the mechanical feedback from supernovae(SNe) and radiative feedback from luminous objects regulate the star formation rate and therefore affect the cosmic reionization.Based on our present knowledge of the negative feedback theory and some numerical simulations, we construct an analytic model in the framework of the Lambda cold dark matter model. In certain parameter regions, our model can explain some observational results properly. In large halos(T_vir>10000 K), both mechanical and radiative feedback have a similar behavior: the relative strength of negative feedback reduces as the redshift decreases. In contrast, in small halos (T_virfeedback gets stronger when the redshift decreases. And the star formation rate in these small halos depends very weakly on the star-formation efficiency. Our results show that the radiative feedback is important for the early generation stars. It can suppress the star formation rate considerably. But the mechanical feedback from the SNe explosions is not able to affect the early star formation significantly. The early star formation in small-halo objects is likely to be self-regulated. The radiative and mechanical feedback dominates the star formation rate of the PopII/I stars all along. The feedback from first generation stars is very strong and should not be neglected. However, their effects on the cosmic reionization are not significant, which results in a small contribution to the optical depth of Thomson scattering.

  11. YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from cofiring coal with waste paper, sunflower hulls, and wood waste showed a broad spectrum of chemical and physical characteristics, according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C618 procedures. Higher-than-normal levels of magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxide were observed for the biomass-coal fly ash, which may impact utilization in cement replacement in concrete under ASTM requirements. Other niche markets for biomass-derived fly ash were explored. Research was conducted to develop/optimize a catalytic partial oxidation-based concept for a simple, low-cost fuel processor (reformer). Work progressed to evaluate the effects of temperature and denaturant on ethanol catalytic partial oxidation. A catalyst was isolated that had a yield of 24 mole percent, with catalyst coking limited to less than 15% over a period of 2 hours. In biodiesel research, conversion of vegetable oils to biodiesel using an alternative alkaline catalyst was demonstrated without the need for subsequent water washing. In work related to biorefinery technologies, a continuous-flow reactor was used to react ethanol with lactic acid prepared from an ammonium lactate concentrate produced in fermentations conducted at the EERC. Good yields of ester were obtained even though the concentration of lactic acid in the feed was low with respect to the amount of water present. Esterification gave lower yields of ester, owing to the lowered lactic acid content of the feed. All lactic acid fermentation from amylose hydrolysate test trials was completed. Management activities included a decision to extend several projects to December 31, 2003, because of delays in receiving biomass feedstocks for testing and acquisition of commercial matching funds. In strategic studies, methods for producing acetate esters for high-value fibers, fuel additives, solvents, and chemical intermediates were discussed with several commercial entities. Commercial industries have an interest in efficient biomass gasification designs but are waiting for economic incentives. Utility, biorefinery, pulp and paper, or o

  12. ATNI Mid-year Convention

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Mid-year Convention will be hosted by the Chehalis Tribe.

  13. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil...

  14. INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES Text formatted by Wintecs Typesetters, Bangalore (Ph. 2332 7311).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhingra, Narender K.

    YEAR BOOK 2014 INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES #12;Text formatted by Wintecs Typesetters, Bangalore (Ph Academy of Sciences C.V. Raman Avenue Post Box No. 8005 Sadashivanagar Post Bangalore 560 080 India . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Role of the Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Statutes

  15. Detection and cultivation of indigenous microorganisms in Mesozoic claystone core samples from the Opalinus Clay Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    the Opalinus Clay Formation (Mont Terri Rock Laboratory) L. Mauclaire a,*, J.A. McKenzie a , B. Schwyn b , P various deep-subsurface environments, the persistence of microbial activity in clay- stones buried life in the Opalinus Clay Formation (Mesozoic claystone, 170 million years old) at the Mont Terri Rock

  16. Feedback Processes [in Massive Star Formation]: A Theoretical Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mordecai-Mark Mac Low

    2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    I review the evidence for the importance of feedback from massive stars at small and large scales. The feedback mechanisms include accretion luminosity, ionizing radiation, collimated outflows, and stellar winds. The good news is that feedback doesn't entirely prevent the formation of massive stars, while the bad news is that we don't know what does limit their masses. Feedback from massive stars also influences their surroundings. I argue that this does not produce a triggering efficiency above unity, nor does it prevent lots of prompt star formation in GMCs, though it may preserve massive remnants of the clouds for many dynamical times.

  17. Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many fractured carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). The process of using dilute anionic surfactants in alkaline solutions has been investigated in this work for oil recovery from fractured oil-wet carbonate reservoirs both experimentally and numerically. This process is a surfactant-aided gravity drainage where surfactant diffuses into the matrix, lowers IFT and contact angle, which decrease capillary pressure and increase oil relative permeability enabling gravity to drain the oil up. Anionic surfactants have been identified which at dilute concentration of 0.05 wt% and optimal salinity can lower the interfacial tension and change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil. The force of adhesion in AFM of oil-wet regions changes after anionic surfactant treatment to values similar to those of water-wet regions. The AFM topography images showed that the oil-wetting material was removed from the surface by the anionic surfactant treatment. Adsorption studies indicate that the extent of adsorption for anionic surfactants on calcite minerals decreases with increase in pH and with decrease in salinity. Surfactant adsorption can be minimized in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (20-42% OOIP in 50 days; up to 60% in 200 days) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Small (<10%) initial gas saturation does not affect significantly the rate of oil recovery in the imbibition process, but larger gas saturation decreases the oil recovery rate. As the core permeability decreases, the rate of oil recovery reduces, and this reduction can be scaled by the gravitational dimensionless time. Mechanistic simulation of core-scale surfactant brine imbibition matches the experimentally observed imbibition data. In-situ distributions observed through simulation indicate that surfactant diffusion (which depends on temperature and molecular weight) is the rate limiting step. Most of the oil is recovered through gravitational forces. Oil left behind at the end of this process is at its residual oil saturation. The capillary and Bond numbers are not large enough to affect the residual oil saturation. At the field-scale, 50% of the recoverable oil is produced in about 3 years if the fracture spacing is 1 m and 25% if 10 m, in the example simulated. Decreasing fracture spacing and height, increasing permeability, and increasing the extent of wettability alteration increase the rate of oil recovery from surfactant-aided gravity drainage. This dilute surfactant aided gravity-drainage process is relatively cheap. The chemical cost for a barrel of oil produced is expected to be less than $1.

  18. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  19. Environmental monitoring report for Calendar Year 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the 1986 environmental monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. Two of three large tokamak machines, the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) were in operation during the year. The Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX) was shut down in December 1985 to undergo major modifications, and will recommence operations in 1987. PLT was shut down in December 1986. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak and the Radio-Frequency Test Facility (RFTF) were operated on a limited basis in 1986. The Environmental Committee became a standing committee of the Executive Safety Board (ESB) and continued to review items of environmental importance. During CY86 no adverse effects to the environment or public resulted from any operational program activities at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental regulations.

  20. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY83 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. Besides the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) and Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX), PPPL's largest tokamak, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) had a full year of operation. A phased approach has been planned to assure the proper level of monitoring to coincide with the TFTR program. During CY83 there were no adverse effects to the environment resulting from any operational program at PPPL and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations.

  1. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY84 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The Princeton Large Torus (PLT), Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX), and PPPL's largest tokamak, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) had a complete year of run time. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak was in operation and the RF Test Facility came on-line. The phased approach of TFTR environmental monitoring continued with the addition of neutron monitors. During CY84 there were no adverse effects to the environment resulting from any operational program at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations.

  2. Use-driven concept formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Jennifer M. (Jennifer Marie)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When faced with a complex task, humans often identify domain-specific concepts that make the task more tractable. In this thesis, I investigate the formation of domain-specific concepts of this sort. I propose a set of ...

  3. Theoretical Tools for Large Scale Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Bond; L. Kofman; D. Pogosyan; J. Wadsley

    1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the main theoretical aspects of the structure formation paradigm which impinge upon wide angle surveys: the early universe generation of gravitational metric fluctuations from quantum noise in scalar inflaton fields; the well understood and computed linear regime of CMB anisotropy and large scale structure (LSS) generation; the weakly nonlinear regime, where higher order perturbation theory works well, and where the cosmic web picture operates, describing an interconnected LSS of clusters bridged by filaments, with membranes as the intrafilament webbing. Current CMB+LSS data favour the simplest inflation-based $\\Lambda$CDM models, with a primordial spectral index within about 5% of scale invariant and $\\Omega_\\Lambda \\approx 2/3$, similar to that inferred from SNIa observations, and with open CDM models strongly disfavoured. The attack on the nonlinear regime with a variety of N-body and gas codes is described, as are the excursion set and peak-patch semianalytic approaches to object collapse. The ingredients are mixed together in an illustrative gasdynamical simulation of dense supercluster formation.

  4. CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bekki, Kenji [ICRAR, M468, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Tsujimoto, Takuji [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We adopt a new chemical evolution model for the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and thereby investigate its past star formation and chemical enrichment histories. The delay time distribution of Type Ia supernovae recently revealed by Type Ia supernova surveys is incorporated self-consistently into the new model. The principle results are summarized as follows. The present gas mass fraction and stellar metallicity as well as the higher [Ba/Fe] in metal-poor stars at [Fe/H] < -1.5 can be more self-consistently explained by models with steeper initial mass functions. The observed higher [Mg/Fe] ({>=}0.3) at [Fe/H] {approx} -0.6 and higher [Ba/Fe] (>0.5) at [Fe/H] {approx} -0.3 could be due to significantly enhanced star formation about 2 Gyr ago. The observed overall [Ca/Fe]-[Fe/H] relation and remarkably low [Ca/Fe] (< - 0.2) at [Fe/H] > -0.6 are consistent with models with short-delay supernova Ia and with the more efficient loss of Ca possibly caused by an explosion mechanism of Type II supernovae. Although the metallicity distribution functions do not show double peaks in the models with a starburst about 2 Gyr ago, they show characteristic double peaks in the models with double starbursts {approx}200 Myr and {approx}2 Gyr ago. The observed apparent dip of [Fe/H] around {approx}1.5 Gyr ago in the age-metallicity relation can be reproduced by models in which a large amount ({approx}10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }) of metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -1) gas can be accreted onto the LMC.

  5. RESIDUA UPGRADING EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENT MODELS: COKE FORMATION PREDICTABILITY MAPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John F. Schabron; A. Troy Pauli; Joseph F. Rovani Jr.

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dispersed particle solution model of petroleum residua structure was used to develop predictors for pyrolytic coke formation. Coking Indexes were developed in prior years that measure how near a pyrolysis system is to coke formation during the coke formation induction period. These have been demonstrated to be universally applicable for residua regardless of the source of the material. Coking onset is coincidental with the destruction of the ordered structure and the formation of a multiphase system. The amount of coke initially formed appears to be a function of the free solvent volume of the original residua. In the current work, three-dimensional coke make predictability maps were developed at 400 C, 450 C, and 500 C (752 F, 842 F, and 932 F). These relate residence time and free solvent volume to the amount of coke formed at a particular pyrolysis temperature. Activation energies for two apparent types of zero-order coke formation reactions were estimated. The results provide a new tool for ranking residua, gauging proximity to coke formation, and predicting initial coke make tendencies.

  6. STAR FORMATION IN NUCLEAR RINGS OF BARRED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, Woong-Tae, E-mail: seowy@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe (CEOU), Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear rings in barred galaxies are sites of active star formation. We use hydrodynamic simulations to study the temporal and spatial behavior of star formation occurring in nuclear rings of barred galaxies where radial gas inflows are triggered solely by a bar potential. The star formation recipes include a density threshold, an efficiency, conversion of gas to star particles, and delayed momentum feedback via supernova explosions. We find that the star formation rate (SFR) in a nuclear ring is roughly equal to the mass inflow rate to the ring, while it has a weak dependence on the total gas mass in the ring. The SFR typically exhibits a strong primary burst followed by weak secondary bursts before declining to very small values. The primary burst is associated with the rapid gas infall to the ring due to the bar growth, while the secondary bursts are caused by re-infall of the ejected gas from the primary burst. While star formation in observed rings persists episodically over a few Gyr, the duration of active star formation in our models lasts for only about half of the bar growth time, suggesting that the bar potential alone is unlikely to be responsible for gas supply to the rings. When the SFR is low, most star formation occurs at the contact points between the ring and the dust lanes, leading to an azimuthal age gradient of young star clusters. When the SFR is large, on the other hand, star formation is randomly distributed over the whole circumference of the ring, resulting in no apparent azimuthal age gradient. Since the ring shrinks in size with time, star clusters also exhibit a radial age gradient, with younger clusters found closer to the ring. The cluster mass function is well described by a power law, with a slope depending on the SFR. Giant gas clouds in the rings have supersonic internal velocity dispersions and are gravitationally bound.

  7. Microprocessors --10 Years Back, 10 Years Gurindar S. Sohi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohi, Guri S.

    Microprocessors -- 10 Years Back, 10 Years Ahead Gurindar S. Sohi Computer Sciences Department computer architects with an increasing number of faster transistors with which to build microprocessors. In the past decade, architects have seized these opportunities to build microprocessors that bear lit- tle

  8. Compost 101Turn this year's trash into next year's treasure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Compost 101Turn this year's trash into next year's treasure Filling and Maintaining Compost Georgia://ceps.georgiasouthern.edu/garden This brochure is funded in part by a grant from a Museums for America Grant. Types of Composting Bins To fill your compost bin, alternate brown and green materials. Keep in mind that the ideal ratio is three

  9. Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission from Large Scale Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobardzic, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For more than a decade now the complete origin of the diffuse gamma-ray emission background (EGRB) has been unknown. Major components like unresolved star-forming galaxies (making 10GeV. Moreover, we show that, even though the gamma-ray emission arising from structure formation shocks at galaxy clusters is below previous estimates, these large scale shocks can still give an important, and even dominant at high energies, contribution to the EGRB. Future detections of cluster gamma-ray emission would make our upper limit of the extragalactic gamma-ray emission from structure-formation process, a firm prediction, and give us deeper insight in evolution of these large scale shock.

  10. Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dursch, Thomas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the University of California. Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusionsub-freezing conditions, ice forms in the gas-diffusionstrategies exist to prevent ice formation, there is little

  11. REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT: Natural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    FORMAT: Natural Gas Use in Transportation REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT: Natural Gas Use in Transportation RCC Workplan NGV.PDF More Documents &...

  12. Mixing device for materials with large density differences

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregg, David W. (Moraga, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An auger-tube pump mixing device for mixing materials with large density differences while maintaining low stirring RPM and low power consumption. The mixing device minimizes the formation of vortexes and minimizes the incorporation of small bubbles in the liquid during mixing. By avoiding the creation of a vortex the device provides efficient stirring of full containers without spillage over the edge. Also, the device solves the problem of effective mixing in vessels where the liquid height is large compared to the diameter. Because of the gentle stirring or mixing by the device, it has application for biomedical uses where cell damage is to be avoided.

  13. Mixing device for materials with large density differences

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregg, D.W.

    1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An auger-tube pump mixing device is disclosed for mixing materials with large density differences while maintaining low stirring RPM and low power consumption. The mixing device minimizes the formation of vortexes and minimizes the incorporation of small bubbles in the liquid during mixing. By avoiding the creation of a vortex the device provides efficient stirring of full containers without spillage over the edge. Also, the device solves the problem of effective mixing in vessels where the liquid height is large compared to the diameter. Because of the gentle stirring or mixing by the device, it has application for biomedical uses where cell damage is to be avoided. 2 figs.

  14. Seasonal Modulation of Eddy Kinetic Energy and Its Formation Mechanism in the Southeast Indian Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    energy and exert profound impacts on large-scale ocean circulations. Satellite altimeter ob- servations- sociations with the large-scale oceanic circulations and the climate. The global eddy kinetic energy (EKESeasonal Modulation of Eddy Kinetic Energy and Its Formation Mechanism in the Southeast Indian

  15. Large Scale Energy Storage: From Nanomaterials to Large Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    Large Scale Energy Storage: From Nanomaterials to Large Systems Wednesday October 26, 2011, Babbio energy storage devices. Specifically, this talk discusses 1) the challenges for grid scale of emergent technologies with ultralow costs on new energy storage materials and mechanisms. Dr. Jun Liu

  16. QUENCHES IN LARGE SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhard, P.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    QUENCHES IN LARGE SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS. P. H. Eberhard,Study of an Unprotected Superconducting Coil Going Normal,"Method for Testing Superconducting Magnets," LBL Physics

  17. Geologic Study of the Coso Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Kamola; J. D. Walker

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been great advances in the last 20 years in understanding the volcanic, structural, geophysical, and petrologic development of the Coso Range and Coso geothermal field. These studies have provided a wealth of knowledge concerning the geology of the area, including general structural characteristics and kinematic history. One element missing from this dataset was an understanding of the sedimentology and stratigraphy of well-exposed Cenozoic sedimentary strata - the Coso Formation. A detailed sedimentation and tectonics study of the Coso Formation was undertaken to provide a more complete picture of the development of the Basin and Range province in this area. Detailed mapping and depositional analysis distinguishes separate northern and southern depocenters, each with its own accommodation and depositional history. While strata in both depocenters is disrupted by faults, these faults show modest displacement, and the intensity and magnitude of faulting does no t record significant extension. For this reason, the extension between the Sierran and Coso blocks is interpreted as minor in comparison to range bounding faults in adjacent areas of the Basin and Range.

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2012 2013 SES 2 1 -50.00% EJEK 10 9 -10.00% EN 04 27 24 -11.11% NN (Engineering) 28 24 -14.29% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 31 29 -6.45% NU (TechAdmin Support) 4...

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A7948 27069

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A7948

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A794826

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A79482693

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A7948269300

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A794826930002

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A794826930002

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861119

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008748611196

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111969

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111969

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861119695

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008748611196957

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861119695789

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.

  19. A basic gesture and motion format for virtual reality multisensory applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luciani, Annie; Couroussé, Damien; Castagné, Nicolas; Cadoz, Claude; Florens, Jean-Loup

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The question of encoding movements such as those produced by human gestures may become central in the coming years, given the growing importance of movement data exchanges between heterogeneous systems and applications (musical applications, 3D motion control, virtual reality interaction, etc.). For the past 20 years, various formats have been proposed for encoding movement, especially gestures. Though, these formats, at different degrees, were designed in the context of quite specific applications (character animation, motion capture, musical gesture, biomechanical concerns...). The article introduce a new file format, called GMS (for 'Gesture and Motion Signal'), with the aim of being more low-level and generic, by defining the minimal features a format carrying movement/gesture information needs, rather than by gathering all the information generally given by the existing formats. The article argues that, given its growing presence in virtual reality situations, the "gesture signal" itself must be encoded,...

  20. HIERARCHICAL STRUCTURE FORMATION AND MODES OF STAR FORMATION IN HICKSON COMPACT GROUP 31

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallagher, S. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Durrell, P. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Elmegreen, D. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States); Chandar, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606-3390 (United States); English, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MN R3T 2N2 (Canada); Charlton, J. C.; Gronwall, C.; Young, J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E. [Laboratory for X-ray Astrophysics, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Johnson, K. E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Mendes de Oliveira, C. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica, e Ciencias Atmosfericas da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Whitmore, B.; Maybhate, Aparna [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218-2463 (United States); Zabludoff, Ann [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)], E-mail: sgalla4@uwo.ca

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The handful of low-mass, late-type galaxies that comprise Hickson Compact Group 31 (HCG 31) is in the midst of complex, ongoing gravitational interactions, evocative of the process of hierarchical structure formation at higher redshifts. With sensitive, multicolor Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we characterize the large population of < 10 Myr old star clusters (SCs) that suffuse the system. From the colors and luminosities of the young SCs, we find that the galaxies in HCG 31 follow the same universal scaling relations as actively star-forming galaxies in the local universe despite the unusual compact group environment. Furthermore, the specific frequency of the globular cluster system is consistent with the low end of galaxies of comparable masses locally. This, combined with the large mass of neutral hydrogen and tight constraints on the amount of intragroup light, indicate that the group is undergoing its first epoch of interaction-induced star formation. In both the main galaxies and the tidal-dwarf candidate, F, stellar complexes, which are sensitive to the magnitude of disk turbulence, have both sizes and masses more characteristic of z = 1-2 galaxies. After subtracting the light from compact sources, we find no evidence for an underlying old stellar population in F-it appears to be a truly new structure. The low-velocity dispersion of the system components, available reservoir of H I, and current star formation rate of {approx}10 M {sub sun} yr{sup -1} indicate that HCG 31 is likely to both exhaust its cold gas supply and merge within {approx}1 Gyr. We conclude that the end product will be an isolated, X-ray-faint, low-mass elliptical.

  1. University Housing! First Year Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    community -Committed faculty member for academic success -Group Work focused -Learning Community Assistant for academic success -Group Work focused -Learning Community Assistant (LCA) Living Learning Communities (LLCs) + + The choice is yours! First Year Experience Thematic First Year Student Housing focused around development

  2. Outlook: The Next Twenty Years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    2003-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    I present an outlook for the next twenty years in particle physics. I start with the big questions in our field, broken down into four categories: horizontal, vertical, heaven, and hell. Then I discuss how we attack the bigquestions in each category during the next twenty years. I argue for a synergy between many different approaches taken in our field.

  3. A paleoenvironmental study of the Lower Mississippian Caballero Formation and Andrecito member of the Lake Valley Formation in the south-central Sacramento Mountains, Otero County, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Peter Gillham

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formations. . . . . . . 3 Southern exposure of Muleshoe Mound and flank beds. . . Isopach of Mississippian strata in southwestern and south-central New Mexico (from Kottlowski . 1963). . . . . . . . . 14 Mountains and counties of southwestern and south... of section 12 in Deadman Canyon. 36 Photographs of bed types from the Andrecito member and large nodules from the Caballero Formation in San Andres Canyon. 39 12 Photographs of erosion of the lowermost Andrecito member in San Andres Canyon. 41 13 Photog...

  4. A study of the factors influencing forty years' operations on a large Texas cattle ranch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Joseph Luther

    1947-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    %% 1954 1' 195$ 1$5V 1958 XQN 1440 1441 1048 l, 945 i%44 40 0 lklA graduation ?n4 3alo uf Beef Por gew The total pounds uf beef pmduood and total pounds uf beef ssxd ysr ooa ara gives in, Table, . XX. Total pounds of beef produced...%1~455 Xo954s905 1 ~540~809 1~~B4~819 1~515, 4lo 1~814, 946 ~l ?Tot%84 1~014, 4~)l 1~QPA~M5 A definite uyward troud in total yuuni. 's uf b wf yrudussd cued total peends of INst sold yor socc 53 sviusnt, fry . "5, "mrs '3s ~lnos 1337 the scssbsr...

  5. 66 million years agopresent25266 million years ago541252 million years ago PRECAMBRIAN ERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    display will be based around four key themes: evolution of life, active Earth, mineral wealth and continental drift. Evolution of lifeIntroduction Active Earth n Why do we have volcanoes and earthquakes? n, volcanoes, earthquakes, tsunamis, the formation of mountains and the rock cycle. Our collections

  6. Guidelines for Managing Large Dairy Herds in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, R. C.; Parsons, Guy S.; Meekma, A. M.; White, Thomas H. Jr.

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the years in these areas, large dairy herds have developed that are often heavily de- pendent upon purchased feedstuffs. The competition for land for alternative uses and the high cost of irrigation water has curtailed forage production on many diary.... In recent years the supply of high-quality replacement cows available for purchase has decreased. More emphasis is being placed upon raising replace- ments. A few dairymen start their own calves and then contract to have them grown out by an experienced...

  7. South Mississippi's Hosston, Sligo formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hosston and Sligo formations, of Early Cretaceous age, lie above the Cotton Valley group and below the Pine Island formation. The beds dip southwesterly and become thicker within the Mississippi Interior Salt basin, where virtually all of the Hosston/Sligo oil and gas production occurs. The 3500 ft of alternating sands and shales found at 10,000-17,000 ft depths have the attributes of fluvial deltaic sediments. The Newsom, Bowie Creek, and Seminary fields are representative of recent gas discoveries in the Hosston/Sligo.

  8. Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

  9. "Sabiha Gök?cen's 80-year-old secret" : Kemalist nation formation and the Ottoman Armenians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulgen, Fatma

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Caucasia. By the end of the Balkan wars and on the eve ofafter the losses of the Balkan wars and a Turkish nationaleconomy beginning with the Balkan Wars, the great project of

  10. "Sabiha Gök?cen's 80-year-old secret" : Kemalist nation formation and the Ottoman Armenians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulgen, Fatma

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    especially in the Kurdistan region for administrative andIskalanm?? Bar??, 61-169. ?Kurdistan‘ and ?Armenia‘ haveto designate where Kurdistan ends and where Armenia begins

  11. "Sabiha Gök?cen's 80-year-old secret" : Kemalist nation formation and the Ottoman Armenians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulgen, Fatma

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Yay?nlar?, Aly, Gotz, Hitler‘s Beneficiaries: Plunder,had first- hand experience in Hitler‘s ethnic cleansing andfrom countries where Hitler had first practiced cultural

  12. Visualizing Twenty Years of Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potel, Mike; Wong, Pak C.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications marks the 20th anniversary of the Applications department as a regular feature of the magazine. We thought it might be interesting to look back at the 20 years of Applications department articles to assess its evolution over that time. By aggregating all twenty years of articles and applying a little statistical and visual analytics, we’ve uncovered some interesting characteristics and trends we thought we’d share to mark this 20 year milestone.

  13. Method of fracturing a geological formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

  14. Dark Radiation in Anisotropic LARGE Volume Compactifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen Angus

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Dark radiation is a compelling extension to $\\Lambda$CDM: current experimental results hint at $\\Delta N_{\\rm eff} \\gtrsim 0.5$, which is increased to $\\Delta N_{\\rm eff} \\simeq 1$ if the recent BICEP2 results are included. In recent years dark radiation has been considered in the context of string theory models such as the LARGE Volume Scenario of type IIB string theory, forging a link between present-day cosmological observations and models of physics at the Planck scale. In this paper I consider an extension of the LARGE Volume Scenario in which the bulk volume is stabilised by two moduli instead of one. Consequently, the lightest modulus no longer corresponds to the compactification volume but instead to a transverse direction in the bulk geometry. I focus on scenarios in which sequestering of soft masses is achieved by localising the Standard Model on D3 branes at a singularity. The fraction of dark radiation produced in such models vastly exceeds experimental bounds, ruling out the sequestered LARGE Volume Scenario with two bulk moduli as a model of the early Universe.

  15. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may include dolomite and hydrocarbons. Methods may include providing heat at less than the decomposition temperature of dolomite from one or more heaters to at least a portion of the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids are mobilized in the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  16. Sealing Ducts in Large Commercial Buildings with Aerosolized Sealant M. P. Modera, O. Brzozowski**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-42414 1 Sealing Ducts in Large Commercial Buildings with Aerosolized Sealant Particles M. P buildings is on the order of 10 kWh/m2 per year (1 kWh/ft2 ). We have tested, in two large commercial technology is capable of sealing the leaks in a large commercial building duct system within a reasonable

  17. Formation Interuniversitaire de Physique Hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balbus, Steven

    Formation Interuniversitaire de Physique Module : Hydrodynamics S. Balbus 1 #12;TO LEARN.8.3 Piston Driven into Gas Cylinder . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 4.8.4 Driven Acoustic Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 6.2.3 Inertial Drag of a Sphere by an Ideal Fluid . . . . . . . 113 6.3 Line Vortices and Flow

  18. Structurally Electromagnetic Formation Flight (EMFF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Structurally connected secondary mirror EMFF secondary mirror EMFF Design Electromagnetic Formation for a smaller, simpler system. µEMFF investigates the use of conventional conductors, capacitors, and solar propellants that often limit lifetime, the EMFF system uses solar power to energize a magnetic field

  19. Star Formation in the Multiverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphael Bousso; Stefan Leichenauer

    2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a simple semi-analytic model of the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of time. We estimate the SFR for a wide range of values of the cosmological constant, spatial curvature, and primordial density contrast. Our model can predict such parameters in the multiverse, if the underlying theory landscape and the cosmological measure are known.

  20. Earth and Terrestrial Planet Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Seth A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth and composition of Earth is a direct consequence of planet formation throughout the Solar System. We discuss the known history of the Solar System, the proposed stages of growth and how the early stages of planet formation may be dominated by pebble growth processes. Pebbles are small bodies whose strong interactions with the nebula gas lead to remarkable new accretion mechanisms for the formation of planetesimals and the growth of planetary embryos. Many of the popular models for the later stages of planet formation are presented. The classical models with the giant planets on fixed orbits are not consistent with the known history of the Solar System, fail to create a high Earth/Mars mass ratio, and, in many cases, are also internally inconsistent. The successful Grand Tack model creates a small Mars, a wet Earth, a realistic asteroid belt and the mass-orbit structure of the terrestrial planets. In the Grand Tack scenario, growth curves for Earth most closely match a Weibull model. The feeding zon...

  1. VEHICLE NETWORKS: ACHIEVING REGULAR FORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VEHICLE NETWORKS: ACHIEVING REGULAR FORMATION MADALENA CHAVES, ROBERT DAY, LUCIA GOMEZ a network of vehicles exchanging information among themselves with the intention of achieving a specified the performance of the vehicle network. A stochastic model for information flow is also considered, allowing

  2. Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estalella, Robert

    Chapter 4 Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction We now begin to trace the journey towards a star. How long does this take? The answer is surprisingly short: a good many clouds already contain new stars and these stars tend to be young. The typical cloud cannot spend long, if any time at all

  3. Accountability report - fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the US NRC`s accountability report for fiscal year 1997. Topics include uses of funds, financial condition, program performance, management accountability, and the audited financial statement.

  4. Development of a large format direct detection device for three dimensional transmission electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milazzo, Anna-Clare

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F. Duttweiler, J.C. Bouwer, S.T. Peltier, M.H. Ellisman, andDuttweiler, J.C. Bouwer, S.T. Peltier, M. Ellisman, and N.H.Duttweiler, J.C. Bouwer, S.T. Peltier, A.C. Milazzo, and M.

  5. Large-Eddy Simulation of Pulverized Coal Jet Flame -Effect of Oxygen Concentration on NOx formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muto, Masaya; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Kurose, Ryoichi; Komori, Satoru; Balusamy, Saravanan; Hochgreb, Simone

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    than those by using other fossil fuels [1]. It is therefore important to develop clean coal technology for pulverized coal fired power plants, in order to control such emissions and to reduce the environmental impact. Regarding the reduction... of environmental impact of CO2, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is expected as a key technology, and it is believed that oxy-fuel pulverized coal combus- tion, in which gas mixture of oxygen (O2) and CO2 are used instead of air as oxidizer, has advantages...

  6. SCUBA-2 instrument: an application of large-format superconducting bolometer arrays for submillimetre astronomy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollister, Matthew Ian

    This thesis concerns technical aspects related to the design and operation of the submillimetre common-user bolometer array 2 (SCUBA-2) instrument, a new wide-field camera for submillimetre astronomy currently undergoing ...

  7. Effect of tab design on large-format Li-ion cell performance , Gang Luo b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to much lower energy density than their coin cell benchmarks. In this work, a 3D computational methodology the cell is operated at high power, which is ubiqui- tous in hybrid and pure electric vehicle (HEV

  8. Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  9. Characterization of a Large Format HgCdTe on Si Focal Plane Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figer, Donald F.

    . Keasler2 Rochester Institute of Technology 1 , Raytheon Vision Systems 2 ABSTRACT The Center for Detectors (CfD) at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) and Raytheon Vision Systems (RVS) are advancing. The Center for Detectors (CfD) at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) and Raytheon Vision Systems

  10. Large-Eddy Simulation of Pulverized Coal Jet Flame -Effect of Oxygen Concentration on NOx formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muto, Masaya; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Kurose, Ryoichi; Komori, Satoru; Balusamy, Saravanan; Hochgreb, Simone

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    than those by using other fossil fuels [1]. It is therefore important to develop clean coal technology for pulverized coal fired power plants, in order to control such emissions and to reduce the environmental impact. Regarding the reduction...

  11. Formation of Thick, Large-Area Nanoparticle Superlatices in Lithographically Defined Geometries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akey, A.; Yang, L.; Lu, C.; Herman, I.P.

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Superlattices of colloidal nanocrystals hold the promise of new nanomaterials with tunable properties. The positioning and size of these structures are often poorly controlled after self-assembly from the solution phase, making studies of their properties difficult. We report the fabrication of {approx}100 layer thick, three-dimensional superlattices on a substrate with controlled lateral placement. This novel fabrication technique generates long-range order over the micrometer scale and controlled placement by employing lithographic patterning and microfluidic flow. Keywords: Nanoparticles; superlattice; self assembly; microfluidics; ordered array.

  12. Revised large mammal biostratigraphy and biochronology of the Barstow Formation (Middle Miocene), California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pagnac, Darrin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stratigraphy, and sedimentology of a rapidly extendedand Range Extension Using Sedimentology and Stratigraphy.

  13. Modeling of Nonuniform Degradation in Large-Format Li-ion Batteries (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Kim, G. H.; Pesaran, A.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shows results of an empirical model capturing effects of both storage and cycling and developed the lithium ion nickel cobalt aluminum advanced battery chemistry.

  14. Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * S H IMaterialsDepartment of EnergyDie

  15. ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a Densified Large Square Bale Format

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 A Strategic Framework for SMRA View from the-1Assessment

  16. Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311,OfficialProductsUptakeMultifamily ProjectsBatteries |

  17. Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311,OfficialProductsUptakeMultifamily ProjectsBatteries |Batteries

  18. Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311,OfficialProductsUptakeMultifamily ProjectsBatteries

  19. Investigation of transition to turbulence at low Reynolds numbers using Implicit Large Eddy Simulations with a Discontinuous Galerkin method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uranga Cabrera, Alejandra (Uranga)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work predicts the formation of laminar separation bubbles at low Reynolds numbers and the related transition to turbulence. In addition to being one of the first Implicit Large Eddy Simulation studies using a ...

  20. Large Area Vacuum Deposited Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Peter M.

    2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    It's easy to make the myriad of types of large area and decorative coatings for granted. We probably don't even think about most of them; the low-e and heat mirror coatings on our windows and car windows, the mirrors in displays, antireflection coatings on windows and displays, protective coatings on aircraft windows, heater coatings on windshields and aircraft windows, solar reflectors, thin film solar cells, telescope mirrors, Hubble mirrors, transparent conductive coatings, and the list goes on. All these products require large deposition systems and chambers. Also, don't forget that large batches of small substrates or parts are coated in large chambers. In order to be cost effective hundreds of ophthalmic lenses, automobile reflectors, display screens, lamp reflectors, cell phone windows, laser reflectors, DWDM filters, are coated in batches.

  1. The Description of Large Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitman, Kent

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we discuss the problems associated with the description and manipulation of large systems when their sources are not maintained as single fields. We show why and how tools that address these issues, such ...

  2. Analytic bootstrap at large spin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apratim Kaviraj; Kallol Sen; Aninda Sinha

    2015-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We use analytic conformal bootstrap methods to determine the anomalous dimensions and OPE coefficients for large spin operators in general conformal field theories in four dimensions containing a scalar operator of conformal dimension $\\Delta_\\phi$. It is known that such theories will contain an infinite sequence of large spin operators with twists approaching $2\\Delta_\\phi+2n$ for each integer $n$. By considering the case where such operators are separated by a twist gap from other operators at large spin, we analytically determine the $n$, $\\Delta_\\phi$ dependence of the anomalous dimensions. We find that for all $n$, the anomalous dimensions are negative for $\\Delta_\\phi$ satisfying the unitarity bound, thus extending the Nachtmann theorem to non-zero $n$. In the limit when $n$ is large, we find agreement with the AdS/CFT prediction corresponding to the Eikonal limit of a 2-2 scattering with dominant graviton exchange.

  3. Analytic bootstrap at large spin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaviraj, Apratim; Sinha, Aninda

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use analytic conformal bootstrap methods to determine the anomalous dimensions and OPE coefficients for large spin operators in general conformal field theories in four dimensions containing a scalar operator of conformal dimension $\\Delta_\\phi$. It is known that such theories will contain an infinite sequence of large spin operators with twists approaching $2\\Delta_\\phi+2n$ for each integer $n$. By considering the case where such operators are separated by a twist gap from other operators at large spin, we analytically determine the $n$, $\\Delta_\\phi$ dependence of the anomalous dimensions. We find that for all $n$, the anomalous dimensions are negative for $\\Delta_\\phi$ satisfying the unitarity bound, thus extending the Nachtmann theorem to non-zero $n$. In the limit when $n$ is large, we find agreement with the AdS/CFT prediction corresponding to the Eikonal limit of a 2-2 scattering with dominant graviton exchange.

  4. Large-scale pool fires 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhaus, Thomas; Welch, Stephen; Carvel, Ricky O; Torero, Jose L

    2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of research into the burning behaviour of large pool fires and fuel spill fires is presented. The features which distinguish such fires from smaller pool fires are mainly associated with the fire dynamics at low ...

  5. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile element. Now, another use has been found: magnets. One would not expect pure...

  6. ON STAR FORMATION RATES AND STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF GALAXIES OUT TO z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wuyts, Stijn; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Lutz, Dieter; Nordon, Raanan; Berta, Stefano; Genzel, Reinhard; Magnelli, Benjamin; Poglitsch, Albrecht [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Altieri, Bruno [Herschel Science Centre, ESAC, Villanueva de la Canada, 28691 Madrid (Spain); Andreani, Paola [ESO, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Aussel, Herve; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service d'Astrophysique, Bat.709, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Bongiovanni, Angel; Cepa, Jordi; Garcia, Ana Perez [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38205 La Laguna (Spain); Cimatti, Andrea [Departamento di Astronomia, Universita di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Koekemoer, Anton M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Maiolino, Roberto [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via di Frascati 33, 00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); McGrath, Elizabeth J. [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare multi-wavelength star formation rate (SFR) indicators out to z {approx} 3 in the GOODS-South field. Our analysis uniquely combines U to 8 {mu}m photometry from FIREWORKS, MIPS 24 {mu}m and PACS 70, 100, and 160 {mu}m photometry from the PEP, and H{alpha} spectroscopy from the SINS survey. We describe a set of conversions that lead to a continuity across SFR indicators. A luminosity-independent conversion from 24 {mu}m to total infrared luminosity yields estimates of L{sub IR} that are in the median consistent with the L{sub IR} derived from PACS photometry, albeit with significant scatter. Dust correction methods perform well at low-to-intermediate levels of star formation. They fail to recover the total amount of star formation in systems with large SFR{sub IR}/SFR{sub UV} ratios, typically occuring at the highest SFRs (SFR{sub UV+IR} {approx}> 100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) and redshifts (z {approx}> 2.5) probed. Finally, we confirm that H{alpha}-based SFRs at 1.5 < z < 2.6 are consistent with SFR{sub SED} and SFR{sub UV+IR} provided extra attenuation toward H II regions is taken into account (A{sub V,neb} = A{sub V,continuum}/0.44). With the cross-calibrated SFR indicators in hand, we perform a consistency check on the star formation histories inferred from spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling. We compare the observed SFR-M relations and mass functions at a range of redshifts to equivalents that are computed by evolving lower redshift galaxies backward in time. We find evidence for underestimated stellar ages when no stringent constraints on formation epoch are applied in SED modeling. We demonstrate how resolved SED modeling, or alternatively deep UV data, may help to overcome this bias. The age bias is most severe for galaxies with young stellar populations and reduces toward older systems. Finally, our analysis suggests that SFHs typically vary on timescales that are long (at least several 100 Myr) compared to the galaxies' dynamical time.

  7. Two years of ALMA bibliography - lessons learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meakins, Silvia; Bishop, Marsha J; Stoehr, Felix; Tatematsu, Ken

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Telescope bibliographies are integral parts of observing facilities. They are used to associate the published literature with archived observational data, to measure an observatory's scientific output through publication and citation statistics, and to define guidelines for future observing strategies. The ESO and NRAO librarians as well as NAOJ jointly maintain the ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array) bibliography, a database of refereed papers that use ALMA data. In this paper, we illustrate how relevant articles are identified, which procedures are used to tag entries in the database and link them to the correct observations, and how results are communicated to ALMA stakeholders and the wider community. Efforts made to streamline the process will be explained and evaluated, and a first analysis of ALMA papers published after two years of observations will be given.

  8. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the 1987 environmental monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. Two of three large tokamak machines, the Princeton Beta Experiment Modification (PBX-M) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) were in operation during the year. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak and the Radio-Frequency Test Facility (RFTF) were operated on a limited basis in 1987. The Environmental Committee which is a standing committee of the Executive Safety Board (ESB) continued to review items of environmental importance. During CY87 no adverse effects to the environment or public resulted from any operational program activities at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations. 41 refs., 24 figs., 34 tabs.

  9. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY85 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. All of the tokamak machines, the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX), and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), has a full year of run time. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak and the RF Test Facility were in operation. The phased approach to TFTR environmental monitoring continued with the establishment of locations for off-site monitoring. An environmental committee established in December 1984 reviewed items of environmental importance. During CY85 no adverse effects to the environmental resulted from any operational program activities at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations.

  10. LNG to the year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davenport, S.T.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By 2000, about 190 MM metric-tpy of LNG will be moving in world trade, with Asia-Pacific as the dominant producer By the year 2000, approximately 190 million metric tons per year of LNG will be moving in worldwide trade. Production of LNG will be spread throughout most of the world, with Asia-Pacific as the dominant producer. LNG will be delivered only to the heavily industrialized areas of North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific. The success of any LNG project will be dependent on its individual economics, market needs, financial planning, and governmental permit processes. We hope industry will be able to put together the LNG projects required to meet the quanitities of production forecast here for the year 2000.

  11. Absorption and elimination of formate following oral administration of calcium formate in female human subjects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanzlik, Robert P.; Fowler, Stephen C.; Eells, Janis T.

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Published abstract: Calcium formate is a water-soluble salt of an essential mineral nutrient with potential for use as a dietary calcium supplement. Formate ion is a product of endogenous and xenobiotic metabolism, but sustained high plasma formate...

  12. Formation of polar ring galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Bournaud; F. Combes

    2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Polar ring galaxies are peculiar systems in which a gas rich, nearly polar ring surrounds an early-type or elliptical host galaxy. Two formation scenarios for these objects have been proposed: they are thought to form either in major galaxy mergers or by tidal accretion of the polar material from a gas rich donor galaxy. Both scenarios are studied through N-body simulations including gas dynamics and star formation. Constraints on physical parameters are drawn out, in order to determine which scenario is the most likely to occur. Polar ring galaxies from each scenario are compared with observations and we discuss whether the accretion scenario and the merging scenario account for observational properties of polar ring galaxies. The conclusion of this study is that the accretion scenario is both the most likely and the most supported by observations. Even if the merging scenario is rather robust, most polar ring galaxies are shown to be the result of tidal gas accretion events.

  13. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  14. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daly, T.P.; Moses, E.I.; Patterson, R.W.; Sawicki, R.H.

    1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse using one or more delay loops is disclosed. The delay loops have a partially reflective beam splitter and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors arranged such that the laser beam pulse enters into the delay loop through the beam splitter and circulates therein along a delay loop length defined by the mirrors. As the laser beam pulse circulates within the delay loop a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse strikes the beam splitter. The laser beam pulse is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses. The delay loops are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses using additive waveform synthesis. 8 figs.

  15. Shock Formation in Lovelock Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey S. Reall; Norihiro Tanahashi; Benson Way

    2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue that Lovelock theories of gravity suffer from shock formation, unlike General Relativity. We consider the propagation of (i) a discontinuity in curvature, and (ii) weak, high frequency, gravitational waves. Such disturbances propagate along characteristic hypersurfaces of a "background" spacetime and their amplitude is governed by a transport equation. In GR the transport equation is linear. In Lovelock theories, it is nonlinear and its solutions can blow up, corresponding to the formation of a shock. We show that this effect is absent in some simple cases e.g. a flat background spacetime, and demonstrate its presence for a plane wave background. We comment on weak cosmic censorship, the evolution of shocks, and the nonlinear stability of Minkowski spacetime, in Lovelock theories.

  16. Kinetic models of opinion formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Toscani

    2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce and discuss certain kinetic models of (continuous) opinion formation involving both exchange of opinion between individual agents and diffusion of information. We show conditions which ensure that the kinetic model reaches non trivial stationary states in case of lack of diffusion in correspondence of some opinion point. Analytical results are then obtained by considering a suitable asymptotic limit of the model yielding a Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution of opinion among individuals.

  17. Large-eddy simulations of isolated disc galaxies with thermal and turbulent feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Harald; Niemeyer, Jens C; Almgren, Ann S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a subgrid-scale model for the Multi-phase Interstellar medium, Star formation, and Turbulence (MIST) and explore its behaviour in high-resolution large-eddy simulations of isolated disc galaxies. MIST follows the evolution of a clumpy cold and a diffuse warm component of the gas within a volume element which exchange mass and energy via various cooling, heating and mixing processes. The star formation rate is dynamically computed from the state of the gas in the cold phase. An important feature of MIST is the treatment of unresolved turbulence in the two phases and its interaction with star formation and feedback by supernovae. This makes MIST a particularly suitable model for the interstellar medium in galaxy simulations. We carried out a suite of simulations varying fundamental parameters of our feedback implementation. Several observational properties of galactic star formation are reproduced in our simulations, such as an average star formation efficiency ~1%, a typical velocity dispersion arou...

  18. 1992 five year battery forecast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amistadi, D.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Five-year trends for automotive and industrial batteries are projected. Topic covered include: SLI shipments; lead consumption; automotive batteries (5-year annual growth rates); industrial batteries (standby power and motive power); estimated average battery life by area/country for 1989; US motor vehicle registrations; replacement battery shipments; potential lead consumption in electric vehicles; BCI recycling rates for lead-acid batteries; US average car/light truck battery life; channels of distribution; replacement battery inventory end July; 2nd US battery shipment forecast.

  19. Ten Thousand Years of Solitude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benford, G. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) California Univ., Irvine, CA (USA). Dept. of Physics); Kirkwood, C.W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (USA). Coll. of Business Administration); Harry, O. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Pasqualetti, M.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (USA))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the authors work as an expert team advising the US Department of Energy on modes of inadvertent intrusion over the next 10,000 years into the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP) nuclear waste repository. Credible types of potential future accidental intrusion into the WIPP are estimated as a basis for creating warning markers to prevent inadvertent intrusion. A six-step process is used to structure possible scenarios for such intrusion, and it is concluded that the probability of inadvertent intrusion into the WIPP repository over the next ten thousand years lies between one and twenty-five percent. 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Annual Report Calendar Year 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .E. Bailey 2013 July 15 #12;Cover: Birds-eye view of the Armagh Observatory's Human Orrery, the first such large-scale outdoor model of the solar system to be laid out on the ground with precision. The Armagh distant objects in the Universe that happen to lie roughly in same plane as the solar system in space

  1. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both up-flow and down-flow of fluid at rates that range between 0.5 to 214 cm/yr and 2-162 cm/yr, respectively. The fluid flow system at the mound and background sites are coupled having opposite polarities that oscillate episodically between 14 days to {approx}4 months. Stability calculations suggest that despite bottom water temperature fluctuations, of up to {approx}3 C, the Bush Hill gas hydrate mound is presently stable, as also corroborated by the time-lapse video camera images that did not detect change in the gas hydrate mound. As long as methane (and other hydrocarbon) continues advecting at the observed rates the mound would remain stable. The {_}{sup 13}C-DIC data suggest that crude oil instead of methane serves as the primary electron-donor and metabolic substrate for anaerobic sulfate reduction. The oil-dominated environment at Bush Hill shields some of the methane bubbles from being oxidized both anaerobically in the sediment and aerobically in the water column. Consequently, the methane flux across the seafloor is higher at Bush hill than at non-oil rich seafloor gas hydrate regions, such as at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia. The methane flux across the ocean/atmosphere interface is as well higher. Modeling the methane flux across this interface at three bubble plumes provides values that range from 180-2000 {_}mol/m{sup 2} day; extrapolating it over the Gulf of Mexico basin utilizing satellite data is in progress.

  2. GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

  3. Large aperture optical switching devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

    1983-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a new approach to constructing large aperture optical switches for next generation inertial confinement fusion lasers. A transparent plasma electrode formed in low pressure ionized gas acts as a conductive coating to allow the uniform charging of the optical faces of an electro-optic material. In this manner large electric fields can be applied longitudinally to large aperture, high aspect ratio Pockels cells. We propose a four-electrode geometry to create the necessary high conductivity plasma sheets, and have demonstrated fast (less than 10 nsec) switching in a 5x5 cm aperture KD*P Pockels cell with such a design. Detaid modelling of Pockels cell performance with plasma electrodes has been carried out for 15 and 30 cm aperture designs.

  4. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,sand CERNLand andComputingLargeLarge

  5. Annual Report Fiscal Year 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Kristen L.

    funding to Washington University in FY08 was $548.4M, up 2% from the previous year. Both the dollar amount funding. Funding from the NIH, consistently the University's main contributor of research funding, increased by $1.5M (0.4%) in FY08. Funding from private sources to Washington University actually increased

  6. Non-aqueous formation of the calcium carbonate polymorph vaterite: astrophysical implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Day, Sarah J; Parker, Julia E; Evans, Aneurin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the formation of calcium carbonate, through the solid-gas interaction of amorphous Ca-silicate with gaseous CO2, at elevated pressures, and link this to the possible presence of calcium carbonate in a number of circumstellar and planetary environments. We use in-situ synchrotron X-Ray powder diffraction to obtain detailed structural data pertaining to the formation of the crystalline calcium carbonate phase vaterite and its evolution with temperature. We found that the metastable calcium carbonate phase vaterite was formed alongside calcite, at elevated CO2 pressure, at room temperature and subsequently remained stable over a large range of temperature and pressure. We report the formation of the calcium carbonate mineral vaterite whilst attempting to simulate carbonate dust grain formation in astrophysical environments. This suggests that vaterite could be a mineral component of carbonate dust and also presents a possible method of formation for vaterite and its polymorphs on planetary surfaces.

  7. Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiel, Elizabeth Chilcote

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

  8. Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiel, E.C.; Fuhrman, P.W.

    2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

  9. Assessment of the potential for ammonium nitrate formation and reaction in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two principal scenarios by which ammonium nitrate may be formed were considered: (a) precipitation of ammonium nitrate in the waste, and (b) ammonium nitrate formation via the gas phase reaction of ammonia and nitrogen dioxide. The first of these can be dismissed because ammonium ions, which are necessary for ammonium nitrate precipitation, can exist only in negligibly small concentrations in strongly alkaline solutions. Gas phase reactions between ammonia, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor in the gas phase represent the most likely means by which ammonium nitrate aerosols could be formed in Tank 241-SY-101. Predicted ammonium nitrate formation rates are largely controlled by the concentration of nitrogen dioxide. This gas has not been detected among those gases vented from the wastes using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) or mass spectrometry. While detection limits for nitrogen dioxide have not been established experimentally, the maximum concentration of nitrogen dioxide in the gas phase in Tank 241-SY-101 was estimated at 0.1 ppm based on calculations using the HITRAN data base and on FTIR spectra of gases vented from the wastes. At 50 C and with 100 ppm ammonia also present, less than one gram of ammonium nitrate per year is estimated to be formed in the tank. To date, ammonium nitrate has not been detected on HEPA filters in the ventilation system, so any quantity that has been formed in the tank must be quite small, in good agreement with rate calculations. The potential for runaway exothermic reactions involving ammonium nitrate in Tank 241-SY-101 is minimal. Dilution by non-reacting waste components, particularly water, would prevent hazardous exothermic reactions from occurring within the waste slurry, even if ammonium nitrate were present. 41 refs.

  10. Formation damage in underbalanced drilling operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyes Serpa, Carlos Alberto

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation damage has long been recognized as a potential source of reduced productivity and injectivity in both horizontal and vertical wells. From the moment that the pay zone is being drilled until the well is put on production, a formation...

  11. Structure formation: Models, Dynamics and Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Padmanabhan

    1995-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The constraints on the models for the structure formation arising from various cosmological observations at different length scales are reviewed. The status of different models for structure formation is examined critically in the light of these observations.

  12. Dynamics and control of electromagnetic satellite formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahsun, Umair, 1972-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Satellite formation flying is an enabling technology for many space missions, especially for space-based telescopes. Usually there is a tight formation-keeping requirement that may need constant expenditure of fuel or at ...

  13. The Formation and Fragmentation of Primordial Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Abel; Greg L. Bryan; Michael L. Norman

    1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Many questions in physical cosmology regarding the thermal history of the intergalactic medium, chemical enrichment, reionization, etc. are thought to be intimately related to the nature and evolution of pregalactic structure. In particular the efficiency of primordial star formation and the primordial IMF are of special interest. We present results from high resolution three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations that follow the collapse of primordial molecular clouds and their subsequent fragmentation within a cosmologically representative volume. Comoving scales from 128 kpc down to 0.5 pc are followed accurately. Dark matter dynamics, hydrodynamics and all relevant chemical and radiative processes (cooling) are followed self-consistently for a cluster normalized CDM structure formation model. Primordial molecular clouds with ~100,000 solar masses are assembled by mergers of multiple objects that have formed hydrogen molecules in the gas phase with a fractional abundance of 100,000/cm^3 are found. We find that less than 1% of the primordial gas in such small scale structures cools and collapses to sufficiently high densities to be available for primordial star formation. Furthermore, our results indicate that the formation of very massive objects, massive black holes, fragmentation of a large fraction of baryons into brown dwars or Jupiter size fragments seems, in contrast to various claims in the literature, very unlikely. The expected escape fraction of UV photons with (h nu) > 11eV is very small.

  14. On the formation of massive stellar clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillermo Tenorio-Tagle; Jan Palous; Sergiy Silich; Gustavo A. Medina-Tanco; Casiana Munoz-Tunon

    2003-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we model a star forming factory in which the continuous creation of stars results in a highly concentrated, massive (globular cluster-like) stellar system. We show that under very general conditions a large-scale gravitational instability in the ISM, which triggers the collapse of a massive cloud, leads with the aid of a spontaneous first generation of massive stars, to a standing, small-radius, cold and dense shell. Eventually, as more of the collapsing matter is processed and incorporated, the shell becomes gravitationally unstable and begins to fragment, allowing the formation of new stars, while keeping its location. This is due to a detailed balance established between the ram pressure from the collapsing cloud which, together with the gravitational force exerted on the shell by the forming cluster, acts against the mechanical energy deposited by the collection of new stars. We analyze the mass spectrum of fragments that result from the continuous fragmentation of the standing shell and show that its shape is well approximated at the high mass end by a power law with slope -2.25, very close to the value that fits the universal IMF. The self-contamination resultant from the continuous generation of stars is shown to lead to a large metal spread in massive ($\\sim$ 10$^6$ M$_\\odot$) clusters, while clusters with a mass similar to 10$^5$ M$_\\odot$ or smaller, simply reflect the initial metalicity of the collapsing cloud. This is in good agreement with the data available for globular clusters in the Galaxy.

  15. Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

  16. CALIFORNIA ENERGY Large HVAC Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Large HVAC Building Survey Information Database of Buildings over 100 Energy Systems: Productivity and Building Science Program. This program was funded by the California of Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. Project Management: Cathy Higgins, Program Director for New Buildings

  17. Autonomous Helicopter Formation using Model Predictive Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sastry, S. Shankar

    Autonomous Helicopter Formation using Model Predictive Control Hoam Chung and S. Shankar Sastry are required to fly in tight formations and under harsh conditions. The starting point for safe autonomous into a formation, so that each vehicle can safely maintain sufficient space between it and all other vehicles

  18. The Formation of Population III Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuya Saigo; Tomoaki Matsumoto; Masayuki Umemura

    2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility for the formation of Population III binaries. The collapse of a rotating cylinder is simulated with a three-dimensional, high-resolution nested grid, assuming the thermal history of primordial gas. The simulations are done with dimensionless units, and the results are applicable to low-mass as well as massive systems by scaling with the initial density. We find that if the initial angular momentum is as small as $\\beta \\approx 0.1$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of centrifugal force to pressure force, then the runaway collapse of the cloud stops to form a rotationally-supported disk. After the accretion of the envelope, the disk undergoes a ring instability, eventually fragmenting into a binary. If the initial angular momentum is relatively large, a bar-type instability arises, resulting in the collapse into a single star through rapid angular momentum transfer. The present results show that a significant fraction of Pop III stars are expected to form in binary systems, even if they are quite massive or less massive. The cosmological implications of Population III binaries are briefly discussed.

  19. The Formation of Population III Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saigo, K; Umemura, M; Saigo, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Umemura, Masayuki

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility for the formation of Population III binaries. The collapse of a rotating cylinder is simulated with a three-dimensional, high-resolution nested grid, assuming the thermal history of primordial gas. The simulations are done with dimensionless units, and the results are applicable to low-mass as well as massive systems by scaling with the initial density. We find that if the initial angular momentum is as small as $\\beta \\approx 0.1$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of centrifugal force to pressure force, then the runaway collapse of the cloud stops to form a rotationally-supported disk. After the accretion of the envelope, the disk undergoes a ring instability, eventually fragmenting into a binary. If the initial angular momentum is relatively large, a bar-type instability arises, resulting in the collapse into a single star through rapid angular momentum transfer. The present results show that a significant fraction of Pop III stars are expected to form in binary systems, even if they ar...

  20. Halo Formation in Warm Dark Matter Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Bode; Jeremiah P. Ostriker; Neil Turok

    2001-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrepancies have emerged between the predictions of standard cold dark matter (CDM) theory and observations of clustering on sub-galactic scales. Warm dark matter (WDM) is a simple modification of CDM in which the dark matter particles have initial velocities due either to their having decoupled as thermal relics, or having been formed via non-equilibrium decay. We investigate the nonlinear gravitational clustering of WDM with a high resolution N-body code, and identify a number of distinctive observational signatures. Relative to CDM, halo concentrations and core densities are lowered, core radii are increased, and large halos emerge with far fewer low mass satellites. The number of small halos is suppressed, and those present are formed by `top down' fragmentation of caustics, as part of a `cosmic web' connecting massive halos. Few small halos form outside this web. If we identify small halos with dwarf galaxies, their number, spatial distribution, and formation epoch appear in better agreement with the observations for WDM than they are for CDM.

  1. On the formation of massive stellar clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tenorio-Tagle, G; Silich, S A; Medina-Tanco, G A; Muñoz-Tunón, C; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Palous, Jan; Silich, Sergiy; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo A.; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we model a star forming factory in which the continuous creation of stars results in a highly concentrated, massive (globular cluster-like) stellar system. We show that under very general conditions a large-scale gravitational instability in the ISM, which triggers the collapse of a massive cloud, leads with the aid of a spontaneous first generation of massive stars, to a standing, small-radius, cold and dense shell. Eventually, as more of the collapsing matter is processed and incorporated, the shell becomes gravitationally unstable and begins to fragment, allowing the formation of new stars, while keeping its location. This is due to a detailed balance established between the ram pressure from the collapsing cloud which, together with the gravitational force exerted on the shell by the forming cluster, acts against the mechanical energy deposited by the collection of new stars. We analyze the mass spectrum of fragments that result from the continuous fragmentation of the standing shell and show that it...

  2. Species Introductions in Large Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinch, Scott G.

    ) ­ No management procedures mandated ­ Fully loaded cargo hold ­ Residual water and accumulated sediment hold #12;Global Ballast Water · Global ballast water transfer: ~10 billion tonnes/year · Ballast water per of animals and plants transported in ballast water: > 3000/day · > 80% of global goods and commodities

  3. Star Formation and Merging in Massive Galaxies at z < 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice

    2008-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Observing massive galaxies at various redshifts is one of the most straightforward and direct approaches towards understanding galaxy formation. There is now largely a consensus that the massive galaxy (M_* > 10^11 M_0) population is fully formed by z~1, based on mass and luminosity functions. However, we argue that the latest data can only rule out number and mass density evolution of a factor of > 2-3 at z 10^11 M_0 galaxies reveals that 40+/-5% of galaxies with M_* > 10^11 M_0 at z~1 are undergoing star formation that effectively doubles their stellar mass between z = 0.4 - 1.4. These massive galaxies also undergo 0.9^+0.7_-0.5 major mergers during this same time period.

  4. A General Systems Theory for Rain Formation in Warm Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A cumulus cloud model which can explain the observed characteristics of warm rain formation in monsoon clouds is presented. The model is based on classical statistical physical concepts and satisfies the principle of maximum entropy production. Atmospheric flows exhibit selfsimilar fractal fluctuations that are ubiquitous to all dynamical systems in nature, such as physical, chemical, social, etc and are characterized by inverse power law form for power (eddy energy) spectrum signifying long-range space-time correlations. A general systems theory model for atmospheric flows developed by the author is based on the concept that the large eddy energy is the integrated mean of enclosed turbulent (small scale) eddies. This model gives scale-free universal governing equations for cloud growth processes. The model predicted cloud parameters are in agreement with reported observations, in particular, the cloud dropsize distribution. Rain formation can occur in warm clouds within 30minutes lifetime under favourable conditions of moisture supply in the environment.

  5. Feedback Effects on Low-Mass Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Charles E; McKee, Christopher F; Fisher, Robert T

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Protostellar feedback, both radiation and bipolar outflows, dramatically affects the fragmentation and mass accretion from star-forming cores. We use ORION, an adaptive mesh refinement gravito-radiation-hydrodynamics code, to simulate the formation of a cluster of low-mass stars, including both radiative transfer and protostellar outflows. We ran four simulations to isolate the individual effects of radiation feedback and outflow feedback as well as the combination of the two. Outflows reduce protostellar masses and accretion rates each by a factor of three and therefore reduce protostellar luminosities by an order of magnitude. Thus, while radiation feedback suppresses fragmentation, outflows render protostellar radiation largely irrelevant for low-mass star formation above a mass scale of 0.05 M_sun. We find initial fragmentation of our cloud at half the global Jeans length, ~ 0.1 pc. With insufficient protostellar radiation to stop it, these 0.1 pc cores fragment repeatedly, forming typically 10 stars each...

  6. Fiscal Year 2012 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Nordstrom

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2012 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Actions and Resolutions for each site. Ten disturbed sites were evaluated for this assessment. Six have achieved final stabilization. The remaining four sites not meeting the criteria for final stabilization will be evaluated again in the next fiscal year.

  7. Mid-year market review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite a tumultuous beginning marked by considerable excitement over the amendment to the US/Russian suspension agreement, 1994`s marketplace has been fairly quite so far. During the first half of the year, only thirty-two near-term uranium transactions, involving 10.1 million pounds equivalent U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, have been reported. Compared to the same period in 1993, which saw 16.5 million pounds transacted in fifty deals, 1994`s volume represents a drop of 39 percent. With the amendment initialed in the last days of 1993, many market participants expected the first part of 1994 to be very active, with buyers and sellers rushing to conclude {open_quotes}matched sales.{close_quotes} No such surge materialized, however, and market volume remained below the average of 17.3 million pounds equivalent U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in fifty transactions recorded over the past five years.

  8. Fiscal Year 2013 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Nordstrom

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2013 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: Summary of each site Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location Actions and Resolutions for each site. Six disturbed sites were evaluated for this assessment. One has achieved final stabilization. The remaining five sites not meeting the criteria for final stabilization will be evaluated again in the next fiscal year.

  9. Gas Cooling Through Galaxy Formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariwan A. Rasheed; Mohamad A. Brza

    Abstract-- Gas cooling was studied in two different boxes of sizes and by simulation at same redshifts. The gas cooling is shown in four different redshifts (z=1.15, 0.5, 0.1 and 0). In the simulation the positions of the clumps of cooled gas were studied with slices of the two volumes and also the density of cooled gas of the two volumes shown in the simulation. From the process of gas cooling it is clear that this process gives different results in the two cases. Index Term- Gas Cooling, Simulation, galaxy Formation. I.

  10. Petrophysical evaluation of subterranean formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klein, James D; Schoderbek, David A; Mailloux, Jason M

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems are provided for evaluating petrophysical properties of subterranean formations and comprehensively evaluating hydrate presence through a combination of computer-implemented log modeling and analysis. Certain embodiments include the steps of running a number of logging tools in a wellbore to obtain a variety of wellbore data and logs, and evaluating and modeling the log data to ascertain various petrophysical properties. Examples of suitable logging techniques that may be used in combination with the present invention include, but are not limited to, sonic logs, electrical resistivity logs, gamma ray logs, neutron porosity logs, density logs, NRM logs, or any combination or subset thereof.

  11. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

  12. Earth: 15 Million Years Ago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masataka Mizushima

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In Einstein's general relativity theory the metric component gxx in the direction of motion (x-direction) of the sun deviates from unity due to a tensor potential caused by the black hole existing around the center of the galaxy. Because the solar system is orbiting around the galactic center at 200 km/s, the theory shows that the Newtonian gravitational potential due to the sun is not quite radial. At the present time, the ecliptic plane is almost perpendicular to the galactic plane, consistent with this modification of the Newtonian gravitational force. The ecliptic plane is assumed to maintain this orientation in the galactic space as it orbits around the galactic center, but the rotational angular momentum of the earth around its own axis can be assumed to be conserved. The earth is between the sun and the galactic center at the summer solstice all the time. As a consequence, the rotational axis of the earth would be parallel to the axis of the orbital rotation of the earth 15 million years ago, if the solar system has been orbiting around the galactic center at 200 km/s. The present theory concludes that the earth did not have seasons 15 million years ago. Therefore, the water on the earth was accumulated near the poles as ice and the sea level was very low. Geological evidence exists that confirms this effect. The resulting global ice-melting started 15 million years ago and is ending now.

  13. Heating tar sands formations while controlling pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX

    2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. A pressure in the majority of the section may be maintained below a fracture pressure of the formation. The pressure in the majority of the section may be reduced to a selected pressure after the average temperature reaches a temperature that is above 240.degree. C. and is at or below pyrolysis temperatures of hydrocarbons in the section. At least some hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  14. Advanced Horizontal Well Recirculation Systems for Geothermal Energy Recovery in Sedimentary Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Bruno; Russell L. Detwiler; Kang Lao; Vahid Serajian; Jean Elkhoury; Julia Diessl; Nicky White

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    There is increased recognition that geothermal energy resources are more widespread than previously thought, with potential for providing a significant amount of sustainable clean energy worldwide. Recent advances in drilling, completion, and production technology from the oil and gas industry can now be applied to unlock vast new geothermal resources, with some estimates for potential electricity generation from geothermal energy now on the order of 2 million megawatts. Terralog USA, in collaboration with the University of California, Irvine (UCI), are currently investigating advanced design concepts for paired horizontal well recirculation systems, optimally configured for geothermal energy recovery in permeable sedimentary and crystalline formations of varying structure and material properties. This two-year research project, funded by the US Department of Energy, includes combined efforts for: 1) Resource characterization; 2) Small and large scale laboratory investigations; 3) Numerical simulation at both the laboratory and field scale; and 4) Engineering feasibility studies and economic evaluations. The research project is currently in its early stages. This paper summarizes our technical approach and preliminary findings related to potential resources, small-scale laboratory simulation, and supporting numerical simulation efforts.

  15. Coring in deep hardrock formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan Kelkar

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Hunton formation in Oklahoma has been the subject of attention for the last ten years. The new interest started with the drilling of the West Carney field in 1995 in Lincoln County. Subsequently, many other operators have expanded the search for oil and gas in Hunton formation in other parts of Oklahoma. These fields exhibit many unique production characteristics, including: (1) decreasing water-oil or water-gas ratio over time; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can optimize the production from fields with similar characteristics.

  17. Large Component Removal/Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, D. M.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the removal and disposal of the large components from Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant. The large components discussed include the three steam generators, pressurizer, and reactor pressure vessel. Two separate Exemption Requests, which included radiological characterizations, shielding evaluations, structural evaluations and transportation plans, were prepared and issued to the DOT for approval to ship these components; the first was for the three steam generators and one pressurizer, the second was for the reactor pressure vessel. Both Exemption Requests were submitted to the DOT in November 1999. The DOT approved the Exemption Requests in May and July of 2000, respectively. The steam generators and pressurizer have been removed from Maine Yankee and shipped to the processing facility. They were removed from Maine Yankee's Containment Building, loaded onto specially designed skid assemblies, transported onto two separate barges, tied down to the barges, th en shipped 2750 miles to Memphis, Tennessee for processing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel Removal Project is currently under way and scheduled to be completed by Fall of 2002. The planning, preparation and removal of these large components has required extensive efforts in planning and implementation on the part of all parties involved.

  18. Synergistic effect of mixing dimethyl ether with methane, ethane, propane, and ethylene fuels on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and soot formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, S.S. [Corporate Research and Development Division, Hyundai-Kia Motors, Gyeonggi-do 445-706 (Korea); Anh, D.H. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon 305-380 (Korea); Chung, S.H. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and soot formation in counterflow diffusion flames of methane, ethane, propane, and ethylene fuels mixed with dimethyl ether (DME) have been investigated. Planar laser-induced incandescence and fluorescence techniques were employed to measure relative soot volume fractions and PAH concentrations, respectively. Results showed that even though DME is known to be a clean fuel in terms of soot formation, DME mixture with ethylene fuel increases PAH and soot formation significantly as compared to the pure ethylene case, while the mixture of DME with methane, ethane, and propane decreases PAH and soot formation. Numerical calculations adopting a detailed kinetics showed that DME can be decomposed to produce a relatively large number of methyl radicals in the low-temperature region where PAH forms and grows; thus the mixture of DME with ethylene increases CH{sub 3} radicals significantly in the PAH formation region. Considering that the increase in the concentration of O radicals is minimal in the PAH formation region with DME mixture, the enhancement of PAH and soot formation in the mixture flames of DME and ethylene can be explained based on the role of methyl radicals in PAH and soot formation. Methyl radicals can increase the concentration of propargyls, which could enhance incipient benzene ring formation through the propargyl recombination reaction and subsequent PAH growth. Thus, the result substantiates the importance of methyl radicals in PAH and soot formation, especially in the PAH formation region of diffusion flames. (author)

  19. A Random Walk through Star and Planet Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maness, Holly

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and its Neptune-Mass Planet 3.1 Introduction . . . . . . .of Low Mass Star Formation . . . . . 1.3 Planet FormationConstraining Theories of Planet Formation and Evolution .

  20. Exploiting Universality in Atoms with Large Scattering Lengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braaten, Eric

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this research project was atoms with scattering lengths that are large compared to the range of their interactions and which therefore exhibit universal behavior at sufficiently low energies. Recent dramatic advances in cooling atoms and in manipulating their scattering lengths have made this phenomenon of practical importance for controlling ultracold atoms and molecules. This research project was aimed at developing a systematically improvable method for calculating few-body observables for atoms with large scattering lengths starting from the universal results as a first approximation. Significant progress towards this goal was made during the five years of the project.

  1. General Single Field Inflation with Large Positive Non-Gaussianity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miao Li; Tower Wang; Yi Wang

    2008-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent analysis of the WMAP three year data suggests $f_{NL}^{local}\\simeq86.8$ in the WMAP convention. It is necessary to make sure whether general single field inflation can produce a large positive $f_{NL}$ before turning to other scenarios. We give some examples to generate a large positive $f_{NL}^{equil}$ in general single field inflation. Our models are different from ghost inflation. Due to the appearance of non-conventional kinetic terms, $f_{NL}^{equil}\\gg1$ can be realized in single field inflation.

  2. Hydrogeochemical studies of the Rustler Formation and related rocks in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Area, Southeastern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegel, M.D.; Lambert, S.J.; Robinson, K.L. (eds.)

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical, mineralogical, isotopic, and hydrological studies of the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation and related rocks are used to delineate hydrochemical facies and form the basis for a conceptual model for post-Pleistocene groundwater flow and chemical evolution. Modern flow within the Culebra in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) area appears to be largely north-to-south; however, these flow directions under confined conditions are not consistent with the salinity distribution in the region surrounding the WIPP Site. Isotopic, mineralogical, and hydrological data suggest that vertical recharge to the Culebra in the WIPP area and to the immediate east and south has not occurred for several thousand years. Eastward increasing {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios suggest recharge from a near-surface Pleistocene infiltration zone flowing from the west-northwest and imply a change in flow direction in the last 30,000 to 12,000 years. 49 refs., 34 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. The case against scaling defect models of cosmic structure formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Albrecht; Richard A. Battye; James Robinson

    1997-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate predictions from defect models of structure formation for both the matter and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) over all observable scales. Our results point to a serious problem reconciling the observed large-scale galaxy distribution with the COBE normalization, a result which is robust for a wide range of defect parameters. We conclude that standard scaling defect models are in conflict with the data, and show how attempts to resolve the problem by considering non-scaling defects would require radical departures from the standard scaling picture.

  4. Fiscal Year 2009 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Lewis

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2009 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Recommendation(s) for each site.

  5. Fiscal Year 2010 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Nordstrom; Mike Lewis

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2010 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Recommendation(s) for each site.

  6. 2014 Year-in-Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment ofCBFO-13-3322(EE)Department ofNow4 Year-in-Review i 2014 YIR May

  7. RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE LOWER GREEN RIVER FORMATION, SOUTHWEST UINTA BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Robert Bereskin

    2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Anastamosing, low gradient distributary channels produce {approx}30 gravity, paraffinic oils from the Middle Member of the lacustrine Eocene Green River Formation in the south-central portion of the Uinta Basin. This localized depocenter was situated along the fluctuating southern shoreline of Lake Uinta, where complex deposits of marginal-lacustrine to lower delta plain accumulations are especially characteristic. The Middle Member contains several fining-upward parasequences that can be recognized in outcrop, core, and downhole logs. Each parasequence is about 60 to 120 feet thick and consists of strata deposited during multiple lake level fluctuations that approach 30 to 35 feet in individual thickness. Such parasequences represent 300,000-year cycles based on limited absolute age dating. The subaerial to subaqueous channels commonly possess an erosional base and exhibit a fining upward character. Accordingly, bedding features commonly range from large-scale trough and planar cross bedding or lamination at the base, to a nonreservoir, climbing ripple assemblage near the uppermost reservoir boundary. The best reservoir quality occurs within the laminated to cross-stratified portions, and the climbing ripple phase usually possesses more deleterious micas and/or detrital clays. Diagenesis also exerts a major control on reservoir quality. Certain sandstones were cemented by an early, iron-poor calcite cement, which can be subsequently leached. Secondary intergranular porosity (up to 20%) is largely responsible for the 10 -100 millidarcy rock, which represents petrophysical objectives for both primary and secondary production. Otherwise, intense compaction, silicic and iron-rich carbonate cements, and authigenic clays serve to reduce reservoir quality to marginal economic levels.

  8. Alignments of Galaxy Group Shapes with Large Scale Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paz, Dante J; Merchán, Manuel; Padilla, Nelson

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we analyse the alignment of galaxy groups with the surrounding large scale structure traced by spectroscopic galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. We characterise these alignments by means of an extension of the classical two-point cross-correlation function, developed by Paz et al. 2008 (arXiv:0804.4477, MNRAS 389 1127). We find a strong alignment signal between the projected major axis of group shapes and the surrounding galaxy distribution up to scales of 30 Mpc/h. This observed anisotropy signal becomes larger as the galaxy group mass increases, in excellent agreement with the corresponding predicted alignment obtained from mock catalogues and LCDM cosmological simulations. These measurements provide new direct evidence of the adequacy of the gravitational instability picture to describe the large-scale structure formation of our Universe.

  9. Our 50-year odyssey with fission: Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nix, J.R.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On the occasion of this International Conference on Fifty Years Research in Nuclear Fission, we summarize our present understanding of the fission process and the challenges that lie ahead. The basic properties of fission arise from a delicate competition between disruptive Coulomb forces, cohesive nuclear forces, and fluctuating shell and pairing forces. These static forces are primarily responsible for such experimental phenomena as deformed ground-state nuclear shapes, fission into fragments of unequal size, sawtooth neutron yields, spontaneously fissioning isomers, broad resonances and narrow intermediate structure in fission cross sections, and cluster radioactivity. However, inertial and dissipative forces also play decisive roles in the dynamical evolution of a fissioning nucleus. The energy dissipated between the saddle and scission points is small for low initial excitation energy at the saddle point and increases with increasing excitation energy. At moderate excitation energies, the dissipation of collective energy into internal single-particle excitation energy proceeds largely through the interaction of nucleons with the mean field and with each other in the vicinity of the nuclear surface, as well as through the transfer of nucleons between the two portions of the evolving dumbell-like system. These unique dissipation mechanisms arise from the Pauli exclusion principle for fermions and the details of the nucleon-nucleon interaction, which make the mean free path of a nucleon near the Fermi surface at low excitation energy longer than the nuclear radius. With its inverse process of heavy-ion fusion reactions, fission continues to yield surprises in the study of large-amplitude collective nuclear motion. 87 refs., 12 figs.

  10. An integrated palaeoenvironmental investigation of a 6200 year old peat sequence from Ile de la Possession, Iles Crozet, sub-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    An integrated palaeoenvironmental investigation of a 6200 year old peat sequence from Ile de la;Abstract A 6200 year old peat sequence, cored in a volcanic crater on the sub-Antarctic Ile de la the proxy data the following changes could be inferred. From the onset of the peat formation (6200 cal yr BP

  11. LLNL Underground Coal Gasification Project annual report - fiscal year 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, D.R.; O'Neal, E.M. (eds.)

    1985-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Laboratory has been conducting an interdisciplinary underground coal gasification program since 1974 under the sponsorship of DOE and its predecessors. We completed three UCG tests at the Hoe Creek site near Gillette, Wyoming, during the period 1975 to 1979. Five small field experiments, the large-block tests, were completed from 1981 to 1982 at the exposed coal face in the WIDCO coal mine near Centralia, Washington. A larger test at the same location, the partial-seam CRIP test, was completed during fiscal year 1984. In conjunction with the DOE and an industrial group lead by the Gas Research Institute, we have prepared a preliminary design for a large-scale test at the WIDCO site. The planned test features dual injection and production wells, module interaction, and consumption of 20,000 tons of coal during a hundred-day steam-oxygen gasification. During fiscal year 1984, we documented the large-block excavations. The cavities were elongated, the cavity cross sections were elliptical, and the cavities contained ash and slag at the bottom, char and dried coal above that, and a void at the top. The results from the large-block tests provided enough data to allow us to construct a composite model, CAVSM. Preliminary results from the model agree well with the product-gas chemistry and cavity shape observed in the large-block tests. Other models and techniques developed during the year include a transient, moving-front code, a two-dimensional, reactive-flow code using the method of lines, and a wall-recession-rate model. In addition, we measured the rate of methane decomposition in the hot char bed and developed an engineering rate expression to estimate the magnitude of the methane-decomposition reaction. 16 refs., 30 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The Large Aperture GRB Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allard, D; Asorey, H; Barros, H; Bertou, X; Castillo, M; Chirinos, J M; De Castro, A; Flores, S; González, J; Berisso, M Gomez; Grajales, J; Guada, C; Day, W R Guevara; Ishitsuka, J; López, J A; Martínez, O; Melfo, A; Meza, E; Loza, P Miranda; Barbosa, E Moreno; Murrugarra, C; Núñez, L A; Ormachea, L J Otiniano; Pérez, G; Perez, Y; Ponce, E; Quispe, J; Quintero, C; Rivera, H; Rosales, M; Rovero, A C; Saavedra, O; Salazar, H; Tello, J C; Peralda, R Ticona; Varela, E; Velarde, A; Villaseñor, L; Wahl, D; Zamalloa, M A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) is aiming at the detection of the high energy (around 100 GeV) component of Gamma Ray Bursts, using the single particle technique in arrays of Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) in high mountain sites (Chacaltaya, Bolivia, 5300 m a.s.l., Pico Espejo, Venezuela, 4750 m a.s.l., Sierra Negra, Mexico, 4650 m a.s.l). WCD at high altitude offer a unique possibility of detecting low gamma fluxes in the 10 GeV - 1 TeV range. The status of the Observatory and data collected from 2007 to date will be presented.

  13. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home asLCLSLaboratoryRowland toShade Landscaping forandLarge

  14. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,sand CERNLand andComputingLarge

  15. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,sand CERNLandLarge Magnetization at

  16. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,sand CERNLandLarge Magnetization

  17. Extra-Large Memory Nodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) /EmailMolecularGE, Ford, University ofExtra-Large

  18. to 150 GPa, consistent with the modulus values of large SWNT bundles (22). Al-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cottet, Audrey

    to 150 GPa, consistent with the modulus values of large SWNT bundles (22). Al- though an individual to provide the optimum conditions for nanotube strand formation. The gas flow carried the strands down), assuming that the sample volume is constant, where D0 and Df are the original diameter and the real

  19. Natural Gas Year-in-Review

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    December 9, 2011 | Next Release Date: December 2012 Previous editions of Natural Gas Year-in-Review Year: 2009 2008 2007 2006 Go Highlights Growing domestic production, rising...

  20. The Geothermal Technologies Office Congratulates this Year's...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Geothermal Technologies Office Congratulates this Year's GEA Honors Awardees The Geothermal Technologies Office Congratulates this Year's GEA Honors Awardees December 11, 2013...

  1. Chondrule Formation in Bow Shocks around Eccentric Planetary Embryos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Melissa A; Desch, Steven J; Athanassiadou, Themis

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent isotopic studies of Martian meteorites by Dauphas & Pourmond (2011) have established that large (~ 3000 km radius) planetary embryos existed in the solar nebula at the same time that chondrules - millimeter-sized igneous inclusions found in meteorites - were forming. We model the formation of chondrules by passage through bow shocks around such a planetary embryo on an eccentric orbit. We numerically model the hydrodynamics of the flow, and find that such large bodies retain an atmosphere, with Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities allowing mixing of this atmosphere with the gas and particles flowing past the embryo. We calculate the trajectories of chondrules flowing past the body, and find that they are not accreted by the protoplanet, but may instead flow through volatiles outgassed from the planet's magma ocean. In contrast, chondrules are accreted onto smaller planetesimals. We calculate the thermal histories of chondrules passing through the bow shock. We find that peak temperatures and cooling rate...

  2. Parallel implementation and one year experiments with the Danish Euleian Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimov, Ivan

    -page: http://www.dmu.dk/AtmosphericEnvironment Abstract. Large scale air pollution models are powerful tools for air pollution modelling has been studied for years [8, 15]. An air pollution model is generally of chemical species (pollutants and other components of the air that interact with the pollutants) in a large

  3. Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Kayser-Ames Laboratory

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 2007. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring activities. Ames Laboratory is located on the campus of Iowa State University (ISU) and occupies 11 buildings owned by the Department of Energy (DOE). See the Laboratory's Web page at www.external.ameslab.gov for locations and Laboratory overview. The Laboratory also leases space in ISU owned buildings. In 2007, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of waste under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. All waste is handled according to all applicable EPA, State, Local and DOE Orders. In 2006 the Laboratory reduced its generator status from a Large Quantity Generator (LQG) to a Small Quantity Generator (SQG). EPA Region VII was notified of this change. The Laboratory's RCRA hazardous waste management program was inspected by EPA Region VII in April 2006. There were no notices of violations. The inspector was impressed with the improvements of the Laboratory's waste management program over the past ten years. The Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, local and DOE regulations and orders in 2007. There were no radiological air emissions or exposures to the general public due to Laboratory activities in 2007. See U.S. Department of Energy Air Emissions Annual Report in Appendix B. As indicated in prior SERs, pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs have been in practice since 1990, with improvements implemented most recently in 2003. Included in these efforts were battery and CRT recycling, waste white paper and green computer paper-recycling. Ames Laboratory also recycles/reuses salvageable metal, used oil, styrofoam peanuts, batteries, fluorescent lamps and telephone books. Ames Laboratory reported to DOE-Ames Site Office (AMSO), through the Laboratory's Self Assessment Report, on its Affirmative Procurement Performance Measure. A performance level of 'A' was achieved in 2007 for Integrated Safety, Health, and Environmental Protection. As reported in Site Environmental Reports for prior years, the Laboratory's Environmental Management System has been integrated into the Laboratory's Integrated Safety Management System since 2005. The integration of EMS into the way the Laboratory does business allows the Laboratory to systematically review, address and respond to the Laboratory's environmental impacts.

  4. Large aperture diffractive space telescope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hyde, Roderick A. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary objective lens functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass "aiming" at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The objective lens includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the objective lens, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets which may be either earth bound or celestial.

  5. CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR 2011-2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steiner, Ullrich

    in overseeing the direction of the Library and to reflect modern terminology in relation to digital access will be available only in digital format, the Library will move from an acquisitions model based on recurrent costs#12;CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR 2011-2012 Cambridge University Library

  6. Progress in year 2001 1. Observation of Vortex Lattices in Bose-Einstein Condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Progress in year 2001 1. Observation of Vortex Lattices in Bose-Einstein Condensates Quantized in rotating gaseous Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) [2, 3]. We have observed the formation of highly-ordered vortex lattices in a rotating Bose- condensed gas [4]. They were produced by rotating the condensate

  7. Radio Triggered Star Formation in Cooling Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. R. McNamara

    1999-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The giant galaxies located at the centers of cluster cooling flows are frequently sites of vigorous star formation. In some instances, star formation appears to have been triggered by the galaxy's radio source. The colors and spectral indices of the young populations are generally consistent with short duration bursts or continuous star formation for durations much less than 1 Gyr, which is less than the presumed ages of cooling flows. The star formation properties are inconsistent with fueling by a continuously accreting cooling flow, although the prevalence of star formation is consistent with repeated bursts and periodic refueling. Star formation may be fueled, in some cases, by cold material stripped from neighboring cluster galaxies.

  8. Twenty Years of Tevatron Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay C. Theilacker

    2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The superconducting Tevatron accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) has surpassed twenty years of operation. The Tevatron is still the highest energy particle accelerator in the world and will remain so until the commissioning of the LHC in Europe later this decade. The Tevatron has operated in a Fixed Target mode, accelerating a proton beam into stationary targets/detectors, as well as a Colliding Beam mode, continuously colliding counter rotating beams of protons and antiprotons. Upon completion, the Tevatron cryogenic system became the world's largest helium refrigeration system. In 1993, the Tevatron cryogenic system was given the designation of International Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The operational history, experiences and statistics of the Tevatron, with an emphasis on the cryogenic system, is presented. Improvements, upgrades and current challenges of the cryogenic system are discussed.

  9. Critical mechanisms for the formation of extreme arctic sea-ice extent in the summers of 2007 and 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Xiquan

    deformation on top of the long-term thinning of an Arctic ice pack that had become more dominated by seasonalCritical mechanisms for the formation of extreme arctic sea-ice extent in the summers of 2007 system, the largest year-to-year variation in sea-ice extent (SIE) has occurred in the Laptev, East

  10. PHENIX: Beyond 15 years of discovery

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Morrison, D.; Nagle, J. L.

    2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHENIX experiment at BNL’s Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was designed to uncover properties of the quark–gluon plasma (QGP) via rare penetrating probes. Over the past 15 years, the collaboration has delivered on its promised measurements, often with exciting results beyond those originally foreseen. That the QGP behaves as a nearly perfect fluid and that non-photonic electrons are substantially suppressed has led to the use of heavy quarks as probes of the medium. The PHENIX silicon vertex detectors are opening a new arena for QGP studies, and the MPC-EX, a novel forward calorimeter with silicon readout, accesses low-x physicsmore »via direct photons with unprecedented precision. PHENIX has proposed sPHENIX, a major upgrade using the recently acquired BaBar solenoid and full calorimetric coverage and high rate capabilities. sPHENIX will reconstruct jets and extend observables to higher transverse momentum, where comparisons to results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) heavy-ion program will provide the most insightful. Following the RHIC program, the nuclear physics community has identified an electron ion collider (EIC) as crucial to the next generation of QCD investigations. The BaBar magnet and sPHENIX calorimetry will be an excellent foundation for a new collaborative pursuit of discovery.« less

  11. Formation of ice lenses and frost heave A. W. Rempel1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rempel, Alan W.

    are promoted by the influence of mineral surfaces on the phase behavior of ice. A large body of experimental, but nevertheless ad hoc parameterizations for the ice particle interactions, the choice of functional form beingFormation of ice lenses and frost heave A. W. Rempel1 Received 13 April 2006; revised 26 January

  12. New French Guidelines for Structural Safety of Embankment Dams in a Semi-probabilistic Format

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    New French Guidelines for Structural Safety of Embankment Dams in a Semi-probabilistic Format P in France and in most countries, hydraulic works (dams and levees) have remained excluded from semi rules. In this context, the French Committee on Large Dams ­ FRCOLD - initiated, with a panel of experts

  13. OH-initiated oxidation of benzene Part I. Phenol formation under atmospheric conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OH-initiated oxidation of benzene Part I. Phenol formation under atmospheric conditions Rainer-radical initiated oxidation of benzene was studied in two simulation chambers: (1) the large-volume outdoor chamber-red spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to simultaneously measure phenol and benzene. The second study used only FTIR

  14. Glass foams: formation, transport properties, and heat, mass, and radiation transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    Glass foams: formation, transport properties, and heat, mass, and radiation transfer Andrei G depend, to a large extent, on foams formed on the surface of the molten glass and of the batch due models for thermophysical and transport properties and heat, mass, and radiation transfer in glass foams

  15. Floating insulated conductors for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burns, David; Goodwin, Charles R.

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in a first opening in the subsurface formation. Three electrical conductors are located in the conduit. A return conductor is located inside the conduit. The return conductor is electrically coupled to the ends of the electrical conductors distal from the surface of the formation. Insulation is located inside the conduit. The insulation electrically insulates the three electrical conductors, the return conductor, and the conduit from each other.

  16. Nonequilibrium Atmospheric Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol Formation and Growth. Abstract: Airborne particles play a critical role in air quality, human health effects, visibility and climate. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA)...

  17. Heating tar sands formations to visbreaking temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Colmenares, Tulio Rafael (Houston, TX); Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX); Marino, Marian (Houston, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Ryan, Robert Charles (Houston, TX); Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Dombrowski, Robert James (Houston, TX); Jaiswal, Namit (Houston, TX)

    2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat may be controlled so that at least a majority of the section reaches an average temperature of between 200.degree. C. and 240.degree. C., which results in visbreaking of at least some hydrocarbons in the section. At least some visbroken hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  18. Standard Format and Content for Emergency Plans

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume addresses recommended emergency plan format and content for Operational Emergency Base Programs and Operational Emergency Hazardous Material Programs. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.

  19. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  20. Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation in Supported Few-Layer Graphene Friday, February 28, 2014 Among the allotropes of carbon, diamond has some of the most...

  1. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating a karsted formation containing heavy hydrocarbons and dolomite includes providing heat to at least part of one or more karsted layers in the formation from one or more heaters located in the karsted layers. A temperature in at least one of the karsted layers is allowed to reach a decomposition temperature of dolomite in the formation. The dolomite is allowed to decompose and at least some hydrocarbons are produced from at least one of the karsted layers of the formation.

  2. Theoretical Investigations on the Formation and Dehydrogenation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of boron-nitrogen-hydrogen (BNHx) compounds that are promising materials for chemical hydrogen storage. Understanding the kinetics and reaction pathways of formation of these...

  3. Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ayers, Marion Jay; Ayers, Shannon Lee

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

  4. Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ayers, Marion Jay (Brentwood, CA); Ayers, Shannon Lee (Brentwood, CA)

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

  5. Visualization of Large-Scale Distributed Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Andrew

    that are now considered the "lenses" for examining large-scale data. THE LARGE-SCALE DATA VISUALIZATIONVisualization of Large-Scale Distributed Data Jason Leigh1 , Andrew Johnson1 , Luc Renambot1 representation of data and the interactive manipulation and querying of the visualization. Large-scale data

  6. Turing pattern formation in the Brusselator system with nonlinear diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Gambino; M. C. Lombardo; M. Sammartino; V. Sciacca

    2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we investigate the effect of density dependent nonlinear diffusion on pattern formation in the Brusselator system. Through linear stability analysis of the basic solution we determine the Turing and the oscillatory instability boundaries. A comparison with the classical linear diffusion shows how nonlinear diffusion favors the occurrence of Turing pattern formation. We study the process of pattern formation both in 1D and 2D spatial domains. Through a weakly nonlinear multiple scales analysis we derive the equations for the amplitude of the stationary patterns. The analysis of the amplitude equations shows the occurrence of a number of different phenomena, including stable supercritical and subcritical Turing patterns with multiple branches of stable solutions leading to hysteresis. Moreover we consider traveling patterning waves: when the domain size is large, the pattern forms sequentially and traveling wavefronts are the precursors to patterning. We derive the Ginzburg-Landau equation and describe the traveling front enveloping a pattern which invades the domain. We show the emergence of radially symmetric target patterns, and through a matching procedure we construct the outer amplitude equation and the inner core solution.

  7. TESTING TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION IN SIX H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirienzo, William J.; Indebetouw, Remy [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 3818, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Brogan, Crystal; Friesen, Rachel K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Cyganowski, Claudia J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Churchwell, Ed, E-mail: dirienzo@virginia.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 N Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated six H II regions with infrared, bright rimmed bubble or cometary morphology, in search of quantitative evidence for triggered star formation, both collect and collapse and radiatively driven implosion (RDI). We identified and classified 458 young stellar objects (YSOs) in and around the H II regions. YSOs were determined by fitting a collection of radiative transfer model spectral energy distributions to infrared photometry for a large sample of point sources. We determined areas where there exist enhanced populations of relatively unevolved YSOs on the bright rims of these regions, suggesting that star formation has been triggered there. We further investigated the physical properties of the regions by using radio continuum emission as a proxy for ionizing flux powering the H II regions, and {sup 13}CO (1-0) observations to measure masses and gravitational stability of molecular clumps. We used an analytical model of collect and collapse triggered star formation, as well as a simulation of RDI, and thus we compare the observed properties of the molecular gas with those predicted in the triggering scenarios. Notably, those regions in our sample that show evidence of cometary, or 'blister', morphology are more likely to show evidence of triggering.

  8. Chromospheric Dynamics and Line Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Hammer; P. Ulmschneider

    2007-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar chromosphere is very dynamic, due to the presence of large amplitude hydrodynamic waves. Their propagation is affected by NLTE radiative transport in strong spectral lines, which can in turn be used to diagnose the dynamics of the chromosphere. We give a basic introduction into the equations of NLTE radiation hydrodynamics and describe how they are solved in current numerical simulations. The comparison with observation shows that one-dimensional codes can describe strong brightenings quite well, but the overall chromospheric dynamics appears to be governed by three-dimensional shock propagation.

  9. A Comparison of Independent Star Formation Diagnostics for a UV-Selected Sample of Nearby Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, M; Chan, B; Cram, L; Ellis, R; Treyer, M A; Hopkins, A; Sullivan, Mark; Mobasher, Bahram; Chan, Ben; Cram, Lawrence; Ellis, Richard; Treyer, Marie; Hopkins, Andrew

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from a decimetric radio survey undertaken with the Very Large Array as part of a longer term goal to inter-compare star formation and dust extinction diagnostics, on a galaxy by galaxy basis, for a representative sample of nearby galaxies. For our survey field, Selected Area 57, star formation rates derived from 1.4GHz luminosities are compared with earlier nebular emission line and ultraviolet (UV) continuum diagnostics. We find broad correlations, over several decades in luminosity, between H-alpha, the UV continuum and 1.4GHz diagnostics. However, the scatter in these relations is found to be larger than observational errors, with offsets between the observed relations and those expected assuming constant star-formation histories and luminosity-independent extinction models. We investigate the physical origin of the observed relations, and conclude the discrepancies between different star-formation diagnostics can only be partly explained by simple models of dust extinction in galaxies. ...

  10. A feedback compression star formation model and the black hole - bulge relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bing-Xiao Xu; Xue-Bing Wu

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a "feedback compression" model to describe the galactic spheroid formation and its relation with the central nuclear activity. We suggest that the star formation itself can serve as the "positive feedback" in some extremely dense region to trigger the starburst. The star formation rate as well as the related stellar feedback-induced turbulence will be maximized under the regulation of the background dark halo's gravity. There is also stellar feedback acting inward to confine and obscure the central black hole (BH) till the BH grows sufficiently large to satisfy a balance condition between the accretion disk wind and the inward stellar feedback. The extremely vigorous star formation activity, the BH - bulge relations, the maximum velocity dispersion as well as the maximum BH mass are investigated based on such scenario, and are found to be consistent with observations.

  11. EXFOR BASICS A SHORT GUIDE TO THE NEUTRON REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its' bibliographic information, experimental information is also compiled. The status (e.g., the source of the data) and history (e.g., date of last update) of the data set is also included. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. It was originally conceived for the exchange of neutron data and was developed through discussions among personnel from centers situated in Saclay, Vienna, Livermore and Brookhaven. It was accepted as the official exchange format of the neutron data centers at Saclay, Vienna, Brookhaven and Obninsk, at a meeting held in November 1969.3 As a result of two meetings held in 1975 and 1976 and attended by several charged-particle data centers, the format was further developed and adapted to cover all nuclear reaction data. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center's own sphere of responsibility. The EXFOR format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in a format: l that is machine-readable (for checking and indicating possible errors); l that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting errors). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange file include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  12. EXFOR BASICS A SHORT GUIDE TO THE NEUTRON REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its' bibliographic information, experimental information is also compiled. The status (e.g., the source of the data) and history (e.g., date of last update) of the data set is also included. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. It was originally conceived for the exchange of neutron data and was developed through discussions among personnel from centers situated in Saclay, Vienna, Livermore and Brookhaven. It was accepted as the official exchange format of the neutron data centers at Saclay, Vienna, Brookhaven and Obninsk, at a meeting held in November 1969. As a result of two meetings held in 1975 and 1976 and attended by several charged-particle data centers, the format was further developed and adapted to cover all nuclear reaction data. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center's own sphere of responsibility. The EXFOR format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in a format: that is machine-readable (for checking and indicating possible errors); that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting errors). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange file include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  13. Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric Transmission and Distribution Programs. Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric...

  14. Commission for Women Year-End Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    Commission for Women Year-End Report Academic Year 2009-2010 The Commission for Women ­ Knoxville. This year's Commission has been busy. We have accomplished our goals this year, thanks in great measure will be described later in this report. Campus and Community Programs In November the Commission for Women and Women

  15. Adaptive Optics for Large Telescopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olivier, S

    2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of adaptive optics was originally conceived by astronomers seeking to correct the blurring of images made with large telescopes due to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. The basic idea is to use a device, a wave front corrector, to adjust the phase of light passing through an optical system, based on some measurement of the spatial variation of the phase transverse to the light propagation direction, using a wave front sensor. Although the original concept was intended for application to astronomical imaging, the technique can be more generally applied. For instance, adaptive optics systems have been used for several decades to correct for aberrations in high-power laser systems. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the world's largest laser system, the National Ignition Facility, uses adaptive optics to correct for aberrations in each of the 192 beams, all of which must be precisely focused on a millimeter scale target in order to perform nuclear physics experiments.

  16. Analysis of large urban fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, S.W.; Reitter, T.A.; Takata, A.N.

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fires in urban areas caused by a nuclear burst are analyzed as a first step towards determining their smoke-generation chacteristics, which may have grave implications for global-scale climatic consequences. A chain of events and their component processes which would follow a nuclear attack are described. A numerical code is currently being developed to calculate ultimately the smoke production rate for a given attack scenario. Available models for most of the processes are incorporated into the code. Sample calculations of urban fire-development history performed in the code for an idealized uniform city are presented. Preliminary results indicate the importance of the wind, thermal radiation transmission, fuel distributions, and ignition thresholds on the urban fire spread characteristics. Future plans are to improve the existing models and develop new ones to characterize smoke production from large urban fires. 21 references, 18 figures.

  17. THE FORMATION OF YOUNG DENSE STAR CLUSTERS THROUGH MERGERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujii, M. S.; Portegies Zwart, S. F. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300RA Leiden (Netherlands); Saitoh, T. R. [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Young star clusters such as NGC 3603 and Westerlund 1 and 2 in the Milky Way and R136 in the Large Magellanic Cloud are dynamically more evolved than expected based on their current relaxation times. In particular, the combination of a high degree of mass segregation, a relatively low central density, and the large number of massive runaway stars in their vicinity are hard to explain with the monolithic formation of these clusters. Young star clusters can achieve such a mature dynamical state if they formed through the mergers of a number of less massive clusters. The shorter relaxation times of less massive clusters cause them to dynamically evolve further by the time they merge, and the merger product preserves the memory of the dynamical evolution of its constituent clusters. With a series of N-body simulations, we study the dynamical evolution of single massive clusters and those that are assembled through merging smaller clusters together. We find that the formation of massive star clusters through the mergers of smaller clusters can reproduce the currently observed spatial distribution of massive stars, the density, and the characteristics (number and mass distribution) of the stars ejected as runaways from young dense clusters. We therefore conclude that these clusters and possibly other young massive star clusters formed through the mergers of smaller clusters.

  18. Composition Mixing during Blue Straggler Formation and Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric L. Sandquist; Michael Bolte; Lars Hernquist

    1996-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We use smoothed-particle hydrodynamics to examine differences between direct collisions of single stars and binary star mergers in their roles as possible blue straggler star formation mechanisms. We find in all cases that core helium in the progenitor stars is largely retained in the core of the remnant, almost independent of the type of interaction or the central concentration of the progenitor stars. We have also modelled the subsequent evolution of the hydrostatic remnants, including mass loss and energy input from the hydrodynamical interaction. The combination of the hydrodynamical and hydrostatic models enables us to predict that little mixing will occur during the merger of two globular cluster stars of equal mass. In contrast to the results of Proctor Sills, Bailyn, & Demarque (1995), we find that neither completely mixed nor unmixed models can match the absolute colors of observed blue stragglers in NGC 6397 at all luminosity levels. We also find that the color distribution is probably the crucial test for explanations of BSS formation - if stellar collisions or mergers are the correct mechanisms, a large fraction of the lifetime of the straggler must be spent away from the main sequence. This constraint appears to rule out the possibility of completely mixed models. For NGC 6397, unmixed models predict blue straggler lifetimes ranging from about 0.1 to 4 Gyr, while completely mixed models predict a range from about 0.6 to 4 Gyr.

  19. FORMATION, SURVIVAL, AND DETECTABILITY OF PLANETS BEYOND 100 AU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veras, Dimitri; Crepp, Justin R.; Ford, Eric B. [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Sciences Center, Gainesville, FL 32111 (United States)], E-mail: veras@astro.ufl.edu

    2009-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct imaging searches have begun to detect planetary and brown dwarf companions and to place constraints on the presence of giant planets at large separations from their host star. This work helps to motivate such planet searches by predicting a population of young giant planets that could be detectable by direct imaging campaigns. Both the classical core accretion and the gravitational instability model for planet formation are hard pressed to form long-period planets in situ. Here, we show that dynamical instabilities among planetary systems that originally formed multiple giant planets much closer to the host star could produce a population of giant planets at large ({approx} 10{sup 2}-10{sup 5} AU) separations. We estimate the limits within which these planets may survive, quantify the efficiency of gravitational scattering into both stable and unstable wide orbits, and demonstrate that population analyses must take into account the age of the system. We predict that planet scattering creates detectable giant planets on wide orbits that decreases in number on timescales of {approx} 10 Myr. We demonstrate that several members of such populations should be detectable with current technology, quantify the prospects for future instruments, and suggest how they could place interesting constraints on planet formation models.

  20. ON MOLECULAR HYDROGEN FORMATION AND THE MAGNETOHYDROSTATIC EQUILIBRIUM OF SUNSPOTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaeggli, S. A.; Lin, H. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawai'i, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Uitenbroek, H. [National Solar Observatory, Sacramento Peak, P.O. Box 62, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the problem of sunspot magnetohydrostatic equilibrium with comprehensive IR sunspot magnetic field survey observations of the highly sensitive Fe I lines at 15650 A and nearby OH lines. We have found that some sunspots show isothermal increases in umbral magnetic field strength which cannot be explained by the simplified sunspot model with a single-component ideal gas atmosphere assumed in previous investigations. Large sunspots universally display nonlinear increases in magnetic pressure over temperature, while small sunspots and pores display linear behavior. The formation of molecules provides a mechanism for isothermal concentration of the umbral magnetic field, and we propose that this may explain the observed rapid increase in umbral magnetic field strength relative to temperature. Existing multi-component sunspot atmospheric models predict that a significant amount of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) exists in the sunspot umbra. The formation of H{sub 2} can significantly alter the thermodynamic properties of the sunspot atmosphere and may play a significant role in sunspot evolution. In addition to the survey observations, we have performed detailed chemical equilibrium calculations with full consideration of radiative transfer effects to establish OH as a proxy for H{sub 2}, and demonstrate that a significant population of H{sub 2} exists in the coolest regions of large sunspots.

  1. H2 formation on PAHs in photodissociation regions: a high-temperature pathway to molecular hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boschman, Leon; Spaans, Marco; Hoekstra, Ronnie; Schlathölter, Thomas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular hydrogen is the most abundant molecule in the Universe. It is thought that a large portion of H2 forms by association of hydrogen atoms to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We model the influence of PAHs on total H2 formation rates in photodissociation regions (PDRs) and assess the effect of these formation rates on the total cloud structure. We set up a chemical kinetic model at steady state in a PDR environment and included adiative transfer to calculate the chemistry at different depths in the PDR. This model includes known dust grain chemistry for the formation of H2 and a H2 formation mechanism on PAHs. Since H2 formation on PAHs is impeded by thermal barriers, this pathway is only efficient at higher temperatures (T > 200 K). At these temperatures the conventional route of H2 formation via H atoms physisorbed on dust grains is no longer feasible, so the PAH mechanism enlarges the region where H2 formation is possible. We find that PAHs have a significant influence on the structure of PD...

  2. Constraints on the Formation Age of Cometary Material from the NASA Stardust Mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matzel, J; Ishii, H; Joswiak, D; Hutcheon, I; Bradley, J; Brownlee, D; Weber, P K; Teslich, N; Matrajt, G; McKeegan, K; MacPherson, G

    2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the {sup 26}Al-{sup 26}Mg isotope systematics of a {approx} 5-micrometer refractory particle, Coki, returned from comet 81P/Wild 2 in order to relate the time scales of formation of cometary inclusions to their meteoritic counterparts. The data show no evidence of radiogenic {sup 26}Mg and define an upper limit to the abundance of {sup 26}Al at the time of particle formation: {sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al < 1 x 10-5. The absence of {sup 26}Al indicates that Coki formed >1.7 million years after the oldest solids in the solar system, calcium- and aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs). The data suggest that high-temperature inner solar system material formed, was subsequently transferred to the Kuiper Belt, and was incorporated into comets several million years after CAI formation.

  3. Cloud Formation in the Plumes of Solar Chimney Power Generation Facilities: A Modeling Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nenes, Athanasios

    for a proposed solar chimney facility in southwestern Australia. A range of temperatures and updraft velocities technology for converting solar energy into electricity that has shown promise in recent years is the so1 Cloud Formation in the Plumes of Solar Chimney Power Generation Facilities: A Modeling Study

  4. A BASIC GESTURE AND MOTION FORMAT FOR VIRTUAL REALITY MULTISENSORY APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Movement, Motion Capture, Virtual Reality, Computer Animation, Multisensoriality. Abstract: The questionA BASIC GESTURE AND MOTION FORMAT FOR VIRTUAL REALITY MULTISENSORY APPLICATIONS Annie Luciani of encoding movements such as those produced by human gestures may become central in the coming years, given

  5. A Software-Oriented Floating-Point Format for Enhancing Automotive Control Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwu, Wen-mei W.

    A Software-Oriented Floating-Point Format for Enhancing Automotive Control Systems Daniel A, yamada, hwug@crhc.uiuc.edu August 11, 1999 In recent years, the software of automotive control sys- tems- ber computation in automotive control systems by design- ing a new software-oriented floating

  6. Le logiciel "Tigre" en formation PLC 1 Grtice J. Vincent Le logiciel Tigre en formation PLC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    "Tigre" en formation PLC 1 Grétice J. Vincent Le logiciel « Tigre » en formation PLC J. Vincent Le;______________________________________________________________________________________ Le logiciel "Tigre" en formation PLC 2 Grétice J. Vincent 1.1. La lecture Voici l'écran d;______________________________________________________________________________________ Le logiciel "Tigre" en formation PLC 3 Grétice J. Vincent Figure 3 1.2. La démonstration Voici l

  7. Shell Formation and Bone Strength Laying Hens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shell Formation and Bone Strength in Laying Hens Effects of Age, Daidzein and Exogenous Estrogen Cover aquarelle: E. Spörndly-Nees #12;Shell Formation and Bone Strength in Laying Hens Effects of Age eggshells as shell quality declines with age during the laying period. This is a concern for food safety

  8. DISSERTATION FORMATION OF THE HURRICANE EYE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Wayne H.

    DISSERTATION FORMATION OF THE HURRICANE EYE Submitted by Jonathan L. Vigh Department of Atmospheric OF THE HURRICANE EYE BE ACCEPTED AS FULFILLING IN PART REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY. Schubert Department Head: Richard H. Johnson ii #12;ABSTRACT OF DISSERTATION FORMATION OF THE HURRICANE EYE

  9. FAINT RADIO SOURCES AND STAR FORMATION HISTORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waddington, Ian

    FAINT RADIO SOURCES AND STAR FORMATION HISTORY Deborah B. Haarsma 1 , R. Bruce Partridge 1 , Ian 85287­1504 USA Abstract. Faint extragalactic radio sources provide important information about the global history of star formation. Sensitive radio observations of the Hubble Deep Field and other fields

  10. First Structure Formation and the First Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael L. Norman; Tom Abel; Greg Bryan

    2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the results of recent 3D simulations of first structure formation in relationship to the formation of the first stars. On the basis of a new, high-resolution AMR simulation (spatial dynamic range = 30,000,000), we conclude that the first stars are likely to be massive.

  11. Methods for forming wellbores in heated formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guimerans, Rosalvina Ramona; Mansure, Arthur James

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming a wellbore in a heated formation includes flowing liquid cooling fluid to a bottom hole assembly in a wellbore in a heated formation. At least a portion of the liquid cooling fluid is vaporized at or near a region to be cooled. Vaporizing the liquid cooling fluid absorbs heat from the region to be cooled.

  12. Hydrology and Hydraulic Properties of a Bedded Evaporite Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; ROBERTS,RANDALL M.

    2000-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Permian Salado Formation in the Delaware Basin of New Mexico is an extensively studied evaporite deposit because it is the host formation for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, a repository for transuranic wastes. Geologic and hydrologic studies of the Salado conducted since the mid-1970's have led to the development of a conceptual model of the hydrogeology of the formation that involves far-field permeability in anhydrite layers and at least some impure halite layers. Pure halite layers and some impure halite layers may not possess an interconnected pore network adequate to provide permeability. Pore pressures are probably very close to lithostatic pressure. In the near field around an excavation, dilation, creep, and shear have created and/or enhanced permeability and decreased pore pressure. Whether flow occurs in the far field under natural gradients or only after some threshold gradient is reached is unknown. If far-field flow does occur, mean pore velocities are probably on the order of a meter per hundreds of thousands to tens of millions of years. Flow dimensions inferred from most hydraulic-test responses are subradial, which is believed to reflect channeling of flow through fracture networks, or portions of fractures, that occupy a diminishing proportion of the radially available space, or through percolation networks that are not ''saturated'' (fully interconnected). This is probably related to the directional nature of the permeability created or enhanced by excavation effects. Inferred values of permeability cannot be separated from their associated flow dimensions. Therefore, numerical models of flow and transport should include heterogeneity that is structured to provide the same flow dimensions as are observed in hydraulic tests. Modeling of the Salado Formation around the WIPP repository should also include coupling between hydraulic properties and the evolving stress field because hydraulic properties change as the stress field changes.

  13. Investigating the Distribution of Teacher Quality by Race/Ethnicity and Socioeconomic Status of Students by School in One Large School District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGlohn, Robin

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    large school district. The population for this study included 69 schools during the 2007-2008 school year within one large suburban school district. Included in this study were 47 elementary schools, 14 middle schools, and 8 high schools...

  14. Extreme argon purity in a large, non-evacuated cryostat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tope, Terry; Adamowski, Mark; Carls, B.; Hahn, A.; Jaskierny, W.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Lockwitz, S.; Pahlka, B.; Plunkett, R.; Pordes, S.; Rebel, B.; Schmitt, R.; Skup, E.; Stancari, M.; Yang, T. [Particle Physics Division, Fermilab, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) show promise as scalable devices for the large detectors needed for long-baseline neutrino oscillation physics. Over the last several years at Fermilab a staged approach to developing the technology for large detectors has been developed. The TPC detectors require ultra-pure liquid argon with respect to electronegative contaminants such as oxygen and water. The tolerable electronegative contamination level may be as pure as 60 parts per trillion of oxygen. Three liquid argon cryostats operated at Fermilab have achieved the extreme purity required by TPCs. These three cryostats used evacuation to remove atmospheric contaminants as the first purification step prior to filling with liquid argon. Future physics experiments may require very large detectors with tens of kilotonnes of liquid argon mass. The capability to evacuate such large cryostats adds significant cost to the cryostat itself in addition to the cost of a large scale vacuum pumping system. This paper describes a 30 ton liquid argon cryostat at Fermilab which uses purging to remove atmospheric contaminants instead of evacuation as the first purification step. This cryostat has achieved electronegative contamination levels better than 60 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent. The results of this liquid argon purity demonstration will strongly influence the design of future TPC cryostats.

  15. PROGRESS ON LARGE GRAIN AND SINGLE GRAIN NIOBIUM: INGOTS AND SHEET AND REVIEW OF PROGRESS ON LARGE GRAIN AND SINGLE GRAIN NIOBIUM CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Kneisel

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Large grain and single crystal niobium has been proposed several years ago as an alternative material to poly-crystalline niobium for superconducting cavities, exhibiting potential advantages such as ¿stream-lined¿ procedures, reduced costs and better reproducibility in performance. Several major laboratories have investigated the use of large grain and single crystal material in the past years and the niobium producing industry has responded in providing ingot material with enlarged grain sizes. Besides a large number of single cell and multi-cell cavities from large grain niobium, several single crystal cavities have been fabricated and tested with good performances. This contribution will review the progress since the SRF workshop in 2005 in material processing and handling and in cavity performances.

  16. Running spectral index and formation of primordial black hole in single field inflation models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drees, Manuel; Erfani, Encieh, E-mail: drees@th.physik.uni-bonn.de, E-mail: erfani@th.physik.uni-bonn.de [Physikalisches Institut and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Universität Bonn, Nussallee 12, 53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A broad range of single field models of inflation are analyzed in light of all relevant recent cosmological data, checking whether they can lead to the formation of long-lived Primordial Black Holes (PBHs). To that end we calculate the spectral index of the power spectrum of primordial perturbations as well as its first and second derivatives. PBH formation is possible only if the spectral index increases significantly at small scales, i.e. large wave number k. Since current data indicate that the first derivative ?{sub S} of the spectral index n{sub S}(k{sub 0}) is negative at the pivot scale k{sub 0}, PBH formation is only possible in the presence of a sizable and positive second derivative (''running of the running'') ?{sub S}. Among the three small-field and five large-field models we analyze, only one small-field model, the ''running mass'' model, allows PBH formation, for a narrow range of parameters. We also note that none of the models we analyze can accord for a large and negative value of ?{sub S}, which is weakly preferred by current data.

  17. Program Year 2008 State Energy Program Formula

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) State Energy Program (SEP), SEP Program Guidance Fiscal Year 2008, Program Year 2008, energy efficiency and renewable energy programs in the states, DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  18. Y-12 apprentice programs through the years

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    through the years Apprentice programs have been in existence at Y-12 at various times over the years beginning as early as the 1960's. With only one exception, in 1991 when an...

  19. The Year in Review: Comments from the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    1 The Year in Review: Comments from the Executive Director The President's Diversity Initiative.udel.edu/udaily/2013/oct/historic-diversity-100212.html. Year in Review 1 Staffing and space 1 Disabilities Support 2

  20. the year in review OUR STUDENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carleton University

    the year in review 2011-12 #12;OUR STUDENTS 26,771 total students 81 per cent average entering retired faculty: 39 graduate teaching assistants: 1,773 #12;the year in review 2011-12 #12;We Must

  1. Budget estimates, fiscal year 1997. Volume 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the fiscal year budget justification to Congress. The budget provides estimates for salaries and expenses and for the Office of the Inspector General for fiscal year 1997.

  2. West Virginia University 1 First Year Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 First Year Experience FAQs · What is a First-Year Seminar? · Who must the knowledge and skills necessary for academic success. What are the goals and objectives of FYS? 1. Set

  3. Biogeochemical Processes in a Clay Formation In-situ Experiment: Part B Results from overcoring and evidence of strong buffering by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2 Biogeochemical Processes in a Clay Formation In-situ Experiment: Part B ­ Results from overcoring in the Opalinus Clay formation was carried out at the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory (Jura Mountains/precipitation reactions. After five years, the 4.5 m long vertical test interval was overcored and Opalinus clay samples

  4. Secretary Chu Celebrates NNSA's 10-Year Anniversary

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu speaks at NNSA's 10-year anniversary celebration on April 28, 2010.

  5. 1995 shipment review & five year forecast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fetherolf, D.J. Jr. [East Penn Manufacturing Co., Inc., Lyon Station, PA (United States)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the 1995 battery shipment review and five year forecast for the battery market. Historical data is discussed.

  6. Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayser, Dan

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 2010. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring activities. In 2010, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of waste under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. All waste is handled according to all applicable EPA, State, Local regulations and DOE Orders. In 2006 the Laboratory reduced its generator status from a Large Quantity Generator (LQG) to a Small Quantity Generator (SQG). EPA Region VII was notified of this change. The Laboratory's RCRA hazardous waste management program was inspected by EPA Region VII in April 2006. There were no notices of violations. The inspector was impressed with the improvements of the Laboratory's waste management program over the past ten years. The Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, local and DOE regulations and orders in 2010. There were no radiological air emissions or exposures to the general public due to Laboratory activities in 2010. See U.S. Department of Energy Air Emissions Annual Report in Appendix B. As indicated in prior SERs, pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs have been in practice since 1990, with improvements implemented most recently in 2010. Included in these efforts were battery and CRT recycling, miscellaneous electronic office equipment, waste white paper and green computer paper-recycling and corrugated cardboard recycling. Ames Laboratory also recycles/reuses salvageable metal, used oil, foamed polystyrene peanuts, batteries, fluorescent lamps and telephone books. Ames Laboratory reported to DOE-Ames Site Office (AMSO), through the Laboratory's Performance Evaluation Measurement Plan, on its Affirmative Procurement Performance Measure. A performance level of 'A-' was achieved in 2010 for Integrated Safety, Health and Environmental Protection. As reported in Site Environmental Reports for prior years, the Laboratory's Environmental Management System (EMS) has been integrated into the Laboratory's Integrated Safety Management System since 2005. The integration of EMS into the way the Laboratory does business allows the Laboratory to systematically review, address and respond to the Laboratory's environmental impacts. The Laboratory's EMS was audited in April 2009 by DOE-CH. There were four 'Sufficiently in Conformity' findings as a result of the audit. All four findings were tracked in the Laboratory's corrective action database for completion. Beryllium was used routinely at Ames Laboratory in the 1940's and 1950's in processes developed for the production of highly pure uranium and thorium in support of the historic Manhattan Project. Laboratory metallurgists also worked on a process to produce pure beryllium metal from beryllium fluoride. In the early 1950's, beryllium oxide powder was used to produce shaped beryllium and crucibles. As a result of that work, beryllium contamination now exists in many interstitial spaces (e.g., utility chases) and ventilation systems in Wilhelm, Spedding and Metals Development buildings. Extensive characterization and remediation efforts have occurred in 2009 and 2010 in order to better understand the extent of the contamination. Analysis of extensive sampling data suggests that a fairly wide dispersion of beryllium occurred (most likely in the 1950's and 60's) in Wilhelm Hall and in certain areas of Spedding Hall and Metals Development. Area air-sampling results and work-area surface characterizations indicate the exposure potential to current workers, building visitors and the public remains extremely low. This information is now used to guide cleaning efforts and to provide worker protection during remodeling and maintenance activities. Results were shared with the DOE's Former Worker Program to support former worker medical test

  7. ON THE STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY OF TURBULENT MAGNETIZED CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Federrath, Christoph [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Vic 3800 (Australia)] [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Vic 3800 (Australia); Klessen, Ralf S., E-mail: christoph.federrath@monash.edu [Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the star formation efficiency (SFE) in simulations and observations of turbulent, magnetized, molecular clouds. We find that the probability density functions (PDFs) of the density and the column density in our simulations with solenoidal, mixed, and compressive forcing of turbulence, sonic Mach numbers of 3-50, and magnetic fields in the super- to the trans-Alfvenic regime all develop power-law tails of flattening slope with increasing SFE. The high-density tails of the PDFs are consistent with equivalent radial density profiles, {rho}{proportional_to}r {sup -{kappa}} with {kappa} {approx} 1.5-2.5, in agreement with observations. Studying velocity-size scalings, we find that all the simulations are consistent with the observed v{proportional_to}l{sup 1/2} scaling of supersonic turbulence and seem to approach Kolmogorov turbulence with v{proportional_to}l{sup 1/3} below the sonic scale. The velocity-size scaling is, however, largely independent of the SFE. In contrast, the density-size and column density-size scalings are highly sensitive to star formation. We find that the power-law slope {alpha} of the density power spectrum, P {sub 3D}({rho}, k){proportional_to}k {sup {alpha}}, or equivalently the {Delta}-variance spectrum of the column density, {sigma}{sup 2} {sub {Delta}}({Sigma}, l) {proportional_to} l{sup -{alpha}}, switches sign from {alpha} {approx}< 0 for SFE {approx} 0 to {alpha} {approx}> 0 when star formation proceeds (SFE > 0). We provide a relation to compute the SFE from a measurement of {alpha}. Studying the literature, we find values ranging from {alpha} = -1.6 to +1.6 in observations covering scales from the large-scale atomic medium, over cold molecular clouds, down to dense star-forming cores. From those {alpha} values, we infer SFEs and find good agreement with independent measurements based on young stellar object (YSO) counts, where available. Our SFE-{alpha} relation provides an independent estimate of the SFE based on the column density map of a cloud alone, without requiring a priori knowledge of star formation activity or YSO counts.

  8. A Year in Review BOUNDLESS 20112012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Year in Review BOUNDLESS 2011­2012 #12;­ ­ ­ pg.18 30.03.12 Preparing Global Citizens at Arts & Science pg.26 31.05.12 Spring Reunion Boundless: pg.22 15.04.12 A Year in Review pg.14 31.01.12 29 Afterword pg.71 Volunteer Leadership #12;BOUNDLESS ENGAGEMENT BOUNDLESS COMMITMENT 02 / BOUNDLESS: A Year

  9. Clinical Biochemical Geneticist Two-Year Fellowship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Clinical Biochemical Geneticist Two-Year Fellowship YEAR 1 YEAR 2 MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY A.M. Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research & Clinical Training 8AM Newborn Screen Follow-up conference Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research & Clinical

  10. Clinical Molecular Geneticist Two-Year Fellowship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Clinical Molecular Geneticist Two-Year Fellowship YEAR 1 YEAR 2 MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY A.M. 11-12 DNA Sign- out conference Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research & Clinical Training (includes rotation in Molecular Microbiology lab) Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research

  11. Large margin classification in infinite neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saul, Lawrence K.

    Large margin classification in infinite neural networks Youngmin Cho and Lawrence K. Saul, CA 92093-0404 Abstract We introduce a new family of positive-definite kernels for large margin classi- fication in support vector machines (SVMs). These kernels mimic the computation in large neural networks

  12. Large-Scale Manifold Learning Ameet Talwalkar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    Large-Scale Manifold Learning Ameet Talwalkar Courant Institute New York, NY ameet on spectral decom- position, we first analyze two approximate spectral decom- position techniques for large-dimensional embeddings for two large face datasets: CMU-PIE (35 thousand faces) and a web dataset (18 million faces). Our

  13. Large-Scale Renewable Energy Guide Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Webinar introduces the “Large Scale Renewable Energy Guide." The webinar will provide an overview of this important FEMP guide, which describes FEMP's approach to large-scale renewable energy projects and provides guidance to Federal agencies and the private sector on how to develop a common process for large-scale renewable projects.

  14. Conundrum of the Large Scale Streaming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. M. Malm

    1999-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The etiology of the large scale peculiar velocity (large scale streaming motion) of clusters would increasingly seem more tenuous, within the context of the gravitational instability hypothesis. Are there any alternative testable models possibly accounting for such large scale streaming of clusters?

  15. The Formation of the Hubble Sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice

    2003-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The history of galaxy formation via star formation and stellar mass assembly rates is now known with some certainty, yet the connection between high redshift and low redshift galaxy populations is not yet clear. By identifying and studying individual massive galaxies at high-redshifts, z > 1.5, we can possibly uncover the physical effects driving galaxy formation. Using the structures of high-z galaxies, as imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope, we argue that it is now possible to directly study the progenitors of ellipticals and disks. We also briefly describe early results that suggest many massive galaxies are forming at z > 2 through major mergers.

  16. Infall Motions in Massive Star-Forming Regions: Results from Years 1 & 2 of the MALT90 Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Yu-Xin; Esimbek, Jarken; Ji, Wei-Guang; Wu, Gang; Tang, Xin-Di; Yuan, Ye; Li, Da-Lei; Baan,; A, W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Massive star-forming regions with observed infall motions are good sites for studying the birth of massive stars. In this paper, 405 compact sources have been extracted from the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL) compact sources that also have been observed in the Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz (MALT90) survey during Years 1 and 2. These observations are complemented with Spitzer GLIMPSE/MIPSGAL mid-IR survey data to help classify the elected star-forming clumps into three evolutionary stages: pre-stellar, proto-stellar and UCHII regions. The results suggest that 0.05 g cm$^{-2}$ is a reliable empirical lower bound for the clump surface densities required for massive-star formation to occur. The optically thick HCO$^{+}$(1-0) and HNC(1-0) lines, as well as the optically thin N$_{2}$H$^{+}$(1-0) line were used to search for infall motions toward these sources. By analyzing the asymmetries of the optically thick HCO$^{+}$(1-0) and HNC(1-0) lines and the mapping observations of HC...

  17. The Regulation of Cooling and Star Formation in Luminous Galaxies by AGN Feedback and the Cooling-Time/Entropy Threshold for the Onset of Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Rafferty; Brian McNamara; Paul Nulsen

    2008-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Using broadband optical imaging and Chandra X-ray data for a sample of 46 cluster central dominant galaxies (CDGs), we investigate the connection between star formation, the intracluster medium (ICM), and the central active galactic nucleus (AGN). We report the discovery of a remarkably sharp threshold for the onset of star formation that occurs when the central cooling time of the hot atmosphere falls below ~ 5x10^8 yr, or equivalently when the central entropy falls below ~ 30 keV cm^2. In addition to this criterion, star formation in cooling flows also appears to require that the X-ray and galaxy centroids lie within ~ 20 kpc of each other, and that the jet (cavity) power is smaller than the X-ray cooling luminosity. These three criteria, together with the high ratio of cooling time to AGN outburst (cavity) age across our sample, directly link the presence of star formation and AGN activity in CDGs to cooling instabilities in the intracluster plasma. Our results provide compelling evidence that AGN feedback into the hot ICM is largely responsible for regulating cooling and star formation in the cores of clusters, leading to the significant growth of supermassive black holes in CDGs at late times.

  18. HYDROCARBON FORMATION ON POLYMER-SUPPORTED COBALT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benner, Linda S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NV~ August 25-29, 1980 HYDROCARBON FORMATION ON POLYMER-catalyzed reduction of CO to hydrocarbons Tropscb. Among theof CO to saturated linear hydrocarbons and appears to retain

  19. Modeling deposit formation in diesel injector nozzle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudhiesh Kumar, Chintoo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation of deposit in the diesel injector nozzle affects the injection behavior and hinders performance. Under running condition, deposit precursors are washed away by the ensuing injection. However, during the cool down ...

  20. Electromagnetic formation flight of satellite arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Daniel W., 1980-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposed methods of actuating spacecraft in sparse aperture arrays use propellant as a reaction mass. For formation flying systems, propellant becomes a critical consumable which can be quickly exhausted while maintaining ...

  1. Cyclic Imide Dioxime: Formation and Hydrolytic Stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, S.O. [University of Kansas; Vukovic, Sinisa [ORNL; Custelcean, Radu [ORNL; Hay, Benjamin [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Poly(acrylamidoximes) play an important role in the uranium extraction from seawater. The present work reports solution studies of simple analogs to address the formation and stability of two binding sites present in these polymers, open-chain amidoximes and cyclic imide dioximes, including: 1) conditions that maximize the formation of the cyclic form, 2) existence of a base-induced conversion from open-chain to cyclic form, and 3) degradation under acid and base conditions.

  2. Situ microbial plugging process for subterranean formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McInerney, Michael J. (Norman, OK); Jenneman, Gary E. (Norman, OK); Knapp, Roy M. (Norman, OK); Menzie, Donald E. (Norman, OK)

    1985-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Subterranean paths of water flow are impeded or changed by the facilitation of microbial growth therein. Either indigenous bacterial growth may be stimulated with nutrients or the formation may be first seeded with bacteria or their spores which inhibit fluid flow after proliferation. These methods and bacteria are usable to alter the flow of water in a waterflooded oil formation and to impede the outflow of contaminated water.

  3. Formation evaluation MWD enters new capability realm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hearn, F. (Baker Hughes INTEQ, Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent industry advances in formation evaluation measurement-while-drilling (FEMWD) have been achieved in well log data acquisition quality and in geosteering drilling applications. This paper presents new technology as applied by Baker Hughes INTEQ which includes: geosteering techniques which help navigate through horizontally drilled reservoirs including improved quality dual propagation resistivity, neutron-porosity and formation-density measurements; predictive modeling of tool responses in reservoir geosteering applications; environmental computer modeling which aids interpretation, including tool eccentering; and new measurement enhancements.

  4. Characterizing the formation of secondary organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunden, Melissa; Black, Douglas; Brown, Nancy

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic aerosol is an important fraction of the fine particulate matter present in the atmosphere. This organic aerosol comes from a variety of sources; primary organic aerosol emitted directly from combustion process, and secondary aerosol formed in the atmosphere from condensable vapors. This secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can result from both anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In rural areas of the United States, organic aerosols can be a significant part of the aerosol load in the atmosphere. However, the extent to which gas-phase biogenic emissions contribute to this organic load is poorly understood. Such an understanding is crucial to properly apportion the effect of anthropogenic emissions in these rural areas that are sometimes dominated by biogenic sources. To help gain insight on the effect of biogenic emissions on particle concentrations in rural areas, we have been conducting a field measurement program at the University of California Blodgett Forest Research Facility. The field location includes has been used to acquire an extensive suite of measurements resulting in a rich data set, containing a combination of aerosol, organic, and nitrogenous species concentration and meteorological data with a long time record. The field location was established in 1997 by Allen Goldstein, a professor in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management at the University of California at Berkeley to study interactions between the biosphere and the atmosphere. The Goldstein group focuses on measurements of concentrations and whole ecosystem biosphere-atmosphere fluxes for volatile organic compounds (VOC's), oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOC's), ozone, carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy. Another important collaborator at the Blodgett field location is Ronald Cohen, a professor in the Chemistry Department at the University of California at Berkeley. At the Blodgett field location, his group his group performs measurements of the concentrations of important gas phase nitrogen compounds. Experiments have been ongoing at the Blodgett field site since the fall of 2000, and have included portions of the summer and fall of 2001, 2002, and 2003. Analysis of both the gas and particle phase data from the year 2000 show that the particle loading at the site correlates with both biogenic precursors emitted in the forest and anthropogenic precursors advected to the site from Sacramento and the Central Valley of California. Thus the particles at the site are affected by biogenic processing of anthropogenic emissions. Size distribution measurements show that the aerosol at the site has a geometric median diameter of approximately 100 nm. On many days, in the early afternoon, growth of nuclei mode particles (<20 nm) is also observed. These growth events tend to occur on days with lower average temperatures, but are observed throughout the summer. Analysis of the size resolved data for these growth events, combined with typical measured terpene emissions, show that the particle mass measured in these nuclei mode particles could come from oxidation products of biogenic emissions, and can serve as a significant route for SOA partitioning into the particle phase. During periods of each year, the effect of emissions for forest fires can be detected at the Blodgett field location. During the summer of 2002 emissions from the Biscuit fire, a large fire located in Southwest Oregon, was detected in the aerosol data. The results show that increases in particle scattering can be directly related to increased black carbon concentration and an appearance of a larger mode in the aerosol size distribution. These results show that emissions from fires can have significant impact on visibility over large distances. The results also reinforce the view that forest fires can be a significant source of black carbon in the atmosphere, which has important climate and visibility. Continuing work with the 2002 data set, particularly the combination of the aerosol and gas phase data, will continue to provide important information o

  5. Resolving to Make Earth Day Last All Year

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    What was your New Year's resolution this year? Maybe you resolved to get back into the gym and finally lose those last pesky pounds. Maybe, like me, you resolved to finally break down and buy that new furnace. Or maybe you liked Chris' idea, and you resolved do whatever you could to save energy and money this year. When we talk about saving energy throughout the year, it's easy to forget that we're not just energy users when we're at home. Many of us spend a large part of our days at work, and the energy we use there is significant. According to ENERGY STAR, the energy needed to support just one office worker for a day produces twice as much greenhouse gas emissions as that person's drive to work. Handily, there are a lot of resources available to help you tackle that energy usage at work, and Earth Day (coming up on April 22nd) can be the perfect time to launch a campaign to make the change.

  6. Creating and maintaining a gas cap in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Dinkoruk, Deniz Sumnu (Houston, TX); Wellington, Scott Lee (Bellaire, TX)

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are disclosed herein. Methods for treating a tar sands formation may include providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the formation. Pressure may be allowed to increase in an upper portion of the formation to provide a gas cap in the upper portion. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from a lower portion of the formation.

  7. Method for formation of thin film transistors on plastic substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carey, P.G.; Smith, P.M.; Sigmon, T.W.; Aceves, R.C.

    1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for formation of thin film transistors (TFTs) on plastic substrates replaces standard thin film transistor fabrication techniques, and uses sufficiently lower processing temperatures so that inexpensive plastic substrates may be used in place of standard glass, quartz, and silicon wafer-based substrates. The process relies on techniques for depositing semiconductors, dielectrics, and metals at low temperatures; crystallizing and doping semiconductor layers in the TFT with a pulsed energy source; and creating top-gate self-aligned as well as back-gate TFT structures. The process enables the fabrication of amorphous and polycrystalline channel silicon TFTs at temperatures sufficiently low to prevent damage to plastic substrates. The process has use in large area low cost electronics, such as flat panel displays and portable electronics. 5 figs.

  8. Planet formation around binary stars: Tatooine made easy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bromley, B C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine characteristics of circumbinary orbits in the context of current planet formation scenarios. Analytical perturbation theory predicts the existence of nested circumbinary orbits that are generalizations of circular orbits in a Keplerian potential. They contain forced epicyclic motion aligned with the binary as well as higher frequency oscillations, yet they do not cross, even in the presence of massive disks and perturbations from large planets. For this reason, dissipative gas and planetesimals can settle onto these "most circular" orbits, facilitating the growth of protoplanets. Outside a region close to the binary where orbits are generally unstable, circumbinary planets form in much the same way as their cousins around a single star. Here, we review the theory and confirm its predictions with a suite of representative simulations. We then consider the circumbinary planets discovered with NASA's Kepler satellite. These Neptune- and Jupiter-size planets, or their planetesimal precursors, may have ...

  9. Method for formation of thin film transistors on plastic substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Smith, Patrick M. (San Ramon, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Portola Valley, CA); Aceves, Randy C. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for formation of thin film transistors (TFTs) on plastic substrates replaces standard thin film transistor fabrication techniques, and uses sufficiently lower processing temperatures so that inexpensive plastic substrates may be used in place of standard glass, quartz, and silicon wafer-based substrates. The process relies on techniques for depositing semiconductors, dielectrics, and metals at low temperatures; crystallizing and doping semiconductor layers in the TFT with a pulsed energy source; and creating top-gate self-aligned as well as back-gate TFT structures. The process enables the fabrication of amorphous and polycrystalline channel silicon TFTs at temperatures sufficiently low to prevent damage to plastic substrates. The process has use in large area low cost electronics, such as flat panel displays and portable electronics.

  10. Formation flying for a Fresnel lens observatory mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Krizmanic; Gerry Skinner; Neil Gehrels

    2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The employment of a large area Phase Fresnel Lens (PFL) in a gamma-ray telescope offers the potential to image astrophysical phenomena with micro-arcsecond angular resolution. In order to assess the feasibility of this concept, two detailed studies have been conducted of formation flying missions in which a Fresnel lens capable of focussing gamma-rays and the associated detector are carried on two spacecraft separated by up to 10$^6$ km. These studies were performed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Integrated Mission Design Center (IMDC) which developed spacecraft, orbital dynamics, and mission profiles. The results of the studies indicated that the missions are challenging but could be accomplished with technologies available currently or in the near term. The findings of the original studies have been updated taking account of recent advances in ion thruster propulsion technology.

  11. Sub-mm clues to elliptical galaxy formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James S. Dunlop

    2000-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    There is growing evidence that, at the S(850) 2.5, with a mean redshift z = 3.5. While radio selection raises concerns about bias, I argue that our current knowledge of the brightest (S(850) ~ 10 mJy) sub-mm sources detected in unbiased SCUBA imaging surveys indicates that they are also largely confined to this same high-z regime. Consequently, while the most recent number counts imply such extreme sources can contribute only 5-10% of the sub-mm background, their comoving number density (in the redshift band 3 < z < 5) is 1-2 x 10^{-5} per cubic megaparsec, sufficient to account for the formation of all ellipticals of comparable mass to radio galaxies (~4L-star) in the present-day universe.

  12. High-Throughput Dry Processes for Large-Area Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BUSS,RICHARD J.; HEBNER,GREGORY A.; RUBY,DOUGLAS S.; YANG,PIN

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In October 1996, an interdisciplinary team began a three-year LDRD project to study the plasma processes of reactive ion etching and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on large-area silicon devices. The goal was to develop numerical models that could be used in a variety of applications for surface cleaning, selective etching, and thin-film deposition. Silicon solar cells were chosen as the experimental vehicle for this project because an innovative device design was identified that would benefit from immediate performance improvement using a combination of plasma etching and deposition processes. This report presents a summary of the technical accomplishments and conclusions of the team.

  13. Stochastic opinion formation in scale-free networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Bartolozzi; D. B. Leinweber; A. W. Thomas

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of opinion formation in large groups of people is a complex nonlinear phenomenon whose investigation is just beginning. Both collective behavior and personal views play an important role in this mechanism. In the present work we mimic the dynamics of opinion formation of a group of agents, represented by two states 1, as a stochastic response of each agent to the opinion of his/her neighbors in the social network and to feedback from the average opinion of the whole. In the light of recent studies, a scale-free Barabsi-Albert network has been selected to simulate the topology of the interactions. A turbulent-like dynamics, characterized by an intermittent behavior, is observed for a certain range of the model parameters. The problem of uncertainty in decision taking is also addressed both from a topological point of view, using random and targeted removal of agents from the network, and by implementing a three-state model, where the third state, zero, is related to the information available to each agent. Finally, the results of the model are tested against the best known network of social interactions: the stock market. A time series of daily closures of the Dow-Jones index has been used as an indicator of the possible applicability of our model in the financial context. Good qualitative agreement is found.

  14. Star Formation in a Complete Spectroscopic Survey of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. J. Carter; D. G. Fabricant; M. J. Geller; M. J. Kurtz

    2001-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The 15R-North galaxy redshift survey is a uniform spectroscopic survey (S/N $\\sim $10) covering the range 3650---7400\\AA for 3149 galaxies with median redshift 0.05. The sample is 90% complete to $R=15.4$. The median slit covering fraction is 24% of the galaxy, apparently sufficient to minimize the effects of aperture bias on the EW(H$\\alpha$). Forty-nine percent of the galaxes in the survey have one or more emission lines detected at $\\geq 2 \\sigma$. In agreement with previous surveys, the fraction of absorption-line galaxies increases steeply with galaxy luminosity. We use H$\\beta$, O[III], H$\\alpha$, and [N\\II] to discriminate between star-forming galaxies and AGNs. We use the EW(H$\\alpha$ + [N\\II]) to estimate the Scalo birthrate parameter, $b$, the ratio of the current star formation rate to the time averaged star formation rate. Finally, we examine the way galaxies of different spectroscopic type trace the large-scale galaxy distribution.

  15. Structure formation and CMBR anisotropy spectrum in the inflessence model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Sen; V. F. Cardone; S. Capozziello; A. Troisi

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The inflessence model has recently been proposed in an attempt to explain both early inflation and present day accelerated expansion within a single mechanism. The model has been successfully tested against the Hubble diagram of Type Ia Supernovae, the shift parameter, and the acoustic peak parameter. As a further mandatory test, we investigate here structure formation in the inflessence model determining the evolution of matter density contrast $\\delta \\equiv \\delta \\rho_M/\\rho_M$ in the linear regime. We compare the growth factor $D(a) \\equiv \\delta/a$ and the growth index $f(z) \\equiv d\\ln{\\delta}/d\\ln{a}$ to these same quantities for the successful concordance $\\Lambda$CDM model with a particular emphasis on the role of the inflessence parameters $(\\gamma, z_Q)$. We also evaluate the anisotropy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) to check whether the inflessence model may be in agreement with the observations. We find that, for large values of $(\\gamma, z_Q)$, structure formation proceeds in a similar way to that in the $\\Lambda$CDM scenario, and it is also possible to nicely fit the CMBR spectrum.

  16. The Formation of Nuclear Rings in Barred Spiral Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael W. Regan; Peter J. Teuben

    2002-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Although nuclear rings of gas and star formation are common in barred spiral galaxies, current theories of why and how they form do not provide the level of detail needed to quantify the effect that these rings can have on the fueling of active galactic nuclei and on the evolution of their host galaxy. In this paper we use detailed modeling to show that existence of nuclear rings is directly related to the existence of the orbit family whose major axis is perpendicular to the major axis of the bar (x_2). We explore a large range of barred galaxy potentials and for each potential we use a two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation to determine whether and at what radius a nuclear ring forms. We compare the results of the hydrodynamic simulations to numerical integrations of periodic orbits in a barred potential and show that the rings only form when a minimum amount of x_2 orbits exists. Because the rings migrate inwards with time as they accumulate gas, the radius at which a nuclear ring is seen does not give direct information on the shape of the rotation curve. We also show that the common assumption that nuclear rings are related to an inner Lindblad resonance is incorrect. In fact, we show that there is no RESONANCE at the inner Lindblad resonance in barred galaxies. We also compare the predictions of this theory to HST observations and show that it correctly predicts the observed gas and star formation morphology of nuclear rings.

  17. Worming Their Way into Shape: Toroidal Formations in Micellar Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardiel Rivera, Joshua J.; Tonggu, Lige; Dohnalkova, Alice; de la Iglesia, Pablo; Pozzo, Danilo C.; Shen, Amy

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the formation of nanostructured toroidal micellar bundles (nTMB) from a semidilute wormlike micellar solution, evidenced by both cryogenicelectron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images. Our strategy for creating nTMB involves a two-step protocol consisting of a simple prestraining process followed by flow through a microfluidic device containing an array of microposts, producing strain rates in the wormlike micelles on the order of 105 s^1. In combination with microfluidic confinement, these unusually large strain rates allow for the formation of stable nTMB. Electron microscopy images reveal a variety of nTMB morphologies and provide the size distribution of the nTMB. Small-angle neutron scattering indicates the underlying microstructural transition from wormlike micelles to nTMB. We also show that other flow-induced approaches such as sonication can induce and control the emergence of onion-like and nTMB structures, which may provide a useful tool for nanotemplating.

  18. Gas and Star Formation in the Circinus Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    For, Bi-Qing; Jarrett, Tom

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed study of the Circinus Galaxy, investigating its star formation, dust and gas properties both in the inner and outer disk. To achieve this, we obtained high-resolution Spitzer mid-infrared images with the IRAC (3.6, 5.8, 4.5, 8.0 micron) and MIPS (24 and 70 micron) instruments and sensitive HI data from the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and the 64-m Parkes telescope. These were supplemented by CO maps from the Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope (SEST). Because Circinus is hidden behind the Galactic Plane, we demonstrate the careful removal of foreground stars as well as large- and small-scale Galactic emission from the Spitzer images. We derive a visual extinction of Av = 2.1 mag from the Spectral Energy Distribution of the Circinus Galaxy and total stellar and gas masses of 9.5 x 10^{10} Msun and 9 x 10^9 Msun, respectively. Using various wavelength calibrations, we find obscured global star formation rates between 3 and 8 Msun yr^{-1}. Star forming regions in the inner spira...

  19. Hydrogen Bubbles and Formation of Nanoporous Silicon during Electroche...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bubbles and Formation of Nanoporous Silicon during Electrochemical Etching. Hydrogen Bubbles and Formation of Nanoporous Silicon during Electrochemical Etching. Abstract: Many...

  20. NO Adsorption on Ultrathin O Films: Formation of Nitrite and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Adsorption on Ultrathin O Films: Formation of Nitrite and Nitrate Species. NO Adsorption on Ultrathin O Films: Formation of Nitrite and Nitrate Species. Abstract: Interaction of...